• 41
    F Troop

    F Troop

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    ABC (ended 1967)
    F Troop was a classic comedy set in the Old West. Fort Courage was the home of the US Army's sorriest band of misfits, led by the well-meaning Captain Parmenter, scion of a distinguished line of military officers, but himself naive, clumsy, bumbling and reliant on the Army manual. The old hand of the fort was Sergeant O'Rourke, who secretly ran O'Rourke Enterprises, a string of profitable but not always upstanding businesses, on the side, including the town saloon and an Indian souvenir company. He was happy when Parmenter was assigned to Fort Courage, a commanding officer who would be easy to hide his shenanigans from. O'Rourke's sidekick was the loyal but not too bright Corporal Agarn. Their business partner was the cranky but affable Wild Eagle, chief of the Hekawi. Completing the circle was Wrangler Jane, the beautiful blonde owner of the general store in town. She was a expert in all things Western, including shooting, horseback riding and lassoing, and fancied the dashing, young captain who was too bashful to return her affections in public. The men of F Troop were a motley lot. Bugler Dobbs had a hard time playing anything but Yankee Doodle, and not well at that. Duffy would often hold forth on how he stood side by side with Davy Crockett at the Alamo. Vanderbilt, who often stood guard duty, was nearly blind and hard of hearing. Duddleson was a slob, sort of F Troop's equivalent of Peanuts' Pigpen. Hoffenmueller spoke no English. The rest were as incompetent as they were undistinguished. A running joke was the guard tower constantly falling down, usually blasted by the balky cannon but sometimes felled by something as simple as an arrow. Aiding and abetting O'Rourke in his numerous moneymaking schemes were the Hekawi, the most cowardly tribe in the country. Lacking the will and skills to fight, they turned to commerce, manufacturing the souvenirs for O'Rourke Enterprises and brewing the whiskey for his saloon. Chief Wild Eagle was helped by his second in command, Crazy Cat. Unlike other military comedies such as McHale's Navy or Gomer Pyle, nobody ever really hated each other, as Captain Binghamton did McHale and Sergeant Carter did Gomer. The show and all its characters were all in good-hearted fun, a family show for all ages. The theme song said it perfectly: "Where Indian fights are colorful sights but nobody takes a licking."moreless
  • 42
    The Dick Van Dyke Show

    The Dick Van Dyke Show

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    CBS (ended 1966)
    Once Upon a Time... There's a New Show on CBS-TV called The Dick Van Dyke Show debuted on October 3, 1961 and fresh out of the pilot called "Head of the Family" in 1960 as part of "The Comedy Spot". On this Series, Set in New Rochelle, NY at home. The Show focus on Robert "Rob" Petrie is the husband and Father of 1 Child and the Head Writer of the mythical "THE ALAN BRADY SHOW" where his co-writers Maurice "Buddy" Sorrell & Sally Rogers. Buddy Sorrell is a Married Man and he's unflappable and also he can insult Mel Cooley. Sally Rogers is a Single Woman as she's looking for a Husband. Melvin "Mel" Cooley is the Brother-In-Law of the Star of the Show and the unseen wife and The Star of the Show is Alan Brady is egomaniac, arrogant, selfish, obnoxious and stubborn Boss of Rob, Sally & Buddy in New York City. At Home, There's Laura Meeker Petrie is a Sensitive but Nervous and absolute Sexy Wife and Mother of 1 Child when she knows, sees and hears about goings-on of Rob's follies and non-sensible activities. The Child is Richard R. "Richie" Petrie is the 1 and Only Child of Rob & Laura happens to be their own son as he's being obedient and an habit of trouble and very loud when he gets into havoc of his wild fantasies and mischievous schemes and finally The Helpers lived across the street where Millie & Jerry Helper are helping out. Stories relates the trials and tribulations of the Petries, the Helpers and the Writing Staff of "THE ALAN BRADY SHOW". On September 7, 1966 THE DICK VAN DYKE SHOW is hot on CBS-TV when its Cancelled. The Daytime Edition of the show aired reruns from August 1965 to September 1969. Syndicated from 1969 to 1991. From September 1991 to September 1998, Nick-at-Nite aired the show and in 1997, TV LAND airs the show. In 2004 CBS-TV and TV LAND airs the true last episode of the show. -------------- NIELSEN RATINGS (Top 30 or Better) No Ranking in the 1961-1962 Season No. 9 in the 1962-1963 Season No. 3 in the 1963-1964 Season No. 7 in the 1964-1965 Season No. 16 in the 1965-1966 Season No. 12 in the 1965-1966 Season (Daytime) No. 11 in the 1966-1967 Season (Daytime) No. 18 in the 1967-1968 Season (Daytime) No Ranking in the 1968-1969 Season (Daytime) __________ THE BROADCAST HISTORY of The Dick Van Dyke Show October 3, 1961-December 26, 1961 Tuesdays at 8:00-8:30pm January 3, 1962-September 16, 1964 Wednesdays at 9:30-10:00pm September 23, 1964-September 8, 1965 Wednesdays at 9:00-9:30pm September 15, 1965-September 7, 1966 Wednesdays at 9:30-10:00pm on CBS-TV Nighttime. August 2-13, 1965 Monday-Friday at 7:30-8:00am on CBS-TV August 16, 1965-September 2, 1966 Monday-Friday at 11:00-11:30am on CBS-TV September 5, 1966-September 5, 1969 Monday-Friday at 11:30am-12Noon on CBS-TV Daytime.moreless
  • 43
    Love, American Style

    Love, American Style

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    ABC (ended 1974)
    Love, American Style entertained viewers with stories about common people finding love in all walks of life. In this anthology series, each hour-long broadcast consisted of a group of vignettes, aired sequentially and separately and each with an introductory title card. Normally there were three or four vignettes to a show, although occasionally there were as few as one or as many as five. Short blackout skits would be shown in between segments whenever time allowed. The skits featured a recurring cast of players which included James Hampton, best known as Hannibal Dobbs from F Troop, and veteran character actor Stuart Margolin, brother of executive producer Arnold Margolin. The syndication rerun package consisted of 30-minute broadcasts that were edited from the original hour-long broadcasts, except for those which aired in the first half of season 2, which ran in a 30-minute time slot. The show never ranked above #25 in the Nielsen Ratings. Time slots that Love, American Style originally aired in: September 29, 1969 to January 12, 1970: Mondays, 10:00 to 11:00. January 23, 1970 to September 18, 1970: Fridays, 10:00 to 11:00. September 25, 1970 to January 15, 1971: Fridays, 9:30 to 10:00. January 22, 1971 to January 11, 1974: Fridays 10:00 to 11:00. In 1970, the show received a Golden Globe nomination for Best TV Show in a Musical or Comedy. It also won two Emmys for Charles Fox's musical compositions and was nominated for two more. The theme song was originally sung by the pop group, the Cowsills, but later replaced by an uptempo version, credited to the "Love American Style Singers." There was a short-lived revival in 1986 called The New Love, American Style, which aired on ABC's daytime schedule. One of the segments, "Love and the Happy Days," spawned a successful spin-off series, Happy Days.moreless
  • 44
    The Jetsons

