Battlestar Galactica

Season 3 Episode 16

Dirty Hands

3
Aired Friday 10:00 PM Feb 25, 2007 on Syfy
8.1
out of 10
User Rating
669 votes
44

EPISODE REVIEWS
By TV.com Users

Episode Summary

EDIT
Amid a heated labor dispute, Tyrol asks the imprisoned Baltar for advice. Seelix becomes involved after she is turned down for flight training.

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SUBMIT REVIEW
  • Agenda episode

    1.5
    Ugh. This is such a lame episode. It is like the producers were paid by the unions to make this garbage. We get it, everyone works hard.
  • Losing Interest Fast!

    1.0
    A "look at the working class of the fleet" ??? What the heck does that have to do with science fiction? We don't get enough of Hollywood's politics crammed down our throats everyday, they need another venue? I agree with the other person who said the writers have run out of material. This gets less interesting with each new episode. Don't think so, just look at the week by week ratings here. It's definitely swirling the bowl.moreless
  • Dirty Hands

    10
    Dirty Hands was an amazing look at the background characters who keep the Colonial Fleet running and operational by undertaking the "dirty work". It was interesting to see that Gaius had been able to influence people with his book and how things really did appear to be going the way he claimed. This was a perfect story to focus on Tyrol and he was very impressive in his ability to manage and communicate. It would be scary to be a young and put in a situation with out a choice and forced to do a job you would never consider and then have a terrible accident. In the end Tyrol and the President talk about solutions and come to terms, wrapping things up nicely. I look forward to watching the next episode!!!!!!!!!moreless
  • A show about labor relations.

    8.1
    I thought that this episode was very good. It shows what happens in a society that is on the run and needs to have vital needs met but the conditions under which the goods are produced are just horrific. In this episode we see that Tyrol was at first very pro Message from the president and the admiral. When he sees that the conditions are just deplorable and that if the people have no hope of ever rising above their station then people start to loose all hope their children having a better life than they had. If you don't have any hope then you don't care what you do since you don't care what happens to you.moreless
  • I would like the so-called fans who toss around the word "Filler" like it's candy to read this one.

    10
    I have tried, really..I have struggled to maintain an "everybody has a right to an opinion" attitude toward fans who have been calling the majority of third season episodes fillers. But some reactions to this episode take the cake. This series, people..for those who have not been paying attention for the..mmm..what is it now ...almost five years since the mini-series aired...is NOT a sci-fi show. I'll say that again..IT IS NOT A SCI-FI SHOW! Can ya hear me now? Good. It is , as Ron Moore pointed out before the min-series even aired, (and that's a year BEFORE the mini-series, so that's actually six years, for whoever's counting) is a DRAMA, that happens to take place in a sci-fi universe. That means it's about people first. It's not about the scenerios cloaked in the action, suspense, tragedies, special effects, etc..it's about how those events effect the people, the characters, that we have grown to love. Every time one of these episodes comes around which do not deal with Cylons, traps, attacks, or the suspenseful plots, twists and turns which this series so well presents, then it is automatically crap, right? These reviews seem to be posted by people with the attention span of a sound bite, and a scope of intelligence just as vast. In the last episode, it was stated that it had been just under 50 days since the Cylons had last been seen. So we've been taking a refreshing look at the people in the fleet too seldom seen. The little people, the people who in fact are the life-blood of the fleet. The people without whom, the fleet could not survive. It's one of the things I love about this show, and frankly, what separates it, and distinguishes it from the rest of the sci-fi drek which numbs itself under the guise of a lot of tech. We were given a glimpse of the underbelly of the fleet. It showed, in-your-face style, things that are seriously wrong with the society, and need fixing, badly. If society ignores these issues, than what are we staying alive for, fighting for, and indeed..dying for? It was also a shining moment for Tyrol. One of the biggest challenges for all the people in the fleet, is to find a way to keep their sanity and humanity, sometimes scratching and clawing to keep it, in the face of madness, and a constant shadow of death and destruction. As Agathon demonstrated in "The Woman King", (another episode designated as filler by so many), Tyrol demonstrated that, in a culture that has lost almost everything, sometimes the most important thing, and indeed, maybe the only important thing we have left, is who we are, what we believe in. What is right, and what is wrong. This, my friends and fellow fans is at the very core of the show. It doesn't matter if it's Cylons, or dogfights, or personal conflicts, or labor disputes. It's about hanging on to, and fighting for, what you believe in. That's what Tyrol did. And it brought a hell of a drama to the episode. This was a well acted, very dramatic and , yes, very suspenseful episode. Those of you looking for the same plotlines, twists and turns, action etc., every single episode are unrealistic and silly. This is the most human type of story. And now that we've spent the last small handful of them dealing with this type of human exploration, we can look forward for the thrills and chills to resume. And indeed, we can appreciate them that much more.moreless
Katee Sackhoff

