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Cinemax (ended 2016)

Banshee S02E05: "The Truth About Unicorns"


In my review of "The Warrior Class," I made a joke about Banshee going Full Mallick with its dreamy shots of hands moving through wheat. Well, if that episode went Full Mallick, "The Truth About Unicorns" went FULL Mallick. This one was chock-full of those meditative sequences with the wheat, the sun, the open road, and characters imagining themselves taking a different path of action but ultimately deciding to stay the course. But despite my hackneyed joke, the approach worked, and very successfully. "The Truth About Unicorns" was, without a doubt, the quietest episode of Banshee to date and yet another interesting departure for a show that continues to find slightly new things to focus on and different approaches to take in its second season.

"The Truth About Unicorns" basically hit pause on most of the season's ongoing stories. Only three series regulars appeared, and Frankie Faison's Sugar was only around for a few moments at the end of the episode. No Proctor, no Alex, no simmering tension/uneasy truces between the Amish and the Kinaho. No Siobhan or any of the hangover romantic tension between her and Hood. And no scummy Jason Hood hanging around to make things more difficult for Hood and Job. Nope, "The Truth About Unicorns" was all about Carrie and Hood, where they've been, where they might want to go, and where they like to imagine they could end up, in some kind of skewed perfect world. I wouldn't go as far to say that Banshee absolutely needed this kind of episode, especially when the first four did great work building out the show's world and adding layers to its characters, but dedicating an entire hour to its central relationship is never going to be a bad thing. 

If anyone did in fact need this episode, it was Carrie. I've mentioned some minor frustration with her story over the last couple of weeks, not because it wasn't solid or compelling (because it was), but because the show didn't give it enough time. "The Truth About Unicorns" certainly made a real attempt to rectify that issue, and for the most part, it worked. I think the episode could have been even better if we'd seen more of Carrie's internal struggles—which would have made her awkward re-entry that much more awkward—but at a certain point, the show probably had to just pull her out of prison to end the isolation. And to be fair, "The Truth About Unicorns" worked overtime to emphasize that even though she's out of jail and back in Banshee, the isolation isn't gone. Heck, it might even be worse now that she's closer in proximity to everyone she cares about, but can't really be close to them emotionally. Re-entering the real world after spending time inside is surely never easy, and Carrie's circumstances are fairly extreme.


One of Banshee's strengths this season has been the way it hasn't made Hood and Carrie into this tragic fated love story. The feelings and the history are there, but there are no simple ways for them to get together—and at this point, I'm not even sure they want that. "The Truth About Unicorns" reinforced Carrie's dedication to her kids, and conveyed that Hood isn't entirely sure why he's still in Banshee because he recognizes Carrie's commitment to her family. On a lesser show, the pair would try to be together no matter what, blowing up everything in sight to stick it out, but there's a certain level of restraint here that I appreciate. Carrie and Hood understand the crappy situation they're in, and while they don't necessarily want out of each other's lives, they're also not in any hurry to run off together, consequences be damned. 

"The Truth About Unicorns" was really successful in establishing those awkward feelings, for both Carrie and Hood. Antony Starr and Ivana Miličević have good chemistry together, but one of the things Banshee seems to have figured out is that it can pull great moments out of them without dialogue. As such, this episode went all-in on the non-verbal, almost dream-like sequences, with the two of them sitting in the car or just walking in silence, intercut with the possible avenues they could go down, if all those weird feelings didn't exist. That approach probably got a tiny bit repetitive by the end of the episode, but it was a really nice way to structure the story and examine the relationship between the two without having to rely on long monologues about the past and the future. It also gave John Romano's direction a chance to shine throughout; this was a wonderfully shot episode that made great use of its locations and the beautiful weather. Those elements really added to its dream-like quality.

And all of that made the second portion of the episode that much better, with Racine making his triumphant return and all the Rabbit information spilling out onto the table. I was actually disappointed to see Racine and Zeljko Ivanek go so quickly, but I guess that's what happens when the show brings in characters who know Hood's real identity. IMDb suggests that Ivanek will return in future episodes, so I'd expect some more flashbacks very soon. And! The closing "action" set-piece, with Carrie and Hood slinking through the fields trying to take out the sniper who popped Racine? Awesome. 