    The Jetsons

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    ABC (ended 1987)
    With the success of The Flintstones, the modern Stone Age family, Hanna-Barbera decided to make a similar family cartoon, but set in their vision of the Space Age in the 21st century. This new series that debuted September 23, 1962 became The Jetsons. Set mainly in sky-high Orbit City, the show featured the family of George Jetson, Jane, his wife, their daughter Judy, and son Elroy living the average life in the future with flying space cars, instant transport tubes, and various robots and gadgets than can get their work done for them in a matter of seconds.

    George brought in the family income by working at Spacely Space Sprockets, run by his stocky, ill-tempered boss Cosmo Spacely, who's usually quick to fire George for any reason he could find. But somehow, he always managed to get his job back and continue supporting his family. He works as an indexer and is teamed with his helpful computer R.U.D.I. Other than the threats of firing by Spacely, George would also have to worry about any schemes carried out by Mr. Spacely's top business rival W.C. Cogswell, owner and president of Cogswell Cogs. If there's a dispute between the two businessmen, it's almost certain George would wind up in the middle of it. Most times, though, things always worked out in the end.

    Jane is the housewife who tends to the home, but loves to shop for the latest fashions and various items that can be a help to the family, like new gadgets that can help them in new ways. She's assisted by the family's robot maid Rosey (which can also be spelled Rosie). She's one of the older-fashioned models compared to most of the advanced robot maids of the future, but the Jetsons love her and regard her as a member of the family.

    Judy is the Jetsons' teenage daughter who attends Orbit High School and goes for the latest teen fashions, trends, and music, and seems to have a different boyfriend in most episodes. If she's lucky, she can even wind up dating a celebrity, like her favorite rock star Jet Screamer, much to her father's chagrin.

    Elroy is the Jetsons' genius son who attends Little Dipper Elementary School and is a straight-A student. He's a part-time inventor and can make new creations in hope to make a better future, and if fortunate, a little money on the side. But most times, he likes to be an average boy by playing various sports, and with his faithful companion, the family's dog Astro, who at times is overly affectionate, and can annoy George at times. But like Rosey, he's regarded as a member of the family.

    The Jetsons reside at the Skypad Apartments, which are properly cared for by superintendant Henry Orbit, who like Elroy is a mechanical genius. At times, he can invent gadgets that can help him with his maintenance work. His greatest accomplishment is his robot assistant Mac, who can get his work at the Skypad Apartments done in half the time. But he does have feelings for Rosey as the two are occasionally seen as a couple, but are mainly friends.

    Other recurring characters in this series include Mr. Spacely's family, particularly his wife Stella (sometimes called Petunia, likely her nickname), one of few people who can actually put a scare in him if he rubs her the wrong way. And they have a young son close to Elroy's age named Arthur. Common characters at Spacely Sprockets are Uniblab, an underling robot who at times is a stool pigeon for Mr. Spacely to George's dismay, as well as Spacely's secretary Miss Galaxy. Cogswell also had a few subordinates of his own. Among them were his assistant Harlan and his scientist Moonstone.

    The Jetsons ran for only one season on ABC, but the series was more successful in syndication. This led to a revival in 1985 with new episodes with more advanced animation that was richer in color and made the series even more futuristic than the 1960's version of the 21st century. New characters were introduced as well, including a new alien gremlin pet for the Jetsons, named Orbitty, who has springlike legs and suction cup feet, enabling him to hang upside down. He could also tinker with machines and change color in accordance to emotion. Another new animal for the revival was a robot dog for Cogwell named Sentro, who served as a guard dog and a spy often used against Mr. Spacely in efforts to beat him to the punch on his latest projects.

    These episodes aired in syndication, which generated the same level of success as the originals when they went in that direction. This led to 10 more episodes to finalize the series in 1987, as well as two TV movies, the music-themed Rockin' with Judy Jetson, which was preceded by the epic crossover The Jetsons Meet the Flintstones, which brought the Space Age and the Stone Age together as Hanna-Barbera's most famous families had a grand adventure spanning two eras. The Jetsons had its true finale when Jetsons: The Movie hit the theaters in 1990, as this would be among the last voice work for actors George O'Hanlon (George Jetson) and Mel Blanc (Mr. Spacely) for they both had died just prior to the movie's release.

    Overall, The Jetsons may not have had the supreme popularity of The Flintstones, but it did have a wide appeal for families of any generation and certainly had a place in the heart for those who would turn on and watch the series.

    The Jetsons, like many Hanna-Barbera series, can be seen on Boomerang from Cartoon Network. Check your local listings. And the majority of the series can be seen on DVD, so it would be a good means to build your cartoon collection.moreless
  • 45
    Mayberry R.F.D.

    Mayberry R.F.D.