Katee Sackhoff

Kara "Starbuck" Thrace

Edward James Olmos

Edward James Olmos

William Adama

Mary McDonnell

Mary McDonnell

Laura Roslin

James Callis

James Callis

Gaius Baltar

Jamie Bamber

Jamie Bamber

Lee "Apollo" Adama

Grace Park

Grace Park

Sharon Valerii/Sharon "Athena" Agathon

Samuel Patrick Chu

Samuel Patrick Chu

Milo

Guest Star

Samantha Ferris

Samantha Ferris

Pollux

Guest Star

David Patrick Green

David Patrick Green

Xeno Fenner

Guest Star

Aaron Douglas

Aaron Douglas

Galen Tyrol

Recurring Role

Don Thompson

Don Thompson

Anthony Figurski

Recurring Role

Nicki Clyne

Nicki Clyne

Cally Henderson Tyrol

Recurring Role

Trivia, Notes, Quotes and Allusions

FILTER BY TYPE

  • TRIVIA (5)

    • After a Raptor crashes into Colonial One, President Roslin relocates her office to an undamaged part of the ship. She says to Adama that she will have to stay there for "God knows how long" rather than "Gods know how long."

    • According to Ronald Moore, this episode was originally going to focus on Lt. Dualla ("Dee") and the continuation of the Sagittaron story from "The Woman King" episode.

    • When Baltar takes the book notes from his underwear, he's still wearing his pants. But a moment later, he is seen wearing only his underwear.

    • Aerelon seems to have an accent that very closely resembles the dialect of the people of Yorkshire (northern England).

    • Caprica, Tauron and Picon are described as being affluent and desirable colonies before the initial Cylon attack. Aerelon, Sagittaron and Gemenon were considered to be somewhat backward. Their members faced disdain and discrimination from members of other colonies.

  • QUOTES (15)

    • Tyrol: You do important work down here, just as important as sittin' in a cockpit.
      Seelix: Thanks, Chief. I'm gonna... deliver some more important laundry.

    • Tyrol: (discussing Fenner's arrest over the telephone) He seemed like a good guy. What'd he do?
      Adama: Pissed off the president.

    • Tyrol: (to Roslin) There are a lot of dirty jobs that need to be done every day in this fleet. Cleaning, hauling, low-level maintenance, things like that. These are the kind of jobs that I think should be allocated to people... well, people like yourself, no offense.

    • Roslin: Chief, the workers in this fleet, they need someone to represent them in their interests. And if this society is becoming truly polarized between an entrenched political class and a disenfranchised underclass we are doomed. We won't need the Cylons to destroy us, we'll destroy ourselves. The fleet that arrives at Earth will not represent Colonial society at all. I am willing to fight for that society until my dying breath. I would love it if you would fight for that society as well.

