• 41
    Scooby-Doo

    Scooby-Doo

    Follow
    ABC (ended 1978)
    The Scooby Doo Show premiered on ABC in September 1976 as part of The Scooby-Doo-Dynomutt Hour, in which new episodes of Scooby Doo shared an hour with a superhero dog named Dynomutt. It was a revamped version of Scooby Doo, Where Are You? which started on CBS in 1969. In September of 1977, The Scooby-Doo Show once again shared an hour with The All-Star Laff-A-Lympics,which placed Scooby's team, Yogi's team, and Dread Baron's team competing to win points for their team. In 1978, the show had its own 30-minute segment until it was replaced with Scooby and Scrappy Doo in 1979.moreless
  • 42
    Father Knows Best

    Father Knows Best

    Follow
    CBS (ended 1960)
    Father Knows Best was the classic wholesome family situation comedy. It was set in the typical Midwestern community of Springfield, where Jim Anderson was an agent for the General Insurance Company. Every evening he would come home from work, take off his sport jacket, put on his comfortable sweater, and deal with the everyday problems of a growing family. In contrast to most other family comedies of the period, in which one of the other parents was a blundering idiot, both Jim and his wife Margaret were portrayed as thoughtful, responsible adults. When a family crisis arose, Jim would clam the waters with a warm smile and some sensible advice. When Father Knows Best went on television in 1954, the three children were aged 14 [Bud], and 9 [Kathy]. As the seasons passed two of them graduated from High School, first Betty [1956] and then Bud [1959]. Neither left home, howevery, both electing to go to Springfield's own State College. The Andersons were truly an idealized family, the sort that viewers could relate to and wish to emulate. The children went through the normal problems of growing up, included those concerning school, friends, and members of the opposite sex. They didn't always agree with their parents, but the bickering was miminal, and everything seemed to work out by the end of the half-hour. Father Knows Best began as an NBC radio series in 1948, with Robert Young in the starting role. He was the only member of the radio cast that made the transition to TV in 1954. The TV series was not partculiarly successful at first and CBS cancelled it in March 1955. A flood of viewer protests demanding that the program be reinstated and moved to an earlier time slot so that the whole family could watch it, prompted NBC to pick it up for the following season with an 8:30 p.m. started time. Father Knows Best prospered for the next five years.moreless
  • 43
    The Jetsons

    The Jetsons

    Follow
    ABC (ended 1987)
    With the success of The Flintstones, the modern Stone Age family, Hanna-Barbera decided to make a similar family cartoon, but set in their vision of the Space Age in the 21st century. This new series that debuted September 23, 1962 became The Jetsons. Set mainly in sky-high Orbit City, the show featured the family of George Jetson, Jane, his wife, their daughter Judy, and son Elroy living the average life in the future with flying space cars, instant transport tubes, and various robots and gadgets than can get their work done for them in a matter of seconds.

    George brought in the family income by working at Spacely Space Sprockets, run by his stocky, ill-tempered boss Cosmo Spacely, who's usually quick to fire George for any reason he could find. But somehow, he always managed to get his job back and continue supporting his family. He works as an indexer and is teamed with his helpful computer R.U.D.I. Other than the threats of firing by Spacely, George would also have to worry about any schemes carried out by Mr. Spacely's top business rival W.C. Cogswell, owner and president of Cogswell Cogs. If there's a dispute between the two businessmen, it's almost certain George would wind up in the middle of it. Most times, though, things always worked out in the end.

    Jane is the housewife who tends to the home, but loves to shop for the latest fashions and various items that can be a help to the family, like new gadgets that can help them in new ways. She's assisted by the family's robot maid Rosey (which can also be spelled Rosie). She's one of the older-fashioned models compared to most of the advanced robot maids of the future, but the Jetsons love her and regard her as a member of the family.

    Judy is the Jetsons' teenage daughter who attends Orbit High School and goes for the latest teen fashions, trends, and music, and seems to have a different boyfriend in most episodes. If she's lucky, she can even wind up dating a celebrity, like her favorite rock star Jet Screamer, much to her father's chagrin.

    Elroy is the Jetsons' genius son who attends Little Dipper Elementary School and is a straight-A student. He's a part-time inventor and can make new creations in hope to make a better future, and if fortunate, a little money on the side. But most times, he likes to be an average boy by playing various sports, and with his faithful companion, the family's dog Astro, who at times is overly affectionate, and can annoy George at times. But like Rosey, he's regarded as a member of the family.

    The Jetsons reside at the Skypad Apartments, which are properly cared for by superintendant Henry Orbit, who like Elroy is a mechanical genius. At times, he can invent gadgets that can help him with his maintenance work. His greatest accomplishment is his robot assistant Mac, who can get his work at the Skypad Apartments done in half the time. But he does have feelings for Rosey as the two are occasionally seen as a couple, but are mainly friends.