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    CBS (ended 1971)
    Mayberry R.F.D. premiered in 1968 as a spin off of The Andy Griffith Show (1960-68) with the highest ratings, at the time, of any new show in the history of television. Andy Griffith had grown tired of doing The Andy Griffith Show, so it was decided to continue the show using a different format. Sam Jones arrived in Mayberry during the final season of The Andy Griffith Show. He was very similar to Andy and, also, had a son. The last episode of The Andy Griffith Show served as the pilot for Mayberry R.F.D. In the first episode of Mayberry R.F.D., Andy and Helen were married. Don Knotts also gave a special appearance as Barney Fife. Shortly after Andy and Helen were married, they moved away. Most regulars from The Andy Griffith Show did stay including Howard Sprague, Emmett Clark, Goober Pyle, and, for the first two seasons, Bee Taylor. In 1971, Mayberry R.F.D. was cancelled by CBS in an effort to rid itself of its image as the "hillbilly" network. Main Title Theme Song "The Mayberry March" written by Earle Hagen and Carl Brandt CBS Broadcast History September 23, 1968 - September 6, 1971 ---- Mondays ---- 9:00 - 9:30 P.M. Nielsen Ratings Season 1 (1968-69) #4 (25.4) Season 2 (1969-70) #4 (24.4) Season 3 (1970-71) #15 (22.3) First Telecast: September 23, 1968 Last Telecast: March 29, 1971 Episodes: 78 color episodesmoreless
  • 46
    Top Cat

    Top Cat

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    ABC (ended 1962)
    The misadventures of a smart-aleck, street-wise alley cat name T.C., and his pals Benny, Choo Choo, Fancy, Brain and Spook; who get into many acts of trouble with Officer Charlie Dibble, and always have each other. Watch Top Cat on Boomerang. Like The Flintstones, Top Cat was another situation cartoon created by Hanna-Barbera Theme song lyrics: Top Cat The most effec-tu-al Top Cat Who's intellectual close friends get to call him T. C. Providing it's with dignity Top Cat The indisputable leader of the gang He's the boss He's the VIP He's a championship He's the most tip top - Top Cat Yes he's the chief He's the king, but above everything He's the most tip top - Top Cat!moreless
  • 47
    The Munsters

    The Munsters

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    CBS (ended 1966)
    The Munsters was one of the two "creepy" sitcoms that began in 1964. CBS aired The Munsters and ABC aired The Addams Family. Both of them lasted only two years and finished their network run within a week of each other.

    The Munsters live at 1313 Mockingbird Lane.

    Show Characters

    Herman Munster: The irascible head of the family. One of Frankenstein's monsters, he works at a funeral parlor, and has the same intelligence as some of the "stiffs" he works with.

    Lily Munster: Also known as the family homemaker. She has long flowing black hair with a white streak, and manages to keep up her appearance, despite cleaning and cooking.

    Eddie Munster: A typical American boy who howls at the moon and goes to sleep with his Woof-Woof.

    Marilyn Munster: The plain one of the bunch, is actually an all American beautiful blonde, who also goes to college.

    Grandpa Munster: The original Count Dracula, who was born and raised in Transylvania and doubles as a mad scientist. First Telecast: September 24, 1964 Last Telecast: September 1, 1966

    Episodes: 70 B&W Episodesmoreless
  • 48
    Get Smart

    Get Smart

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    NBC (ended 1970)
    In 1965 the cold war was made a little warmer and a lot funnier due in part to the efforts of an inept, underpaid, overzealous spy: Maxwell Smart, Agent 86. The hit comedy series 'Get Smart' is the creation of comic geniuses Buck Henry and Mel Brooks. Henry teamed with Brooks to create what has undoubtedly become one of the finest parody/satires of all time. The project seemed headed for success from the start: ABC had green lighted it based on the strength of the concept, and they had an actor already under contract to play Smart. Brooks was approached to write the pilot. As he was looking for a way to finance his new movie The Producers, he agreed. Deemed "not funny", the initial script was rejected by ABC. Undaunted, the production team shopped the script around and NBC accepted it with one minor change. They wanted Don Adams in the title role. And so, an unlikely legend was born. Set in Washington, D.C., the show features Agent 86 (Maxwell Smart), his boss (The Chief), Smart's partner and later wife (Agent 99) and a host of other agents both good and evil. Perhaps one of the most important elements of the show is the gadgetry created to help Smart in his quest to keep the free world free. On this show, anything including the kitchen sink can be a phone, a tape recorder, a camera or weapon. Looking for an Agent? Check under your seat cushion. Want a weapon? Try your finger-gun. Need to make a phone call? Open up that bologna sandwich. The show was painted in the broadest of strokes and played every moment for its own delightful reality. In order to give the agents of CONTROL, a series of worthy opponents, KAOS was created. Smart and 99 battled the likes of Mr. Big, The Claw, and Siegfried. On the home front, Max and 99 had a relationship that developed as the show ran and eventually they married. 99 soon gave birth to twins (a boy and a girl) and the Smart family (and the show) began to experience some growing pains. Get Smart ran from 1965 through 1970 on both NBC and CBS. For one month in 1995 FOX attempted to bring the series back with some changes; Max as the Chief, 99 as a Congresswoman, and the Smart twins were now inexplicably only one child. Despite the lack of success experienced by the sequel, Get Smart remains a favorite by agents and civilians alike. (TV Land) ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Telecast NBC September 18, 1965 - September 20, 1969 CBS September 26, 1969 - September 11, 1970 Broadcast History Sep 1965 - Sep 1968, NBC Sat 8:30-9:00 Sep 1968 - Sep 1969, NBC Sat 8:00-8:30 Sep 1969 - Feb/Apr - Sep 1970, CBS Fri 7:30-8:00 Episodes 138 Episodes On Film 1 Episode in Black And White; 137 Episodes In Color -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------moreless
  • 49
    Underdog

    Underdog

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    NBC (ended 1967)
    Welcome to the Underdog guide at TV.com. There's no need to fear! Underdog is here! When criminals in this world appear
    And break the laws that they should fear
    And frighten all who see or hear
    The cry goes up both far and near
    For Underdog! Underdog! Underdog! Underdog!
    Speed of lightning, roar of thunder
    Fighting all who rob or plunder
    Underdog. Underdog!
    When in this world the headlines read
    Of those whose hearts are filled with greed
    Who rob and steal from those who need
    To right this wrong with blinding speed
    Goes Underdog! Underdog! Underdog! Underdog!
    Speed of lightning, roar of thunder
    Fighting all who rob or plunder
    Underdog. Underdog!
    ** The original airing order of the episodes is not available, but if you uncover it or have some info to add, please submit it. Thanks. **moreless
  • 50
    Disneyland