All told, it was great to see a show that's known for loud, physical, and bloody fight sequences try something almost the opposite—a quiet hour with little real physicality, and not a lot of blood. "The Truth About Unicorns" was a smart, well-constructed detour into more character-based territory. And the midpoint of the season was a great place for it, as it dealt with some leftover tension between the leads and brought Carrie back into the fold for what will likely be a much louder, more violent second half. 



CASE NOTES

– I love that Hood can sense someone hiding in the woods hundreds of yards away. He's like a superhuman bloodhound. 

– That unicorn toy was kind of creepy. It may or may not haunt my dreams. 

– Do we have any theories about how the second half of the season, specifically the stuff with Rabbit, might play out? Is it possible that Hood and Carrie will cut some kind of deal that keeps the feds off their asses in Banshee, in exchange for taking Rabbit out? Or does Racine's death change that?


What'd you think of this different-ish episode? And how are you feeling about the season overall? 


Previously Aired Episode

AIRED ON 5/20/2016

Season 4 : Episode 8

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"On a lesser show, the pair would try to be together no matter what, blowing up everything in sight to stick it out, but there's a certain level of restraint here that I appreciate."

This directly emphasizes a point I made in connection with Scandal. Hood and Carrie are FAR more damaged in every regard than Liv and Fitz by should get a pass if they decided to say "FTW, we're doing what we want and being together". Even though they could, they see the bigger picture and they don't. It's still overtly hinted at, but they don't. And that's the sort of thing that will ultimately make me want to see these two get together. It's exceptionally well played.

"I was actually disappointed to see Racine and Zeljko Ivanek go so quickly, but I guess that's what happens when the show brings in characters who know Hood's real identity."

I had the exact same thought. Kinda like the fate of anybody on Smallville who learned Clark's secret...and since I don't see Banshee playing the amnesia card, death it is. It's too bad, cause I REALLY like the character Racine.

"The closing "action" set-piece, with Carrie and Hood slinking through the fields trying to take out the sniper who popped Racine? Awesome."

During the production meeting where the layout of the house, field and shootout were explained, whoever said, "We should have a camera on a crane and pull up from the characters crawling in the wheat to a wide shot where we can see all three and the paths they've taken to wind up where they are in proximity to each other"...THAT person deserves a raise.
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Another solid episode. I was late to the party with Banshee, but I've been ravenous the last few days, gobbling up everything, and I'm almost up-to-date. I feel like it's still early for me to make predictions or judgements, but I really hope that somehow Rabbit and Kai get into it- a baddie-off (My word. Mine.). We need someone more substantial for Kai to kill. We know that he's a raging badass, but for him to take on and take out someone like Rabbit- who the whole world knows is a badass- would not only give him more "global" clout, but it'd add another wrinkle to his odd relationship with Hood (and it connects Ana to Kai in a way that isn't really there at this point).

But whatever the writers do, they've got my trust at this point. Excellent show!
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“Marveling at his own boldness, he said softly, "I would enter your sleep if I could, and guard you there, and slay the thing that hounds you, as I would if it had the courage to face me in fair daylight. But I cannot come in unless you dream of me.”
Peter S. Beagle, The Last Unicorn
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Alternative end for Killer Woman: it looks like Ana was heading to a violent encounter with Killer Woman. I guess Ana wins. Hood calmly watches the action when he realizes He is been left out of the fun

