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Bates Motel S02E10: "The Immutable Truth"


I wasn't very thrilled with Bates Motel's Season 1 finale and the murder of Blair Watson. We had just done all that with Keith Summers in the series premiere, so covering up another murder felt repetitive. Thus, when Season 2 kicked off with Bradley killing Gil, it seemed like the show was doubling down on murder cover-ups that would entangle the Norms, and I was not too optimistic about its prospects in its sophomore season.

That lack of optimism was largely misplaced, and thank goodness! Blair Watson's murder investigation was handled off-screen, and it didn't really return to the narrative until the seventh episode of this season. Bradley was put on a bus (presumably to go fight giant robots)—and again, thank goodness, because I never found Bradley even remotely interesting. Plus, her slaying of Gil was what set off the gang war in White Pine Bay that in part kept Dylan busy and separated him from the Norms for much of the season (Caleb, Norman's brother, was the other thing keeping Dylan away). 

So instead of dealing with murders in a direct way, Bates Motel tightened up its stories and tone in Season 2—quite an improvement over Season 1, which often felt too scattered between Norman's teenage development, the sex-trafficking mystery with Emma and Norman, the cover-up of Keith Summers' death, Dylan's career in the drug business of White Pine Bay, and, of course, all the longing looks between Norman and Norma. Bates Motel will always need that last element, but so much of everything else felt grafted-on, like a bunch of different shows and styles cobbled together into a weird Frankenstein's monster of a show.


Looking back, it's not as if Season 2 had any less going on, but rather that everything that was happening was connected to other stories in a more cohesive way than Season 1 managed to achieve. It helped that White Pine Bay started to feel like a place with people in it as opposed to this slightly dystopic city in the Pacific Northwest built around a marijuana business and a compromised sheriff. It had a city council, a community theater (Norma belting out "Maybe This Time" may've been the highlight of the season), and people who have lives and houses. In short, there was a world for the Norms to interact with, a world that would drive them away from and toward one another in equal measure.

Norma had Christine (Rebecca Creskoff) and Christine's brother George (Michael Vartan) to play up politics and romance, the former of which was interesting due to Nick Ford's involvement and its addition of some much-needed color to the town. The Norma/George romance never really did anything except highlight the jealousy and bizarre give-and-take that defines Norma and Norman's relationship; George was always going to fizzle out, but Norman getting kidnapped and trapped in a box sped thing along.

Norman primarily had Bradley's replacement, the significantly more interesting Cody (Paloma Kwiatkowski, who hopefully will be getting more work), and their stories were more about teenagers and sex. Again, Cody added color to the season, but she also served as a way for someone else to get in on Norman's secret blackouts while also not running into Norma immediately, which is something Emma totally would've done—and which she totally did. But as Cody was the rebellious teenager sort, the absolute worst thing ever in Norma's eyes, she was like George, and had to be shuffled out of White Pine Bay for the sake of the Norms.

Both these larger serialized stories kept circling back to the Norms as a pairing, since both Norman and Norma are jealous/protective of one another's new romantic interests. But they also served larger narrative arcs, including Norma landing a spot on the city council and making Norman aware of his blackouts. This, more than anything, was what the finale was about, and ended up resolving.


In fact, there was a hell of a lot of resolution in the "The Immutable Truth." So much of it, in fact, that the only dangling storylines by the end were the pot one and the questions of whether or not Dylan will be the one running things come next season, and whether or not Norma will still be on the city council. The finale even resolved—for now—Romero's interest in Norman as a budding killer, thanks to the polygraph test. When Season 3 begins next year, Bates Motel will have a relatively blank sheet of paper on which to write a new story. 

More important than the larger seasonal plots, however, was the way the finale saw everything laid out between the Norms, as Norman finally learned the truth about his blackouts and the death of his father during the confrontation in the woods with Norma, itself spurred since Norman realized that he had killed Blair Watson. 

