Beat the Clock (1950)

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CBS (ended 1958)

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6.7
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User Rating
32 votes
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SHOW REVIEWS
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Beat the Clock (1950)

Show Summary

"Beat the Clock" was one of television's most durable game shows. Its popularity was derived from its simple format and wacky action. Two couples, preselected from the studio audience, had to complete various stunts within a time limit (usually 60 seconds or less) to win cash and prizes. Examples of the often-messy stunts (the centerpiece of the show) included blowing a plastic ship carrying a ping-pong ball from one side of a water-filled tub to the other, without allowing the ball to fall off; stuffing eight balloons in a lidded wastebasket without breaking any; and extracting three marshmallows buried in Jell-O using a spoon held in his mouth, then placing each marshmallow on a plate next to them. A huge clock counted down the seconds, as host Collyer provided commentary and encouragement. Couples who successfully completed their stunt won cash (usually $100 to $200, depending on the round) and a prize. After the first round of stunts, each couple got a chance to complete an extra-difficult "bonus stunt" (e.g., blowing a feather off a table and then catching it with a top hat while it was being worn) worth $100 plus $100 for each show it was not completed. During the big-money quiz-show era, the bonus prize stunt was worth $5,000 plus $1,000 for each show not completed. The format of "Beat the Clock" factored into countless stunt-related game shows in the years that followed; three "Beat the Clock" revivals also followed in 1969, 1979 and 2002. by Brian Rathjenmoreless
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SUBMIT REVIEW
  • A TV game show that featured couples doing wacky stunts that take 55 seconds or less to complete.Some gags are very easy,some are nearly impossible.

    8.0
    What can you say about a 30 minute commercial for Sylvania that had couples making fools of themselves for $100-$200 and the possibility of winning a new Sylvania console TV? Sure it doesnt sound good on the surface,but the laughable stunts and the very professional host let the show stand above the usual dull clutter.The occasional appearance from bombshell "Roxanne" is always a welcome sight.She basically was under-used on this show.I would have had her stand in front of the camera 100% of the time and smile...she wouldnt have to say a thing....ratings would have doubled immediately! Shame this entire series (1950-1955 anyway)isnt available on DVD.Bud and Roxanne (real name Delores)sure had a way of getting one's attention and holding it.But if those pesky Sylvania commercials could be edited out.....moreless
  • Beat the Clock -1950 - live show with people trying to win gifts for completing the tasks for$100/$200 and jackpot ( which is always a new tv with halo glow - new for 1950)moreless

    10
    This show holds your attention without any nasty stuff going on. The people are very hard working and the cast is very hard working also. An excellant time and people.You can see clearly how the people/cast are treating each other with due respect. Love the Children!! Bud is so very good with the kids!! The task are a source of pride to Bud and the other crew. You are very sure that he takes the tasks seriously and has done each one of the those tasks for himself to make sure that it is fair! I love that the children always are eager for the whipped cream for the DAD! Thanksmoreless
  • What a workhorse this little show was. Bud, Beverly, Roxanne... All were working their tails off for the entire 30 minutes every week. I guess somebody had to give away those lovely B&W televisions with the exclusive "Halo Lighting."moreless

    9.0
    Wow... If today's game show hosts and support staff worked as hard as Bud Collyer and his staff worked some 50 years ago, with all the high tech equipment we now possess, these game shows would inadvertently solve war, world hunger, and domestic abuse while spinning out their big winners.



    The key.... Hard Work. While John Charles Daly was TV's smartest game show host over at What's My Line? Mr. Collyer was far and away the fastest and hardest worker, never missing a beat. Even when somethng did go wrong, Bud made it perfect. It just amazes to watch the crew do their thing so flawlessly, and then to realize that this game show was so popular, that Bud would happily provide measurements for viewers at home to build their own props to practice, in case they wound up on the show.



    And being it was the fifties, innocence was the order of the day, even though some stunts required what could not get by today's television punmeisters without a lewd comment. Once a young married lady had to maneuver herself across 15 chairs without her feet touching the floor. To assist her, Mr. Collyer brought in the "seat lifters," 15 men from every field of the military. Even BUd made what might today be considered "lewd" stating that he didn't the seat lifters were going to mind the stunt (as opposed to the young lady's husband waiting on the sideline.) She completed the stunt with ease.. No one-gun salutes were detected. (Pardon my pun)



    Of course if you got hit with whipped cream, you got your pic taken with a new camera, which you kept and were told to remember that their "special moment" was first on the roll of film. (I do wonder how many pictures were accidentally lost by those who forgot.)



    None the less, this show was fun... as is. You could not throw the bells and whistles of today's technology into this and make it better. It was a delight to watch, especially when parents brought young children. They were so polite, well-dressed, and true little ladies and gentlemen, and Mr. COllyer in the midst of his breakneck pace was so kind to them and made them feel special. This was television I would gladly take over high-def war coverage 24 hours a day.



    Thank you Bud... A true innovator of the game show.moreless

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