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Come on Banshee. What's up ? Bored to death in this episode. And Rabbitt ? Ok, he had to be back. But, is he going to be THE bad guy all along ? I hope not because then Banshee will remain stuck in its own storyline ...
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Very good review! I devour every second of this episode, it was intense and the photography was surrealistic. Lucas suffers longing for this happy perfect life with Ana. He wants to stop the pain, he wants to move forward, but he is tied to his fate and fate wont let him go. Maybe this episode will make for Banshee what Clear made for The Walking Dead: changing the way people connect to each other.
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Overall, I am really enjoying this season so far. I was disappointed by this episode. The writers could have embedded pieces of the "Unicorns" story line throughout all episodes without using up this entire episode. There are so many other interesting characters with stories to further develop, in my opinion.
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Hood should only fight giants.
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somebody had a cutting orgasm in the edit room, i am no fan of such per se and it didn't work for me since we already accepted the hopelessness of their relationship so the wannabe future edit served no real purpose other than maybe be annoying...
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I loved it in E5. Maybe a bit too much in E2 though...
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They went a bit overboard with the slow-mo, dutch-angles, creative camera-angles and non-chronological editing for my personal taste, but the episode was really solid nonetheless. It did feel a bit like a filler though, which you would think wouldn't be necessary in a season with only 10 episodes.
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I've enjoyed this season of Banshee a lot more than the first, with it's toned down style. And then they throw in this emotional minefield of an episode. I never expected to be emotionally battered by Banshee. The symbolism for the end of a relationship, the pain Hood displayed when he killed the sniper, the lack of sex speaking more volumes than any sex scene. Great episode, and beautifully shot. I also thought the sense of foreboding in the episode before they got to the house was excellent. Banshee continues to surprise in the best way this season.
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I liked the way it was shot. It was poignant in the way they walked together almost touching but not. An invisible chasm between them, holding them together yet keeping them apart.
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Hauntingly beautiful and heartbreaking.... excellent episode.
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Ladies and Gentlemen, it grieves me to say that this hour of television left me in the impossible place of wondering perplexity and simultaneously experienced outmost certitude. In lack of any stringent thought and little to no trust in my perception of time and location for the time being, I feel the dominant urge to temporarily retire from this stimulating exchange with the only word that with every waking hour seems so much more imprinted into my very own DNA - impossible to be hidden, denied or ignored:
BANSHEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEE!!!!!!!!!
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Me not understand a word of what you say :)
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Cory's review says it all.
a majestic episode for a brillant series~I don't have any fabulous insights that haven't already been said in the comments and Cory's review. I do love the over the top action that the other episodes had but I also love the focus and view (and everything else) of this episode.
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Poor Zeljko Ivanek must be tired of dying in the shows he's in. Damages, Heroes, Revolution, now Banshee.
What's the deal with Americans and wooden houses? These are fire hazards! It's the second wooden house that has burned in this show.
I was wondering when that meaningful scene from Banshee: Origins between Racine and the man supposed to be Hood would be mentioned again. I was starting to think the writers would expect us to watch Banshee: Origins to understand the show. But Racine gave us a nice recap before he died. Anyway, for anyone who hasn't seen it, I recommend they watch the interrogation scene Racine referred to.

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Don't forget the last Bourne movie, Ivanek died in that one, too!
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Oh, not very important, but i noticed Anthony Starr pronounces the city name BANshee, while fans seem to prefer BanSHEEEEEEEE.
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I pronounce it BanSHEE because in Irish mythology we that's how we pronounce 'bean-sidhe' a female spirit whose cry you will hear before a death.
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Absolutely incredible episode. It was so different, so character driven, the acting was brilliant (very underrated thanks to the content of the show: sex, violence, gore, nudity) I understand why some people didn't like it because of how different it was compared to previous episodes, but it was definitely far from boring. My favourite show on TV at the minute.
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Although it didn't match the rest of the series that much and it sucked for the main characters, I loved it because it just looked beautiful. The music (not mentioned in the review) really added to it.

The three time elements past, present and (would like to be) future (dream sequences), were beautifully presented.
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A very interesting episode. Definitely slower-paced than any episode to date, but they did it very artfully, and very well. Many of the shots were beautiful, including the three characters crawling through the wheat field. You even felt sad to see the house burning down and knowing it's symbolism. Great episode.
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I absolutely loved it. Different, slower, yet very assured.

There was such a fine style to this episode - from great visuals, through elegant direction, to haunting music.
And it was an episode focusing on the smaller details, the deeper meanings. What is and what could've been, or perhaps should've been. How dreams are glaringly at odds with the reality.