    Disneyland

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    ABC (ended 1990)
    Walt Disney, one of Hollywood's most ambitious producers, was first approached to do television in 1950, when The Coca-Cola Company offered him a one-hour special. The one hour special, "One Hour in Wonderland," aired December 25, 1950 on NBC and garnered 90% of the television viewing audience. A second special, "The Walt Disney Christmas Special," aired December 25, 1951 on CBS. When Walt had drawn up plans for a theme park, known as Disneyland, he found a hard time obtaining funding; critics, including Walt's brother Roy, thought that it was unfeasible and that it would be a fiasco. At the same time, the ABC television network offered him a deal for a television anthology series. Walt wouldn't agree to it unless they put up partial financing for Disneyland (a term that had kept CBS and NBC from signing with him). ABC agreed, and also paid him $50,000 per program, an exorbitant sum for the time. The show, titled Disneyland, premiered on October 27, 1954 and was an immediate success. Historically, the show is significant for two reasons. First, with thirty-four seasons, it is the longest-running prime time network series in history (not counting news programs; if one were to count news programs, 60 Minutes would take that title). Second, it was the first original television production by a major Hollywood studio. Other studios resented television for fear that it would keep people from going out to the movies. Thus, they refused to produce television programs, and they refused to let networks or stations use any of their more recent or better-known material. Walt Disney was the first Hollywood producer to do so. Disneyland was a mixture of cartoons, live-action adventures, documentaries, and nature stories. Some of these were made expressly for television, but others were former theatrical releases. Many of the early programs were designed to promote upcoming theatrical releases. One particular early success of the Disneyland series was the Davy Crockett trilogy. This was a phenomenal success in every aspect; the merchandising bonanza that followed sold $300 million worth of Crockett memorabilia. Thus, ABC wanted more adventure stories along the lines of Davy Crockett. Disney provided them, but none were nearly as successful. Along the way, in 1958, it was retitled Walt Disney Presents. Eventually the show became more reliant on original material, though pre-existing material was used at times. In 1961, his contract with ABC expired. He moved his show to NBC where he could broadcast it in color (ABC would not have the capability for color broacasting until 1962). It was rechristened Walt Disney's Wonderful World of Color, with an original theme song by Richard M. Sherman and Robert B. Sherman (who went on to write the song scores to such well-known Disney films as Mary Poppins, The Jungle Book, The Many Adventures of Winnie-the-Pooh and Bedknobs and Broomsticks). It premiered on NBC on Sunday, September 24, 1961. On NBC, he was able to re-air many of the ABC shows in color, as they had been filmed that way as insurance for possible future airings once color broadcasting, or "colorcasting," took hold. In September of 1966, doctors told Walt Disney, a lifetime chain-smoker, that he had lung cancer. Though the cancerous lung was removed, doctors told him that the cancer had been detected too late, and he died on Thursday, December 15, 1966. Knowing full well that no one could replace him as a host, Walt Disney Productions dropped the hosted introduction segments after the season's end. Luckily, Walt had filmed that all of that season's host segments before it was too late. The show changed its name to The Wonderful World of Disney on September 14, 1969, and dropped the Sherman Brothers theme song in favor of various alternating medleys of well-known songs from Disney movies and parks. The trusted Disney name continued to insure high ratings for the next few years. As popular tastes changed dramatically during the late 1960s and early 1970s, the public seemed to have largely begun to turn away from anything Disney (except theme parks and merchandise), seeing the name as symptomatic of a square, uptight, and unhip mindset that young people were coming to reject. The studio itself suffered from the lack of hit movies and accusations of incompetent management at the time. The ratings of the anthology series, however, remained reasonably stable, enough so that NBC renewed Disney's contract through 1978. In the fall of 1975, the show began a ratings decline when it was moved back to 7 PM from 7:30 PM. Disney's ratings fell from the Top 30 and continued to fall every year afterwards. The following year went face to with CBS's 60 Minutes. Though it had begun in 1968 and was scheduled on Tuesday, the CBS newsmagazine had been scheduled on Sunday evenings since the 1971-1972 season, and had been held back until after football season due to the risk of pre-emptions; it was this year that the show finally began its season in the fall. The show was easily able to beat ABC's Sunday night offerings but trailed the CBS newsmagazine by a wide margin. As the number of original installments decreased every year, so, too, did the ratings. In 1979, NBC (which, as a network, was also in the midst of a very public, humiliating decline) threatened Disney with cancellation unless the ratings improved. That fall, Walt Disney Productions rechristened the anthology series Disney's Wonderful World and commissioned a new, original theme song by John Debney and John Klawitter, new opening and closing credits, and a new announcer, Gary Owens (longtime announcer Dick Wesson committed suicide in January of that year). In a flashback to the original themed format, many episodes initially were divided into one of four categories: "Fantasy Night," "Adventure Night," "Comedy Night," and "Animation Night." Beneath the "happy new face" sung of in the new theme song, however, was more of the same: too little original material, airings of theatrical movies, and far too many reruns. In spite of this, the face-lift helped the ratings, so the show was renewed for the 1980-1981 season. But the next season saw only 10 installments that had not been aired on the anthology series before, and pre-emptions were far more frequent. Ratings for the show's 27th season did not improve, and in on December 30, 1980 NBC announced that it would not be renewing the series for next season. All was not lost that year, as the show was then immediately picked up by CBS. It was moved from its longtime Sunday night slot to Saturday night at 8 PM, as the network would not displace its highly-rated pride and joy 60 Minutes. Retitled Walt Disney, the show promised to present more original programming than it had in its final years on NBC. On September 26, 1981, after a huge advertising campaign by the network, the series premiered on CBS. Ratings improved against mediocre competition, and the show was renewed for another season (its 29th on network television). A few of these shows were pilots for series that were never picked up. The second CBS year saw an increase in the number of reruns (as opposed to last year's increase in new episodes), and the ratings dropped. Disney did, however, produce several midseason replacement series for CBS, but all of them failed. On Monday, April 18, 1983, Walt Disney Productions and Westinghouse Broadcasting launched The Disney Channel, a cable network created to showcase the large library of Disney cartoons, movies, and TV shows (the anthology series was rerun under the name Walt Disney Presents). Thus, in the eyes of CBS, the anthology series had outlived its purpose and was canceled. There were occasional network and syndicated specials, but all of Disney's television resources were concentrated on the cable service. When Michael Eisner became CEO of Walt Disney Productions in September of 1984, one of the first things he and his new regime did was express an interest in reviving Disney's presence on network TV. He had some success, as the Emmy-winning, Touchstone-produced sitcom The Golden Girls and the Saturday morning cartoon (a medium with which Walt Disney himself had refused to get involved due to fears of compromised quality) Disney's Adventures of the Gummi Bears both premiered on NBC on Saturday, September 14, 1985 and lasted several years. However, these particular shows were the exception, not the rule; a number of series that the new regime eventually launched failed (Wildside and The Ellen Burstyn Show, for instance). Also, of course, did the company plan to revive the anthology series. Now known as The Disney Sunday Movie, it made its much-hyped return to network television on February 2, 1986 after a hiatus of 2 years, 4 months, and eight days, replacing the dismally-rated Ripley's Believe it or Not. Just as Walt Disney had hosted the original until his death, Michael Eisner appeared in an introductory segment at the beginning of each episode. Nostalgia and ratings were high initially, but both eventually wore off. The show premiered at a two-hour length, but in the fall of 1987, once again being soundly beaten in the ratings regularly by 60 Minutes in its first hour, and by Murder, She Wrote in its second, it was shortened to one hour for its third and final season on ABC. NBC, which had not been able to launch a hit show in Disney's old time slot in the seven years since the show was axed by that network, picked up the show, which was renamed The Magical World of Disney. At first, a rotating "wheel" format was used, utilizing three different genres; every fourth week would be a special. This lasted until a few months into the following season. Eisner continued to host the show, but ratings on NBC were no better than they had been on ABC, and it limped through a two-year run here before the network pulled the plug for good. After 36 years (save for the September 1983-January 1986 hiatus), one of television's last remaining institutions from its golden age came to an unceremonious end. In 1995, The Walt Disney Company announced plans to buy out the ABC television network, which went through in January of 1996. In the fall of 1997, a family-oriented movie time slot was set aside on ABC and christened The Wonderful World of Disney. Ratings to date have been middling. Though the show is not currently repeated anywhere (The Disney Channel dropped it and all vintage Disney programming in September of 2002), episodes are slowly being released on DVD in the United States, and its legacy of quality television entertainment for all members of the family lives on in the hearts and minds of many. Here is a chronology of titles used for the series: Disneyland: October 27, 1954-September 3, 1958
    Walt Disney Presents: September 12, 1958-September 17, 1961
    Walt Disney's Wonderful World of Color: September 24, 1961-September 7, 1969
    The Wonderful World of Disney: September 14, 1969-September 2, 1979
    Disney's Wonderful World: September 9, 1979-September 13, 1981
    Walt Disney: September 26, 1981-September 24, 1983
    The Disney Sunday Movie: February 2, 1986-September 11, 1988
    The Magical World of Disney: October 9, 1988-September 9, 1990 The final name was used as an umbrella title for Disney movie airings on cable's The Disney Channel from September 23, 1990 to August 25, 1996. ABC Broadcast History (1954-1961):
    October 27, 1954-September 3, 1958: Wednesday, 7:30 PM-8:30 PM
    September 12, 1958-September 25, 1959: Friday, 8:00 PM-9:00 PM
    October 2, 1959-September 23, 1960: Friday, 7:30 PM-8:30 PM
    September 25, 1960-September 17, 1961: Sunday, 6:30 PM-7:30 PM NBC Broadcast History (1961-1981):
    September 24, 1961-August 31, 1975: Sunday, 7:30 PM-8:30 PM
    September 14, 1975-September 11, 1977: Sunday, 7:00 PM-8:00 PM
    September 18, 1977-October 23, 1977: Sunday, 7:00 PM-9:00 PM
    October 30, 1977-September 13, 1981: Sunday, 7:00 PM-8:00 PM CBS Broadcast History (1981-1983):
    September 26, 1981-January 1, 1983: Saturday, 8:00 PM-9:00 PM
    January 4, 1983-February 15, 1983: Tuesday, 8:00 PM-9:00 PM
    July 9, 1983-September 24, 1983: Saturday, 8:00 PM-9:00 PM
    (two irregularly scheduled airings on May 3, 1983 and May 21, 1983) ABC Broadcast History (1986-1988):
    February 2, 1986-September 6, 1987: Sunday, 7:00 PM-9:00 PM
    September 13, 1987-September 11, 1988: Sunday, 7:00 PM-8:00 PM NBC Broadcast History (1988-1990):
    October 9, 1988-July 2, 1989: Sunday, 7:00 PM-8:00 PM
    July 9, 1989-July 23, 1989: Sunday, 8:00 PM-9:00 PM
    August 6, 1989-February 25, 1990: Sunday, 7:00 PM-8:00 PM
    March 4, 1990-April 15, 1990: Sunday, 7:00 PM-9:00 PM
    April 22, 1990-May 6, 1990: Sunday, 7:00 PM-8:00 PM
    May 27, 1990-July 22, 1990: Sunday, 7:00 PM-9:00 PM
    August 5, 1990-September 9, 1990: Sunday, 7:00 PM-8:00 PM
    First Telecast: October 27, 1954
    Last Telecast: September 9, 1990 Episodes: 751 (180 black and white episodes, 571 color episodes [as far as the format in which they were first broadcast]) (NOTE: many of these were originally theatrical releases, and a small number were specials aired at other times, but for purposes of their first airing on the anthology series they are counted as episodes)moreless
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    Dad's Army

