Battlestar Galactica

Season 3 Episode 7

A Measure of Salvation (2)

3
Aired Friday 10:00 PM Nov 10, 2006 on Syfy
SUBMIT REVIEW

Episode Fan Reviews (36)

9.1
out of 10
Average
683 votes
  • Helo

    9.5
    Helo made some good points but still should be accountable for his actions.
  • A Measure of Salvation

    10
    A Measure of Salvation was a superb episode of Battlestar Galactica and I really enjoyed watching because there was action, drama, intrigue, character and plot development. Some good moral questions were raised about whether or not to destroy a civilization that tried to destroy your own. The best thing about the series and this episode is all the little moments that show humanities qualities and characteristics. The search for Earth is on, and neither side will stop. I look forward to watching the next episode to see what happens!!!!!!!!!
  • Helo must die

    9.2
    Really good episode and at the same time one that should have ended differently. I'll make it short...Helo should die. I wanted to kill him after this and I hope I get to see his death in episodes to come. The Sharon-character grows on me though. I have liked her since the beginning but I still like her more now and Laura Roslin is right now my absolute favorite. May she live long and keep on making the right decisions. The Gaius-segment was boring in my opinion and just felt like a filler. I am tired now and angry. Zzzzzzz. I shall dream of a world without Helo.
  • Open-ended ethical and philosophical questions that make us think without giving away cheap answers.

    9.5
    One of the things I like most about BSG is its ability to be controversial. Most of the good guys have indulged in despicable behavior from time to time, and this but shows their humanity.

    Here, no one is exempt from blame. On the one hand there are those who would commit genocide. On the other is Helo, who does behave like a traitor in the truest sense of word. What the episode does (though it should've been done better) is examine the moral question of whether treason is justifiable in the face of a greater evil. Indeed some would say that the true patriots are those "traitors" who work against wrong wars, like we're seeing in our own society currently. It's very much an open question with no clear answer, and the episode does overall a good job of presenting it this way. When TV shows are mostly designed for couch potatoes to get cheap thrills and quick satisfaction, a show with more questions and fewer answers cannot but be welcome!

    What does bother me--and this has bothered me since the very beginning--is the lack of insight into the REAL philosophical question in BSG: what tells a Cylon apart from a human? Characters keep trading jabs about how "human" the Cylons are or aren't, but no real argument is ever made either way. Helo and Lee come close in this episode when Helo says the extermination of the Cylons is "a crime against humanity" and Lee responds that "they're not human: they're programmed." Well, aren't humans programmed also? Are we not also brain machines with wiring and chemical reactions? What do the Cylons have that we do not? Surely not some mechanical interface like a Borg implant from Star Trek, or else it would have been very easy to determine who is or isn't a Cylon. But then what, and what exactly *does* make them different?

    At this point, all evidence points to the conclusion that there really isn't any substantial difference between humans and Cylons, and I believe that's where the series will end up going. The whole religious deal (Gods vs. God, creation, fate, the birth of a new human-Cylon generation and "the shape of things to come") points to a rich and deep truth about the common origins of the species. Let's not forget humans are the Cylons' creators, hence, in a sense, "God." This, along with the "minority" five Cylon models of which we learn in this episode, is exactly what makes BSG the most exciting series I've ever seen.
  • Open-ended ethical and philosophical questions that make us think without giving away cheap answers.

    9.0
    One of the things I like most about BSG is its ability to be controversial. Most of the good guys have indulged in despicable behavior from time to time, and this but shows their humanity.

    Here, no one is exempt from blame. On the one hand there are those who would commit genocide. On the other is Helo, who does behave like a traitor in the truest sense of word. What the episode does (though it should've been done better) is examine the moral question of whether treason is justifiable in the face of a greater evil. Indeed some would say that the true patriots are those "traitors" who work against wrong wars, like we're seeing in our own society currently. It's very much an open question with no clear answer, and the episode does overall a good job of presenting it this way. When TV shows are mostly designed for couch potatoes to get cheap thrills and quick satisfaction, a show with more questions and fewer answers cannot but be welcome!

    What does bother me--and this has bothered me since the very beginning--is the lack of insight into the REAL philosophical question in BSG: what tells a Cylon apart from a human? Characters keep trading jabs about how "human" the Cylons are or aren't, but no real argument is ever made either way. Helo and Lee come close in this episode when Helo says the extermination of the Cylons is "a crime against humanity" and Lee responds that "they're not human: they're programmed." Well, aren't humans programmed also? Are we not also brain machines with wiring and chemical reactions? What do the Cylons have that we do not? Surely not some mechanical interface like a Borg implant from Star Trek, or else it would have been very easy to determine who is or isn't a Cylon. But then what, and what exactly *does* make them different?

