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Monday 10:00 PM on ABC (Returning September 29, 2014)
Whether or not you were completely satisfied with "Smells Like Teen Spirit," it was certainly a strong and memorable addition to the show. Much more than "Dressed to Kill," certainly. While I did feel that there were some loose ends here and there, which I will go into detail about later, this week's episode is what I think we've all come to expect and want from Castle: a kick-filled-case populated by characters that are wacky enough to be interesting, while still bordering on real people.

Before I spend several paragraphs talking about this week's case, I feel like I should address those of you who are wondering why I don't just recap all the wicked banter that Castle and company exchanged this week. In my review of the previous episode, some of you commented about how everyone watches Castle for the banter, and presumably not for the cases, plot, or character development. While that's certainly true for a significant amount of Castle fans (though not for the majority, let's be real), I for one like this show for the full package. Because Castle may be many things, but it is not a panel show. It is an out-of-the-box, case-of-the-week dramedy. Sure, it contains some great banter, but Castle has so, so much more to offer.

So in order to do this show justice, I try and review all important aspects of an episode, not just the funny one-liners that characters throw at each other. Now, I am fully aware that most of you already suspected as much, considering this is what most reviewers try to do. But it is worth noting that not everyone watches Castle for the same reasons. Some watch it for the banter, others try and solve the mysteries, some want to laugh, and some just watch to see Nathan Fillion in a TV show (RIP Firefly y'all). So as I sprinkle a good helping of praise onto this episode for the case of the week, a good number of you will be thinking "screw the case, they didn't talk about the wedding once."

To those people, I feel for you. You were robbed this week. There was no wedding planning. They didn't try cakes or flowers. They didn't start drafting vows. Hell, I don't think the word "wedding" was said even once. Instead, "Smells Like Teen Spirit" shone the spotlight brightly on its case this week, something that I always enjoy when it happens. So while some may have ranked this episode pretty low on their list, I put it pretty high up there.

Now, if you're wondering why I've spent a good deal talking about something that many of you probably think is inherent and straightforward, I'll have you know that it's the basis of a larger issue that I'll be tackling at the end of this review. For now, seeing as this week was all about the case, let's spend a lot of time talking about it (those who couldn't care less about the case, you might want to skim for a while).

This week, the writers treated us to something that we've almost never seen on Castle: we got to see the victim die. Well, we kind of did, but not really. I'll be getting to that later.

The episode started with the introduction of some teenage girls being, well, a tad on the bratty side. And before you could say "poltergeist," a girl by the name of Madison (played by Natasha Hall) was murdered during a video chat. I'm not sure what was stranger: the fact that we actually saw someone die from being thrown about her room by an invisible force, or the fact that a technology that was considered futuristic ten years ago is now practically commonplace. Probably the latter.





Okay, so that's not exactly what happened, but there was definitely something witchy going on. Even without seeing the video, the police found Madison's murder to be very suspicious. They found her blood in a spot which indicated that someone had thrown he upward with a high degree of force, a feat requiring great strength. While we knew, or thought we knew, that it wasn't as simple as that, the NYPD went looking for a very strong suspect.

It was at this point that the investigation practically moved full-time to Faircroft Preparatory Academy, the school that Madison had gone to. In a funny twist of coincidence that often befalls television, Faircroft happened to be Castle's alma mater as well. In true Castle fashion, though, he hadn't actually graduated. An incident involving a cow had gotten him expelled at the 11th hour. You'd think that, considering his fame, they would have wanted to make him an honorary graduate in exchange for a talk, a few book signings, and an endowment, or something like that. But instead the school was in the clutches of the same old principal who had been responsible for our hero's expulsion.




Principal Dunnan, played by Sam Anderson (Bernard from Lost!), ended up being one of the more interesting characters in this episode. Anderson fit very well into this role. This isn't surprising, considering that he was the principal for none other than Forest Frickin' Gump. It was through him that Castle and Beckett saw their first glimpse of this telekinesis phenomenon that we had already been exposed to. Footage of the school cafeteria revealed a stampede of tables, and their prime suspect. It also brought a familiar character out of the woodwork that we haven't seen in a while.