    Other recurring characters in this series include Mr. Spacely's family, particularly his wife Stella (sometimes called Petunia, likely her nickname), one of few people who can actually put a scare in him if he rubs her the wrong way. And they have a young son close to Elroy's age named Arthur. Common characters at Spacely Sprockets are Uniblab, an underling robot who at times is a stool pigeon for Mr. Spacely to George's dismay, as well as Spacely's secretary Miss Galaxy. Cogswell also had a few subordinates of his own. Among them were his assistant Harlan and his scientist Moonstone.

    The Jetsons ran for only one season on ABC, but the series was more successful in syndication. This led to a revival in 1985 with new episodes with more advanced animation that was richer in color and made the series even more futuristic than the 1960's version of the 21st century. New characters were introduced as well, including a new alien gremlin pet for the Jetsons, named Orbitty, who has springlike legs and suction cup feet, enabling him to hang upside down. He could also tinker with machines and change color in accordance to emotion. Another new animal for the revival was a robot dog for Cogwell named Sentro, who served as a guard dog and a spy often used against Mr. Spacely in efforts to beat him to the punch on his latest projects.

    These episodes aired in syndication, which generated the same level of success as the originals when they went in that direction. This led to 10 more episodes to finalize the series in 1987, as well as two TV movies, the music-themed Rockin' with Judy Jetson, which was preceded by the epic crossover The Jetsons Meet the Flintstones, which brought the Space Age and the Stone Age together as Hanna-Barbera's most famous families had a grand adventure spanning two eras. The Jetsons had its true finale when Jetsons: The Movie hit the theaters in 1990, as this would be among the last voice work for actors George O'Hanlon (George Jetson) and Mel Blanc (Mr. Spacely) for they both had died just prior to the movie's release.

    Overall, The Jetsons may not have had the supreme popularity of The Flintstones, but it did have a wide appeal for families of any generation and certainly had a place in the heart for those who would turn on and watch the series.

    The Jetsons, like many Hanna-Barbera series, can be seen on Boomerang from Cartoon Network. Check your local listings. And the majority of the series can be seen on DVD, so it would be a good means to build your cartoon collection.moreless
  • 44
    Welcome Back, Kotter

    Welcome Back, Kotter

    Follow
    ABC (ended 1979)
    Gabe Kotter, formerly a Sweathog, returns to James Buchanan High as a teacher and is assigned the remedial class to which he once belonged. Mr. Kotter is an involved and caring teacher, which one would have to be in dealing with a certain four students in his class, who end up in trouble on a regular basis -- lady's man Vinnie Barbarino, the always cool Freddie "Boom-Boom" Washington, the tough Juan (Luis Pedro Phillipo de Huevos) Epstein, and the sheepish Arnold Dingfelder Horshack. Welcome Back, Kotter was based on Gabe Kaplan's own high school experiences with redmedial education and a teacher who cared dearly for her students. Changes on the show. Gabe Kaplan left the series in the third season. He hadn't expected the show to run as long as it had. Kotter was made Vice-Principal, and thus was seen considerably less. John Travolta, of course, found his own place as a celebrity, leaving the show around the same time Gabe Kaplan did (returning every so often as a "special guest star"). The replacement for Barbarino was Beau, who didn't help things much. By now the show had essentially lost its two biggest stars. Theme song. "Welcome Back" by John Sebastian: opening credits Welcome back, your dreams were your ticket out. Welcome back to that same old place that you laughed about. Well, the names have all changed since you hung around. But those dreams have remained and they've turned around. Who'd have thought they'd lead ya (who'd have thought they'd lead ya) Back here where we need ya (back here where we need ya)? Yeah, we tease him a lot 'cause we've got him on the spot, welcome back. Welcome back, welcome back, welcome back. Welcome back, welcome back, welcome back. end credits The second verse of the full song plays partially over the end credits. It goes as thus: Welcome back, we always could spot a friend. Welcome back, and I smile when I think how you must have been. And I know what a scene you were learnin' in. Was there something that made you come back again? And what could ever lead ya (what could ever lead ya) Back here where we need ya (back here where we need ya)? Yeah, we tease him a lot 'cause we've got him on the spot, welcome back. Welcome back, welcome back, welcome back. Welcome back, welcome back, welcome back. Catchphrases. Welcome Back, Kotter was a breeding ground for memorable catch phrases. If you have one that's been overlooked, feel free to contact the editor. Gabe Kotter: "Hey, Julie, wanna hear a joke?" (or similar dialogue) Vinnie Barbarino: "What? Where?" "I'm so confused!" "Ooookay, fine." "I said a ba-ba-ba-ba-Barbarino..." Freddie "Boom-Boom" Washington: "Hi there." "I don't happen to have it...handy." Juan Epstein: "Signed, Epstein's mother." Arnold Horshack: "Ooh! Ooh, ooh!" "Hello. How are ya? I'm Arnold Horshack." "Very impressive, Mr. Kotter!" "Be brave, little soldier." (or "buckaroo") ...and a very distinctive laugh. DVD? Welcome Back, Kotter has yet to be released properly on either video or dvd. Be sure to visit TVShowsonDVD to vote for Welcome Back, Kotter on dvd (you will have to register for free in order to vote).moreless
  • 45
    Are You Being Served?