    At this point, all evidence points to the conclusion that there really isn't any substantial difference between humans and Cylons, and I believe that's where the series will end up going. The whole religious deal (Gods vs. God, creation, fate, the birth of a new human-Cylon generation and "the shape of things to come") points to a rich and deep truth about the common origins of the species. Let's not forget humans are the Cylons' creators, hence, in a sense, "God." This, along with the "minority" five Cylon models of which we learn in this episode, is exactly what makes BSG the most exciting series I've ever seen.
  • Change to wipe out Cylons..

    9.0
    So, if not thinking of the ethical questions - they had the best change ever to get rid of Cylons, end their problems but no - they ended up over dilemma is it right or wrong and that shows nothing is so black and white and easy as first look. We thought get rid of Cylon is their goal but no - it's surviving as human and that's hard but they have a way, an idea I think at least now.

    So, most of the episode we get some deep thought serious talk about ethics and to be honest, after those two episodes where most of the concentration was screwed up lives of people on board Galactica, this was refreshing and showing the other side of the show what we do like.. and in my case - even more than the other part.

    So great episode.. great developments.
  • Morality with a few spaceships and great action sequences.

    9.0
    While this is a two part episode it feels more like a single story. The great debate on who is really higher on the morality side. Is an eye for an eye really necessary? Does the destruction of the twelve colonies justify the eradication of all Cylon life? This is the main story line of this episode. Where does one draw the line on what is moral or not? What makes humans different from cylons. The way Lee Adama just started laughing to himself about how to rid the Cylon problem is touching. With all that has happened to them, they are now condition to hate the Cylons. We also get to see the other side of the argument with Helo's points of view, especially that he is currently first officer of Galactica.
  • While the episode had really good scenes it had even more logical mistakes.

    5.0
    I will just list all inconsistency that were apparent to me:

    1. They are entering the cylon ship and actually have no clue what happened there, so what do they do??? Walk without a freaking space suit around. I mean common I'm sure there is some kind of security protocol when entering an apparently abandoned ship. And even if not once you see all the dead bodies lying around any sane person would try to get of this ship as fast as possible especially if you don't know what happened there. How do you know it won't kill yourself. After all the cylons are very humanlike.

    2. The Cylons are threatening the survival of mankind and the probably destruction of earth. They are hunting the last ships creating an atmosphere of constant fear hatred and stress. So finally they get the chance to get rid of the cylons for good and what do they do.....start arguing if it's morally right. By all means but the cylons hunt them without a break they are constantly fighting against them and for their survival. NO human in their right mind would think a minute if it's morally right to kill all cylons!!

    2.When they jumped to the cylon route to execute their prisoners they don't have their execution teame on standby in the cell. They know the cylons are way stronger than the battlestar so what I would want is not to be engaged in a fight with them. So as soon as a ressurection ship would be close I would tell them to shoot and not to finally WALK to the cell.

    3. Halo apparently gets out of it without consecquences?! The cylons could have been killed once and for all and because of him the whole plan failed and the survivors have to keep running and not only that but they are also on their way to earth now. It's treason in my opionion and he gets off the hook without punisment!!!
  • Great well-planned episode.

    9.2
    What a great plot line, even if it did not go off as planned. As Roslin made the final order to Adama to execute plans that would finally genocide the Cylons, deep in my heart I knew that this would be to soon to accomplish that feat. The show is not that close to ending yet. Plus with the way Helo was acting I knew that he would do something to sabotage their plans. Even Adama did not feel comfortable with the whole idea. I believe that Adama did understand where Helo was coming from. Humans created Cylons, so there might be another way to solve the problem and not have to exterminate them. Only an idea everyone. There are so many story lines that are yet to follow thru. I know that Helo and Sharon have a surprise ahead of them, that's for sure. Right now the show has been based upon finding Earth or a new Earth and surviving against the Cylons. I believe the search is on its way and no telling what the future holds.
  • C'mon Helo and Adama!! Great episode but these people are fracking idiots.