I suppose we all knew this day would come. And I suppose many of you were even looking forward to it. Crazy Castle is back. Or at least, this is the first time in a while that our hero dropped some nonstop dubious hypotheses right off the bat. Now, I personally like the more adult Castle. Ever since the beginning of this season we've seen a protagonist who is more mature, more sensible, and overall more worthy of his age. Granted, he'll never stop being a little childish, full of wonder, and driven by a thirst for fun. And that part of him should never change. But I was happy that we haven't been seeing any petty disagreements, misunderstandings, and lies between him and Beckett. His emotional maturity has grown, to the point that his relationship isn't in jeopardy of a random dude off the street advising him that you really show a woman you love her if you treat her like dirt. Because back in the day, he took advice on all things from any and all shady characters (his mom included) who were asked (or not asked) to throw down some wisdom concerning situations that were actually pretty straightforward. Yeah, I'm happy that at least this part of his past immaturity is still absent.

But this week did mark a resurgence of the crazy hypothesis bombs, which felt like a blast from the past. Even now, they are still something of the past. But only for certain types of episodes. Because "Smells Like Teen Spirit" is the first "supernatural" episode (those quotes are becoming less and less justified these days) we've seen since "Time Will Tell" (yes, that one). And even though we've seen a handful of conspiracy episodes in-between, it's taken a supernatural episode to get these conclusions jumping again. Which is really strange, if you think about it. I mean, conspiracy theories aren't inherently crazy. Even since it was discovered that Nixon was directly involved in/ordered a criminal action against the Democratic Party, any conspiracy theory that doesn't involve lizard people is a lot less crazy, and a lot more plausible. You still need to prove actually prove unlikely things, like that Apollo 11 never landed on the moon (good luck), but at least these things are in the realm of possibility.

Mummy curses though, not so much. So what you'd expect to see in this new, more mature Castle is restraint with the supernatural themed cases, but an all out conspirathon with just about any other case. Instead, though, we're seeing the opposite? It's strange, I know. But for what feels like the first time this season (he held back until halfway through the episode in "Time Will Tell"), Castle was bucking for the illogical and irrational explanation straight out of the gate. Granted, telekinesis is a lot less fantastical than ghosts, mummy curses, or cursed videos that haunt and kill people. So at least there's that.

Anyway, back to the case. This week's prime suspect was a girl by the name of Jordan Gibbs (played by Hannah Marks). I thought it was fun how it was really clear that she couldn't have physically killed Madison (she had an alibi) and yet both she and Castle suspected she was responsible.







There was a lot of evidence pointing to Jordan...provided that telekinesis was possible, and that she was capable of it. The video made it look like she had something to do with the tables moving, she had recently purchased a number of books on telekinesis, and she'd been visiting a dude who could float in the air. But if, as you'd normally expect, telekinesis isn't possible in the Castle 'Verse (yeah, that was a reference to what you think it was), there was no way that Jordan was responsible. She had a perfect alibi for every relevant criminal undertaking in the episode, which would normally drop someone from suspicion instantly. But that didn't happen so much, especially considering just how realistic this telekinesis stuff started to look.

Here's the thing: why didn't they pursue the floating guy? I'm not saying they should have made him the prime suspect, but they could have used the NYPD's authority and the fact they were investigating a murder to force him to reveal how the floating thing was done. I mean, the main "wow" factor of this episode was just how realistic all of the floating things looked. This wasn't like back in "Secret Santa," where it was maddening that the NYPD couldn't think of a flying craft other than a plane or Santa's sleigh (helicopter, blimp, hot air balloon...). No, in this situation there was no easy, obvious rational explanation. Even the eventual explanation given didn't make all that much sense.

So as it turned out, Jordan had nothing to do with anything. This dude named Lucas Troy (played by Leigh Parker) was actually the telekinesis wizard. He had set up the stunt in the cafeteria, in Madison's room, and also at some organized crime guy's house. He claimed that he alone did everything with some fishing line and magnets. Seriously? Fishing line? There couldn't have been fishing line involved with the cafeteria stunt. Tory Ellis herself couldn't detect how that spectacle was carried out. Are we to believe that with all her brilliance and zooming skills she couldn't make out some fishing line?

What's more troubling is that we know this has to be the case. We know that a harness was used in Madison's fake face chat, and we know that Lucas heavily edited the footage. So you'd expect that Ellis would have discovered something hinky about that video. Either some fishing line here or pixel manipulation there. Something. But nothing suspicious about that video was ever mentioned. Who knows, maybe she never looked at it.

