Andromeda

Season 3 Episode 3

Mad to Be Saved

0
Aired Unknown Oct 14, 2002 on Syfy
7.1
out of 10
User Rating
78 votes
2

EPISODE REVIEWS
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Episode Summary

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Mad to Be Saved
AIRED:

The Andromeda picks up a group of refugees who have been subjected to psychological and physical torture.

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SUBMIT REVIEW
  • An episode that makes no sense.

    2.0
    After two great seasons, Andromeda seems to take a turn for the worse. This is a particularly bad episode, with holes in the plot so large you could drive, well, Andromeda through.



    When the crew saves a group of mentally unstable prisoners, they are allowed to practically take over the ship without anyone so much as protesting (why does Dylan let unstable people walk all over the ship? Why doesn't he try to confine them to quarters or throw them to the brig or something when they are obviously a threat? And why does the only way the Andromeda crew seems to be able to fight is with their fists? Haven't they got stun-guns or something similar in their century?).



    The episode then takes one more bizarre twist, with some Mengele-type doctor masquerading as a prisoner, then being found out, then turning into some sort of informer for the Commonwealth, then unexpectedly dying from some unidentified disease. The whole plot looks contrived, the twists are non-sensical and the episode reminds one of a particularly annoying dream that just doesn't make any sense when one wakes up.



    Matt Kiene and Joe Reinkemeyer have given us a number of excellent Andromeda shows ("Double Helix" being the best example), but this simply isn't one of them. Dylan, in particular, is increasingly made into a spineless caricature of Hercules, and if a character can "un-develop", then this is what happens in this episode.moreless
  • A bunch of crazy people are taking over the ship.

    10
    What could be more fun than watching the ship over run with insane people.



    Dillon and his crew rescued some people unaware that any of them had a mental problem. I would of thought they would of been detained for awhile in the infirmary until they were checked out.



    I don't understand why Dillon would let them run all over the ship, especially after he realized that they weren't right in the head.



    And Dillon seemed to be infatuated with this one girl, when she was a little crazy too. She acted more normal, but she mentioned killing the captain of the previous ship, who's brains were found in a box. If that isn't crazy, I don't know what is.



    At first the episode was a little confusing, but in the end I thought it turned out pretty good and it kept me interested.moreless

Trivia, Notes, Quotes and Allusions

FILTER BY TYPE

  • TRIVIA (1)

    • Goof: Beka says that her pillows conform to the neck "for extra lumbar support". Unfortunately, the lumbar vertebrae are in the lower back; those in the neck are called the cervical vertebrae.

  • QUOTES (11)

    • Dylan: I created the Commonwealth for good. The day it stops serving the good is the day that I stop serving it.

    • Dylan: Well, you know me with percentages, Rommie. I like to take a big gamble every day, because I might be walking around lucky and not even know it.

    • Tyr: (after knocking down a refugee) He says that to everyone.
      Dylan: Does everyone he says it to end up hitting him?
      Tyr: So far - fifty percent.

    • Oderick: (after finishing his martial arts katas inches away from Tyr's face) You know, if you weren't so intensely self-absorbed, you'd realize that all of life is balance between the emptiness of the eternity, and the need to make art to remind ourselves we were here.
      Tyr: I had an epiphany like that, once. Then I mercilessly beat someone until it went away.

    • Harper: I once had a rock garden, ya know? And three of them died!

    • Beka: Maybe we're going about this all wrong.
      Dylan: Okay. Let's hear it.
      Beka: Well, we should just let Harper sit.
      Dylan: (chucking incredulously) What?
      Beka If they spend enough quality time with him, maybe they'll get sick of him and send him back.
      Dylan: Don't you think these people have suffered enough cruel and unusual punishment?

    • (Rommie shoves the brain-in-a-box into Dylan's hands)
      Dylan: (not really meaning it) Thank you, Rommie.

    • Dylan: (as the entire crew comes into his room) Did I call a meeting in my quarters?

    • Rommie: (opens box) Human brains in a box.
      Dylan: (peering into the box) Well, that's certainly...gross.
      Rommie: And puzzling. Not exactly your standard carry-on item.

    • Tyr: Now listen up! I am only going to say this once! Don't let the fact that you are insane lead you to the erroneous assumption that I will hesitate for even a moment before slaughtering every last one of you. Please save me the trouble and don't delude yourself.

    • The Rabid Dogs of Gallaphron
      Can be trained to drool
      At the ring of a bell.
      Doesn't stop them from biting.

      Karlos El Greeta-Stirra,
      "Reflections of Rim-Salt", CY 4389.

  • NOTES (1)

    • International Airdates:

      -This episode aired in Canada on October 5, 2002 on Global.
      -This episode aired in the UK on October 28, 2002 on Sky One.
      -This episode aired in the Australia on November 29, 2003 on Fox 8.

  • ALLUSIONS (2)

    • The Rabid Dogs of Gallaphron
      Can be trained to drool
      At the ring of a bell.
      Doesn't stop them from biting.
      Karlos El Greeta-Stirra, "Reflections of Rim-Salt", CY 4389
      This is an allusion to Pavlov's dogs. Pavlov trained dogs to salivate at the ring of a bell by first offering them food every time he rang a bell. Eventually, the dogs would start salivating, expecting food, every time they heard a bell ring. This is known as classical conditioning. As for "Gallaphron" and, this" is likely a reference to Gallifrey, the fictional home of Doctor Who, an homage to the British series Doctor Who.

    • Dylan: Dr. Yanomani, I presume?


      In 1871, New York Herald journalist Henry Morton Stanley set out to find famed British explorer Dr. David Livingstone who had left six years earlier to find the source of the Nile. Upon finding him, Stanley is said to have uttered the famous phrase, "Dr. Livingstone I presume?"

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