    9.2
    You know-if Helo and Adama would have second thoughts about ending the Cylon race, then why the hell are they in the fleet and on the Galactica who's mission is JUST that. Everytime the fleet comes into contact with the Cylons, the objective is to kill as many as possible. So why now do they second guess if they have an opportunity to do, in a fraction of the time, what they eventually strive to do anyway. There is no plan to live side by side and all we have every heard from ANYONE in the fleet is hatred for the Cylon's. Even Helo himself wanted to shoot Sharon when he found out she was a Cylon. But after running around Caprica with her and seeing her in her tight pants and finally getting him some, he has a complete different perspective. Yeah, right. He's and idiot. Starbuck told him on Caprica. "They fracked with you! They have a way of making us ALL look like idiots!" and she was right. Helo just got played! He doesn't get it! They set him up to have a half-Cylon baby. That was the plan. That's why when, on Caprica, Sharon left Helo and briefly met up with her Cylon compadres, and reported that she's getting him to love her. So, he is, like a true IDIOT, falling for their plan. Whether Sharon truly loves him now or not is irrelevant, it was still all based on a lie and a setup. So now, this clown is fighting the enemy and lobbying for the enemy at the same time. I used to like Helo's character, but he's a bit of an idiot. I mean, Cylon's are supposed to be the enemy. No one FORCED him to get one knocked up and fall in love with her. And no one FORCED Sharon to betray her people. To me she is just a POW fighting for her own survival. Even though I like her character, she is ALSO, the enemy. If they captured someone from Al Qaeda after 9-11 who was directly involved in the attacks and THAT terrorist made a deal to help the Government stop another attack, would you then consider that person the enemy? Of course! Because he did it in order to stay alive. But it still doesn't just wipe the slate clean. They should have just disallowed Helo to continue his relationship with Sharon(she IS a Cylon,I mean, what if she gets pregnant again? Another half-breed? How about 5? Ridiculous! They need to put an end to that NOW), then gave Sharon a deal to let her live with her baby aboard galactica so she could have SOME kind of existance, and in return for this humane treatment, she helps the Galactica in the war. But still on a POW status. They don't need pilots THAT bad as to purposely let a Cylon in the fleet on official status. Besides, as far as they know, the Cylons did SOMETHING to Sharon and she ended up putting two into the Captain already! How do they even know what that was and if and when it could ever happen again? I say THEY because while it was solely Adama's call, no one has forcefully objected to the matter. Not even the other pilots. Not really anyway, I mean, I wouldn't wanna be flying around with that thing and not knowing when or if she's gonna flip. I mean, how do they know that she is not just strategically placed by the Cylons in case of an extreme emergency or for a contingency plan of some sort? How naive of these veterans. After that rescue mission, she should have taken off that uniform and went back to the brig! Are you kidding me? But however I may disagree with the direction Adama and the decision-makers are taking, I would, in no way, let this reflect my rating because we are not the writers and so if their characters appear to be idiots in some ways, that's just the way they are written so we must accept this as the story they are telling. So-Still great episode- but the lack of intelligence of the Fleet is at times astounding.
  • anyone notice??

    9.0
    dont know if anyone else noticed (Im sure someone must of!), but did u notice that the "buoy" that the Cylons got the disease from was from an origional Star Trek episode. that thing on the Cylon base ship's floor, was that "robot" thing that thought Kirk was its creator!
  • Excellent.

    10
    Apollo figures out a way of wiping out the cylons for good. Adama and Roslin debates about the issue and they conclude that the plan must be executed for the sake of humanity. Helo deals with the prospect of the humans committing genocide in order to save themselves. Number 3 suspects that Baltar has something to do with the virus that infected and disabled the cylon baseship. Baltar seeks help from his number six imaginary friend. This episode deals with the use of genocide as a tool of war, but in this show we get to play with that issue as a narrative plot, it works well with the show.
  • Helo: "You can rationalize it any way you want. We do this; we wipe out their race. Then we're no different then they are."

    8.5
    If you were presented with the opportunity to completely annihilate a race that has caused chaos, destruction, and death unto yours, would you take it?

    A big part of me agrees with Roslin. The Cylons started the war. They are the ones who killed billions of human beings, and ever since the destruction of the colonies they have been hell-bent on wiping out the last survivors of the human race. A piece of me does understand Helo's arguments, though, as well. Genocide is genocide. No matter whom it is against. Like Adama said in the pilot episode, human beings need to be worthy of survival. But one has to wonder as well, what have the Cylons done to warrant their right to live?

    This was a big character-defining episode for Helo. He took an adamant stance against President Roslin and Admiral Adama and deliberately disobeyed their orders to save the Cylon race. Does that make Helo a traitor? What if the Cylons kill more human beings in the future; hundreds or maybe thousands? How will Helo feel then? Will he still feel so positive that his choice was right?

