Battlestar Galactica

Season 3 Episode 7

A Measure of Salvation (2)

3
Aired Friday 10:00 PM Nov 10, 2006 on Syfy
9.1
out of 10
User Rating
681 votes
36

EPISODE REVIEWS
By TV.com Users

Episode Summary

EDIT
Apollo formulates a plan that threatens the very existence of the Cylon culture. Adama and Roslin must decide whether to follow through on the plan to use a biological weapon against the Cylons.

D'Anna Biers (Number Three) believes Baltar knows who created the virus that infected and disabled the Cylon baseship. She is willing to take extreme measures to learn the truth.moreless

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SUBMIT REVIEW
  • Helo

    9.5
    Helo made some good points but still should be accountable for his actions.
  • A Measure of Salvation

    10
    A Measure of Salvation was a superb episode of Battlestar Galactica and I really enjoyed watching because there was action, drama, intrigue, character and plot development. Some good moral questions were raised about whether or not to destroy a civilization that tried to destroy your own. The best thing about the series and this episode is all the little moments that show humanities qualities and characteristics. The search for Earth is on, and neither side will stop. I look forward to watching the next episode to see what happens!!!!!!!!!moreless
  • Helo must die

    9.2
    Really good episode and at the same time one that should have ended differently. I'll make it short...Helo should die. I wanted to kill him after this and I hope I get to see his death in episodes to come. The Sharon-character grows on me though. I have liked her since the beginning but I still like her more now and Laura Roslin is right now my absolute favorite. May she live long and keep on making the right decisions. The Gaius-segment was boring in my opinion and just felt like a filler. I am tired now and angry. Zzzzzzz. I shall dream of a world without Helo.moreless
  • Open-ended ethical and philosophical questions that make us think without giving away cheap answers.

    9.5
    One of the things I like most about BSG is its ability to be controversial. Most of the good guys have indulged in despicable behavior from time to time, and this but shows their humanity.



    Here, no one is exempt from blame. On the one hand there are those who would commit genocide. On the other is Helo, who does behave like a traitor in the truest sense of word. What the episode does (though it should've been done better) is examine the moral question of whether treason is justifiable in the face of a greater evil. Indeed some would say that the true patriots are those "traitors" who work against wrong wars, like we're seeing in our own society currently. It's very much an open question with no clear answer, and the episode does overall a good job of presenting it this way. When TV shows are mostly designed for couch potatoes to get cheap thrills and quick satisfaction, a show with more questions and fewer answers cannot but be welcome!



    What does bother me--and this has bothered me since the very beginning--is the lack of insight into the REAL philosophical question in BSG: what tells a Cylon apart from a human? Characters keep trading jabs about how "human" the Cylons are or aren't, but no real argument is ever made either way. Helo and Lee come close in this episode when Helo says the extermination of the Cylons is "a crime against humanity" and Lee responds that "they're not human: they're programmed." Well, aren't humans programmed also? Are we not also brain machines with wiring and chemical reactions? What do the Cylons have that we do not? Surely not some mechanical interface like a Borg implant from Star Trek, or else it would have been very easy to determine who is or isn't a Cylon. But then what, and what exactly *does* make them different?



    At this point, all evidence points to the conclusion that there really isn't any substantial difference between humans and Cylons, and I believe that's where the series will end up going. The whole religious deal (Gods vs. God, creation, fate, the birth of a new human-Cylon generation and "the shape of things to come") points to a rich and deep truth about the common origins of the species. Let's not forget humans are the Cylons' creators, hence, in a sense, "God." This, along with the "minority" five Cylon models of which we learn in this episode, is exactly what makes BSG the most exciting series I've ever seen.moreless
  • Open-ended ethical and philosophical questions that make us think without giving away cheap answers.

    9.0
    One of the things I like most about BSG is its ability to be controversial. Most of the good guys have indulged in despicable behavior from time to time, and this but shows their humanity.



    Here, no one is exempt from blame. On the one hand there are those who would commit genocide. On the other is Helo, who does behave like a traitor in the truest sense of word. What the episode does (though it should've been done better) is examine the moral question of whether treason is justifiable in the face of a greater evil. Indeed some would say that the true patriots are those "traitors" who work against wrong wars, like we're seeing in our own society currently. It's very much an open question with no clear answer, and the episode does overall a good job of presenting it this way. When TV shows are mostly designed for couch potatoes to get cheap thrills and quick satisfaction, a show with more questions and fewer answers cannot but be welcome!



    What does bother me--and this has bothered me since the very beginning--is the lack of insight into the REAL philosophical question in BSG: what tells a Cylon apart from a human? Characters keep trading jabs about how "human" the Cylons are or aren't, but no real argument is ever made either way. Helo and Lee come close in this episode when Helo says the extermination of the Cylons is "a crime against humanity" and Lee responds that "they're not human: they're programmed." Well, aren't humans programmed also? Are we not also brain machines with wiring and chemical reactions? What do the Cylons have that we do not? Surely not some mechanical interface like a Borg implant from Star Trek, or else it would have been very easy to determine who is or isn't a Cylon. But then what, and what exactly *does* make them different?



