Beakman's World

Season 1 Episode 7

Electricity, Beakmania, & Light Bulbs

0
Aired Unknown Oct 23, 1993 on

Episode Recap

At the South Pole, Herb tries to turn on Don then turns on Beakman. Beakman reveals that most bears use their left paw over their right paw for swatting.



Beakman says he should never play Old Maid with Ray the Camera Guy because he'll rob you blind. He goes looking for his lab coat which Josie lent to Bones, the lab skeleton, who felt cold. In a letter, Veronica Moreno of Dallas, New Mexico asks if do electrical plugs have two prongs. Beakman says they do and moves on, but Josie gets him to explain why. Beakman finally explains its because electrical current flows in a loop, it goes in and out. It's not so much a thing, but an event of energy flowing through an unbroken circuit which stops when the circuit is broken.



In Beakmania, Beakman reveals there are about 2000 beekeepers in the country and that Johann Erlinger of Australia holds the record for waking on his hands for over 871 miles. When asked if sharks kill a lot of people, Beakman reveals that bees and wild pigs have killed far more. He also reveals that reptiles and amphibians don't dream and that carrots are only good for the eyes in that they provide Vitamin A for seeing at night. As to why people yawn when seeing someone else yawn, he says no one knows that, but he reveals penguins are near-sighted - the mere notion of which irks Don and Herb.



In the Beakman Challenge, Beakman challenges Lester to balance a handful of nails on the top of one nail. Lester can't do it, but Beakman shows him how by balancing the nails as a set of ribs held together on one center of gravity.



Beakman and Josie make hot cocoa in the lab as Ann Milder of Cole Branch, Florida mails in a question. She asks how does a light bulb work. To explain, Beakman calls up Thomas Alva Edison who takes credit for inventing everything and starting on things already invented. He says light bulbs are better than candles because they don't burn like a candle, they are safer than oil lamps and don't emit smoke. He reveals that by giving resistance to the electrons in electricity causes them to light and give off heat within a filament without immediately burning up or melting. The light provides the illumination from the light bulb.



Beakman ends the show on a riddle: what animal can throw a man across a room? He identifies it as the electrical eel which can produce a 6500 volt shock enough to stun an elephant!
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