The slowly happening change in Hood manifested itself with new strength here. The show keeps adding interesting layers to its characters. Banshee has provided an undeniable proof that it can take a vastly different approach just to make it work in an amazing way.
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Different pace ,but good episode nonetheless . Beautifully filmed.
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Very nice indeed to see something different. It was kind of fresh to see a different set of pace without losing the magic of the show. Although I have to admit that by the end of the episode it felt a bit to slow. Thank god for that awsome shootout in the field otherwise i would have been disapointed with this episode.

Who knows what will happen to Rabbit, he seem to have several lives. It will be interesting to see how they choose to resolve the FBI part. Racine seemed to be working alone in this episode and if they pulled DNA from the real Hoods body, the fake Hoods identity is in jeopardy.
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This episode was so damn boring! :(
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Loved the episode. It was always going to be interesting when the foot came off the pedal, but they nailed it. Kudo's to both Antony Starr and Ivana Milicevic for absolutely nailing it. Special mention for the cinematography. Banshee always looks stunning, but this was on a different level. Best show on TV, without a doubt.
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I really good episode probably the best so far because it told us that the route that hood started was never going the way he thought out, past always come back to haunt him. Liked the way sniper in the cornfield played out as well and also Racine is now gone it leaves Hood and carrie to tie up loose ends. I think this series needs a bit of reflection as well otherwise it falls into all style and no substance.
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heartbreaking, wonderful, pretty pretty episode. just wow
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I said this previously in the season and I will say it again. This show is utterly watchable. It just is. This was one of the best directed episodes that I have seen. The visuals were fantastic. The acting was great. And the little sprinkle of action was just the icing on top.

But the metaphors in this episode. Damn. There is no happy ending for these people. And Hood's Fuck that at the end? That was the cherry.
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Yes, I watch Banshee for the over-the-top action, the surprisingly realistic gore, the awesome and BAMF! characters - but this episode was still great.

I've been struggling to see just what was left between Hood and Carrie, after what I've seen as a hot and fiery youthful romance gone Romeo and Juliet when Hood took the fall for them.
I've only really seen the kick-ass, superviolent, supersexy version of their backstory, and how it crashed with Carrie's present life.
But this episode brought out a very different perspective, and added a lot of depth for me: No, Hood didn't picture them living a life of luxury between crazy capers, and Carrie didn't settle down in Nowhere, US because she was forced to leave behind a glorious jetset lifestyle on the fringes of "civilized" society.
Apparently, what they both really wanted was a cabin in the woods.
Quiet, sedate lives with lacy curtains and a nursery.
Who knows - maybe that would have been between the occasional heist, but I'm thinking maybe, just maybe they really WERE planning to leave it all behind.

I found it telling - and incredibly sad - that their short detour into their shared fantasy dreamlife only lasted a few hours before there was blood in the field and the house was burning to the ground.
The universe wouldn't even let them have this one, tiny slice of could-have-been - everything has to go.

Suddenly, Carrie's present life wasn't so terrible, just the fact that her husband is a bit of a bore and she picked the WRONG town to settle in.
But while SHE may be able to settle into (and maybe even BACK into) that sort of life, Hood is too damaged.
Too hypervigilant, too traumatized - I'm surprised we haven't seen more examples of his PTSD.

The entire episode was just so poignant, so heartfelt, so sweet and dreaming and yet utterly realistic that I was constantly saying to myself "What are you doing to me, Banshee - what IS this?!? You're making me FEEL, damnit - stop it!".

But they didn't, really - they just made me feel less melancholy, and more sad.
Hood isn't just a broken man with a tragic past.
He's f*ing CURSED.
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I enjoyed the slow pace, the ultra-soft background music and the weird camera angles, but those weird edits are just annoying.