    Gaius really isn't having a good time on the Cylon ship; what, with receiving severe torture and all. Six appeared severely distressed while Gaius was being tortured by D'Anna, so I'm assuming Six still loves him. I don't think that Gaius will be returning the love any time soon, though, after all the pain Six has been putting him through. During the torture, Gaius was shouting, "I believe in you" and "I love you" at his Imaginary Six. D'Anna appeared strangely affected by his exclamations. Did she think they were directed at her? Do I smell a little ménage a trios developing?

    Final Notes and Quotes

    - Survivor Count: 41, 420.

    - There was a parental warning for this episode.

    - I noticed Starbuck back in the cockpit for a short scene.

    - I have to wonder if Helo would still feel the need to defend the Cylons if he didn't have his Cylon sweetie waiting for him at the end of the day.

    - Again, with the Cylon miracle cures, as Athena's baby ended up saving her life. Athena referred to her child in the past tense this episode. Did she not believe D'Anna a few weeks ago when she said her baby was alive?

    - I agreed with many of Helo's arguments, but when he defended the Cylons occupation on New Caprica, saying the Cylons were trying to live corporately with humans, that was crossing the line IMO. Torture and executions are not what I would call living side by side.

    - Imaginary Six said that Cylons can interpret any sensation as they like. She revealed this right as she was helping Gaius transfer his pain into pleasure. Again with the clues that Gaius could be a Cylon.

    - Roslin: "They struck first in this war, and not being content with the annihilation of billions of human beings they perused us relentlessly through the galaxies; determined to wipe us out."

    - Helo: "They'll be coming for me. You or me. Seems like they're always coming for one of us."

    - Adama: "Helo's right on one thing. You start destroying entire races, even mechanical races, and you're liable to tear off a piece of a man's soul."

    - Athena: "My people may die. My entire race may be wiped out, but this Cylon will keep her word. Even if it means she's the last Cylon left in the universe. Can a human being do that?"

    Final Rating: This was a great, thought-provoking episode. BSG is having a fantastic third season so far, and I am extremely excited for next week when Carl Lumbly (Dixon, Alias) guest stars. 3 out of 4 stars.

    - Tim Bronx
  • The Path to Earth Continues..

    9.0
    There seem to have been quite a few negative reviews about this episode but I thought that it was a really good ending to Torn. The episode referred to many events in the present day, most noticibly the debate about genocide and religion.

    I thought that this story really was driven by the characters. Firstly I thought that Helo really did show another side to him as he was the one who closed the air vents and killed the cylons before they could be resurected. It was good to see that he took action in what he believed, as he disagreed with the genocide of another race, even though they were cylons. Grace Park was also great in this episode. Athenas moments with Helo were terrific as you felt that they really did care for one another and the moment when she found out what the humans were going to do with the other cylons was priceless. It sent chills down by back.

    Even though it was short, I really enjoyed the relationship between Number 3, Baltar and his inner six. You really got the feeling that 3 was starting to realise what Caprica 6 had said on New Caprica about love. Baltars questioning of 3's faith was also compelling while he was being tortured as it referred back to the athiest christian debate in present time.

    Roslin and Adama also continued down their path of retribution from the events of their skirmish in season 2. I do not know when but I hope that they will start to act on their mutural attraction. I thought that the last scene between the two was great especially when Adama made the reference about a single sneeze 4000 years ago could have caused the destruction of an entire race.

    Overall, even though the episode was a bit slow in some places and it missed Tigh, I thought that the themes shown and the character development made it a worthy episode to watch indeed.
  • I agree with others you that this one left some annoying plot holes, and what some have hinted at, that it loses the momentum the show has kept up so well to this point.

    6.0
    What Im surprised no one seemed to comment on is the WHY behind Adamas _close[ing] the book on this one_ in reference to the plan failure/treasonous action by Helo. I happen to be among the few who think genocide is the appropriate term for trying to infect the resurrection ship, and that it was a topic worthy of dialogue before acting on. But Helos action was just outright bizarre: physically improbable, in terms of how a starships HVAC system would be designed, not to mention around a high security holding cell; and psychologically unlikely, given that what he did disobeyed his life experience of military command structure, flew in the face of the origin of his motive (Sharon herself having come-to-terms with it), and especially that what he was doing was technically a multiple homicide.

