Maggie Smith

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Maggie Smith

Born

12/28/1934, Ilford, North London, England, UK

Birth Name

Margaret Natalie Smith Cross

Gender

Female
9.5
out of 10
User Rating
59 votes

Biography

EDIT
Margaret Natalie Smith Cross was born on December 28, 1934. She and her family lived in Ilford, Essex, but later moved to Oxford. There she went to Oxford High School for Girls. Her acting career kicked-off when she played Viola in Twelfth Night. From that day on, she…more

Credits

Trivia and Quotes

  • Trivia

    • In 2011-2012, Maggie won 2 Emmy Awards for Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Miniseries or Movie and Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Drama Series playing Violet Crawley on Downton Abbey.


    • In 1970, Maggie won an Academy Award for Best Actress in a Leading Role playing Jean Brodie on The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie.

    • Theatre Awards

      Olivier Awards
      Actress of the Year in a New Play for Virginia (1981) (Nomination).
      Comedy Performance of the Year for The Way of the World (1985) (Nomination)
      Actress of the Year for Lettice and Lovage (1987) (Nomination).
      Best Comedy Performance for The Importance of Being Earnest (1994) (Nomination)
      Best Actress for The Lady in the Van (2000) (Nomination)

    • Maggie appeared on Broadway in Private Lives, as Amanda Prynne (1975), in Night and Day, as Ruth Carson (1979-1980) and in Lettice and Lovage, as Lettice Douffet (1990).

    • In March 2008, Maggie revealed that she had been suffering from breast cancer. The cancer was removed at the start of the year, and doctors are optimistic that they have removed all of it. Maggie maintains that she will continue to film the Harry Potter films, and any others that come her way.

    • In 2001, Maggie won the SEFCA Award for Best Supporting Actress
      for Gosford Park (2001).

    • In 2002, Maggie & co. won the Screen Actors Guild Award for Outstanding Performance by the Cast of a Theatrical Motion Picture for: Gosford Park (2001).

    • In 2002, Maggie and the other cast members won the Golden Satellite Special Achievement Award for Outstanding Motion Picture Ensemble for Gosford Park (2001).

    • In 2002, Maggie won the Golden Satellite Award for Best Performance by an Actress in a Supporting Role, Comedy or Musical for Gosford Park (2001).

    • In 2004, Maggie was nominated for the Golden Satellite Award for Best Performance by an Actress in a Miniseries or a Motion Picture Made for Television for My House in Umbria (2003).

    • In 1989, Maggie won the RTS Television Award for Best Actor - Female for the Talking Heads (1987) episode Bed Amongst The Lentils.

    • In 2002, Maggie was nominated for the PFCS Award for Best Actress in a Supporting Role for Gosford Park (2001).

    • In 2002, Maggie & co. was nominated for the PFCS Award for Best Acting Ensemble for: Gosford Park (2001).

    • In 2003, Maggie & co. were nominated for the PFCS Award for Best Acting Ensemble for Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets (2002).

    • In 2002, Maggie was nominated for the OFCS Award for Best Supporting Actress for Gosford Park (2001).

    • In 2002, Maggie & co. won the OFCS Award for Best Ensemble for Gosford Park (2001).

    • In 1996, Maggie & co. won the NBR Award for Best Acting by an Ensemble
      for: The First Wives Club (1996).

    • In 1966, Maggie was nominated for the Golden Laurel New Faces, Female Award. She received 11th place.

    • In 1970, Maggie was nominated for the Golden Laurel Award for Best Female Dramatic Performance for The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie (1969). She received 4th place.

    • In 1979, Maggie won the KCFCC Award for Best Supporting Actress
      for: California Suite (1978).

    • In 1987, Maggie won the KCFCC Award for Best Supporting Actress
      for: A Room with a View (1985).

    • In 2002, Maggie won the KCFCC Award for Best Supporting Actress
      for: Gosford Park (2001).

    • In 1964, Maggie was nominated for the Golden Globe for Most Promising Newcomer - Female for The V.I.P.'s (1963).

    • In 1966, Maggie was nominated for the Golden Globe for Best Motion Picture Actress - Drama for Othello (1965).

    • In 1970, Maggie was nominated for the Golden Globe for Best Motion Picture Actress - Drama for The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie (1969).