All things considered, it was a good episode. I just can't make sense of what the assassin did. If she came there to kill the three of them, then it was a bad idea to kill the least dangerous target first. If she came there to kill only Zeljko Ivanek's character, then it was a bad idea to approach the house after.
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so bizarre to me that people who love fast paced action/violence get so fixated in it that if there is the slightest breakaway all value seems to be lost. For me, this art house style, slow paced episode was more than welcome. The last thing I want from any form of entertainment is the expectation of the same static procedure over and over, no matter how action packed. Maybe that's why I never got into the WWF...
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After reading this, I thought the page would be filled with negative comments, but I only found a couple of those.
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i'm glad you searched. what was the count?
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Great review. What he said...
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Blimey, the scarecrow from The Wizard of Oz went a bit mental with the sniper rifle! Also, and this will only make sense to readers with access to UK telly, Hood: channeling Barry Shitpeas off Charlie Brooker's Screenwipe or what? He's even got the same bandage FCS! If it works see:http://img684.imageshack.us/img684/5639/oatcakedp.jpg
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It was a pretty episode, but not very memorable.

Killing Racine the way they did was a bit of a waste (Zeljko Ivanek is always good), and leaves some loose ends (who else knows about the DNA for example).

It did highlight the differences in attitudes of Carrie and Hood - her silence when Hood told her he was thinking of leaving, her surprise that he was willing to work with Racine and the fact that she didn't tell him that Rabbit visited her in prison, all make me wonder about her motivation.

I felt the dream sequences, mixed with the actual real time situations were coming from Hood and were giving the viewer an insight into his thinking, contrasting what he expected to happen when he originally turned up in Banshee to the reality of the situation.
He thought they would go off and live their dream life together, but Carrie had moved on, and he is now realizing the dream is dead, or at least changed.

The cinematography was very similar to The Thin Red Line, especially the stuff in the fields, so I can easily see Cory's Mallick reference.

One other thing:
Worst unicorn of the week =

BEST UNICORN OF THE WEEK =

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A pegasus with a horn on it's head does not a unicorn make, or maybe it does...
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A milestone.
What had before been mostly a conglomerate of sex, violence and straightforward storytelling turned into something totally unexpected - and as it is the case with AMERICAN HORROR STORY's Alfonso Gomez Rejon, one could only marvel at what good directing makes a difference.
In its montages, woven together with the soundtrack, this episode of BANSHEE showed both the sweetness of the wishing and the harshness of the real world, dreams turning into ashes and everything one could expect from classical Greek drama: no matter how much the "tragic" heroes with to change their path, they cannot escape what fate (or reality or simply life) has up its sleeve for them.
Usually, I tended to chuckle at BANSHEE's graphic novel approach and its "balls" in regards to sex and violence as a major part of its entertainment - but today, I was amazed by what COULD be done, thanks to great directing, mood and acting. - I am not sure if the show needs this turn as a steady path, but by taking the foot of the accellerator, taking itself somehow serious for the first time, this episode was truly a milestone and makes me curious for what is to come.
Thank you!
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I am okay with this episode and fans of Ivana Miličević will be happy to see her in the buff again. However, they must get back to the normal style next week. Banshee has only 10 episodes per season and I will be piss if they do this more than 1 time in a short season. Plus I prefer the other ladies actually:-)
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For most of the episode, I kept wondering how I missed the news that Banshee was now with the Sundance channel. The whole episode was mostly quiet beautiful scenery, time-cutting montages, and characters staring off into the distance.

That's to say that I neither hated nor loved the episode. I can't actually think of any episodes of Banshee that I'd say I enjoyed less than this one, but that also doesn't mean I didn't like it. I liked it. I didn't mind the slow pace and the international-independent-film style. I liked the focus on the kind of relationship Carrie and Hood have... afterall, despite the nudity, killing, and fist-fighting, this has always been a love story between those two.