    Which brings us back to Adama and Rosalyn at the tail end of the show. Sure, its water under the bridge, but thereve been so many occasions when such insubordination sent other key players way the heck up the creek (and it was a while before they got chance for a paddle/respect from Adama again). Did I miss something? And as some of you noted, the resurrection ship couldve been infected without causing the complete anihilation of the cylons (and the end of the tv series). Either cylons couldve found a cure with baby half-n-half blood, or only a portion of the cylon fleet couldve been lost, with those remaining having to scamper away until they could rebuild their regeneration capacity. Im perplexed and have to wonder if the production lost a head writer. Hopefully s/he will be back, or they can bring in some high school kids with enough time to sew up gaping plot holes.
  • A Cylon basestar is crippled from an unknown disease. Lee feels like this is humanity's oppurtunity to rid the universe of the Cylon menace.

    8.6
    This entire season has been incredible so far. The end of season 2 left something to be desired as well as a hole that seemed unfillable, until season 3 remedied that situation. This episode was a great installment to the series, but next to the epic proportions of the human exodus from New Caprica, this seems predictable and frankly not very thrilling to boot. The saving grace of it, as is more than a few episodes of this show, is the handling of the subject matter, which in this case was genocide. The writers force you to breathe in the social critiques and allegories of your own life and the world you live in, which helps to keep this show imminent and more of a history always repeating itself story than a star [insert noun] scifi drama.
  • Because sometimes one mature content warning just isn't enough

    8.3
    I think the writing staff at Battlestar Galactica has been infiltrated by philosophy grad students. Plot and action have been put on the back burner, and lengthy discussions about ethics have taken their place. Not that I mind, of course, but somehow the debate left me wanting a little bit. It felt as if some of the characters were taking contrary positions just for the sake of debate rather than as an actual representation of their beliefs. In "Collaborators," for example, a large number of characters took as many different stances on the issue at hand, and I felt that every one of them really meant it. Not so here. But don't take that to mean that the debate wasn't fascinating. It's nice to see that even after being driven to the brink of extinction, the human race can stop to consider whether reciprocation is justified.

    Speaking of which, how did Helo not find himself in the brig, or on the wrong side of an airlock at the end of this episode? Putting a gun to Tigh's head and running off with a Raider are both irresponsible actions, but sabotaging a plan to destroy humanity's deadliest (and, apparently, only) enemy? That's high treason, is what that is. Seems you can get away with murder on the Galactica these days.
  • Seems they ran out of time and just ended it. Sloppy writing.

    6.5
    IMO, this has been the weakest episode this season. This third season has been my favorite so far, but I was really disappointed with this one.

    Like has been said in other reviews, there are many holes in the plot. A human virus able to move through a digital wireless download of the consciousness of a cylon???? Come on--even for scifi, that is too hard to swallow!

    But there were also some facts passed quickly over that would have been interesting to explore. For instance, one of the Cylons decided to tell-all to the humans just to save his skin. That is very similar to what Baltar is doing. Would\'t some kind of parallel between those two decisions be interesting to explore? Doesn\'t that make the Cylons seem much more human, more vulnerable?

    To me, it seemed that they ran out of time on this one. It\'s like they got toward the end, realized that they only had X amount of minutes left of air time and decided to just end it. It just felt wrong when it ended. I sure hope they get back in the swing of things soon. This is my favorite show!
  • Hum...I saw the synopsis for this episode before I watched it, and anticipated it would be a cracker. But it didn't hit the spot.

    8.1
    Torn, the previous episode was perfect, a multifaceted plot with a seemingly endless series of revelations and twists. 'Salvation though seemed one-dimensional in comparison to Torn's screenplay. If anything 'Salvation was linear - plot event A was followed by B was followed by C...There were no opportunities for the viewer to figure anything out, no revelation. The question over whether the use of a genocidal biological weapon could be condoned was briefly discussed, but with none of the cutting-edge dialog that BSG is superb at.

    And some of the gaps in the plot were just too big. Agathon conveniently kills the Cylon prisoners (who are again conveniently unguarded, and not even video-monitored) by disconnecting a Scotch-lock. And why didn't the Cylons just blast the infected base ship rather than leave it adrift? Where was Adama's response to Agathons actions? Presumerably he agreed with them, but how do we know? And wasn't Agathon, as Executive Officer, supposed to be in CIC during the incursion into Cylon territory? We could have had more from Doctor Cottle (isn't it time Donnelly Rhodes was given a decent bit of script?)

    Too many glaring holes, all of which could have been glossed-over with a compelling script. It could have been great, but instead it was mediocre.