That scene in the woods was pretty much my everything about Bates Motel. Other aspects of the series' general weirdness—seriously, the "Let's try out for a musical!" idea was just so bizarre for the show that I couldn't help but love it and cherish it and hate that Libby OF ALL PEOPLE got the part instead of Norma—have helped to keep things interesting when the Norms aren't sharing the screen, but when they are, pretty much everything else feels entirely justified, or at least tolerable. Their wonderfully touching moment at the end of the episode tiptoed right up to the creepy line, but because Farmiga and Highmore have somehow figured out how to not cross it, their closeness and raw emotion brought everything into complete focus.

One Bates Motel's producers, Carlton Cuse, called the show a tragedy in a recent interview, and it's really the best way of looking at this story, and that scene in particular. It's not a tragedy about Norman, because Norman doesn't have a tragic flaw in the way we we normally think about tragic flaws—his blacking out and killing people is just a straight-up flaw. Rather, Bates Motel is a tragedy about Norma, because she just loves her son so damn much that she drives him to become the killer who ends up keeping her skeleton in the fruit cellar. Norman was ready to kill himself because he doesn't want to be the person he's becoming and, more importantly to him, he doesn't want to hurt Norma. And Norma convinced him otherwise through the power of motherly love (and motherly guilt), saying that they have to be together, that they're supposed to be together, and that if he dies, then she'll only be a "few steps" behind him. She thinks she's saving her son's life, but she's actually just killing herself.


Bates Motel's second season wasn't all sunshine and rainbows, or even what passes for those things on the show. Dylan was stuck in the drug war storyline after his break from Norma—which itself followed the reveal from Caleb—and it was very, very boring. Zane (Michael Eckund) was a worn-out jumble of unstable criminal clichés, and his sister Jodi (Kathleen Roberston) bordered on being a non-entity for all the value she contributed to the narrative. The saving grace of the drug storyline was that Nick Ford's (Michael O'Neill) involvement allowed it have small, tangential connections to Norma's various goings-on, but given how long it took those connections to pay off, the rest just fell all sorts of flat.

That's probably why I was so oddly elated to see Dylan and Norma's reconciliation in this episode. Seriously. My notes have "AWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWW." in them in response to watching them hug. While Romero seemed insistent that Dylan take over the pot business (presumably both operations?) and that means we may have yet another drug storyline next season, he'll at least be back in the Norms' orbit again. 

While Dylan was understandably lost for much of this season, the character works best as someone who's aware of just how dysfunctional the Norms' relationship is—and who's not only willing to say as much, but to try to do something about it, even if his efforts turn out to be wildly ineffective. (Plus, Max Thieriot is really wonderful as a counter to both Farmgia and Highmore's odder performance vibes, and I missed that this season.) When you keep up with that tragedy lens, however, Dylan's inability to protect Norman from Norma's motherly impulses contribute as much to Norman's descent into Psycho-ness as her love does. It's even more of a reason to keep him around, as it enhances that perspective. 

As a result of this finale, I'm not entirely sure what's in store for us in Season 3 beyond Dylan and the drug operations. I'm hopeful that more citizens of White Pine Bay will arrive and make things complicated for the Norms, but given that there's no lingering mystery or inciting incident to propel us at the start, I'll guess we'll just spend the offseason theorizing.



COMMENTS FROM THE GUESTBOOK

– Just in case you'd forgotten what we're building to here. Then again, how could you?

– I didn't touch on Emma's story very much, but that's largely because I think Bates Motel is afraid to do too much with her, or to allow her to get too close to Norman (hence the blandly handsome pot-dealing guy). I think the show likes her as much as I do, and doesn't want it to feel as if she's getting too close to being murdered.

– If Norma loses her city council seat, I'm going to be very sad. I want to see her be ridiculous during these meetings.

– Norma and Norman danced to Bobby Darin singing "Dream Lover."


What'd you think of "The Immutable Truth" and the season as a whole? Got any ideas for what Season 3 could be about?


