Boy Meets World

Season 6 Episode 9

Poetic License: An Ode to Holden Caulfield

1
Aired Friday 8:30 PM Nov 20, 1998 on ABC
8.7
out of 10
User Rating
70 votes
3

EPISODE REVIEWS
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Episode Summary

EDIT
Shawn writes a beautiful poem, but gets too choked up to read it. When Cory reads it without his consent, Shawn gets angry and lets slip the poems meaning.

Meanwhile, Eric, Jack and Rachel stress over exams, so Eric comes up with an idea to help everyone relax.moreless

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SUBMIT REVIEW
  • perfect

    10
    What I liked: Seeing the poetry side of Shawn, something we do not see often, Rachel twirling her hair, Eric clipping his pen and Jack biting the apple, and Eric getting upset that Rachel is twirling her hair, Rachel and 'the troll' becoming friends, Eric doing horribly on his exams, amongst other things.



    Good episode. The main plot was good for plot development, and the sub plot was good for some comic relief. Overall grade is definitely going to be an A+, I think is more than fair.moreless
  • Bottom line: Poetic Shawn + Unbearable Cory = a horrible experience. Luckily, we're given an Eric-centered "B" plot, to pull us out of the mire. Read on..

    5.0
    First of all, "Poet Shawn" does not appeal to me at all. It's such a drastic change for his character and it seems very forced. Yes, Rider Strong is a poet, but actors are supposed to fit the characters. The writers shouldn't be forcing Rider's persona on Shawn's character.



    I hate that they tried to justify the change, by making it appear that Shawn has always been poetic. Shawn: I've been doing it since I can remember.



    Wrong! The writers tried to pull one over on us, but I have a good memory. How could one forget this exchange from season 3's "New Friends and Old":



    Shawn: I hate poetry!

    Cory: Shawn, if our friend who's going to let us live likes poetry, then we like poetry!

    Shawn: Oh, poetry! I thought you said...liver.



    It's not the fact that they added poetry to Shawn's repertoire that I dislike. It's the fact that new Shawn almost completely replaces old Shawn. If we were to bring Eric down to earth the slightest bit, and then give that bit of devil may care goofiness to Shawn, we'd be golden. Alas, it was not to be. The other thing that bothers me about this episode is that Cory is turning into quite the unsavory character. He just doesn't know when to quit. He makes everybody else's business his own, and never takes no for an answer. The best part of the episode was when Shawn blew up at Cory for just that.



    Shawn: That's not what I want to hear! Not this time! I want to hear that you were wrong. That I asked you to back off and you wouldn't take no for an answer. That you totally disregarded my feelings! You went way to far this time, Cory!



    Bottom line: Poetic Shawn + Unbearable Cory = a horrible experience.



    Luckily, we're given an Eric-centered "B" plot, to pull us out of the mire.moreless
  • I loved it!

    10
    Everyone finds out that Shawn is a poet. Cory reads one of his poems without permission and Shawn says that the poem he wrote was about Angela. Angela slaps him. Angela confides in Cory that she still loves Shawn and Shawn confides in Topanga that he still loves Angela! Eric makes up a study habit which actually helps everyone on their finals, everyone that is, except himself. It was too relax a little. Mr. Feeny tells Eric that that does work, only if you've studied the material first! Eric had forgotten that part.



    This was a great episode! The poetry was beautiful! I really hate it when two people love each other, but they don't want to other to know! Eric's plan really does work! I give this episode a 10!moreless
Matthew Lawrence

Matthew Lawrence

Jack Hunter (Seasons 5+)

Will Friedle

Will Friedle

Eric Randall Matthews

Danielle Fishel

Danielle Fishel

Topanga Lawrence-Matthews (Seasons 2+)

Ben Savage

Ben Savage

Cornelius A. 'Cory' Matthews

Rider Strong

Rider Strong

Shawn Patrick Hunter

Maitland Ward

Maitland Ward

Rachel Kimberly McGuire (Seasons 6+)

Trivia, Notes, Quotes and Allusions

FILTER BY TYPE

  • TRIVIA (3)

    • The poetry used in this episode was written by cast member, Rider Strong.

    • Eric's "shoe" idea is flawed. What if Person One drew Person Two's shoe, but Person Two drew Person Seven's shoe, etc.?

    • Shawn says he's been doing poetry ever since he can remember. His memory must be pretty short, considering he has previously stated his disdain for poetry; most notably in New Friends and Old.

  • QUOTES (6)

    • Eric: You two are so uptight, I can't even think; and you know how hard that is for me in the first place.

    • Rachel: I'm about to beat the crap out of the troll.

    • Cory: My next poem is called "Frustration". Come on Topanga!

    • Cory: Are we OK?
      Shawn: You're my date aren't you.

    • Cory: I call this next poem "Feeny".
      Mr. Feeny is very smart,
      on many subjects,
      including art.
      And yet he can't help me with my frustration.
      COME ON, TOPANGA!

    • Cory (reading Shawn's poem):
      "Top of the World"

      You don't know it,
      but sometimes I go to a hill
      That overlooks the lanscape's mask of city lights
      for a sip of momentary grace.
      On this brink of everything i know,
      I can gain an eyeful of the lost Atlantis
      in the humal soul
      and the breath that fills my lungs
      with the air between 2 stars.
      If you were now to capture the image of this elation
      in the framework of your mind
      or find transcendence through these words,
      then, at most, you would know nothing
      of the beauty your existence throws to me.
      For mine is a love
      no experience,
      no measure,
      no words,
      could ever degrade into reality by virtue or degree.

  • NOTES (0)

  • ALLUSIONS (1)

    • Title: Poetic License: An Ode to Holden Caulfield

      Poetic License is the freedom a writer has to ignore conventional rules of writing, grammar and even fact, for the sake of his/her work.

      Holden Caulfield is the main character in J.D. Salinger's novel, The Catcher in the Rye.

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