    Are You Being Served?

    Follow
    BBC (ended 1985)
    Are You Being Served? is a British Sitcom that ran from 1972-1985. The show revolved around "Grace Brothers Department Store" and in particular the goings on within the "Gentlemen's Ready-To-Wear" and "Ladies' Separates and Underwear" Departments. A store reorganization forced these two departments to share floor space, and the conflicts that this created set the tone for most episodes. Are You Being Served? showcases a bygone period of time in which the class structure was still very much alive. There was a strict heirarchy within Grace Brothers. Everyone knew their "places" and remained in them, unless, of course, there was a chance for advancement and then it was every man and woman for themselves. A spin-off series of Are You Being Served? was released, called Grace and Favour. Although in the U.S, it was named Are You Being Served? Again!moreless
  • 46
    The Bullwinkle Show

    The Bullwinkle Show

    Follow
    (ended 1963)
    The Bullwinkle Show is a funny animated cartoon about a dimwitted moose (Bullwinkle) and his spunky flying squrriel friend (Rocky) getting in and out of adventures and foiling the plans of their archenemies (Boris and Natasha). Rocky is the smarter of the two. He likes to fly in the air and cook salami soufflé. Bullwinkle isn't the brightest star in the sky, he likes to hang out with his buddy Rocky. Boris is the short bad guy with the black suit and is the one with the "brains." Natasha is a tall skiny dark haired lady that assists in Boris's evil scheme. Both are sent to do evil plots by their boss, Fearless Leader. First airing on ABC in 1959 with Rocky and Bullwinkle, the show was called "Rocky and his Friends". At that time, the show was in black and white. Later in 1961, the show moved to NBC with Bullwinkle's popularity, the show was renamed "The Bullwinkle Show". Then, the show began to run in color. The show would always air with a Bullwinkle segment, the "Fractured Fairy Tales" then "Mr. Know-it-All", "Peabody's Inprobabale History" Another Bullwinkle segment and finally "Bullwinkle's Corner". "Hello poetry lovers" One of segments on the Bullwinkle Show...Bullwinkle's Corner Bullwinkle always tries to recite a famous poem, but stuff always happens: Boris wrecks the poem, Rocky doesn't do his part right, or it's just plain Bullwinkle's fault! Rocky and Bullwinkle have been on TV for more than 40 years throughout various syndication. The show started in black and white called Rocky and His Friends, then went to color called The Bullwinkle Show. TV-G Characters Rocket J. "Rocky" Squirrel One of the main stars of the show. Rocky is just an all-american flying squrriel who wears a blue aviator's helmets. Bullwinkle J. Moose The Main Moose. Bullwinkle is a dimwitted moose who always goes anywhere without little buddy (Rocky). He and Rocky live in a little town of Frostbite Falls, Minnesota. Narrator The guy who lets ya' know what's going on. When narrating, he uses awful puns or confused words that makes you wanna laugh or wanna make Rocky, Bullwinkle, and everyone else get sore. Boris Badenov A Pottsyvainaian spy who is always wanting to "kill moose and squirrel" with his parter, Natasha. Natasha Fatale Boris's partner in crime. Fearless Leader Boris and Natasha's boss and the one who comes up with the plans to defeat Rocky and Bullwinkle. Mr. Big A midget villain who wanted Bullwinkle's upsidasium. Then was sent to the moon, where he made metal munching mice to destroy American TV. He appears in "Upsidasium" and "Metal-Munching Mice", Captain Peter Wrongway Peachfuzz One of Rocky and Bullwinkle's friends. His fullname is Wrongway Peachfuzz and no wonder because he does everything the wrong way. Gidney and Cloyd Moonman The moonmen duo and Rocky and Bullwinkle's friends. Gidney is the one with the moustache and Cloyd is the one with the scrootch-gun. They appeared in "Jet Fuel Formula" and "Metal-Munching Mice" Chaunzy and Edgar Two old timers that are frequently seen in the show. Usually you see them saying "Well there's something you don't see everyday Chauntzy" "What's that Edgar?" Uncle Dewlap Bullwinkle's dead uncle who was twice removed, once for vagrancy, and the other for loitering. Fairy She introduced Fratured Fairy Tales and is always getting squished by the fairy tale book. Edward Everett Horton The guy who let's you know what's going on in Fractured Fairy Tales. Mr. Peabody A Genius dog who can go back in time with his "WAYBAC" machine. SHERMAN was a orphen boy that Mr. Peabody adopted. Other Minor Characters Dudley Do-Right A mixed-up Canadian mounty who is "always there to save the day". He appears in Upsidasium, Buried Treasure and The Last Angry Moose. Nell Fenwick> Dudley's vision of lovelyness. Nell is the daughter of Ispector Fenwick. She appears in Upsidasium, Buried Treasure and The Last Angry Moose. Inspector Nathaniel Fenwick The Inspector of the R.C.M.P. (royal canadian mounted police) and Dudley's role model. He appears in Upsidasium, Buried Treasure and The Last Angry Moose. Horse Dudley's horse that Nell love. He appears in Upsidasium, Buried Treasure and The Last Angry Moose. Snidley K. Whiplash Dudley's archenemy and Nell's secret admirer. He appears in Upsidasium, Buried Treasure and The Last Angry Moose. Aesop An ancient Greek fableteller and alway's had a moral. He appears in Upsidasium, Metal-Munching Mice, Greenpernt Oogle, Rue Britannia, Buried Treasure, The Last Angry Moose, and Wailing Whale. Junior Aesops's son. He appears in Upsidasium, Metal-Munching Mice, Greenpernt Oogle, Rue Britannia, Buried Treasure, The Last Angry Moose, and Wailing Whale. History Rocky and Bullwinkle was originally to be part of the "Frostbite-Falls Revue." It was about a group of forest animals running a TV station. The group included Rocket J. Squirrel, Oski Bear, Canadian Moose (Bullwinkle), Sylvester Fox, Blackstone Crow, and Floral Fauna. The show was created by Jay Ward's former partner Alex Anderson, but it never sold. Airing format From seasons 1-2 were formated as one Bullwinkle and Rocky cartoon, then a Fractured Fairy Tale (or Aesop and Son), Mr. Know-it-All, then Peabody (or Dudley Do-Right), another Bullwinkle and Rocky cartoon, and finally Bullwinkle's Corner. Season 1 and 2was in black and white, although, some syndicated stations play the colorized season 1 episodes, but NO ONE plays the black and white season 2 episodes. From season 3-5 were formated as one Bullwinkle and Rocky cartoon, Mr. Know-it-All, then a Fractured Fairy Tale, another Bullwinkle and Rocky cartoon, and finally Bullwinkle's Corner, and one last B&R cartoon. Marathons of the Bullwinkle Show Rocky and Bullwinkle's You call this a marathon? Marathon This marathon was aired on July 2000 on Cartoon Network in response to the movie debut June 29, 2000. BOOMERANG Rocky and Bullwinkle Marathons In September 2003, BOOMERANG had 24 hr. R&B marathons every Friday starting a 8 AM. Original Air times But first, a little brief show info... ABC Years 1959-1961 at 6:30 PM Sundays, and Thursdays, 1964-1974 at 6:30 PM ?. NBC Years 1961-1964 at 6:3O PM Sundays FOX43 Years 2000-2001 at 6:30 AM Monday-Friday NICKELODEON Years 1990-199? at ?:?? ?? ?-? CARTOON NETWORK Years 1996-2001 at 11:00 pm Saturday-Sunday. BOOMERANG Years ?-2002 at 4:00 AM, 12:00 PM, and 8:00 PM/2003-present at 7:00 AM, 3:00 PM, and 11:00 PM. Current Line Up: BOOMERANG has Bullwinkle on at 7:00AM, 3:00PM, and 11:00PM. See "Boomerang" for complete up-to-date line-up.moreless
  • 47
    All Creatures Great and Small