Previously Aired Episode

AIRED ON 5/16/2016

Season 4 : Episode 10

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"Keep her skeleton in the fruit sellar." Did you really need to say this ? You just spoiled the ending for many of us who are not familiar with the full story. Couldn't you have said spoiler before blurting out the ending of the whole thing without warning.
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Psycho came out in 1960. Spoiler alerts don't apply to 55 year old movies. If you haven't heard how it ends by now, then that's no one's issue but your own.
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First, I love that you refer to Norma and Norman as "The Norms." That's definitely what I'm going to call them from now on. And second, Anthony Perkins has an uncanny resemblance to Sheriff Romero in that picture you posted. So weird.
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Oh and lastly, my username is so embarrassing. This is why 11 year olds shouldn't be allowed on the computer.
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Has anyone heard or read when the season 3 premiere of Bates may hit the airwaves? It seems like it's been forever since we watched Norman taking the polygraph test and Blairs' demise.
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I just caught up on this show and it's been such a pleasure to watch, a really consistent and entertaining show. I can't wait for Season 3.
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Can someone tell what the author of this article means by:
"Just in case you'd forgotten what we're building to here. Then again, how could you?"

I'm guessing this is a reference to the original Psycho movie, but I haven't seen it so can someone please tell me what the show is supposedly building to?
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سریال واقعا عالی و فوق العاده ایه وهرکسی هم که دیده باشش تاییدمیکنه وتوی ایرانم کلی طرفدار داره

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Props to the writers. Not as creepy as Hannibal. It´s the perfect suspense. Also excellent performances.
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If a fly landed on Norman's hand at the end of the last scene, it would have been a perfect homage to the original Hitchcock movie :)
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Glad it's coming back for a third season!
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A very minor correction. It's not at all big deal. I only point it out because it might be confusing to some not familiar with the plot.
(Caleb, Norman's brother, was the other thing keeping Dylan away).



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Excellent end to an excellent season!
Vera Farmiga deserves some recognition for her outstanding performance!!!!
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My dvr cut out just before Norman answered if he killed Miss Watson...uuggghhh!! He said no...right?!
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Iwould like to know if they put eyeliner on the sheriff's eyes?
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They don't. Google the actor's name and add the word "eyeliner" to the search and you'll see web sites where he says it's not eyeliner. That's just naturally how his eyes are. It *does* look like it was added, though.
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There was also that scene with Norma in the rocking chair in Norman's bedroom, which reminded me of how her body is discovered in the movie!
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Bates Motel is so dark and disturbing yet.....laid back and slow burning. The two complement each other so perfectly.
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This show is a real find. Very low key and on a channel that is not well known for original shows. It has this awesome below the radar feel to it that i love.

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I can't get over how well everyone is cast on this show. Not just Vera and Freddie but the outstanding work that Nestor Carbonell is doing, I'm even dying to know more about Dylan and Emma. I love the idea of Norman having a step brother (he's apparently his cousin as well).

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Half-brother, not step-brother.
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I actually love the drug wars on the show. Nick Ford was especially interesting. And anything Dylan does is usually great. But admittedly, if you hold those storylines up to whatever Norma and Norman are doing, then the drug wars seem pretty boring and played out.
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I liked the drug storyline up until the end, where it fell apart and they were like 'let's just kill everyone'.
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Bates Motel is one of these little underrated shows that is always fun to watch and we'll know will go beyond the brainless adventure or silly love triangles. I'm glad its ratings have ensured a renewal. I don't know what A&E would find acceptable in terms of ratings, so I have no idea how well it's doing.

The ending with the polygraph went exactly as I thought it would, but still I found it well made and interesting. Indeed I'd figured that Norman would convince himself that he didn't kill Blair Watson, "Mother did." That was so in tune with the character we would get to know in the movie(s).

One fun thing about the settings is that Bates Motel (the place, not the show) has become an iconic setting for anyone who loves classic movies. And, at this day and age, showing such an old hotel as a scenery for a horror/psychological twist/crime story would be supposed to give us an eerie, uneasy feeling. Bates Motel certainly isn't The Hilton, and it's good to remember that even in the 1960 movie, it was already supposed to be an old and sort of derelict place. (And Norman doesn't dress like a regular, contemporary teenager.)

However for me, personally, it has a contrary effect. First, obviously it reminds me of my favorite Hitchcock movies, and I've always had so much fun watching them. Besides, as a kid I used to stay in several hotels like that when going to the beach and clothes like those were normal in my teenage years. We didn't have much money as a family but we did have a lot of fun in those simple hotels. So, in the end, strangely enough, I find Bates Motel (the location) quite cozy indeed. it's funny what happy childhood memories do to us.

