Back to the Future

Season 2 Episode 3

A Friend In Deed

0
Aired Saturday 8:30 AM Oct 03, 1992 on CBS
10
out of 10
User Rating
3 votes
0

EPISODE REVIEWS
By TV.com Users

Episode Summary

EDIT
A Friend In Deed
AIRED:
Biff Tannen brags that he has an old, 1800s deed to the ranch of Jennifer Parker, and that he plans to evict her. Determined to help, Marty races back to the Wild West era, where he discovers that Tannen's outlaw ancestors swindled the Parkers out of their land. Unfortunately, the only way Marty can stop the scheme is to saddle up with Tannen's gang!moreless

Who was the Episode MVP ?

Wednesday
No results found.
Thursday
No results found.
Friday
No results found.
SUBMIT REVIEW
    Christopher Lloyd

    Christopher Lloyd

    Dr. Emmett L. Brown (live segments)

    Dan Castellaneta

    Dan Castellaneta

    voice of Dr. Emmett L. Brown

    Mary Steenburgen

    Mary Steenburgen

    voice of Clara Clayton Brown

    David Kaufman

    David Kaufman

    voice of Martin Seamus 'Marty' McFly

    Danny Mann

    Danny Mann

    voice of Einstein

    Thomas F. Wilson

    Thomas F. Wilson

    voice of Biff Tannen

    Trivia, Notes, Quotes and Allusions

    FILTER BY TYPE

    • TRIVIA (1)

      • It is a bit unlikely that it would take 117 years (1875 to 1992) for invisible ink to become invisible, even if the deed was buried underground for that time.

    • QUOTES (0)

    • NOTES (3)

      • This episode was released on the VHS entitled Back to the Future: A Friend in Deed and The Money Tree.

      • In this episode we meet Biff's great-great uncle Thaddeus and his sister-- who of course are brother and sister to Buford "Mad Dog" Tannen from Back to the Future Part III.

      • Clara and (animated) Doc do not appear in this episode. Jules says they have used the DeLorean to go and see Hamlet-- performed by the original cast!

    • ALLUSIONS (1)

      • :
        The earliest film where a woman is tied to railroad tracks by a villain is Barney Oldfield's Race for a Life (1913). Not sure if its occurrence in the popular arts predates the movies, but it wouldn't be surprising.

    More
    Less