My complaint of the episode is not about that stuff, but about killing off Racine already. Maaaaaan... fuck! That sucks. I really enjoyed Zeljko Ivanek and the Racine character. I was really happy when I saw that he was the one in the woods. I was psyched to see them referencing that moment from the first episode of the season when he looked at Hood questioningly after reading his name. I'd been wondering when they'd get to that. So I was happy... then BOOM! He dead. By Rabbit's hitwoman. Already. Bleh. I like surprises and that definitely surprised me, but this was one I kinda dislike. I mean, I love the show enough that I trust what the future is gonna hold, but still, I'd have loved to have seen Racine be a bigger part of that. Oh well.
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Great episode, reminded me of Rectify in cinematography and tone.
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This episode reminded me of Rectify.
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Yeah, but now I remember I miss Rectify. Thank you :-)
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But it will be back in the spring, with a 10 episode season!
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I know, can't wait.
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The first thing I kept thinking about was whose fantasies those "possible avenues they could go down" were. When Carrie met Hood in front of the prison and there was the scene of them embracing, and when she ran smiling towards the house he'd bought, were they her, his or their shared fantasies? Or maybe it's better not to know. That those fantasies could be the product of both their state of minds are what made them intriguing scenes.

The second thing was Hood's real identity. Now that the show finally touched the topic properly, at least for a minute, the question is how significant it will be in the future. Is there a bigger secret connected to his identity, or is his lack of true identity just supposed to signify that he is a lone ranger, a man without a past, a man whose identity doesn't matter despite the fact that he is a main character. Maybe he is just a man of action, the hero who is defined by the things he does, not who he is on the inside, and when the story one day ends, it's insignificant what his name actually was. It wouldn't be the first time the real identity of a main character on TV was left undisclosed.
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Great point about 'Hood' and who is he. I hadn't realised until this episode that we don't know his real name. Surely Carrie knows though? He must have had a name when they were a couple. He worked for Rabbit, so Rabbit must have a name for him too. What name did they prosecute him under? Did his fingerprints not give them anything? Surely if he was arrested they could find out something about him, it couldn't be just a case of 'I'm not telling you who I am'?
Great, now my head is spinning with questions.
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He's the man with no name and Banshee is a TV version of Yojimbo/A Fist Full Of Dollars/ Last Man Standing.
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Ah, my hero with no name. Watch the movies every years at least one time.
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Somebody with time of their hands and COURAGE in their heart should try to tackle one, if not the biggest omission of this community:

Season 2's freaky as-all-hell opening titles.

Man oh man, do I love those credits! But am I the only one noticing how super-duber creepy they have gotten compare to the ones in Season 1, who were not themselves kidding around? I mean, am I really the only one seeing this:

.... and then think "Whoa! Wait a s'cond - is the huge Native guy gonna end up killing Siobhan!? Are they foreshadowing her murder!?!?"

Listen, I would do it if I could. But we're five episodes in already... I didn't keep my copies of the four previous shows... my job is pretty demanding right now... I've been pretty damn sick throughout January... and let's not forget how amazing lazy I am. So, if someone with more guts than I have can start a thread to photo-recap the intros thus far, I'll put my full support behind it, 'cause we REALLY NEED to talk about this.

If someone makes it happen, please let me know.
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Somebody needs to do this! One season on, and the last shot of Ana/Carrie blinking into the camera still creeps me out.
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Episode MVP -that gorgeous Carolina blue sky. Tied for second, the two quiet contemplative performances from our fearless leads Starr and Milicivec. I was hanging on every scene. From what his mind played to him in how 'Hood' was going to show that house to his love and the reality of both of them kind of frozen throughout the episode unable to confess these dreams. Just the moments of lying on the floor next to one another so close yet sooooooo far apart. Both trying to figure out the 'Where do we go from here?' part. When 'Hood' 86ed the assassin pulling him away from his fantasy and filling him with pain and dred as he watched this dream burning to the ground. That was one hell of a set up episode and just sad for those that just want these crazy kids to be together. This episode laid these two characters and where they are now bare and to me, with these actors, it was an absolute pleasure to watch their pain. That sounded less disturbing in my head than it looks.