    • Adama: I'm gonna put her up against a bulkhead and I'm gonna shoot her as a mutineer.
      Tyrol: Are you out of your frakking mind? Cally was just following my orders.
      Adama: She's a ringleader, so she goes first. And then the rest of your deck gang. Figurski, Seelix, Pollux.
      Tyrol: You won't do this. We have a son.
      Adama: Understand me. The very survival of this ship may depend on someone getting an order that they don't want to do. And if they hesitate, if they feel that orders are sometimes optional, then this ship will perish. And so will your son. The entire human race. I don't want to do this, Chief, but I will put ten Callys up against a wall to make sure that this ship and this fleet are not destroyed.

    • Tyrol: We're leaving people behind, Admiral. People are locked into their jobs. They have no control over their lives. They have no say. We're abandoning them to their fate. It's like we've marooned them on a planet.
      Adama: That is not the issue. The men and women on this ship are not allowed to disobey an order, especially in support of some kind of frakking labor dispute.

    • Adama: Are you aware that your deck gang is participating in a work stoppage?
      Tyrol: It's called a general strike, sir.
      Adama: It's mutiny. And do you know what we do with mutineers? We shoot them, Chief.

    • Chief Tyrol: This plant's offline! We're on strike!

    • Baltar: (to Tyrol) Do you honestly believe the fleet will ever be commanded by somebody whose last name is not Adama?

    • Tyrol: Do you see what's happening? Jobs are starting to be inherited, Madame President. We don't know how long we're gonna be on these ships. What if it's ten years? So I, I train my son to be a deckhand because that's what I am? And that's all he can ever be? Is that the future we want?

    • Cally: We're not part of the ruling class so we're stuck doing the dirty work.
      (quoting Baltar's book)

    • (referring to Baltar's book)
      Roslin: Now I am thinking of having a good old-fashioned book burning.

    • Xeno Fenner: Hmm. Maybe we should just start having more glitches.
      Roslin: Is that a threat?
      Fenner: It's like the book says. "If you hear the people, you'll never have to fear the people." (quoting Baltar's book)

    • Adama: Xeno Fenner.
      Roslin: Fenner. Complaining about working conditions and deliveries and, uh, spare parts and compensation, if you can believe that. We're on the run for our lives and the guy wants to talk about overtime bonuses.

    • Adama: (to Roslin) Well, if the quarters become cramped, you're always welcome in one of my beds.
      (Roslin looks up in surprise)
      In a manner of speaking.

  • NOTES (6)

    • The Colonial Workers Alliance, the union that Chief Tyrol headed on New Caprica, is reborn in this episode. Tyrol resumes his role as the leader of that union.

    • With the exception of the "imaginary" Number Six, no known Cylons appear in this episode.

    • Although credited, Jamie Bamber and Grace Park did not appear in this episode.

    • Baltar reveals in this episode that he was raised on a farm on the agricultural colony of Aerelon. He also reveals his original Aerelon accent for the first time. The accent resembles a working-class British accent. Baltar left Aerelon after his 18th birthday and rejected his Aerelon heritage. He eventually learned to speak with a Caprican accent.

    • As of the beginning of this episode, there are 41,400 survivors in the fleet, two more than at the beginning of the previous episode.

    • Aaron Douglas read the "Previously on Battlestar Galactica" line at the beginning of this episode.

  • ALLUSIONS (1)

    • While in his jail cell on Galactica, Gaius Baltar wrote "My Triumphs, My Mistakes", a semi-autobiographical book that includes his observations about the politics and socioeconomics of the fleet. The book and the nature of its creation have strong parallels to the infamous treatise "Mein Kampf", which is often translated as "My Struggle" from the original German. Like Baltar, Adolf Hitler wrote the book by dictating his thoughts while in prison. Just as with Baltar's treatise, "Mein Kampf" is a mixture of autobiography and socio-political ideology.

      Despite the clear similarities, Baltar's book is not meant to mimic Hitler's. The greatest difference is the political focus of the two books. Hitler focused on foreign policy and his racial hatred while Baltar was apparently concerned with the rights of the disenfranchised in the fleet. However, Baltar was motivated by anger, just as Hitler was. Baltar's deep-seated shame over his Aerelon background underlies his attack on the "Caprican aristocracy."

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