Regardless, this episode left us with a lot of questions. And not the good kinds either. Before I get into these, I should probably say that the case itself was very strong. "Smells Like Teen Spirit" was populated with numerous characters that stuck around for more than one scene, and were interesting and important enough to be memorable. There was the principal, the girl who thought she was telekinetic, the guy who actually may have been. And of course the floating guy, who appeared for only a few seconds but will never be forgotten (lesson to television writers: if you want to make a character instantly memorable, introduce them while they're floating in the air). Even the parents were memorable in this episode, and they're normally around just to remind us that these kids have families.

The victim herself, Madison, was arguably the most interesting character of the bunch, and she only showed up for less than a minute. As it turned out, she was a bratty rich kid by day and master thief by night. She was behind two of the telekinesis stunts, as she had forcibly enlisted the help of Lucas to make a prank video call, and scare off a superstitious criminal so she could steal some valuable stolen property.

Basically, this episode had a lot of detail and specificity. There were multiple stories and characters that overlapped to create a larger whole. It was entertaining, intriguing, and clever.

The thing is, though, that there were also some gaping holes. I was left with some mixed emotions, mostly involving the explanation of this telekinesis business. On the one hand, the doctored video was a really cool explanation for how Madison was murdered. What we saw happen looked impossible, because it was. She and Lucas had doctored a prank call for the real killer, one of Madison's friends. The victim had actually been killed earlier, the blood transferred to the beam to look like she'd been killed like in the video, and as a bonus the killer got a cool alibi. This was all very neat, tight, and complimented itself. However, all the other telekinesis stuff was given the extremely vague explanation of "fishing line and magnets."

This is about as unhelpful as possible, especially considering how realistic everything looked. Okay, so we never saw the telekinesis that drove that one superstitious enforcer away from his house and out of the country, so that could have actually been fishing line moving lawn furniture for all we know. The cafeteria scene looked really impressive and complicated to do, but all of the objects moved were relatively light, and most of them were moving towards the wall. So it's possible that Lucas installed an electro magnet in the wall earlier, or was using magnets underneath the cafeteria floor. But the stuff with Jordan and Lucas in the house? Those were multiple objects spinning around, then fluidly slowing down, then instantly dropping. All the objects in the cafeteria each moved in only one direction. Fishing line could have done the job for a lot of them. But the objects revolving around Jordan? They slowed down almost instantaneously without swinging from side to side, as would happen if they were on wires. And the electromagnetic contraption that would be required to pull such a thing off so smoothly is mind boggling.

Which brings us to the other, "better" explanation for the telekinesis: it was actually telekinesis. That's right, this episode strongly suggested that Lucas can actually move things with his mind. Not only that, but I got the feeling that the writers wanted us to think that this solution was more likely than the other. This isn't because telekinesis makes more sense than a rational explanation; it's that the writers didn't really provide us with a rational explanation in the first place. All we've got to work on are fishing line and magnets. And I do mean "work." Any believable hypothesis requires the viewer to piece together an hypothesis on his or her own. There are hypotheses out there, but none of them were provided by the actual episode.

I actually had kind of developed one of these hypotheses while watching the episode. You see, I thought the big twist with the cafeteria scene was going to be that the bullied kids had teamed up on the bullies. Think about it: the video was filmed so that all the important aspects of the telekinesis attack was seen. The confrontation between Jordan and Madison, Jordan clenching her fists, and Madison and her minions cowering against the wall. So what if the person filming the video had been in on it? He did conveniently have the camera focused on the wall when the chairs flew through the air, a consequence being that we didn't get a good look at the hardest part of the phenomenon to explain.

What if they had all been on it? The chairs moving to the sides at the beginning of the video could have been done by kids standing on the sides of the room with fishing line. The tables moving towards the wall could have been done by kids with magnets in the basement. And the chairs launched at the wall? In all the confusion caused by everything else, that effect could actually have been pulled off by people throwing them discretely. Two kids throwing a chair each, another two or three providing cover or a distraction of some sort. And if the video had been filmed by someone in on it, Lucas would even have had the opportunity to edit the footage so that any trace of fishing line or any other evidence would have been erased.

Basically, that whole thingcould easily have been pulled off with fishing line and magnets, provided that Lucas had a lot of help. However, we're to believe that he did all of this alone. The cafeteria, the enforcer's backyard, and the objects at the house. I'm not saying that it would have been completely impossible for him to do something like that. But come on. We're talking about some serious technology, especially for the objects in the house. Technology that we didn't even get a whiff of. It didn't even turn out that he was in cahoots with the floating man. So we're left with two possible solutions. One is that Lucas is capable of telekinesis. And the other is the writers saying: "here's some magnets and string, good luck." So either the writers are lazy, or the whole point is that telekinesis is real.

