A Flame in the Wind

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ABC (ended 1966)

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6.1
out of 10
User Rating
9 votes
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SHOW REVIEWS
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A Flame in the Wind

Show Summary

A Flame in the Wind made it's debut on ABC daytime on December 28, 1964 and ended almost two years later (under the name A Time For Us) on December 16, 1966. The show was set in the fictional community of Haviland (Could be almost ANYWHERE, presumably in the Midwest, and NO, it's NOT Haviland, Kansas!) and was basically centered around the Skerba, Farrell, Austen and Reynolds families. At first, the action was focused on Kate Austen, Haviland's wealthiest widow, who was writing a MAIN STREET-esque novel (some would say a roman a clef) about Haviland's people and their troubles. Sounds like she had too much time on her hands! Quite understandably, some of Haviland's most prominent citizens did NOT like the idea that Kate was writing about them and were they MIFFED! They were working overtime to stop the publishing of their dirty laundry. Hence her publisher, Craig Reynolds stopped it. Since HE and his unhappy wife, Roxanne Farrell, were one of those who were made mention of in said novel! Eventually, and perhaps, inevitably, Kate and her son Chris, [Richard Thomas]) left Haviland for greener pastures. Nobody shed any tears for them! They were all too relieved! However, Kate's former mother in-law, Louise Austen remained in Haviland as a friend and confidante for Jason Farrell who was saddled with a fliartatious wife, Leslie. With no Kate Austen, Miriam Bentley became the town gossip. However, on June 28th 1965, the show had gained a couple of changes. A show title change (it was now called A Time for Us), and a surname change for one of the core families. It seemed that the Skerbas, which was considered to be a quite ethnic name, was changed to the more Americanized, Driscoll. This change, thereby, succeeded on two fronts. It was successful in eliminating the class conflict that had been a part of the show. And in essence, gave the Driscolls somewhat equal footing with some of the other prominent folks in Haviland. Construction foreman Al and homemaker Martha (Skerba)Driscoll's two daughters, Linda (an aspiring actress living in NYC, who dated her director, Paul Davis) and Jane (who remained behind in Haviland and fell for and married her sister's ex-boyfriend, Craig Reynolds), became the core of the show, and young love was more focused on. One highlight was that Linda Driscoll went up against Roxanne Farrell Reynolds for the love of Doug Colton, a piano player who was more interested in Roxanne's money. Again, Linda lost out, since Roxanne married the man! Martha (Skerba) Driscoll was left out of all the fun, sadly, since she was only support for Al, Linda and Jane. Sadly, the plots were not enough to boost ratings! The show had ended it's run on December 16, 1966. Many of the stars were later seen on other shows. Richard Thomas, who played Kate Austen's son, Chris, of course, was later seen as John-Boy Walton on the Waltons; Jane Elliot (the second Linda[Skerba]Driscoll) was later seen as the quite nasty Tracy Quartermaine on General Hospital and the City. (In between, she was crazy Carrie Todd Marler on Guiding Light) A Time for Us (as A Flame in the Wind is best known as) served as the first ever soap appearance for Leslie Charleson (who played Pam and many years later turned up as Tracy's sister-in-law, Dr. Monica Bard Webber Quartermaine on GH) and Margaret Ladd (who was the first person to play Linda's more sensible sister, Jane) eventually went on to have MORE fun in playing Jane Wyman's daughter, Emma Channing, on the prime-time soap, Falcon Crest.moreless
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SUBMIT REVIEW
  • To be honest, I would have preferred to spend my time elsewhere than finish watching this. However, I kept thinking that there is great potential behind this and I was half right.moreless

    7.0
    To be honest, I would have preferred to spend my time elsewhere than finish watching this. However, I kept thinking that there is great potential behind this and I was half right. There was potential to say the least but this potential was poorly exploited leaving a show that is half decent. Nonetheless, you really have to see A Flame in the Wind to get what I'm talking about.

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