    This was the first time I've ever thought I could write a better screenplay than the one filmed for a BSG episode (and I've never successfully sold a screenplay). The "Final Cut" for Season Three.
  • "we'll be no better than they are"

    9.1
    i cannot tell u how many times i have read that in a comic book when the "good guys" r thinking of doing the same thing the "bad guys" have done. guess, what? this is not a comic book. this is a tv show where during the resistance they have resorted 2 suicide bombings, biological warfare is not such a strech. besides, this is a war 4 the very survival of the human race. this kind of discussion should have been longer during the show. it would not have been genocide anyway as the cylons could always b re-built. the baltar scenes on the baseship were exceptional & head-6 helping him through the torture was genius. this dark & sick relationship is 1 of the reasons y this show is great. the fact that the school-teacher president authorized the genocide is great because she was doing what was necessary 2 protect her people. helo being a traitor was also realistic as we've seen with tigh's wife. all things that u wouldn't expect from a regular tv show but u would in the real world. i wonder if baltar actually skeets in the real world when he does while he's projecting?
  • A high score for Baltar, He and Six never disapoint.

    8.0
    Isn't the "moral" question kind of moot anyway? Since there is a Cylon home world out there. They might infect a fleet or two but it's not genocide... whats with all the hesitation with defending oneself or making tactical offensives against ones enemy? I hate Helo
                                                                                                                                                                                                                       
  • A good enough episode, but full of holes

    7.0
    Coming on the heels of a relatively controversial episode, this installment focuses squarely on the viral infection of the Cylons and the moral consequences of using it against the enemy. There’s also more than a little torture and manipulation along the way. The result is a fairly strong episode that continues to turn the season arc in a more complicated direction.

    The least effective element of the episode is the description and execution of the virus afflicting the Cylons. Making it a biological virus is an interesting touch, because it reveals that the Cylons are at least partially biological and that the biology is sufficiently close to human biology for a contagion designed to affect humans to affect the Cylons. (This also helps explain how Helo and Sharon were biologically capable.)

    At the same time, the idea of a virus replicating itself through the resurrection process is hard to swallow. How does a human-based virus mutate into something that has a data-based component? It’s far more likely that the Cylons are assuming that the virus could kill them all, and the Colonials just run with the ball. After all, they assume that the infection of one resurrection ship will somehow equate with the infection of the entire Cylon race, when there’s no reason to assume that at all.

    The sum total of all those assumptions, however, is a compelling moral dilemma. Should the Colonials employ a genocidal biological weapon against the Cylons, even given the fact that they are fighting for their own survival? As Sharon/Athena put it in “Resurrection Ship: Part II”, would the human race be worthy of survival if they were to make that choice? Roslin’s decision is perfectly in keeping with her previous characterization, and it’s interesting to see how Adama’s mindset has shifted, largely because of his relationship to Athena.

    Baltar’s place among the Cylon will likely shift now, because he brings a new and frightening perspective to their faith. At least, that’s how it appears by the end of the torture session. Will Baltar become some kind of prophet among the Cylon? As machines, the Cylons could be searching for the true meaning of faith, and Baltar could end up becoming something of a teacher, despite his flaws. Considering how this would bring Baltar into a position not unlike his role in the original series, it would be an intriguing turn of events.

    Overall, there are still a number of questions to be answered about the Cylons and their nature, and Baltar’s presence on the Basestar is the logical means of exploring that ground. However, these two most recent episodes have introduced some seemingly contradictory elements that need better resolution, especially in terms of this new search for Earth and the five unseen models.

    (As a sidenote: I also have a podcast associated with my various reviews called “Dispatches from Tuzenor”. Current episodes cover “Battlestar: Galactica”, so it might be something of interest. Go to http://entil2001.libsyn.com if you want to listen!)
  • Another solid installment

    9.5
    If you were presented with the option to completely wipe you an enemy that was, for all intents and purposes hell-bent upon your destruction and/or extermination would you do it? Could you do it? That's a question that's been asked by two shows Ron Moore has worked on--first Star Trek: The Next Generation and now Battlestar Galactica. If you'll remember, back in season five of TNG, the Enteprise stumbled across a lone Borg, cut off from the collective. He's taken on board the ship and slowly begins to regain his individual identity. The only problem is--the crew comes up with a computer virus that could be implanted in Hugh. Send him back to the Borg, have it uploaded to their collective consiousness and the universe is free of the Borg. The question becomes though--as Hugh slowly begins to exhibit a personality and an individual identity, does the crew have the right to do this to an enemy that up to this point had been pretty much all about destroying the way of life of the Federation. The answer there was Picard defied orders and sent Hugh back, hoping that the Borg would catch some of his breaking away from the collective and that would lead a revolution. And while it's certainly in keeping with Star Trek's much more hopeful view of humanity, close to ten years after it first aired, I'm still not sure it was the right choice. (Esp. in light of how the Borg changed after all this happened, losing a lot of their terror and appeal). But now we've got Battlestar Galactica, essentially asking the same question. Only this time, it goes a bit deeper. Instead of one episode to get to know a member of the enemy who has broken away, we've had two and a half years to meet, know and maybe even like Sharon. Yes, she'd survive the virus being sent to the Cylons, but as we hear Helo's impassioned speech as to why the Cylons should be spared, it's hard to disagree with him on some levels. At what point do we give up "part of our soul" to win the war? And would the ends justify the means?