    Dad's Army

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    BBC (ended 1977)
    Intoducing the Walmington-On-Sea home guard, a bunch of hapless old and young men who have kept people all over the world very amused for the past forty years. Creator/Writers David Croft and Jimmy Perry made each episode of Dad's Army as funny as the previous one, with an element of humour which has survived decades. It has the most memorable catch phrases of any sitcom and due to our fondness of it, it's probably the most re-run show ever. The BBC keep an episode of it queued up incase of a fault at TV centre and it even successfully invaded the big screen with a memorable, well loved Dad's Army feature film made by Columbia pictures.moreless
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    That Girl (1966)

    That Girl (1966)

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    ABC (ended 1971)
    Talented, young, and beautiful, and hoping to make a career as an actress, Ann Marie leaves her home in Brewster, New York and moves to Manhattan,where she acquires Apartment 4-D at 344 West 78th Street. Stories tenderly depict her world of joys and sorrows as she struggles to further a dream, supporting herself by taking various part-time jobs, cope with parents who don't understand her, and share the interests of her boyfriend, Don Hollinger, a reporter for Newsview magazine. Ann shared a romance with Don for five seasons and finally got engaged in the final season. Before they can could get married, the show was cancelled. Broadcast History: Sept. 8, 1966-Apr. 6, 1967, ABC Thursday at 9:30-10:00pm Apr. 13, 1967-Jan. 30, 1969, ABC Thursday at 9:00-9:30pm Feb. 6, 1969-Sept. 10, 1970, ABC Thursday at 8:00-8:30pm Sept. 25, 1970-Sept. 10, 1971, ABC Friday at 9:00-9:30pm The show never broke into the top 30 in the Nielsen ratings.moreless
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    Here's Lucy