    • In 1973, Maggie was nominated for the Golden Globe for Best Motion Picture Actress - Musical/Comedy for Travels With My Aunt (1972).

    • In 1979, Maggie won the Golden Globe for Best Motion Picture Actress - Musical/Comedy for California Suite (1978).

    • In 1987, Maggie won the Golden Globe for Best Performance by an Actress in a Supporting Role in a Motion Picture for A Room With A View (1985).

    • In 2002, Maggie was nominated for the Golden Globe for Best Performance by an Actress in a Supporting Role in a Motion Picture for Gosford Park (2001).

    • In 2004, Maggie was nominated for the Golden Globe for Best Performance by an Actress in a Mini-Series or a Motion Picture Made for Television for My House In Umbria (2003).

    • In 2002, Maggie & co. won the FFCC Award for Best Ensemble Cast for Gosford Park (2001).

    • In 1980, Maggie won the Evening Standard British Film Award for Best Actress for California Suite (1978).

    • In 1982, Maggie won the Evening Standard British Film Award for Best Actress for: Quartet (1981).

    • In 1989, Maggie won the Evening Standard British Film Award for Best Actress for The Lonely Passion Of Judith Hearne (1987). She tied with Billie Whitelaw for The Dressmaker (1988).

    • In 2002, Maggie was nominated for the Audience Award for Best Actress
      for: Gosford Park (2001) at the European Film Awards.

    • In 2005, Maggie was nominated for the Audience Award for Best Actress for Ladies in Lavender (2004) at the European Film Awards. She shared the nomination with Judi Dench.

    • In 1993, Maggie was nominated for the Emmy for Outstanding Lead Actress in a Miniseries or a Special
      for: Suddenly, Last Summer (1993).

    • In 2000, Maggie was nominated for the Emmy for Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Miniseries or a Movie
      for: David Copperfield (1999).

    • In 2003, Maggie won an Emmy Award for Outstanding Lead Actress in a Miniseries or a Movie playing Emily Delahunty on My House in Umbria.

    • In 2002, Maggie was nominated for the CFCA Award for Best Supporting Actress
      for: Gosford Park (2001).

    • In 2002, Maggie & co. won the BFCA Award for Best Acting Ensemble
      for Gosford Park (2001).

    • In 1959, Maggie was nominated for the BAFTA Film Award for Most Promising Newcomer
      for: Nowhere to Go (1958).

    • In 1966, Maggie was nominated for the BAFTA Film Award for Best British Actress
      for: Young Cassidy (1965).

    • In 1970, Maggie won the BAFTA Film Award for Best Actress
      for: The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie (1969).

    • In 1979, Maggie was nominated for the BAFTA Film Award for Best Supporting Actress for Death on the Nile (1978).

    • In 1980, Maggie was nominated for the BAFTA Film Award for Best Actress
      for: California Suite (1978).

    • In 1982, Maggie was nominated for the BAFTA Film Award for Best Actress
      for: Quartet (1981).

    • In 1984, Maggie was nominated for the BAFTA TV Award for Best Actress
      for: Mrs. Silly (1983).

    • In 1985, Maggie won the BAFTA Film Award for Best Actress
      for: A Private Function (1984).

    • In 1987, Maggie won the BAFTA Film Award for Best Actress
      for: A Room with a View (1985).

    • In 1988, Maggie was nominated for the BAFTA TV Award for Best Actress
      for the Talking Heads (1987) episode Bed Among The Lentils.

    • In 1989, Maggie won the BAFTA Film Award for Best Actress
      for: The Lonely Passion of Judith Hearne (1987).

    • Maggie received the BAFTA Special Lifetime Achievement Award in recent years.

    • In 1993, Maggie was nominated for the BAFTA TV Award for Best Actress
      for: Memento Mori (1992).

    • Maggie's biography was written and released by theatre critic, Michael Coveney, in 1992.

    • Maggie's son, Toby, married actress, Anna Louise Plowman in 2001.

    • Maggie received a Tony for the play, Lettice and Lovage, in 1990. She had previously been nominated for the Best Actress in a Play Tony twice - in 1975 for Private Lives and in 1980 for Night and Day. The latter also earned her a Drama Desk Award for Outstanding Actress in Play.

    • Maggie participiated in the Canadian Stratford Festival seasons from 1976-1980.