Are most of us that come here to the point yet that Antony Starr is pretty f'ing brilliant in this role? I see some haters of his still around but I thought this episode would shut some people up. He was in so much pain - from the great opening shot of him envisioning a welcome back with an embrace and the reality of them not even being able to get to that point. He knows now he has to stay to protect b/c of Rabbit but what is on the other side? Him finally coming to the realization that 'Carrie' is always dreaming about another reconciliation - she had found her happy place without him when he went away - and that look of anguish in his face. Yeah, stop telling me Antony Starr is bland. He doesn't need dialogue to convey his character's emotion and pain and that is anything but. His seeing her in his dreams at the end of his soccer dad fantasy - complete with mom setting up the nursery (if that didn't break your heart than what exactly would it take?) with the gun aimed at his head (She's going to kill you the longer you stick around.)- waking him up. That's one for the 'Banshee' team - this episode was put together very very well. The problem for Carrie is what happens when her happy dream shatters next week? Gordon and Deva - neither even close to a 'good' place since her incarceration. I can't wait.

What a painful chapter beautifully executed with only 3 of our main players. Too bad they got rid of 'Racine', that has to mean a return to 'Banshee' from Xavier though whom I kind of dig. I think Racine went out better than he was contemplating with his cancer and the kitchen scene very good. He works so much so can't wait til Zeljko pops up somewhere else or in someone's memory here. Eagerly anticipating the return of Julian Sands.

I think this show is capable of anything any drama on television is doing. Its never doing the same things over and over and over again, constantly challenging the tried and true way most dramas carry on. Its revelatory. Glad its going to be nearing the finish line when 'Hannibal' returns because that is just going to be much to handle Friday's at 10. Can't wait to be back in 'Banshee' next Friday.

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I just watched a new show, The After. Why havent anyone on this site written about it? Its really good.
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I thought it was really bad. My post on the page that patsully linked to elaborates a bit.
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You are definitely ahead of the game... As @MightyMad noted, it's part of Amazon's new pilot group, so there's no guarantee it will become a full series. That said, Tim Surette put together a nice roundup of the drama pilots here.
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Ousp - sorry, Lise, I may have flagged you by mistake.

DISREGARD THIS FLAG, TV. COM - IT'S ALL GOOD!
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I cant log in anymore via my laptop. Its no good.
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3 reasons - in no particular order:

  • It just came out last night
  • ... Against the Winter Olympics
  • From Amazon Studios
People didn't start talking about Orange is The New Black right out of the gate; it actually helped Netflix to have series with name recognition like House of Cards and Arrested Development to promote their original content, which doesn't seem to be the case with Amazon. The After is from Chris Carter, though, and tons of X-Files fans (me including) were wondering why the hell isn't he doing something right now.

So don't worry - if it is any good, people will eventually start talking about it.

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OMG!!! An episode of Banshee with no sex or brutal fight scenes, the world must be off its axis! Whilst it was certainly a bucolic odyssey, I'm not that invested in Carrie or her relationship with Hood. As a lead, I find him a bit bland too! Still, if this episode gives their issues together less screen time in the future, then it was worth it. If not, then the writers should be aware that Banshee without Job and very little screen time for Sugar is a hanging offence.
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I loved it! I even cried a little when the house burned down
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While I liked the episode I hope that they'll go back to normal, that style of filming is one of those things that is good only in moderation.

Pretty shocked by the FBI dude getting his head blown off though. That came out of nowhere.
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I'm gonna post some of my favourite shots of the episode:




Cory rightly mentioned Mailk as the major reference here, but it also reminded of Nebraska a lot - then again, I'm pretty sure Alexander Payne was just as greatly influenced by theman behind Badlands as Babak Najafi was here.

But then, the Banshee director kinda went all Nicolas Winding Refn on us towards the end of the show ...

... even giving us that weird/smooth retro-80's-electo music that works so well in Drive... and didn't work at all in Only God Forgives (I know, I'm one of those guys who 'didn't get it'... I got that it was an AWFUL movie with a GREAT performance from Kristin Scott Thomas in it - now, if the movie was all about her character, it would definitely be watchable, but it wasn't, and Gosling totally was phoning it in, so, IMO, if you haven't see it, DON'T, rewatch Drive instead... alright, 'got totally off topic here.)