    Here's Lucy

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    CBS (ended 1974)
    HERE'S LUCY. This often forgotten and critically bashed series from Lucille Ball, her 3rd, is arguably superior to the LUCY SHOW. Probably unjustly misaligned by critics due to a difficult and weak opening season, HERE"S LUCY improved with every season and contains some of the best work of Lucille Ball's career. The wonderfully abstract LUCY SHOW plays more as a variety show than sitcom, and certainly has its share of classic episodes. Missing from the Lucy Show, however, is the character development , focus, and warmth ( that made I LOVE LUCY so successful). HERE"S LUCY switches formats and focus' on widower Lucy Carter, single-working Mom and life with her two children (Ball's own children with Desi Arnaz), and their Uncle Harry. Played by Gale Gordon, Uncle Harry was also Lucy's over-bearing boss. As the seasons pass, Uncle Harry softens and Lucy, Kim, and Craig play more as a family unit. Like Lucy Ricardo, Lucy Carter still loved to get into the show, and her work at the "Unique Employment Agency" often allowed her the chance to sing and dance with top guest stars. Carol Burnett, Jack Benny, and Vivian Vance make numerous, nearly seasonal guest appearances, and other famous guests included Liz Taylor and Richard Burton, Flip Wilson, Ann-Margret, Johnny Carson, Milton Berle, Helen Hays, and Ginger Rogers. Still featuring Lucille Ball's amazing talents for physical comedy and turning a funny line, HERE"S LUCY features dozens of iconic "LUCY" moments. Lucy as down-trodden Dirty Gertie, Lucy wielding a jackhammer on cement, Lucy sky-diving through the roof of a lodge, the famous stuck-on-her-finger Liz Taylor diamond ring, Lucy in a giant pickle outfit, and Lucy and Mannix tied to chairs, physically jumping, bouncing the chairs to comedic perfection, and of course, the moment zany Lucy Carter meets superstar actress Lucille Ball! Many episodes are written by her I LOVE LUCY writers, as well as other tops-in-their field scribes such as Bob O'Brien, the Fox-Jacob's team, and Lou Derman (many of these writer's were presenting their best work simultaneously to ALL IN THE FAMILY). Even with numerous top directors at the helm�Herbert Kenwith, Jerry Paris, Jack Donohue, Jay Sandrich, and Coby Ruskin� it is often repeated that Lucille Ball really directed the shows, but offered deference to the directors she most trusted and respected. This show is rarely seen in syndication despite relatively high ratings during the intital run (Season 1 #9, Season 2 #6, Season 3 #3, Season 4 #11, Season 5 #15, Season 6 #29). It had a daytime run on CBS in 1977. This was followed by it's debut in off-network syndication in Fall of 1981 by Telepictures. Most stations aired the show in latenight after the first few months. Now the show is seen mostly in international markets or on independant stations. PAX TV ran the series briefly in the late 90's. A DVD with 24 episodes was released in 2005 and features lots of great bonus features. Here's Lucy Season sets will be coming out starting with Season One in August 2009, Season Two in November 2009, Season 3 in mid 2010 and continuing until Dec 2012 with the entire series to come out on MPI video. The DVDs will have a ton of special features.moreless
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    Charlie Brown

    Charlie Brown

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    CBS
    Charles Schulz's classic comic strip Peanuts started in 1950. Fifteen years later, A Charlie Brown Christmas debuted. When The Little Christmas Special that Could proved to be an unexpected success, the stage was set for successive television specials. To date, over forty have been made. The Charlie Brown specials focus on one round-headed kid, his goofy but intelligent beagle, and their vast array of friends. Each has distinctive qualities: Lucy, the crabby, self-proclaimed psychiatrist; Linus, the blanket-toting theologian; Schroeder, the Beethoven worshiper whose black piano keys are only painted on; Peppermint Patty, the tomboy whose affections toward "Chuck" are only outweighed by her sports abilities; and so on. The wit, the charm, the pleasantness of these specials make them appropriate not just for children, but for the whole family.moreless
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    The Dick Emery Show

    The Dick Emery Show

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    BBC (ended 1981)
    British sketch comedy show
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    Dennis the Menace

    Dennis the Menace

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    CBS (ended 1963)
    This is the 1959 CBS live-action situation comedy based on the comic strip by Hank Ketcham. Dennis is portrayed as the helpful menace that always seemed to cause chaos. Dennis Mitchell lived at 627 Elm Street with his parents, Henry and Alice. Next door was his best friend, Mr. Wilson (though the feeling was, certainly, not mutual). Dennis always was around to help Mr. Wilson whether he wanted the help or not. The allure of the series was to see how Dennis would unintentionally mess things up for Mr. Wilson. The series lasted four seasons, but, perhaps, could have lasted longer. Joseph Kearns, the actor who portrayed Mr. George Wilson, died during the show's third season. This left a huge void that even veteran actor Gale Gordon (Mr. John Wilson) couldn't fill. He was introduced toward the end of the third season, and the series was cancelled the following year. Main Title Theme Song "Dennis the Menace" by Irving Friedman CBS Broadcast History October 4, 1959 - September 22, 1963 ---- Sundays ---- 7:30 - 8:00 P.M. Nielsen Ratings - Top 30 Season 1 (1959-60) 16 (26.0) Season 2 (1960-61) 11 (26.1) Season 3 (1961-62) 17 (23.8) Season 4 (1962-63) Not In Top 30 First Telecast: October 4, 1959 Last Telecast: July 7, 1963 Episodes: 146 black-and-white episodesmoreless
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    The Adventures of Ozzie & Harriet

