Breaking Bad

Season 5 Episode 11

Confessions

59
Aired Sunday 9:00 PM Aug 25, 2013 on AMC
AIRED:
8.6
out of 10
User Rating
236 votes
6

EPISODE REVIEWS
By TV.com Users

Episode Summary

Jesse decides to make a big change in his life, while Walt and Skyler try to deal with an unexpected demand. (Written by Gennifer Hutchison. Directed by Michael Slovis.)

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SUBMIT REVIEW
  • A jaw-dropping game changer for the series

    10
    Not for the first time, Breaking Bad employs a change of events, drastic enough to end the whole series, at a time with still quite a way to go until the very last ending credits roll. And while there's more than just one scene with far-reaching ramifications in "Confessions", it's the final couple of minutes, bringing Jesse up to a major character again after his temporary step back in most of season five's first part, that has audiences stop breathing and blinking for a considerable amount of time. In a manner as extreme and ruthless as the series hardly ever shows it, the entire premise for the series finale is turned on its head again, and it is awesome to watch.



    However, there's more than just one "confession", as the episode's pluralized title already indicates, and midway through it, a scene with Hank and Marie watching a videotape made by Walt not only makes itself one of the most hilarious internet memes in Breaking Bad history, but also skyrockets up on the list of the most ingenious screenwriting achievements in Breaking Bad history. As if that weren't enough, Gennifer Hutchison's splendid script also leads Betsy Brandt and Dean Norris to the best of their respective acting performances. If maybe not the best, it also lays the basis for outstanding jobs at the hands of Aaron Paul, Anna Gunn (excelling herself in a comedy/drama exchange at a Mexican restaurant), Bob Odenkirk (whether it's his awkward strolling in the desert while Jesse and Walt confer or his participation in THAT ending scene), and Bryan Cranston (putting his character's chilling schemes on screen with the usual bravura).



    Without any exaggeration, "Confessions" doesn't include any bad or even average moments and is one of the very few Breaking Bad episodes that succeeds in sustaining thrill and intensity over the full running time. It's a jaw-dropping game changer for the series and rates its top rating because of a screenplay nothing below fantastic.moreless
  • Confessions

    10
    This was one of the best episodes of the show. So many awesome moments, like Walt's confession tape, the scene between Walt and Jesse before Jesse decided to leave{teary-eyed as ever}, and of course, the ending, with Jesse finally realizing the truth about the poisoning of Brock, and proceeds to burn down Walt's house. This sets the rest of the show up nicely, which I'll get to in the next episodes' reviews.moreless
  • Confessions

    8.0
    A really strong episode of Breaking. Predictable and unpredictable at the same time, but as intense as ever. The ending again leaves us wanting more, and while the house may not go up in flames, literally or figuratively, I can't wait to see what happens.
  • Alaskan Cigarettes