    All Creatures Great and Small

    Follow
    BBC (ended 1990)
    This is a British comedy / drama that revolves around a veterinary practice owned by two brothers. A third vet comes to the practice and frequently finds himself caught up in the feuds between the brothers.moreless
  • 48
    The Facts of Life

    The Facts of Life

    Follow
    NBC (ended 1988)
    The Facts of Life began in August of 1979 and aired on NBC. It was a spin-off to the sitcom Diff'rent Strokes on which Charlotte Rae played Mrs. Garrett, housekeeper to Philip Drummond's household. In The Facts of Life, Mrs. Garrett has become headmistress to an exclusive girls school, Eastland. Although the series had a rocky start, including low ratings and a cast overhaul. The series went on to becomes one of the longest running sitcoms of the 80's. In the first season the stories revolved around Mrs. Garrett and her adjustment to her new job. The first season also introduced to us seven girls, Nancy, Blair, Sue Ann, Cindy, Molly, Natalie and Tootie. At the beginning of the second season, the cast was trimmed down to Mrs. Garrett and four primary girls, Blair, Tootie, Natalie and a new girl, Jo. These four girls would remain until the end of the series with Mrs. Garrett re-marrying and leaving in 1986 and Cloris Leachman coming in to play Mrs. Garrett's sister, Beverly Ann from 1986-1988. On November 18, 2001, ABC aired The Facts of Life Reunion, in which Mrs. Garrett, Natalie, Blair and Tootie reunite. First Telecast: August 24, 1979 Last Telecast: September 10, 1988 Episodes: 209 Color Episodes Theme Song: "The Facts of Life" Written by: Alan Thicke, Gloria Loring and Al Burton Sung by: Charlotte Rae (Season 1) and Gloria Loring (Seasons 2-9) Spin-off of : Diff'rent Strokes NBC Broadcast History August-September 1979----Fridays----8:30 p.m. March-May 1980----Fridays----8:30 p.m. June-July 1980----Wednesdays----9:30 p.m. August-October 1980----Fridays----8:30 p.m. November 1980-October 1981----Wednesdays----9:30 p.m. October 1981-August 1985----Wednesdays----9:00 p.m. September 1985-June 1986----Saturdays----8:30 p.m. June 1986-May 1987----Saturdays----8:00 p.m. June-July 1987----Wednesdays----9:00 p.m. July 1987-September 1988----Saturdays----8:00 p.m. Nielsen Ratings: (Top 35 or Better) #26 in the 1980-1981 Season #24 in the 1981-1982 Season #24 in the 1983-1984 Season #32 in the 1984-1985 Season #27 in the 1985-1986 Seasonmoreless
  • 49
    Fawlty Towers