"The Truth About Unicorns" is one of those TV episodes that you can put under the 'calm before the storm' category - yeah, shit went down (not at all happy about Racine's way-too-early death, but it is what it is), but it is nothing compare to what's about to come. FYI for those you don't know: the next one is titled "Armies of One". Yup. So prepare yourself for MAJOR SHIT to GO DOWN then.

Love this episode, though. Very nicely done. Happy to see that the MAJORITY of commenters around here 'got it'.
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My favourite shot. If I had long hair, I would do this all day, every day, out of car windows, train windows, bus windows, aeroplane windows, my apartment window...
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Ah, a feeling only women and dogs can truly understand :)
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That cut-away scene where Carrie was running to the house and turned mid-run to smile at Hood was also great.
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the episode was good... but i loved the shots, really stunning. as a photographer i was going nuts, imagining all the different pictures i could take in a location like that. this episode had stunning imagery
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This is such a brilliant show. To be able to change the pace so significantly and still have you glued to the screen is amazing. I love it when a show trusts it's fans enough to give them something different. It was beautiful.
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The farmer killed the Wabbit - well, his sniper!
One of the biggest problems for Banshee in general and, notably, in this episode is miring itself in groundhog day fashion. They're have already been many dream-like sequences by them both over what c/would've been, so it was brave in a way to have this story. And it was one of the first concrete runs at Hood demonstrating his willingness to move on; albeit not that far down the road, with him dangling an alternate home in Carrie's face!
What this episode also entered into the mix was Hood's, as yet, unknown past with his father. We don't, like Carrie it turned out, know anything much about Hood's past and why he chose the path he did. We could guess from season one that Rabbit became both mentor and father to Hood on many levels. And tonight's episode gave the tidbit that Hood was far from close to his father but that it wasn't his choice. Rabbit's contempt for Hood appears to run deeper than him simply not being worthy of his daughter, or that he went behind his back with the diamond heist, but that Hood chose Carrie over him also.
Racine's character (not to mention the excellent Ivanek) did seem like a serious waste but it was also interesting that the sniper elected to kill him first, which may suggest he was the primary target in case the other two got away. A dying man on a singular mission is a great threat, however Rabbit is a sadist who loves and lives for the long game and I would've imagined him toying with Racine's cancerous last days longer. Racine clearly had a mountain of dirt on Rabbit and one wonders if the latter was more concerned over its leakage and that's why he had to go so soon in the story.
The final death stroke for the sniper by Hood, had him look at Carrie like some tired gladiator gazing up at Caesar for confirmation that he had to kill again. Very powerful stuff. I pray to the God of knee caps that Banshee doesn't have people only being shot in the legs in the future, like some unmentionable T2 copying younger audience demographic grabbing/adding shows of late! Bring me the POWER!!! It's late. O.K.?
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I think some people are being a bit tough on this episode.
If you ask people what they like most about this show, originality & innovation are liklely to be high up the list of many banshee-heads, yet here was 'the truth about unicorns" doing something different than usual and people say they don't like it not being the same as the 'usual' episodes.

Sorry to point out the bleedin obvious, but you can't be innovative if you do the same thing every week - that is being formulaic a la network TV.

Yeah there were no raunchy sex scenes n only two corpses, but so what? The writers wanted to deal with the relationship between Hood and Carrie. IMO getting it all out in one episode with a minimum of the boring & self obssessive ranting that most TV shows put their audience through when trying to illustrate a relationship is a definite plus.

The show will most likely be full of blood, big bangs and beautiful bods next week.

I would much rather have 40 minutes of 'arthouse' photography than weeks and weeks of the "she loves me she loves me not" shit Hollywood scripters like to put us through to depict the ending of a romantic relationship.

That hackneyed crap bleeds into real life. I'm sure I'm not the only human who has been confronted with that unrealistic garbage in a RL relationship. Not because the other party feels that way, but because too many bad movies & TV shows have told them that is how they should behave and feel.
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Every week there is meaningless sex in this show. This week you have a couple who were crazy in love, alone, and they don't touch each other. It speaks volumes about their relationship. How do people not get this?
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