Speaking of locations, I've read that the show is filmed in a small town in British Columbia, Canada. I wonder how much rebuilding of the classic scenery had to be made, and how much CGI they used.
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Firstly I am very glad that Bates Motel is finally getting a review though it is the finale and I am glad Noel is doing it.

From the beginning I was hesitant to watch Bates Motel as firstly we all know how it ends and secondly it is a tragic show.

However it has been a surprisingly good first and second season.I prefer first season slightly though. They have managed to keep things interesting and the performance of both Farmiga and Highmore deserve awards (Farmiga did get some nominations).

Max thieriot and Nestor Carbonell also did great work. I loved Kenny Johnson but his time was short and he played a disgusting character.

This finale was good and it does wrap up most of the story lines. The most important thing was Norman discovering who he is and Norma persuading him to cover it up. This is the first step towards the path of the Norman Bates that we know. If Norman had killed himself or if his mother took Dylan's advice and put him in an insituation then the story we all know would not have happened.

It will be interesting how the writers would portray Norman next season now that he knows.

Sorry Noel but Kenny Johnson played Caleb who is Norma's brother and Norman's uncle (in your 2nd paragraph). He is NOT Norman's brother ( I know Norma and Norman can be confusing.)
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I agree about Emma, every time she's on screen I want to yell at her and tell her to get away from these crazy people!
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This show was terrific, and the acting was great. Vera Farmiga is unbelievable, and I look forward to more from Emma's character. I found the season very entertaining. I would like to see more focus on the main characters and a little less on the town. Thanks for your review.
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Vera is killing it!
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bring on season 3 it only sucks that we have to wait a year in between seasons
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I thought it was brilliant. The writers and actors are doing such a great job walking the creepy/sweet line of the Norms' relationship. It's easy to see that Norma thinks of herself as just a good, loving mom, but man the scene where she and Norman fought and she went off to sleep with that other guy highlighted the sick part of their relationship. I'm not one to watch a lot of television, and I'll drop a show in an instant, but Bates Motel has been a must see for me since its debut. And I'll be waiting eagerly for its return.
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That was a fun last scene for the season. And you could kind of tell Freddie Highmore has been waiting to pull that one off.

I agree, with the fact that I hope next season we have more people dynamic and less outside event dynamic. That there is this weird almost family being created between Norma, Norman, Dylan, Alex and Emma to me really helps illustrate what could create the environment that produces NORMAN BATES more than just the weirdness between Norma and Norman. I mean, without the introduction of violence as a method of resolution through Dylan and Alex and that weird almost sibling dynamic between Emma and Norman (where, I have to think the most intriguing thing about that dynamic as the season wore on is that Norman seems to enjoy that he holds the power in that dynamic and it is really his only relationship he has that in - I mean even last night in basically setting up a daughter for Norma once he was gone and the way he revealed the big Bates family secret was almost, but not quite, patronizing). Or just even the weird nature/nuture or whatever debate that even Norma recognized last night, besides his tendency to the criminal world, how did Dylan manage to be relatively normal? Especially when you consider Norman.
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One of the most interesting things about that scene between Norman and Emma didn't make it onto the screen. At the end of the scene, he kissed her. That wound up on the cutting-room floor, because the writers want to slow down any sign of romance between them, probably because, as Noel said, Emma likely wouldn't survive it. I'm kind of surprised Cody did.
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Huh, interesting. I have been trying to picture who, and I suppose since we all love Emma and Bradley sort of fizzled out, is the figure in Norman's life that Janet Leigh's character represents or sets off. I mean the obvious is she is another Blair Watson to him, but I almost wonder if what really effects the Norman we know is that, and this timing sadly makes a kind of sense, is if maybe Norma dies or Norman kills her (I was never certain in the movie) at some point in his early twenties but Norman can deal. But when Emma dies as a result of her cystic fibrosis (that's what she has, right?) that is the last straw that makes him totally snap.
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Maybe, who knows? I believe the sheriff was suspicious that he killed his mother and her lover (Romero?) but couldn't prove it.
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right. Sorry
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The sheriff in the movie right?
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I am so impressed with this shows ability to make me feel so conflicted about what is obviously the most f***ed up mother/son relationship I've ever witnessed. I mean the way I felt watching that scene in the woods? Disgusted, angry, heartbroken, confused, stunned and incredibly touched - all at once. Actually, that's pretty much the way I feel watching most Norma/Norman scenes. Even when they aren't sharing the screen, those two just send my brain and my emotions into hysterics. Grey, grey so very grey (but never dull).
This is a testament to both the writing and the acting. Both Farmiga & Highmore are just...WOW.