    Fawlty Towers

    Follow
    BBC Two (ended 1979)
    The genesis of Fawlty Towers came when John Cleese and the rest of the Pythons went filming in the Southwest of England in May 1971. They were scheduled to spend two weeks at the Gleneagles in Torquay, but cut their stay to one night. It all had to do with the "wonderfully rude" hotel manager, the late Donald Sinclair. Sinclair hated all the guests who had the shortsightedness to stay in the Gleneagles. Worse, Sinclair was only 5'4" and was married to a large, domineering wife. Cleese turned Sinclair into a character for a Doctor in the House script for the BBC in 1973. This was just after Cleese had finished his TV chores on Monty Python's Flying Circus. Cleese wanted to strike out with his now-separated wife, Connie Booth, so the BBC gave both the offer to do a series. It didn't take long at all for Cleese and Booth to make the series out of that Torquay hotel, which they named Fawlty Towers. Cleese cast himself as manager Basil Fawlty, who felt that the main nuisances in a hotel were the guests. Wife Sybil Fawlty was Basil's equal and opposite, the competent co-owner who could lash out at Basil and win on the first stroke. ("We reversed the sizes [of manager and wife]," said the 6'4" Cleese.) Rounding out the regular staff at Fawlty Towers were Andrew Sachs as Manuel, the dumb waiter from Barcelona who could not make sense of Basil's commands (¿Qué?), and Connie Booth as Polly, whose calmness was sorely tested in each of Basil's schemes and cover-ups. While most sitcom writers spend two weeks turning out an episode, John Cleese and Connie Booth spent six weeks writing each episode of Fawlty Towers. Cleese said each program started with two or three plot threads, which start parallel, but begin to intertwine. The best shows, of course, are those in which the plot threads touch at the end. The production team spent nearly an hour editing each minute of every program, spending up to 25 hours on each show. With such intense work put into each episode, Fawlty Towers drew raves around the world, exceeding the success of Monty Python's Flying Circus in some countries. But Cleese limited the run of Fawlty Towers to approximately twelve shows. He did not want to diminish the impact Fawlty Towers has had. And there has been plenty of impact. America tried three times to regenerate the show, none of which worked. The best U.S. homage to the show may be a hotel called "Fawlty Towers" in Cocoa Beach, Florida (near Ron Jon's Surf Shop). Its owners have adopted the pseudonyms Basil and Sybil. The show won 3 BAFTA Awards and one Broadcasting Press Guild Award. Despite being very short - lived and not airing too often, Fawlty Towers is recognised as one of the greatest British TV shows of all time. It was ranked #5 in the British Comedy Guide's list of Top 50 British Sitcoms. Fawlty Towers was voted #1 In the British Film Instuite TV 100. Other awards the show has won are; 'The Royal Television Society Programme Awards'for outstanding creative achievements which went to John Cleese in May 1976, In April 1982, the two episodes of Fawlty Towers that were used as training films won a Queens Award for Export Acheivement, In 2001 the new Fawlty Towers DVD set won the 'Quality Street DVD award' for being the best comedy on DVD, Basil Fawlty was recognised as the most Monstrous Boss on British TV in May 2003 by UK Satellite Channel UK Gold, just beating David Brent from The Office. Fawlty Towers has aired in over 60 countries in places like Tonga, China, Pakistan, Latvia, Malta and Denmark.moreless
  • 50
    Barney Miller

    Barney Miller

    Follow
    ABC (ended 1982)
    Captain Barney Miller and his officers fight crime in this humorous classic TV series. Captain Barney Miller is the consummate boss, earning the loyalty of the officers under him. The early shows featured scenes from Barney's home life, but it was soon put on the back burner to emphasize the characters with whom he interacted at the twelfth precinct. Detective Ron Harris would rather be an author, and even publishes a book about the precinct that isn't exactly flying off the shelves. Nick Yemana is a Japanese American cop from Omaha who is so low key he's almost napping. Wojciehowicz, or Wojo, is the innocent of the group who doesn't seem very bright but speaks for everyone with his simple statements of truth. Dietrich is the intellectual who could be doing anything for a living, but chooses to be a detective. Fish is the seen-it-all veteran who can't wait for retirement, even though that would mean more time with his wife, Bernice. All of them worked together to make one of the funniest sitcoms ever on the air.moreless
  • 51
    WKRP in Cincinnati