    The Adventures of Ozzie & Harriet

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    ABC (ended 1966)
    Welcome to The Adventures of Ozzie & Harriet guide at TV.com. The real-life Nelson family - Ozzie, his wife Harriet and their sons David and Ricky - played themselves in this long-running sitcom, where Ricky got his start as a teen idol. When the Nelson boys grew up and married their sweethearts, Kris and June, their real-life wives played their TV wives. The series began as a radio program in 1944. At that time David and Ricky were played by actors. It wasn't until 1949, when radio personality Bing Crosby's sons began to play themselves on Bing's show that the real David and Ricky decided to join the Nelson family radio show. The "adventures" the family experienced every week involved very little conflict or friction. Problems and misunderstandings were solved quickly and with a shared laugh over the silliness of it all.moreless
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    The Newlywed Game

    The Newlywed Game

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    ABC (ended 1974)
    "Once upon a time, there was this nice, family TV game show on CBS called Password, wherein teams of two tried to guess words using just one word. It did very well in the ratings, and was quite educational, too. "Then, one day – July 11, 1966, to be exact – a CBS News special report about Robert McNamara reporting on the Vietnam War pre-empted Password. That didn't make people very happy. So, they turned the station to see what else was on. "Some people saw a game unlike what they had ever seen before. There was this handsome young man asking four newlywed couples questions about their marriages. Sometimes, you saw just the beautiful young ladies; and other times, the good-looking men were on, but they always got back together to talk about their marriages. "Sometimes, the couples kissed each other. Other times, they pouted and made a scene. And sometimes, they shared information that was quite intimate (can you say "intimate," kiddies). "The audience on TV laughed and laughed, and the handsome young host did everything to help make the audience laugh. The people couldn't believe what they were seeing on the TV. But they became curious and decided to watch this new show when it came on the next day ... and the next day ... and the next day ... forgetting all about Password wondering if the newlywed couples would or could live happily ever after." That, in a nutshell, tells the story of the classic game show The Newlywed Game, the tell-all game show where four couples – all married less than two years – answered questions about their relationship to win a prize. The game was played in two rounds, each with two parts (though never referred to as such). In the first part, the wives were secluded off-stage (when the show first aired, the husbands were secluded off-stage) while host Eubanks posed a series of three questions to the husbands – usually multiple choice or fill-in-the blank, sometimes with more than one answer required. After the questions were asked, the wives were brought back onstage to answer the same questions. A correct match earned the newlywed couple 5 points, but the real fun came when there was not a match. Usually, not matching meant an argument, with the spouses each (shall we say) strongly defending their answer. And yes, Eubanks did everything to make the situation worse (often using one spouses words against him/her, or even relaying what the spouse said while the other was off-stage); and of course the audience played right along, loving every moment. In the second round, the husbands were taken to the sound-proof room (when the show first aired, the wives were secluded off stage) while the wives were posed the questions, the fourth being a special 25-point bonus question. Correct matches at this point were worth 10 points (for the first 3 questions). The special 25-point bonus question – usually general enough so as not to cause an argument, unless that too was incorrect – often determined the day's winner. The winner after all the questions were asked (or a tie-breaker was played, if necessary, by the couple predicting their point total) "won a special bonus prize, chosen especially for" them. Usually, this prize was kitchen appliances; rooms of furniture; stereo/TV equipment; things for the game room (such as a pinball machine or a pool table) a boat, motorcycle or trailer; a piano; or a trip (with the requisite luggage and camera thrown in). And yes, couples who wanted a specific prize competed for it on that day's show. Special episodes were frequently dedicated toward expectant couples ("maternity day") and couples who had previously appeared on the show but, even though they didn't win, they had won the audience over (refered to as "Alumni Day"). During the ABC run, during the Christmas season, couples donated their gifts to charity. Thousands of couples let all of their secrets out of the bag during The Newlywed Game's four lives. In addition to the 1966-1974 ABC and 1996-2000 syndicated versions, the most often remembered versions (and most-reran on Game Show Network [GSN]) came with the 1977-1980 (1 Night a week) and 1985-1989 5-Day-a-week syndicated incarnations. The rules for The Newlywed Game were modified for the 1988-1989 season, with host Paul Rodriguez; and again when the series resurfaced as a new entry in the 1996-1997 season, with Gary Kroeger as host. Neither of the "modified" versions sat well with fans (like any version did with some), but the alterations basically involved converting the scoring into dollars and rules to how the questions were asked and how the awards were paid out. Bob Eubanks would return to helm the 1996 version during its second and third seasons (1997-1999), and that along with reverting to the original rules made for a welcome reception from long-time (and new) fans. The only difference was that the grand prize each time was a "second honeymoon" (remember, before, it could also be furniture, electronics or transportation). The 4th and Last Season (1999-2000) is a repeat of the previous season. As one might expect on a show like this, there were countless classic moments during the history of The Newlywed Game. None was more infamous than one such moment that occurred early in the 1977-1980 syndicated run. During a maternity week episode, Eubanks had asked the question, "Where, specifically, is the weeeeeiirdest place that you have ever gotten the urge the make whoopee?" The husband gave a pedestrian reply: "The freeway." His wife's answer was, to put it mildly, not: "Is it (bleep)?" (you fill in the blank, but it made for uproarious laughter). Needless to say, the young woman clearly misunderstood the question.moreless
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    I Spy

    I Spy

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    NBC (ended 1968)
    A pair of American operatives work undercover as a tennis pro and his trainer. Kelly Robinson is the man with a racket, Alexander Scott is, among other things, a polyglot. The creation of the Cinemobile for location shooting enabled far-flung episodes in Hong Kong, Europe, Mexico, etc. The writing is of a standard that would be very difficult to match in any circumstances, or as Scott & Robinson might say, the wonderfulness of its marvelousness is only equal to the marvelousness of its wonderfulness.moreless
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    The Bullwinkle Show