    And while you can argue that Galactica's choice was made that much more compelling because it would use a biological weapon, I still see it being the same choice Picard had to make. And while TNG didn't really delve as deeply into the repreccusions of what Picard choose, I think Galactica will. Helo certainly seems to think that as he stands in his quarters, ready to submit to the police squad he knows must be coming. He may not get arrested for what he did and there may be no concrete way to prove it, but could this come back to haunt him and the fleet? This being BSG, I think it will. Whether it's Adama stripping him of some command authority or promoting somoene like Tigh over him, I'm not yet sure.

    But it will make for compelling, interesting television.

    I did like there were no easy answers to this question. I suppose you could argue the ending was a bit of the no harm, no foul way out, but it rang a lot more true than the miracle cure for Laura's cancer early last year. I am guessing there is little the Cylon-hybrid's blood can't do at this point, though it might be interesting to see a storyline where Sharon could have her blood used to save someone and refuses (ala "The Enemy" from TNG's season three). Or to see it somehow fall short. I got this profound sense of relief on the part of everyone involved that while they knew they had to possibly commit genocide of the Cylons that it hadn't worked. While it may be the right thing, I wonder how that decision might have haunted Roslin had it come to pass and gone the way originally planned.

    Meanwhile, over on the basestar, things are starting to go badly for Baltar. He's allowed to live but at what price? And I've got to wonder--can this man talk his way out of anything? He seems to find just the right way to get inside the skin of those he needs to manipulate to save himself every time. I wonder if at some point D'Ana will try to create a relationship with him like Caprica Six seems to be spurning and what might do to the Fantasy Six inside his head. And I loved how Fantasy Six helped Baltar turn pain into pleasure. On how many levels is that relationship just dark, twisted and totally watchable? (And not just because of nearly nekkid Six, though that does help).
  • Ok, it dealt with serious issues, but it did it in such a pedantic and unoriginal way that nothing in that episode was surprising or enlightening.

    8.1
    This episode presents what could be an interesting moral dilemma: Do we use the virus to destroy our enemies as they once almost destroyed us? But the writers just drop the ball on what could be an interesting idea and make it into one of the more uninspiring episodes of the series.

    Mistake #1: In the first half of the episode, the humans slowly find out what we already knew from last episode: that the virus is not infectious to humans and that it was on the beacon that the basestar picked up. A tv show, especially one like BSG that prides itself on not dumbing itself down, shouldn't be sitting around explaining to the viewers what they already know.

    Mistake #2: What little new information was revealed in the episode was not really interesting or surprising. The plot was not progressing in this episode; it was merely a uninspired extension from the previous episode. Given the setup, any viewer of the show could have told you how it would have ended. When given a chance to destroy humanity, Roslin would definitely take that chance. We know she had been ruthless before and this would be no exception. We know also, however, that the Cylons will not be killed. We wouldn't really have a series left if they did! So what's going to stop her? Helo and/or Athena would be the obvious answer. Even the subplot with Baltar revealed nothing new and was merely a continuation of the results of the previous episode. Baltar lied, so now he's being tortured to find out if he was behind the virus.

    Conclusion: It was still good, but I've come to expect more from BSG, especially since the other episodes so far this season have been phenomenal. Don't be a Fat Apollo, writers, and get yourselves back into shape!
  • Galactica discovers the virus that is devastating the Cylons and Roslin and Adama consider using it to wipe out their enemy. Meanwhile, the Cylons suspect Baltar has betrayed them.

