Stanley Kubrick

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Stanley Kubrick

Born

7/26/1928, Manhattan, New York (USA)

Died

3/7/1999

Birth Name

Stanley Kubrick

Gender

Male

Also Known As

Stanley Kubrick
9.4
out of 10
User Rating
39 votes

Biography

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Stanley Kubrick was the American director whose significant output of classic films has changed the face of American filmmaking. Born on July 26, 1928 in Manhattan to a Jewish couple, Kubrick took an interest in photography in his early teen years. He did poorly in high school, often…more

Credits

Trivia and Quotes

  • Trivia

    • Stanley had wanted to do a film version of the thriller novel "Perfume" during the 90s but was busy with Eyes Wide Shut (1999) and died before getting the opportunity.

    • Kubrick's film, Paths Of Glory (1957) was initially banned in France, due to it's depiction of French military actions during WWI, for which the French government considered "an insult to the French national honor."

    • Kubrick kept the original negatives for 2001: A Space Odyssey (1968) in his garage, and prior to his death, made his own final 70mm cut of the film, which was released on Warner Bros. DVD, after which he burned the negatives.

    • Even though Kubrick publicly disowned Spartacus (1960) as not being his film, due to what he considered "interference" from Kirk Douglas and the fact that he was hired 2 weeks after the original director was fired, he nevertheless oversaw the restoration of the film in 1991 and also gave his own color guidelines for the Criterion Collection DVD which was released 2 years after his death, in 2001.

    • CRM-114 is now also being used as the name of a spam filter/mail control freeware program being shared around the Internet.

    • In the film Fun With Dick And Jane (2005) starring Jim Carrey, a reference is made to Kubrick's favorite letters/numbers in the form of a financial transaction form with the registration of -- you guessed it -- CRM-114.

    • Stanley adapted every one of his films except his first two and 2001: A Space Odyssey (1968) from published novels.

    • Stanley gave his daughter, Vivian, and stepdaughter, Katharina cameos in several of his films.

    • Stanley's favorite letter/number combination, CRM-114, is featured in Back To The Future (1985) on an amplifier Michael J. Fox's character plugs his guitar into.

    • Stanley resigned from directing One Eyed Jacks (1961) early in the production phase, due to his clashes with Marlon Brando, who argued constantly with Stanley about the direction of both himself and the film.

    • Stanley died 666 days before 2001.

    • Stanley repeatedly delayed making Artificial Intelligence: A.I. (2001) until he felt that film technology would be able to portray what he wanted to show, but died before starting production, of which Steven Spielberg completed with Stanley's own version of the script as a shooting guide.

    • Stanley had planned to do a movie about the Holocaust, "The Aryan Papers," but was afraid the publicity from Steven Spielberg's Schindler's List (1993) would upstage him and abandoned the project.

    • Stanley turned down directing a sequel to The Exorcist (1973), choosing to do The Shining (1980) for a horror movie instead.

    • Stanley wanted to do an epic movie about Napoleon Bonaparte, but after seeing similar material in War And Peace (1968) and the failure of Waterloo (1970) he reconsidered.

    • Stanley kept one of the suspended animation pods from "2001" and used it as a freezer.

    • Stanley's image was used as the Russian premier along with Arthur C. Clarke's as the American president on the cover of Time Magazine in 2010: The Year We Make Contact (1984).

    • Stanley was believed to have Asperger's Syndrome, a form of autism that is identified by fixation on certain subjects to the exclusion of everything else, obsessive routines and rituals, poor motor skills, introverted and socially maladjusted behavior, and pedantic, condescending speech.

    • Stanley shot 1.3 million feet of film while making The Shining (1980), and used less than 1% of it for the final 142 minute print.

    • Stanley used "The End" in his films years after Hollywood discontinued the practice to allow for credits to be run; he simply moved it to appear after the credits.

    • Stanley became good friends with Malcolm McDowell during the filming of A Clockwork Orange (1971), even advising McDowell not to fly. McDowell said that he sat and listened to air traffic controllers at Heathrow Airport for hours at a time. However, when the filming was finished, Kubrick stopped associating with McDowell altogether, something McDowell has felt hurt over to this day.

    • Stanley was hired by Look Magazine when he was 16 years old, after submitting a photograph of a news vendor the day after President Franklin D. Roosevelt died.

    • Stanley was a big animal lover, at one time he had 16 cats alone. During the filming of Full Metal Jacket (1987) a family of wild rabbits was accidentally killed when an equipment truck accidentally ran over them; he was so upset he halted film production for the rest of the day.

    • Stanley's favorite film was The Godfather (1972), and he told his close friend Michael Herr it was "the greatest film ever made."

    • Stanley was a big American football fan and had friends send him tapes of games to his residence in England.

    • Stanley was an avid chess player and would often play against actors working on his films.

    • Stanley was afraid of flying and often insisted on ground transportation. This resulted in his not leaving England for over 40 years.

    • Stanley sold one of his first films, The Day Of The Fight, the same year he made it, 1951 to RKO Pictures, for a profit of $100.