Regardless, we've only seen something like this once before. Obviously I'm talking about "Time Will Tell." Granted, it was inescapable in that episode that either time travel is real, or there is a trickster god having a good laugh at Castle and Beckett's expense. The same thing most certainly did not happen in this episode. It is not inescapable that telekinesis was responsible for everything. Furthermore, this is not the first time that Castle has presented us with a rational solution, and a supernatural solution, while basically leaving it up to us to choose which one is real. But in all those cases, the rational solution was usually the one that made the most sense. And it was always well formulated, so as not to leave any real doubt as to whether it could serve as a complete explanation for everything. In other words, the supernatural solutions in past episodes have been there for people who like supernatural explanations, and not because they were necessary to explain everything that happened. And in many cases, the supernatural explanation wasn't that well fleshed out. Sure, you could believe that one guy was a vampire if you wanted to, but you had to admit that he got his fangs through surgery.

The opposite of this happened in "Smells Like Teen Spirit." The telekinesis explanation was far more fleshed out than the rational one, which didn't really exist all that much. But what really, if anything, does this mean for Castle? I, for one, hope that if we're "supposed" to stand behind the rational explanation, then the lack of a fleshed out explanation was just a fluke. Since the writers have dropped the bomb that some supernatural things might be real, they could keep on doing what they did in this episode: show a lot of really cool visual effects without really giving a rational explanation for them. In the past, the writers needed a rational explanation for everything, because it was assumed that Castle exists in a world that operates on the same rules as ours (at least as most people perceive our world). If a victim died in a locked room because "they were cursed," we would still be given an alternative explanation that worked, because there was no way that curses actually existed. These days, though, that isn't strictly true. Some irrational things could very well be possible, and a rational explanation may no longer be needed for everything.

Even so, I don't think this completely lets the writers off the hook that I feel they've put themselves on. Okay, so one day we may figure out that on this show ghosts exist and curses are real, a thought which haunts me by the way (the punster is back in business). But even if curses are real, it's still far more satisfying for the writers to come up with a clever way in which a corporeal killer could have murdered someone in a locked room. I think so, at least. Whichever side of that you fall on, there's also the simple truth that leaving too many things up in the air is just bad storytelling. Too many random floating guys and objects will eventually have to fall down. And when they do they'll make a big splat. I don't know about you, but I don't want Castle to splat.

What I'm trying to say here is that if Castle wants to maintain the careful balance that it has created between the rational world it resides in, and the supernatural world that it courts on a regular basis, there needs to be an actual balance between explanations.

Either that, or the series can just revert back to what it's done for most of six seasons: stay safe in a rational reality. Last I checked, Castle is a mystery/drama/comedy with a heavy dose of romance thrown in. It would not feel welcome in the sci-fi or fantasy sections of any TV listing. And if the writers want to keep things this way, then they should keep things grounded in "reality." Or...

For the first time in one of these reviews I'm going to slip into a little Twilight Zone, so to speak. I know this sounds crazy, but what if the writers plan on actually making Castlemore sci-fi than not? In a strange way, that would make a lot of sense. For one, if Season 6 were the transitional season in which this starts to happen, it would bring a sense of purpose that until now we've only gotten from the wedding. And since it would seem that everyone who commented on my last review hated the dress from "Dressed to Kill," maybe this season could use something else to be remembered for. There's also the fact that throwing down some sci-fi here and there wouldn't be that much of a stretch for this show. I mean, so far the writers have only toyed with time travel and telekinesis. Both of these things are arguably more likely to be a thing someday than, say, ghosts and video curses. I mean, telekinesis is kind of already a thing anyway (More than twenty years ago they did an experiment where a dude played Space Invaders with his mind. Granted, they had to remove part of his skull in order to attach the electrodes to his brain, but still. There's also a remote controlled helicopter you can go out and buy today that is activated by your concentration. And all you have to do is wear something on your head.). So it's not like Castle and Beckett would be investigating people selling their souls to demons, or anything like that.