    • Maggie married Beverly Cross in 1975, they were together until his death in 1998.

    • Maggie left the National Theatre Company in 1971.

    • Maggie's son, Toby, was born on April 21, 1969.

    • Maggie's son, Chris, was born on June 19, 1967.

    • In 1967, Maggie married fellow actor, Robert Stephens. They divorced in the early 70's.

    • In 1963, Maggie joined the Olivier's Royal National Theatre Company as a charter member .

    • Maggie acted with the Old Vic Company on her first West End lead appearance in Mary, Mary.

    • Maggie's first Broadway appearance was in a revue, New Faces '56, at the Ethel Barrymore Theatre in 1959.

    • Maggie acted for the Oxford University Dramatic Society (OUDS), and participated in the Edinburgh Theatre Festival.

    • Early on in Maggie's career she worked at the Oxford Playhouse as an Assistant Stage Manager and as an Actor.

    • Maggie left school early at sixteen to attend the Oxford Playhouse School from 1951-1953.

    • Maggie attened Oxford High School for Girls from 1947-1951.

    • Maggie's family moved to Oxford (Cowley) in August of 1939.

    • Maggie has two older twin brothers named Ian and Alastair that were born December 8, 1928.

    • Maggie's parents were Nathaniel Smith (from Newcastle) and Margaret Hutton Little (from Glasgow).

    • In 1994, Maggie was nominated for the BAFTA Film Award for Best Actress in a Supporting Role for The Secret Garden (1993).

    • In 2000, Maggie was nominated for the BAFTA TV Award for Best Actress for: David Copperfield (1999).

    • In 2000, Maggie won the BAFTA Film Award for Best Performance by an Actress in a Supporting Role for Tea with Mussolini (1999).

    • In 2002, Maggie was nominated for the BAFTA Film Award for Best Performance by an Actress in a Supporting Role for Gosford Park (2001).

    • In 1982, Maggie was nominated for the Saturn Award for Best Supporting Actress for Clash of the Titans (1981).

    • In 2002, Maggie was nominated for the Saturn Award for Best Supporting Actress for Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone (2001).

    • In 1966, Maggie was nominated for an Oscar for Best Actress in a Supporting Role for Othello (1965).

    • In 1979, Maggie won another Academy Award for Best Actress in a Supporting Role playing Diana Barrie on California Suite.

    • In 1987, Maggie was nominated for an Oscar for Best Actress in a Supporting Role for: A Room with a View (1985).

    • In 2002, Maggie was nominated for an Oscar for Best Actress in a Supporting Role for: Gosford Park (2001).

    • Maggie ranked tenth in the 2001 Orange Film Survey of greatest British film actresses.

    • Maggie was appointed a CBE in 1970 and a DBE (Dame Commander of the Most Excellent Order of the British Empire) in 1990.

    • Director Agnieszka Holland admired Maggie Smith for years before making The Secret Garden (1993). She knew of Smith's talents and immediately offered her the role of Mrs. Medlock.

    • Maggie is 5' 5" (1.65 m) tall.

    • While filming Death on the Nile (1978), aboard ship, no one was allowed his or her own dressing room, so Maggie shared a dressing room with Bette Davis & Angela Lansbury.

    • Maggie ended up having to change her stage name to "Maggie Smith" as there already was an actress named "Margaret Smith" at the time she started in the profession.

    • Maggie was educated at the High School for Girls in Oxford, she started out in the theater as a prompt girl and understudy at the Oxford Repertory. She claims she never went on as no one ever fell ill.

    • Maggie's twin brothers Ian and Alistair are six years older then she is. They are both architects.

    • Maggie's mother, Margaret. was a secretary.

    • Maggie's father, Nathaniel, was a Geordie and a pathologist.

    • Maggie was portrayed by Ian McKellen on Saturday Night Live.

    • Maggie was awarded the 1984 London Evening Standard Theatre Award for Best Actress for her performance in The Way of the World.

    • Dame Maggie Smith was one of the first 100 to be honoured with her name set into the pavement in London's 'Avenue of the Stars' in Convent Garden.

    • Maggie had worked with co star Daniel Radcliffe before Harry Potter in David Copperfield.