    WKRP in Cincinnati

    Follow
    CBS (ended 1982)
    WKRP in Cincinnati, an MTM production, was created by Hugh Wilson, who had previously written scripts for MTM's The Bob Newhart Show and served as a producer on the short-lived MTM production The Tony Randall Show. MTM, which had not had a big comedy hit since Rhoda several years earlier, was counting on WKRP to revive the company's reputation as the best producer of situation comedies. WKRP debuted in a tough slot, 8:00 on Monday nights, followed by a forgettable and short-lived show called People. Despite strong reviews for the pilot episode, and some positive buzz for an episode called "Turkeys Away," WKRP did poorly in the ratings and was put on hiatus by CBS with five episodes still unaired. Most reports at the time suggested that this "hiatus" was likely to be permanent, but CBS surprised many by bringing the show back in January of 1979, again on Monday nights but this time following the long-running hit M*A*S*H. Though CBS claimed that the series had been "retooled" in the interim, not much had changed except the construction of a new set (the "bullpen" with desks for Les, Bailey, Herb and the DJs) and a slight shift in emphasis: Whereas earlier episodes had focused mostly on Andy Travis, Mr. Carlson and Johnny Fever, WKRP re-emerged as a true ensemble series in which all eight regular characters were of roughly equal importance. In this new time slot, WKRP was a hit, part of a high-quality CBS Monday night lineup of M*A*S*H followed by three series from MTM: WKRP In Cincinnati, The White Shadow, and Lou Grant. Loni Anderson, as Jennifer, became a national sex symbol, while Howard Hesseman as Johnny Fever almost matched her in popularity. Early in 1980, however, CBS moved WKRP away from Monday nights, trying to find a night where it could anchor an uneven lineup. Unfortunately some CBS executives apparently did not care for WKRP, and other executives mistook it for a kids' show based on the rock n' roll music and loud clothes. Thus they had a habit of preceding and following it with shows that were much more lowbrow than the MTM-style humor of WKRP -- for example, on one night WKRP was followed by the Alice spin-off, Flo. In time slots like these, WKRP's ratings dropped badly. The time-slot changes eventually became more frequent and more ill-considered as CBS looked for a spot where WKRP would finally fit in. The show also seems to have received only limited support from MTM (particularly after the departure of MTM founder Grant Tinker, who left to run NBC), which was busy conquering the world of hour long drama with shows like Hill Street Blues. In the summer of 1982, CBS announced that WKRP had been canceled. To the surprise of almost everyone, WKRP finally became a breakout hit when its 90 episodes were released to syndication; its long life in syndication eventually made it, according to Grant Tinker, the biggest moneymaker in the history of MTM. Some cast members remarked that WKRP was a hit in reruns because viewers finally new where to find it.moreless
  • 52
    Green Acres

    Green Acres

    Follow
    CBS (ended 1971)
    Successful New York lawyer Oliver Wendell Douglas gives up the rat race to fulfill his dream: living the life of the traditional American farmer. Fighting the move to rural life is his glamorous, boa-wearing, city-loving wife, Lisa. This quaint premise, however, doesn't begin to capture the screwball absurdity of Green Acres. After a few episodes that were somewhat rooted in reality, the series' true oddness started to bloom. The characters see the opening credits as they appear on screen (or on chicken eggs); they talk with baseball-playing pigs who become movie stars; fife music accompanies Oliver's patriotic speeches and is heard by everyone but him; a full-sized Eiffel tower is built on the Douglases' lawn. Hooterville is clearly operating in its own bizarre universe where Oliver is the only normal, reasonable person--and that's questionable at times. The tiny town revolves around Sam Drucker's General Store, where Sam acts as shopkeeper, postmaster, justice of the peace and publisher of the "Hooterville World Guardian". He's one of the more level-headed residents of the valley, but that's relative. The other locals are considerable more bizarre and are a constant frustration to Oliver. Hank Kimball, the county agricultural agent, is a prime example. His short-term memory is so poor he regularly forgets what he's talking about mid-sentence. Fellow farmer Fred Ziffel is an elderly overalls-wearing man who, with his wife Doris, treats their pig Arnold like an actual child. Arnold attends school, reads, writes, skates, and speaks several languages (though they all sound like oinking). Con man Eustace Haney, who sold Oliver his dump of a farm, is always trying to fleece someone out of their cash. Apparently possessing ESP, he shows up outside of Oliver's door with whatever he and Lisa have just been discussing. The Douglases' farmhand, Eb, lives in their barn and considers Oliver and Lisa to be his parents. Lisa, a stylish Hungarian woman who Oliver met during the war, is hardly cut out for domestic life. Wearing ostrich feathers and diamonds around the farm, she can only cook "hotscakes" (badly) and her mangling of the English language is impressive. Matt Groening once accurately described Green Acres as "Oliver Douglas in hell". All he wants to do is farm, but the constant interruptions from the loony locals, the endless double-talk, the ambitious pig all conspire to make it impossible. Oliver earns his reputation as a "hothead" as his face turns red and he bellows about the latest aggravation.
    Green Acres
    began when CBS handed Paul Henning, the very successful producer of The Beverly Hillbillies and Petticoat Junctionmoreless
  • 53
    The Partridge Family

    The Partridge Family

    Follow
    ABC (ended 1974)
    In 1970, the Partridge Family was among the top-selling recording acts, not to mention one of the top-rated TV shows of its time. Either way, it made David Cassidy a successful teen idol until the show's cancellation in 1974.