And finally, it's not like your average Castle fan dislikes science fiction. I mean, there are literally thousands of people who watch this show solely because it stars Nathan Fillion, and the fact that every once in a while there's a Fireflyreference. Most of us who watch Castle are also massive fans of sci-fi, or at least enjoy it. So while it's certainly true that some people would abandon this show if it slipped another genre under its belt, most people would stay. Besides, Castle would be making history. Frickin' history. Anywho, I for one would embrace such a thing.

Back to the episode itself, and out of the Twilight Zone, there are a few things that I haven't addressed. First and foremost, "Smells Like Teen Spirit" was a terrible title. Let's be honest: it stank (the punster is still in the building). This isn't the first time that a TV show has named an episode after that particular Nirvana song, which already cashed in on any humor found within those words itself more than a decade ago. I guess it would have worked if the episode were actually about cheerleaders, or a school team of some sort. Even a teenage ghost would have warranted it. But instead it seemed like the writers chose this title solely because the episode had a lot of teens. That would be like naming an episode "Lucy in the Sky with Diamonds" because it had a girl named Lucy in it, without it having anything to do with the sky, diamonds, or drugs.

But if nothing else, the title at least got across the fact that this episode was about teens. Which brings me to another issue I had with this episode. Why wasn't Alexis in it? I mean, I realize that she's not a teen anymore and is currently attending college, not high school. But you'd think an episode about young people would at least warrant an appearance by the show's resident young person.

Speaking of which, this week saw a small cast to the max. And this isn't anything new. I've said many a time that Castle doesn't nearly do justice to the entirety of its main cast. But these days it seems worse than usual. Maybe it's just that we've been getting a lot of two-week-long hiatuses lately due to the winter Olympics, but I'm starting to feel like this show is using certain main characters less than they ever have before. I mean, it was still an issue back in the day when Alexis and Martha would barely appear in an average episode, but at least they were appearing. This week it got to the point where I started to feel like the opening credits were lying to me.







Now, after spending several days deep in thought about this issue (two minutes), I think I've finally identified why the writers have been doing this from the beginning. Basically, it all stems from a fundamental problem they've always had to deal with. A problem that revolves around what is arguably this show's greatest strength: Nathan Fillion. Now, before you set about tracking me down so you can beat me to death with your boxed collector's DVD set of Firefly, hear me out. I'm not saying that Nathan Fillion is bad in any way. He's not. Quite the opposite, in fact. I've never met the guy, but I'm a big fan of his work. We're all united in being Nathan Fillion fans. Though if you were actually planning on beating me up with a DVD set because of your obsession with Fillion, you're definitely a bigger fan than I am. And you need therapy.

But that's kind of my point. Nathan Fillion has hordes of passionate fans out there. And, as I mentioned earlier, a lot of people watch Castle solely because he stars in it. Hey, remember how at the start of this review I was talking about how I enjoy this show for the full package while some people watch it for the banter? And remember how I said I'd be coming back to that later? Well, that's happening now. You see, Nathan Fillion is a huge draw for Castle. As a few people testified to in the comments of my review last week, some people only watch it for the banter. Just as some people tune in for Fillion's expressions. In other words, the producers lucked out when they bagged Fillion as the face of Castle, because people will pay money even if it's just to watch his face.

Buuuuuuuuut, this also poses that problem I was talking about earlier. And that is the problem of making as many of your viewers happy as often as possible. Now, Castle isn't the only TV show that revolves very strongly around one or two leads. Not by a long shot. But damn does it sometimes feel like this is the clearest example of such a phenomenon. I like Castkett, I really do. But I also like Alexis, and Gates, and Laney, and Ryan and Esposito. And Castle tends to leave these characters out of the picture more often than not. Sure, Ryan and Esposito have been in practically every episode. But how much do we know about these people, really? Yeah, we know some backstory, their likes and dislikes. But how many episodes have been about them? Very little, is the answer. The only Ryan-centric episode was the one where he went back undercover. And according to my count, Esposito hasn't even had one yet. Unless you count "Under Fire," where both characters spent a lot of the time in danger of dying, though this gave them a significant amount of bro time to themselves.

"Under Fire" is the perfect example of what Castle rarely does, but probably should do more: let characters other than Castle and Beckett shine. But as I've been saying for the last couple of paragraphs, the writers seem to have the impression (maybe rightly so) that viewers want to see Fillion, Fillion, and more Fillion. They also want to see Caskett, Caskett, and more Caskett. Whenever the screen is dominated by Nathan Fillion's face, everything is bright and shiny with the world. Everyone is happy. Except possibly me. Because while I like Nathan Fillion's face, and I like learning more about Richard Castle, I don't like it if the tradeoff is not spending time with anyone else. And let's be honest, we've barely spent time with anyone else.