    9.0
    Breaking Bad continued its dark descent into finality and the stakes were definitely raised. The opening with Todd and Uncle Jack reminiscing as Todd, who left out the part of killing a kid, recapped the events of Dead Freight for bragging rights for himself now that he is going to get back to cooking for Jack's new operation. The blood on the shoe was a great touch to top off them driving into New Mexico triumphant that their greater competition in the west coast has been buried. Jesse is approached by Hank and is told of how Hank knows that Walt is Heisenberg. The interview is cut short with a lovely entrance by Saul who brings up the beating Hank gave Jesse back in Season 3 and how he shouldn't be left alone with Jesse. Walt fears the worst when Junior is almost lured over to the Shraeder household where Walt presumes that Marie will tell Junior about his real activities and Walt redirects him by telling him that his cancer is back in a surprisingly touching moment. The two couples meet at a restaurant to negotiate about the children and Walt talks all the sanctimonious things about putting Junior through too much while Hank seethes that he is going to do his utmost to arrest him at all costs. Walt hands a taped confession to Hank, but it's not what he thinks. He connects the dots all the way back to the beginning of Season 1 in his confession but says that Hank was the one who initiated him into the business for profit and that he was only doing it to help his family financially and that he feared for his life. The message was very blatantly the biggest fabrication Walt has ever attempted, but the best lies often have the truth and the bit about Hank's medical bills having been actually paid by Walt's drug money bring Hank into the fold even further. So this definitely ties Hank's hands even further, and he can't even put surveillance on Jesse because of their issues in Season 3 for fear of a lawsuit according to Gomez. Walt, Jesse, and Saul all meet out in the desert to discuss what Hank knows. Jesse tells him that he didn't give anything up on him and he finally calls Walt on how he "works him" and makes it seem like he has Jesse's best interests at heart when he really just needs him out of the way. But Aaron Paul's monologue was so very torturedly Jesse that when Walt goes for a hug his breakdown culminated in all the frustration he feels over Mike's death and how trapped he truly feels. We of course have seen Jesse go down this road before in anguish but the results this time go much differently. Skyler actually seems to go along with it all even indicating that it was her choice to bring back the kids, even though she seems empty inside looking off into space when Walt approaches her about taking over so that he can go to a chemo session. Saul's contact who specializes in making people start new lives is called and Jesse is dropped off at the meeting place. While looking at his cigarettes and deciding to go to Alaska for a new life he discovers how the risin cigarette was lifted out of his pack back in Season 4 and Walt's guilt in poisoning Brock. He storms into Saul's office, breaks his nose, and uses Saul's own gun and points it at him saying how he knows that he lifted it off of him. Saul confesses and admits how he never wanted anything to do with it. Of course Hewell can't even stop Jesse from locking the doll but the only bit of levity this episode had was the Hello Kitty phone that Jesse got really. That last image of Jesse rolling up to the White household and pouring that can of gas all over the house was an effective cliffhanger to leave us on for next week. Walt also going for the 38 all the way from back in Season 2 which he stores in the soda machine in the car wash was awesome. Hearing the revolver covered in ice open and close as he put it into his jacket shows that things are about to get real. With this out in the open, I honestly never thought Jesse would find out about this, this totally changes everything and makes me wonder how the house in the flash-forward if it is burned stayed in such good shape over the next nine months or so. I honestly always thought that these last few episodes would be Jesse vs. Walt but over him discovering that he watched Jane die, not because of this. Ok, in closing I have a theory about the flash-forward. Just to get it on record. I believe that Jesse is abducted by Uncle Jack in the future and forced to cook because he worked with, presumed dead having moved to New Hampshire, to get a higher quality for Jack's new business. Jack is using Andrea and Brock as leverage to force Jesse to do what he wants so the rifle is for Walt to rescue Jesse from them and redeem himself partly for all the bad stuff he's done. There it is, I'm probably wrong about most of it but it's just a guess. I'll probably have many more but this is my thought given where this episode leaves off. Especially seeing as Walt never wants Jesse to see him in that light of evildoer and how he wants to retain that image as Mr. White to him, which is slowly getting swallowed up by Todd now using the term and leaving business altering voice-mails annoyingly. But this was a very solid installment that makes me wonder when and where the flash-forward will overtake the main series narrative and give us the conclusion we have been waiting for.moreless
  • HOLY SHITTT!

    10
    The Last 15 Mins have to be the MOST INTENSE IN THE HISTORY OF TV.

    Things are heating up quickly and Heisenberg is TRAPPED both ways

Jason Douglas (II)

Jason Douglas (II)

Munn

Guest Star

Millard Drexler

Millard Drexler

Customer

Guest Star

Gonzalo Menendez

Gonzalo Menendez

Kalanchoe

Guest Star

Steven Michael Quezada

Steven Michael Quezada

Steven Gomez

Recurring Role

Michael Bowen

Michael Bowen

Jack

Recurring Role

LaVell Crawford

LaVell Crawford

Huell

Recurring Role

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