    • Stanley was interested in jazz, and had a brief career as a drummer in his 20s.

    • Stanley angered Jack Nicholson so much with his repeated takes during The Shining (1980) that Nicholson refused to ever work with him again.

    • Stanley managed to convince MPAA censors that the elevator doors in the trailer for The Shining (1980) were releasing rusty water, to get around their possibly rejecting the use of the scene since it was blood being portrayed rushing out.

    • Stanley was obsessive about getting camera takes right, some times filming scenes over 100 times. In filming The Shining, (1980) one scene with Shelly Duvall took 127 takes. He had wanted to film the scene where the elderly Scatman Crothers' character died 70 times, but co-star Jack Nicholson talked Kurbrick into going easy on him, only doing 40 takes maximum. During the filming, at one point, Crothers broke down crying, asking "What do you want, Mr. Kubrick?"

    • Academy Award Nominations:
      1965 - Best Director for Dr. Strangelove or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb (1964);
      1965 - Best Picture for Dr. Strangelove or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb (1964);
      1965 - Best Writing, Screenplay Based on Material from Another Medium for Dr. Strangelove or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb (1964);
      1969 - Best Director for 2001: A Space Odyssey (1968);
      1969 - Best Writing, Story and Screenplay - Written Directly for the Screen for 2001: A Space Odyssey (1968);
      1972 - Best Director for A Clockwork Orange (1971);
      1972 - Best Picture for A Clockwork Orange (1971);
      1976 - Best Director for Barry Lyndon (1975);
      1976 - Best Picture for Barry Lyndon (1975);
      1976 - Best Writing, Screenplay Adapted From Other Material for Barry Lyndon (1975);
      1988 - Best Writing, Screenplay Based on Material from Another Medium for Full Metal Jacket (1987).

    • Academy Award Wins:
      1969 - Best Effects, Special Visual Effects for 2001: A Space Odyssey (1968).

    • Kubrick Motifs:
      Credits are always a slide show. Kubrick never used rolling credits except for the opening of The Shining (1980).
      Beginning Voice-over / Narration (nearly all of Kubrick's films contain a voice-over at the beginning or a narration at some point);
      First-Person Perspective (character's perspective) always shown:
      Often features shots down the length of tall, parallel walls;
      Often uses the theme of dehumanization;
      Constructs three-way conflicts;
      "The Glare" (extreme close-ups of intensely emotional / maniacal faces);
      Often uses the number/letter combination of CRM-114 in serial numbers;
      Bathroom (all of his films feature a scene that takes place in a bathroom);
      Involves his wives in his movies;
      Almost always uses previously composed classical music for his films rather than commissioning an original score to be written or discards original score in lieu of the aforementioned.

    • Kubrick's dislike of his early film Fear and Desire (1953) is well known. He went out of his way to buy all the prints of it so no one else could see it.

    • Wanted to take credit for Dalton Trumbo's screenplay for Spartacus (1960) since Trumbo was blacklisted at the time. Originally Trumbo was going to use the alias Sam Jackson but so many people knew about him and his alias that they had to figure something else out. Upset at Kubrick's desire to take credit for someone else's work, Kirk Douglas opted to simply credit Trumbo himself. This ended the Hollywood blacklist started in 1948.

    • He wanted to make a film based on Umberto Eco's novel "Foucault's Pendulum" which appeared in 1988. Unfortunately, Eco refused after being dissatisfied with the filming of his earlier novel Name der Rose, Der (1986), and also because Kubrick wasn't willing to let him write the screenplay himself.

  • Quotes

    • Stanley Kubrick: I think that silent films got a lot more things right than talkies.

    • Stanley Kubrick: How could we possibly appreciate the Mona Lisa if Leonardo had written at the bottom of the canvas: 'The lady is smiling because she is hiding a secret from her lover.' This would shackle the viewer to reality, and I don't want this to happen to 2001.

    • Stanley Kubrick: A filmmaker has almost the same freedom as a novelist has when he buys himself some paper.

    • Stanley Kubrick: A film is - or should be - more like music than like fiction. It should be a progression of moods and feelings. The theme, what's behind the emotion, the meaning, all that comes later.

    • Stanley Kubrick: If it can be written, or thought, it can be filmed.

    • Stanley Kubrick: The greatest nations have all acted like gangsters and the smallest like prostitutes.

SUBMIT REVIEW
  • empty

    10
    Stanley Kubrick is a straight out genius.
    Every film has been an iconic blockbuster and has been directed, scripted and done in such an extraordinary way it leaves others choking on his dust.
    Take for instance the Shining, without a doubt the best directed film in history, up there with Scarface and the Godfather, someone please hook him up with Al Pacino, my bad, posted 3 times
  • empty

    10
    Stanley Kubrick is a straight out genius.
    Every film has been an iconic blockbuster and has been directed, scripted and done in such an extraordinary way it leaves others choking on his dust.
    Take for instance the Shining, without a doubt the best directed film in history, up there with Scarface and the Godfather, someone please hook him up with Al Pacino
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