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Ron McLarty

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Ron McLarty Trivia

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  • Trivia

    • Ron McLarty provided a voiceover for the 2003 video game Batman: Dark Tomorrow.

    • In 1984 Ron McLarty was nominated for an ACE award for Best Actor in a Dramatic or Theatrical Program for Tiger Town.

    • Ron McLarty has provided the voice for many audio books including - but not limited to - David Baldacci's "Split Second," "Lone Eagle" by Danielle Steele and Stephen King's "Salem's Lot."

    • Ron was discovered as an author by Stephen King. Stephen heard Ron's unpublished novel which had been recorded on tape. Ron later accepted an offer of 2 million dollars for publishing rights. The offer was made by Viking.

  • Quotes

    • Ron McLarty: Writing, especially novel writing, isn't a communal act unless you're part of a TV team and unlike being an actor - which is how I made my living for years - you don't need some nod of approval to get on with it. I'd always find some time during my daily auditions and occasional jobs to spend a few hours with my pencil and paper at the New York Public Library.

    • Ron McLarty: I wrote 'The Memory of Running' as a play when my mother and father were actually killed in a car accident up in Maine. My mother lived six weeks and my father lived 10 days after the accident. And in this odd way that I work, I read the play about three months later and I thought, you know, it's too big for a play, it has so much more in it. But because I wrote it as dialogue, I had the voices of Smithy and Norma and Bethany in my head.

    • Ron McLarty: I have a very pronounced solitary part of me that always seems at odds with the performer. While I love acting and, of course, am very, very thankful for all the opportunities I've been given, the introspective side had always searched for a personal expression.

    • Ron McLarty: Writing has never been easy for me. If I work for, say, five or six hours in the morning, I might go through twenty five pages, but almost inevitably, I end a session with 5 or 6 I can use.