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Discussion - "The Woman King" (2/11/07 episode) (spoilers)

  • Avatar of gabfan31

    gabfan31

    [81]Feb 15, 2007
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    chart3 wrote:

    gabfan31 wrote:
    The woman's name was King.

      terrible, terrible title.  they could have come up with something better than that, especially since the plot really revolved around Helo's persistence, and the scenes involving Mrs. King weren't very dramatic or compelling. 

    I totally agree.

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  • Avatar of whalenapp81

    whalenapp81

    [82]Feb 15, 2007
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    i still wanna know why six and baltar see each other in their heads, that secret is gonna be the bomb to find out
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  • Avatar of FrakkingFrakker

    FrakkingFrakker

    [83]Feb 16, 2007
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    I totally agree on the title. I was expecting something different.

    After watching the episode, and I think it was Cottle or Tigh who said it...but the title was clearly stated in the episode... "Do No Harm."...it's from the hippocratic oath. And they used the line!!!!! But..."The Woman King"?? What the frak?

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    boromirbeauty

    [84]Feb 16, 2007
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    Chainblast wrote:
    My only gripe with the episode is why Gaeta is sitting in the bar boozing it up after stabbing Baltar in the neck with a pen. I assume could be a fair explanation to it, but I think it's something we should know. Of course, I doubt Adama or Roslyn care. Great ep none the less.


    Yes, I would have thought Gaeta was in the brig after doing that, but hey they might have given him a medal just as quickly.
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  • Avatar of gabfan31

    gabfan31

    [85]Feb 16, 2007
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    It was Cottle. Obviously they didn't want to let the cat out of the bag as to whether he was guilty or not. But they still should have given Mrs King a bit more if they were going to use her name for the title. Too many people didn't get it, and those who did can only shrug. But I'll take a great episode with a lousy title over a lousy episode with a promising title any day!
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  • Avatar of 123home123

    123home123

    [86]Feb 16, 2007
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    Actually "Do no harm" isn't in the Hippocratic Oath although a similar phrase is. And there really isn't a single Hippocratic Oath. The ancient form is rarely used these days, if at all. Various schools and institutions pick and choose what they want to include in the the "oath," making it much less meaningful than the popular conception makes it out to be.
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  • Avatar of FrakkingFrakker

    FrakkingFrakker

    [87]Feb 16, 2007
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    123home123 wrote:
    Actually "Do no harm" isn't in the Hippocratic Oath although a similar phrase is...

    Thank you for the insight. I did not know that.

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  • Avatar of copygeek

    copygeek

    [88]Feb 17, 2007
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    123home123 wrote:
    Actually "Do no harm" isn't in the Hippocratic Oath although a similar phrase is. And there really isn't a single Hippocratic Oath. The ancient form is rarely used these days, if at all. Various schools and institutions pick and choose what they want to include in the the "oath," making it much less meaningful than the popular conception makes it out to be.

    This may have been what you were talking about. I didn't find the phrase "do no harm" in either version, however the classical version has the phrase as "I will keep them from harm and injustice." The phrase is commonly changed to "do no harm" in TV speeches about the duty of doctors. I think it is funny that the new version was written in 1964 by a Dr. Louis Lasagna!

    I found the "ancient" version and the (a?) "modern" version on PBS's website:

    Hippocratic Oath -- Classical Version

    I swear by Apollo Physician and Asclepius and Hygieia and Panaceia and all the gods and goddesses, making them my witnesses, that I will fulfil according to my ability and judgment this oath and this covenant:

    To hold him who has taught me this art as equal to my parents and to live my life in partnership with him, and if he is in need of money to give him a share of mine, and to regard his offspring as equal to my brothers in male lineage and to teach them this art - if they desire to learn it - without fee and covenant; to give a share of precepts and oral instruction and all the other learning to my sons and to the sons of him who has instructed me and to pupils who have signed the covenant and have taken an oath according to the medical law, but no one else.

    I will apply dietetic measures for the benefit of the sick according to my ability and judgment; I will keep them from harm and injustice.

    I will neither give a deadly drug to anybody who asked for it, nor will I make a suggestion to this effect. Similarly I will not give to a woman an abortive remedy. In purity and holiness I will guard my life and my art.

    I will not use the knife, not even on sufferers from stone, but will withdraw in favor of such men as are engaged in this work.

    Whatever houses I may visit, I will come for the benefit of the sick, remaining free of all intentional injustice, of all mischief and in particular of sexual relations with both female and male persons, be they free or slaves.

    What I may see or hear in the course of the treatment or even outside of the treatment in regard to the life of men, which on no account one must spread abroad, I will keep to myself, holding such things shameful to be spoken about.

    If I fulfil this oath and do not violate it, may it be granted to me to enjoy life and art, being honored with fame among all men for all time to come; if I transgress it and swear falsely, may the opposite of all this be my lot.

    Hippocratic Oath—Modern Version

    I swear to fulfill, to the best of my ability and judgment, this covenant:

    I will respect the hard-won scientific gains of those physicians in whose steps I walk, and gladly share such knowledge as is mine with those who are to follow.

    I will apply, for the benefit of the sick, all measures [that] are required, avoiding those twin traps of overtreatment and therapeutic nihilism.

    I will remember that there is art to medicine as well as science, and that warmth, sympathy, and understanding may outweigh the surgeon's knife or the chemist's drug.

    I will not be ashamed to say "I know not," nor will I fail to call in my colleagues when the skills of another are needed for a patient's recovery.

    I will respect the privacy of my patients, for their problems are not disclosed to me that the world may know. Most especially must I tread with care in matters of life and death. If it is given me to save a life, all thanks. But it may also be within my power to take a life; this awesome responsibility must be faced with great humbleness and awareness of my own frailty. Above all, I must not play at God.

    I will remember that I do not treat a fever chart, a cancerous growth, but a sick human being, whose illness may affect the person's family and economic stability. My responsibility includes these related problems, if I am to care adequately for the sick.

    I will prevent disease whenever I can, for prevention is preferable to cure.

    I will remember that I remain a member of society, with special obligations to all my fellow human beings, those sound of mind and body as well as the infirm.

    If I do not violate this oath, may I enjoy life and art, respected while I live and remembered with affection thereafter. May I always act so as to preserve the finest traditions of my calling and may I long experience the joy of healing those who seek my help.

    Edited on 02/17/2007 6:23am
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  • Avatar of FrakkingFrakker

    FrakkingFrakker

    [89]Feb 17, 2007
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    Who says television isn't educational?

    My apologies to those that my think my side comment took us off topic. My thanks to those of you providing the wonderful information making us all a little smarter.

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  • Avatar of 123home123

    123home123

    [90]Feb 17, 2007
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    Yeah, I read through those different versions. The 1964 version is actually known as the Oath of Lasagna! Sounds like something that belongs on Iron Chef, not at Johns Hopkins.
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