I loved this season and yes I agree with you Noel, so glad Bradley is gone. She was the worst. I'm really starting to like Dylan and both him and Alex have become really interesting this season. They are now actual characters and no longer background noise or plot coupons. I adore Emma. She is another tragically beautiful character (inside and out). My heart just aches for her and her lonely existence. She really is the invisible girl.

I still think Bates Motel is very underrated but that's almost a good thing and probably means the show will only keep getting better.
Plus, I'll take "cult hit" over overrated & overhyped BS any day. Really looking forward to Season 3.
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I really love Emma too. And it hurt when Norma dismissed her so coldly ("Well, we'll really miss you. Don't let the door hit you on the way out.") and the fact that, when Norman was finally supposed to tell her the truth, which in a moment of naivete I thought he was going to do, he chose to tell her the truth that was convenient to him, and told Dylan's dirty truth. Not cool, Norman. Not cool.
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Heartbreaking. But then again, I think Norman was truly scared to tell her his truth.
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Agree with everything you said.
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Can't watch, can't turn away. Conflicted is the perfect word.
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You conveyed my thoughts exactly!
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Hm, I love Alex and Norma together ... I'd really love to see their relationship develop in S03. There have been hints at romance, and I really want to see it happen!

As for Cody, please keep her away. She was annoying as heck, I guess they were going for replacement Bradley whom I also despise. (YAY THEY ARE BOTH GONE) *does happy dance*

The finale was a little disappointing, the drug storyline was a snooze fest + what's up with Dylan not caring that his lady boss got shot and killed? pft. Very odd. I guess he had no feelings for her whatsoever? I find Dylan's whole existence on the show kind of odd. Like most of the time there's nothing there. He's simply existing ... I don't get it. What's his point?

Anyway, not much happened with Emma in S2 which is sad because I love Emma and I love the relationship she has with Norma ...

All I want for S3 is more character development, no drug storyline, and better writing. Oh, and let Norman go full on crazy already, it's happening too slow.
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I believe Dylan is the conduit for Norma and Norman to the outside world. Without his goings on, it would be mostly scenes of interaction indoors of Norma and Norman. Dylan is the foil - he is the normal vs. Norma and Norman. As to his steely exterior, he has a lot of BS to deal with in his life, and it has to make him tough, perfect for the drug dealing world. That's why he was raising in the ranks at his job - he was good at it!
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I liked Cody, but hated Bradley.
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I am SO team Norma/Romero. I've read interviews with the creators and they said that the sexual tension between them is definitely intended and hopefully will be explored next season.