    The Bullwinkle Show

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    (ended 1963)
    The Bullwinkle Show is a funny animated cartoon about a dimwitted moose (Bullwinkle) and his spunky flying squrriel friend (Rocky) getting in and out of adventures and foiling the plans of their archenemies (Boris and Natasha). Rocky is the smarter of the two. He likes to fly in the air and cook salami soufflé. Bullwinkle isn't the brightest star in the sky, he likes to hang out with his buddy Rocky. Boris is the short bad guy with the black suit and is the one with the "brains." Natasha is a tall skiny dark haired lady that assists in Boris's evil scheme. Both are sent to do evil plots by their boss, Fearless Leader. First airing on ABC in 1959 with Rocky and Bullwinkle, the show was called "Rocky and his Friends". At that time, the show was in black and white. Later in 1961, the show moved to NBC with Bullwinkle's popularity, the show was renamed "The Bullwinkle Show". Then, the show began to run in color. The show would always air with a Bullwinkle segment, the "Fractured Fairy Tales" then "Mr. Know-it-All", "Peabody's Inprobabale History" Another Bullwinkle segment and finally "Bullwinkle's Corner". "Hello poetry lovers" One of segments on the Bullwinkle Show...Bullwinkle's Corner Bullwinkle always tries to recite a famous poem, but stuff always happens: Boris wrecks the poem, Rocky doesn't do his part right, or it's just plain Bullwinkle's fault! Rocky and Bullwinkle have been on TV for more than 40 years throughout various syndication. The show started in black and white called Rocky and His Friends, then went to color called The Bullwinkle Show. TV-G Characters Rocket J. "Rocky" Squirrel One of the main stars of the show. Rocky is just an all-american flying squrriel who wears a blue aviator's helmets. Bullwinkle J. Moose The Main Moose. Bullwinkle is a dimwitted moose who always goes anywhere without little buddy (Rocky). He and Rocky live in a little town of Frostbite Falls, Minnesota. Narrator The guy who lets ya' know what's going on. When narrating, he uses awful puns or confused words that makes you wanna laugh or wanna make Rocky, Bullwinkle, and everyone else get sore. Boris Badenov A Pottsyvainaian spy who is always wanting to "kill moose and squirrel" with his parter, Natasha. Natasha Fatale Boris's partner in crime. Fearless Leader Boris and Natasha's boss and the one who comes up with the plans to defeat Rocky and Bullwinkle. Mr. Big A midget villain who wanted Bullwinkle's upsidasium. Then was sent to the moon, where he made metal munching mice to destroy American TV. He appears in "Upsidasium" and "Metal-Munching Mice", Captain Peter Wrongway Peachfuzz One of Rocky and Bullwinkle's friends. His fullname is Wrongway Peachfuzz and no wonder because he does everything the wrong way. Gidney and Cloyd Moonman The moonmen duo and Rocky and Bullwinkle's friends. Gidney is the one with the moustache and Cloyd is the one with the scrootch-gun. They appeared in "Jet Fuel Formula" and "Metal-Munching Mice" Chaunzy and Edgar Two old timers that are frequently seen in the show. Usually you see them saying "Well there's something you don't see everyday Chauntzy" "What's that Edgar?" Uncle Dewlap Bullwinkle's dead uncle who was twice removed, once for vagrancy, and the other for loitering. Fairy She introduced Fratured Fairy Tales and is always getting squished by the fairy tale book. Edward Everett Horton The guy who let's you know what's going on in Fractured Fairy Tales. Mr. Peabody A Genius dog who can go back in time with his "WAYBAC" machine. SHERMAN was a orphen boy that Mr. Peabody adopted. Other Minor Characters Dudley Do-Right A mixed-up Canadian mounty who is "always there to save the day". He appears in Upsidasium, Buried Treasure and The Last Angry Moose. Nell Fenwick> Dudley's vision of lovelyness. Nell is the daughter of Ispector Fenwick. She appears in Upsidasium, Buried Treasure and The Last Angry Moose. Inspector Nathaniel Fenwick The Inspector of the R.C.M.P. (royal canadian mounted police) and Dudley's role model. He appears in Upsidasium, Buried Treasure and The Last Angry Moose. Horse Dudley's horse that Nell love. He appears in Upsidasium, Buried Treasure and The Last Angry Moose. Snidley K. Whiplash Dudley's archenemy and Nell's secret admirer. He appears in Upsidasium, Buried Treasure and The Last Angry Moose. Aesop An ancient Greek fableteller and alway's had a moral. He appears in Upsidasium, Metal-Munching Mice, Greenpernt Oogle, Rue Britannia, Buried Treasure, The Last Angry Moose, and Wailing Whale. Junior Aesops's son. He appears in Upsidasium, Metal-Munching Mice, Greenpernt Oogle, Rue Britannia, Buried Treasure, The Last Angry Moose, and Wailing Whale. History Rocky and Bullwinkle was originally to be part of the "Frostbite-Falls Revue." It was about a group of forest animals running a TV station. The group included Rocket J. Squirrel, Oski Bear, Canadian Moose (Bullwinkle), Sylvester Fox, Blackstone Crow, and Floral Fauna. The show was created by Jay Ward's former partner Alex Anderson, but it never sold. Airing format From seasons 1-2 were formated as one Bullwinkle and Rocky cartoon, then a Fractured Fairy Tale (or Aesop and Son), Mr. Know-it-All, then Peabody (or Dudley Do-Right), another Bullwinkle and Rocky cartoon, and finally Bullwinkle's Corner. Season 1 and 2was in black and white, although, some syndicated stations play the colorized season 1 episodes, but NO ONE plays the black and white season 2 episodes. From season 3-5 were formated as one Bullwinkle and Rocky cartoon, Mr. Know-it-All, then a Fractured Fairy Tale, another Bullwinkle and Rocky cartoon, and finally Bullwinkle's Corner, and one last B&R cartoon. Marathons of the Bullwinkle Show Rocky and Bullwinkle's You call this a marathon? Marathon This marathon was aired on July 2000 on Cartoon Network in response to the movie debut June 29, 2000. BOOMERANG Rocky and Bullwinkle Marathons In September 2003, BOOMERANG had 24 hr. R&B marathons every Friday starting a 8 AM. Original Air times But first, a little brief show info... ABC Years 1959-1961 at 6:30 PM Sundays, and Thursdays, 1964-1974 at 6:30 PM ?. NBC Years 1961-1964 at 6:3O PM Sundays FOX43 Years 2000-2001 at 6:30 AM Monday-Friday NICKELODEON Years 1990-199? at ?:?? ?? ?-? CARTOON NETWORK Years 1996-2001 at 11:00 pm Saturday-Sunday. BOOMERANG Years ?-2002 at 4:00 AM, 12:00 PM, and 8:00 PM/2003-present at 7:00 AM, 3:00 PM, and 11:00 PM. Current Line Up: BOOMERANG has Bullwinkle on at 7:00AM, 3:00PM, and 11:00PM. See "Boomerang" for complete up-to-date line-up.moreless
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