How many episodes have been about Castle? A lot. Almost all of them. How many have been about Beckett? Also a lot. How many have been about anyone else? Umm....yeah. Maybe five? Possibly a couple more. How many of Castle's family members have we met? Three. Two are main characters, and one is James Frickin' Brolin (maybe he's related to Forest Frickin' Gump). How many of Beckett's family members have we met? One. Her dad. And kind of her mom, since she's been talked about a lot. Now, how about any of the other characters? Umm...Jenny? Yeah, Ryan's wife. And technically his daughter.

So maybe I've missed a few people here and there (like Castle's ex-wives), but you get my point. We have spent basically six years watching this show, but most of the characters that we see every week may as well be strangers. And the reason for this is that so much time is given to Castle and Beckett. Because the writers believe that the more Nathan Fillion appears in an episode, the more people will like it. Furthermore, they fear that if Fillion doesn't appear that much in an episode, people will like it lest. At least, that's what I'm getting from this.

But the thing is, they're wrong. Whoever believes that more Fillion equals a better episode is wrong. Hold up, let me take that back. I don't want death threats. Let's say instead that less Fillion doesn't equal a worse episode. Once again, take "Under Fire" as an example. In my opinion that episode probably belongs somewhere high up on the all-time list. And yet, Fillion had far less screen time than he normally does. And when he did show up, he wasn't the focus of attention. Nor did he stand out like he normally does (except for that one scene in which he pointed most epically).

What have I spent a ridiculously long time trying to spell out? Maybe the writers should write episodes for the sake of making them good, rather than making sure that fans have as large a Fillion quota as possible. Give other characters a chance. Let Esposito return to his former school for once, or interact with an old flame, or do anything for that matter. What's more, I think the writers should shake things up a bit, like they did seasons back when Montgomery was killed off. Yeah, Montgomery. The one and only main character who has ever been killed off on this show, and the only main or significantly recurring character who ever turned out to be behind or involved with something sinister. Let's be honest, that was a huge highpoint of this series. Don't make that and the wedding (assuming it happens) the only events this show is remembered for. Though I guess they'll always have time travel. And telekinesis, sort of.

Anyway, that's my $5,000 worth of opinion. Here's some polls.

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Notes From the Bloody Fountain Pen:

1. What did you think of the episode? Let me know. Or not. Either way I won't have any trouble sleeping at night.

2. So, no mention of the wedding this week. Instead Castle and Beckett found a song in the most predictable way possible. I guess it was cute and all, but really? At least they didn't refuse to speak to each other because it turns out they don't like the same bands.

3. I know I already went on and on about how a lot of the show's main characters are underused. But I have to ask: is Gates still alive? More importantly, is she still relevant? Alexis and Martha are Castle's family, so they'll always be relevant. Laney's job is a key part of most investigations. But Gates is...kind of just there? Some of the time? Very rarely? What do we even know about her? I mean, she came late to the party, after the writers had gone to the trouble of actually introducing all the main characters. She never really got an introduction. Okay, so she's angry and doesn't like Castle. Except not anymore, though she's still angry sometimes. And she likes dolls. That's it. That's really it. Oh, Penny Johnson Jerald, you could do so much better. Though I guess she's getting paid stacks of cash just to show up every once in a while to maintain the show's balance of diversity. Still, she's a quality actor. Give her something to do.

4. Where is Alexis these days? Did she violently kill Pi, have to hide the body out in the middle of nowhere, and has been laying low and covering her tracks this whole time? If the next time we see Alexis she seems happy, then we know that's exactly what happened.

5. So, we're expected to believe that Madison played such an elaborate prank on one of her friends, and for an entire week the other friend wasn't told about it? Yeah right. The thought of someone like Madison keeping it just between her and Kris is less believable than telekinesis.

6. So far, Castle has been playing with fire when it comes to time travel and telekinesis. Both of these are still more Fringe than they areSupernatural, but this may change. How do you feel about the whole rise in supernatural supremacy that we may be seeing? Do you think it will lead anywhere? Do you think we'll be seeing the same thing with ghosts, curses, leprechauns, etc? Or will they only dance over the line every time something sci-fi comes along?

7. Why specifically do you watch Castle? And if you don't, why are you reading this?

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