    10
    This episode, probably more than any episode I have ever seen of Battlestar Galactica, has made me think, made me question, and made me unsure of how I feel. The questions raised in this episode are numerous and few have easy answers (depending on whose opinion you believe.) With their very survival at stake, should humanity use the virus on the Cylons and turn to genocide in the process? Would wiping out the Cylons truly be genocide? As their creators, do we have the right to be the Cylons' executioners as well? Did Helo do the right thing? Did Roslin? Was Adama's decision to put things behind them a good one? Will Baltar ever have the chance to return to Galactica now? Will he want to? It is the signature of a great series that can both tell a compelling story and comment on our condition. It was stories like this that made classics like the Twilight Zone and Star Trek so revolutionary, dazzling us, scaring us, making us examine ourselves. If this episode does nothing else, if its story is dull or "filler", it has at least done that. If Moore and Eick can continue to produce stories and ideas of this caliber, then it is a true shame that the audience wanes, and it will be a greater shame if the series is eventually ended before it has its time to complete.
  • What the hell? Its wrong to kill cylons? how about its wrong to kill nazis Or terrorists or serial killers lets roll out the welcome matt for child molesters too and toast to the end of civilisation

    6.1
    Wow a great moral choice
    is made
    rather than kill thier enemies
    they decide to take the high ground
    and let the super powerful genocidal
    enemies live.
    Aww shucks i just cant stay mad at those cute little toasters

    Not only does Helo kill the skin jobs
    but he also lets galactica jump into hostile teritory and start a fire fight with a cylon fleet
    Hes not just moralising coward hes a reckless traitor Adama lets him away with it at the end
    why ?because the choice is between him and Tigh for xo
    he should have put a bullet in his head and in his colon
    Helo you total and complete and utter tool
  • Im a little torn on this episode...

    7.5
    Why they feel the need to wrestle with their conscience with wiping out a race of machines that completely annihilated humans across 12 planets. "Oh gee... we're going to wipe out their 'race'.. boo hoo"

    Sorry, I don't think I would have an issue wiping out a race of artificial intelligence robotic people that decided to nuke all humans, then force them to coexist in some weird experiment, because their 'god' told them to.

    It's still a good episode, and an excellent series, which is why I didn't give it a bad rating. I love the entire show and can't wait for more.

    Baltar bothers me however. He feel guilty about things he has done, which brought about consequences for humans, but will still betray them at every corner to save his own skin. What a p*ssy.
  • Unrealistic portrayal of human nature. In all of human history, humans always respond to attack by doing worse to their enemies than was done to them. My favorite series takes another dip.

    4.0
    While BSG used to be serial where events followed on. Now it seems largely about packaging episodes that quickly resolve into irrelevance. Could be genocide for the cyclons, is quickly reduced to nothing.

    BSG has to maintain some sense of reality and it is not doing a realistic job here. Only is some alternate reality fantasy land would there even be some debate about whether or not to wipe out the cyclon who by any assessment have committed genocide on the human race and is just trying to mop up the few survivors. There should be, and there would be no debate. This farce ruined this episode for me.

    While extreme pacifists living coddled lives who have never had to defend themselves might bring this up. It would not occur in a world where humanity was on the brink of complete annihilation. This would essentially be like if aliens had bombed the earth and destroyed all life on the planet. Would a few survivors in orbit, if given the opportunity wipe out the aliens. Without hesitation IMO. Look at any conflict in human history and the single over-riding constant is that any attack always reap retaliation that is greater than the initial attack if they are able. Failure to do so doesn't line up with human nature.

    Throw in the fact that after the main genocide the Cylons are still hunting an almost insignificant number of survivors to complete the extinction. I can't buy this for a second. If these characters don't posses basic human nature, my interest in the show declines.
  • One of the best episodes this show has provided for a very long time.

    9.8
    This is the first episode in this season that remindes me of the qualityepisodes in the first season. It was fantastic. I was very plased by President Roslin and Admiral Adamas desition to use the infected Cylons to vipe out the entire Cylon population. When Helo decided to destroy their plans I started hating him a little bit, and most likely I will dislike him whatever he does from now on. I would glady flush him out the airlock for what he did against humaity. What he did will probarbly result in the deaths of a lot of innocent people.
    But by removing all Cylons the entire show could face a death sooner than wished by any of it's fans. Unless the writers decided to make another Startrek Voyager with new kind of species and planets everywhere. I don't think that would make anyone particularly pleased.
  • For me this was an exceptional episode. Perhaps too frightening due to the extreme violence but truthful and in place with the long road ahead and how to deal with the enemy.

    10
    War brings much pain and agony, decisions which might not be the right ones, hindsight to enemy intent, a new purpose. A resolution, a plan, a new beginning but for whom. Cylon or human? This is the setup now humans know the Cylons weakness and the Cylons know where the humans are headed. Who will reach there first and at what cost? You can't help but continue to watch.
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