    The Partridge Family consisted of Shirley Partridge (keyboards, vocals) and her five kids: Keith (lead vocalist and guitar), Laurie (keyboards, vocals), Danny (bass guitar, vocals), Chris (drums), and Tracy (tambourine). Rounding out the cast was their manager, Reuben Kincaid.

    With the exception of Shirley Jones and David Cassidy, none of the actors on the show actually sang or played on the group's records. In fact this was done by professional studio musicians and singers, with the family lip-synching to the tracks on camera. In fact, David Cassidy was originally hired for his looks, but when the producers found out that he could sing they realized that they could use him in the real band.

    Many of the episode plots draw upon the comedic relationship between Reuben (Dave Madden) and Danny (Danny Bonaduce). These two were good friends both on and off the set. Other plot devices were Keith's good looks and popularity at school, Laurie's 70's style activism and some of the strange encounters that the family had when on the road in their bus.

    The Partridge Family was true wholesome family programming. At the time Shirley Partridge was one of the the first single mother's to be featured on a television show. Originally the scripts called for her to be divorced, but this was changed to describe her as a widow.

    Telecast: ABC September 25, 1970 - August 31, 1974 Broadcast History (all ET): Sept. 1970 - Jun. 1973, ABC Friday 8:30 - 9:00 P.M. Jun. 1973 - Aug. 1974, ABC Saturday 8:00 - 8:30 P.M. 96 Episodes In Color On Film.moreless
  • 54
    The Bob Newhart Show

    The Bob Newhart Show

    Follow
    CBS (ended 1978)
    Comedian Bob Newhart plays Dr. Robert Hartley, a clinical psychologist living in Chicago with his wife Emily, an elementary schoolteacher. His across-the-hallway neighbor, Howard Borden, is a divorced airline navigator. One of Bob's best friends is Dr. Jerry Robinson, an orthodontist who works on the same floor as Bob. There's also Bob's and Jerry's receptionist Carol Kester, as well as Bob's many clients, including Elliot Carlin, Lillian Bakerman, Emil Peterson and Victor Gianelli.

    The Bob Newhart Show was part of CBS' highly successful Saturday night lineup which also featured The Mary Tyler Moore Show, The Carol Burnett Show and All in the Family. Another connection to The Mary Tyler Moore Show was that The Bob Newhart Show was produced by the same team that made that series a success.

    First Telecast: September 16, 1972 Last Telecast: April 1, 1978

    Episodes: 142 Color Episodes, 1 Special & 1 Unaired Pilot

    CBS Broadcast History September 1972-October 1976----Saturdays----9:30 p.m November 1976-September 1977----Saturdays----8:30 p.m. September 1977-April 1978----Saturdays----8:00 p.m. June 1978-September 1978----Saturdays----8:00 p.m. Characters: Stars: Dr. Robert Anthony "Bob" Hartley - A Clinical Psychologist who grew up in the Chicago area with an easy-going father and a manipulative, talkative mother. Bob attended Loyola University, where his best friend was Cliff "The Peeper" Murdock. Bob's office is in downtown Chicago, and he and his wife, Emily, live in a high-rise twenty minutes from his office. He often takes the train to work, but may take his car, especially if one of his groups has a session in the evening. Late in the show's run Bob publishes a book and is away for several episodes doing a book tour. Emily Joyce Hartley - Bob's wife, A schoolteacher. Emily comes from an expressive, gregarious family from the Seattle area. She married Bob after both had begun their careers, and they celebrate only their third anniversary during the show's first season. After working as a teacher for several years, Emily becomes principal, giving her a well-respected position.

    Howard Mark Borden - Next door neighbor, a divorced airplane navigator. For much of the series Howard's identity is shaped by his divorce. He is helpless around the house and depends on Emily and Bob for almost everything. He is a bit of a "swinger," dating stewardesses quite regularly, but deep-down he is a lonely soul. A bright spot in his life is his son, Howie. For a time Howard is engaged to Bob's sister, Ellen. Dr. Jerome "Jerry" Robinson - An Orthodontist whose office is near Bob's. Jerry was raised in an orphanage and, for the most part, is happy with shallow romantic relationships. He is a good sounding board for Bob, as Bob is for Jerry.