    At this point, all evidence points to the conclusion that there really isn't any substantial difference between humans and Cylons, and I believe that's where the series will end up going. The whole religious deal (Gods vs. God, creation, fate, the birth of a new human-Cylon generation and "the shape of things to come") points to a rich and deep truth about the common origins of the species. Let's not forget humans are the Cylons' creators, hence, in a sense, "God." This, along with the "minority" five Cylon models of which we learn in this episode, is exactly what makes BSG the most exciting series I've ever seen.moreless
Edward James Olmos

Edward James Olmos

William Adama

James Callis

James Callis

Gaius Baltar

Jamie Bamber

Jamie Bamber

Lee "Apollo" Adama

Katee Sackhoff

Katee Sackhoff

Kara "Starbuck" Thrace

Mary McDonnell

Mary McDonnell

Laura Roslin

Grace Park

Grace Park

Sharon Valerii/Sharon "Athena" Agathon

Tahmoh Penikett

Tahmoh Penikett

Karl "Helo" Agathon

Recurring Role

Lucy Lawless, MNZM

Lucy Lawless, MNZM

D'Anna Biers/Number Three

Recurring Role

Matthew Bennett

Matthew Bennett

Aaron Doral

Recurring Role

Trivia, Notes, Quotes and Allusions

FILTER BY TYPE

  • TRIVIA (0)

  • QUOTES (11)

    • Adama: Cottle's report on the virus. He thinks it was simply an accidental contamination of the beacon we abandoned on the sickbay ship.
      Roslin: Somebody sneezed on it.
      Adama: Yeah, an entire race almost wiped out because someone forgot to wipe their nose.

    • Adama: Posterity really doesn't look too kindly on genocide.
      Roslin: You're making the assumption that posterity will define this as genocide. If they do, at least there'll be someone alive to hate us for it.

    • Hot Dog: (to Racetrack) You can kiss my infected ass.
      Cottle: Well, you can kiss it, but it's not infected.

    • Roslin: That beacon was a signpost to earth.
      Adama: I think we're on the right trail, Laura.
      Roslin: Yes, we are on the right trail, Bill. (pause) So are the Cylons.

    • Athena: I made a choice to wear a uniform, to be a person.
      Helo: You were a person before you put on that uniform. OK? You were a person before I fell in love with you. You don't have to prove that.
      Athena: I have to prove it every day! Let me tell you something, Helo. My people may die. My entire race may be wiped out...but this Cylon will keep her word, even if it means she's the last Cylon left in the universe. Can a human being do that?

    • Adama: Helo's right on one thing. You start destroying entire races, even mechanical races, you're liable to tear off a piece of a man's soul.
      Roslin: The Cylons are coming to Earth. If they find us, they are coming for us. Those are the stakes. They always have been, Bill.

    • D'Anna Biers: (to Baltar) There's no such thing as coincidence. God wills the universe according to His design.

    • Baltar: I'm a scientist. And as a scientist, I believe if God exists our knowledge of him is imperfect. Why? Because the stories and myths we have are the products of men, the passage of time. The religion you practice is based on a theory, impossible to prove, yet you bestow it with absolutes like 'there is no such thing as coincidence.'
      D'Anna Biers: It's called faith.

    • Baltar: (to D'Anna) But the truth is, if we knew God's will, we'd all be gods, wouldn't we?

    • Baltar: (to Caprica Six and D'Anna Biers) I was wrong and it was a mistake and I fully admit my responsibility. It will never happen again and I hope you accept my most, uh, yeah, my most humble apology.

    • Apollo: Sharon...Athena! See what you can pick up on the computers.

  • NOTES (5)

    • Adama states that the 13th Colony left Kobol at least 3000 years ago.

    • Lymphocytic encephalitis is an actual disease caused by the Lymphocytic Choriomeningitis Virus. Encephalitis is the acute inflammation of the brain. Brain damage and death can occur as a result of the inflammation.

      As Doc Cottle stated in the episode, it is usually carried and transmitted by rodents. Unlike the Colonial survivors, humans on Earth are not immune, although infection does not result in symptoms in most healthy adults. It can, however, be deadly for persons with compromised immune systems.

    • Tahmoh Penikett (Karl "Helo" Agathon) read the "Previously on Battlestar Galactica" line at the beginning of this episode.

    • As of the beginning of this episode, there are 41,420 survivors, two fewer than at the beginning of the previous episode, "Torn."

    • This episode contained a warning about violent content and mature subject matter.

  • ALLUSIONS (0)

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