I also hated Cody and Bradley. Good riddance to both!
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Agree with Noel on most points, and in particular that the 'drug war' and its key players, Dillon aside, were about as interesting as watching a blade of grass grow. I will say that this was one of the more satisfying season finales of the far too many going on these days (summer is going to suck!), and I think the show upped its ante quite a bit. For me it was the little touches -- Norma sitting the in the infamous rocking chair, Norman's "killing them all", etc. I think this show has gone from a kind of campy and potentially cancelled pilot to a more serious front runner. Well, maybe not THAT good, but still the show has come a long way. And creepy factor? ouch! I wonder if the actor who plays Norma felt weirder about kissing a kid or about kissing a kid who plays the role of her son.
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How was the pilot campy? It was darker than any other episode imo, she got raped FFS.
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Settle down. It definitely had it's darker elements, but you cannot deny that later into the season the show, and particularly Norman's life, got a whole lot darker. THAT was my point -- the pilot set him up to be weird and disturbed, but still a teen who befriends other teens, etc. By the end of the season we have a kid who acknowledges he's a full out murderer, by comparison.
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That rocking-chair scene was great. Norma just sitting there with the creak, creak, creak of the chair as she watched Norman sleep. It was sweet but sent chills up my spine, too. It doesn't get any better than that.
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I think it was an hommage to the original movies (maybe only Psycho II, and it's not really Norma in the chair then), and there were a few lines that seemed to be characteristic of Norman from the original movies as well. It is indeed creepy... GOOD creepy.
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Oh, it absolutely was an homage or maybe foreshadowing. The chair was featured in the original Psycho, and Norma's skeleton was in it.
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Thanks. Yeah, couldn't remember if it was the first or the second.
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BTW, I don't recognize most of the shots in the article as being from the show, especially the one with Norma standing behind Norman during his polygraph. They look like promo shots, especially with the lighting in them.
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That's because they are promo shots, likely taken on set at the time, and likely before any post-production work was done. Hannibal's episode shots often have the same thing going on, though they've gotten better about it as this season has gone on.
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That's what I figured, Noel, thanks. Aside from the shot at the end with Norman, no similar shots to those posted were in the actual episode, and the lighting was too well set up.
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Oh, I know.
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It wasn't in any way a criticism of the article, btw.
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I think we should take a moment to appreciate how awesome Alex is, in season one he killed the creepy dude and now he's killed the other creepy dude that burned down his house, fucking small town sheriff justice for you assholes! I like how he realizes his town's corrupt up the ass and instead of trying to fix it like every other cop on tv he's just trying to manage is and keep the madness from spilling out into the streets. Even though in real life I'd rather a cop actually fix the problem for a tv show it's more original and more entertaining to do it this way and it keep him in a moral gray area instead of making him a white knight which I like. From the start I've thought that he's going to be the guy that eventually drives the final wedge between "the Norms" that makes Norman completely snap and kill the both of them which of course will lead us into the outcome from the movie.
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Carbonell often steals the show from Norma and Norman. He's soooooo good. I trust him yet I also know he's corrupt as hell. He's so interesting.
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I think so, too.
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Ok now that season 2 is over, is it worth watching if you have seen season 1? Is it better than season 1?
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No. It nearly fell apart in the last 4 episodes. episodes 3-6 were arguably better than Season 1, but S1 was just far more consistent.
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Like I said in the mid-season cram a while back, it's only 10 episodes so it's not a huge investment, but if you want to have a sense of things, watch the pilot, and then eps 6 to 10 and you should be okay.

If even that seems too much, I think you would be OKAY to watch Season 2 w/o S1, so long as you're okay with looking at some episode summaries to fill in gaps.
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Well it depends. I never saw the show as unwatchable so to me, Season 1 was already good television. Season 2 just built on what happened in S1 and definitely pushed the narrative forward.
But this is still a slow-burn drama about a unhinged woman, who's a very unstable mother and her heartbreakingly tragic but also horrifically dysfunctional relationship with her (innocently) disturbed son. So, if you want to see more of the Norma/Norman dynamic and less about kidnapped sex slaves then I'd say, yes watch Season 2. Or at least give the first 3-4 episodes a try. Like Noel said, the plot is a lot more cohesive in S2.

Plus marathoning through it will probably be a lot more satisfying then watching a week at a time.
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Vera....wow....
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About time someone started reviewing this show. I think it's the best show on Mondays.
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We did the first four episodes in Season 1, but the pageviews just weren't there to support it. I should've covered the Season 2 premiere...but I forgot it was on and ended up punting it to the FTW/WTF that week instead. But, hey, macro-level review! Woo!
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I think you guys just watch to see what shows I comment upon, and then stop reviewing them. Not that I'm paranoid or anything.
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*hides the servers TV.com has dedicated to tracking your TV and computer habits* No need to be paranoid. Nope. Just the will of the market of readers.
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That SO comforting.lol
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It was an incredible and induce with bitter suspense in it. I think we all knew that something bigger and dangerous would happen to Norman.
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