  • Quotes

    • Dame Maggie Smith: (on her late husband Bev) I still miss him so much it's ridiculous. People say it gets better but it doesn't. It just gets different, that's all. Even in my dream I kept saying to him, 'You are dead. You can't be here.'

    • Dame Maggie Smith: One went to school, one wanted to act, one started to act, and one's still acting.

    • Dame Maggie Smith: I wanted to be a serious actress, but of course that didn't really happen. I did Desdemona [at the National, opposite Olivier] with great discomfort and was terrified all the time. But then everyone was terrified of Larry

    • Dame Maggie Smith: I tend to head for what's amusing because a lot of things aren't happy. But usually you can find a funny side to practically anything.

    • Maggie Smith: I like being outside and working with the elements. The elemental aspects of it. The physicality of it

    • Dame Maggie Smith: (on acting) I love it, I'm privileged to do it and I don't know where I'd be without it.

    • Maggie Smith: I remember when he was diagnosed as hyper-manic asking what it meant and the doctor saying violent moods swings and indiscriminate sexual activity and I thought 'that about covers it really'.

    • Maggie Smith: I said 'It can't go on' and he said 'No, it can't'. Honestly, I don't think I could have mattered less to him by then, but by then, nothing mattered to him.

    • Dame Maggie Smith: [on her friend, Dame Judi Dench] Jude is the most incredibly level person. Generous, understanding. All the things I'd have to work very hard at, Jude is like that all the time. I would love to be like that. And working with Jude you have to try to remember that you ought to be like that.

    • Dame Maggie Smith: [on her father] But there was an incredible nervousness about him. You couldn't do this, couldn't do that. Mustn't ride a bike, you'd be bound to fall off. Couldn't swim, you'd most certainly drown.

    • Dame Maggie Smith: My career is chequered. Then I think I got pigeon-holed in humour; Shakespeare is not my thing.

    • Dame Maggie Smith: (on roles) When you get into the granny era, you're lucky to get anything.

    • Maggie Smith: I longed to be bright and most certainly never was. I was rather hopeless, I suspect.

    • Maggie Smith: The performances you have in your head are always much better than the performances on stage.

    • Maggie Smith: [On the Harry Potter movies] There's this wonderful first assistant and he'll be saying, 'Now Harry goes down among the dragons'. You have to hold yourself together because if you lose it for a second then you're sunk.

    • Maggie Smith: It's true I don't tolerate fools, but then they don't tolerate me, so I am spiky. Maybe that's why I'm quite good at playing spiky elderly ladies.

    • Maggie Smith: Athletically, they had a slight edge on us. We did what we could to put ourselves in a position to win.

    • Maggie Smith: We walked in last September and told her we had been beige people, but we wanted to rejuvenate our house.

    • Maggie Smith: People say it gets better, but it doesn't. It just gets different, that's all.

    • Maggie Smith: Chris and Toby are far too sane to be upset any more.

    • Maggie Smith: I believe that I am past my prime. I had reckoned on my prime lasting till I was at least fifty.

    • Maggie: Speak your mind, even if your voice shakes.

    • Maggie: I'm not tired of London yet and I've not seen Naples.

    • Maggie: I longed to be bright and most certainly never was. I was rather hopeless, I suspect.

    • Maggie: I like the ephemeral thing about theatre, every performance is like a ghost, it's there and then it's gone.

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SUBMIT REVIEW
  • One of a kind.

    10
    Great actress.
  • A Legendary Actress...

    10
    Dame Maggie Smith is absolutely a charming woman who doesn't simply portray characters in films, or on television, instead she lives whatever role she is currently engaged in. Some of my personal favorites are her roles as Mother Superior in the Sister Act films, where she outshined everyone else. Her work in Gosford Park, The Divine Secrets of the Ya-Ya Sisterhood, The First Wives Club, My House in Umbria, and countless others. She has proven not only is she a serious actress, who can portray Dramas while keeping the audience on the edge of their seats, but can hold her own in any genre she chooses. She stole hearts with her recent work in Ladies In Lavender, and cast her own spell over millions while portraying Professor Minerva McGonagall in the movie adaptations of J.K. Rowling's Best-selling series Harry Potter. It’s not often when such extraordinary things can said about just one Actress, but Maggie Smith is exception as she’s yet to deliver anything less than a star stunning performance.moreless
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