    Carol Kester Bondurant - The receptionist for all the doctor's on the floor where Bob has his office. After being overweight for much of her young life in Iowa, Carol lost over 100 pounds, then started a new life in Chicago. Carol always longed for Mr. Right until she met him in Larry Bondurant. They married after a very short courtship. Carol is an excellent receptionist, but sometimes longs for more meaning in her job. Thankfully, Bob is always ready to listen to her problems. Ellen Inez Hartley (1974-1976) - Bob's sister and Howard's girlfriend. Ellen is a part-time reporter, picking up any story she can until she can establish her career. Bob's Group Regulars: Elliot Carlin - The insecure, hostile patient Victor Gianelli - The hostile, insensitive patient Emil Peterson - The hen-pecked patient Lillian Bakerman - The insecure, motherly patient Michelle Nardo - The insecure, overweight patient Ed Herd - The timid door-to-door salesman patient. Other Doctors at the Timpau Medical Arts Building: Dr. Bernie Tupperman - The Urologist Dr. Phillip Newman - The ego-centric Plastic Surgeonmoreless
  • 55
    Dad's Army

    Dad's Army

    Follow
    BBC (ended 1977)
    Intoducing the Walmington-On-Sea home guard, a bunch of hapless old and young men who have kept people all over the world very amused for the past forty years. Creator/Writers David Croft and Jimmy Perry made each episode of Dad's Army as funny as the previous one, with an element of humour which has survived decades. It has the most memorable catch phrases of any sitcom and due to our fondness of it, it's probably the most re-run show ever. The BBC keep an episode of it queued up incase of a fault at TV centre and it even successfully invaded the big screen with a memorable, well loved Dad's Army feature film made by Columbia pictures.moreless
  • 56
    Rhoda

    Rhoda

    Follow
    CBS (ended 1978)
    Rhoda which began in the fall of 1974, began each episode (at least the 1st season) with Valerie Harper stating: "My name is Rhoda Morgenstern. I was born in the Bronx, New York in December, 1941. I've always felt responsible for World War II. The first thing I remember liking that liked me back was food. I had a bad puberty, it lasted 17 years. I'm a high school graduate, I went to art school. My entrance exam was on a book of matches. I decided to move out of the house when I was 24, my mother still refers to this as the time I ran away from home. Eventually I ran to Minneapolis where it's cold, and I figured I'd keep better. Now I'm back in Manhattan. New York, this is your last chance!" Rhoda is the successful spin-off to the classic The Mary Tyler Moore Show. Rhoda returns to New York where she eventually marries Joe Gerard, and later divorces him. She finds comfort from her sister, Brenda (Julie Kavner). Her biggest problem is her mother, Ida (Nancy Walker). In 1978, after 110 episodes, Rhoda went off the air. It being the second most successful spin-off from The Mary Tyler Moore Show - the first being Lou Grant. During its short run Rhoda earned two Emmys (one for Valerie Harper in 1975, and one for Julie Kavner in 1978) and two Golden Globes (one for Harper and one for the series itself, both in 1975). All together it earned 11 Emmy nominations and 7 Golden Globe nominations. The series has since earned itself a reputation as a classic in its own right. NOTE: CBS left four episodes unaired. Spinoff of: The Mary Tyler Moore Show First Telecast: September 9, 1974
    Last Telecast: December 9, 1978
    Episodes: 110 Color Episodes CBS Broadcast History September 1974-September 1975----Mondays----9:30 p.m.
    September 1975-January 1977----Mondays----8:00 p.m.
    January 1977-September 1978----Sundays----8:00 p.m.
    September-December 1978----Saturdays----8:00 p.m.
    Nielsen Ratings: (Top 25 or Better) #6 in the 1974-1975 Season
    #8 in the 1975-1976 Season
    #25 in the 1977-1978 Season
    moreless
  • 57
    The New Scooby-Doo Movies

    The New Scooby-Doo Movies

    Follow
    CBS (ended 1974)
    After the original run of Scooby-Doo Where Are You (1969-70), Hanna-Barbera continued the success of the great dane and his mystery-solving sidekicks Shaggy, Daphne, Fred, and Velma in their first spinoff series The New Scooby-Doo Movies which debuted about two years later on the CBS Saturday morning schedule. The formula remained the same as they investigated several mysteries, resulting in the capture and unmasking of a ghost or monster as a villain in disguise making efforts to carry out some nefarious plot. However, there were two significant differences. First, the episodes were double the length of the original series (about 45 minutes without commercials), and second, the gang was joined by a number of guest stars, from real life celebrities like Sonny and Cher, Jonathan Winters, and Jerry Reed, to fictional characters like the Addams Family, and even crossovers with characters from other H-B series, including Jeannie, Josie and the P u s s y cats, and Speed Buggy. The majority of episodes in this series had two titles. The official titles are the ones primarily listed here at TV.com. The secondary titles are usually seen as "Scooby-Doo Meets _____________", which will be listed in episode notes. But there were exceptions for those episodes in which certain stars appeared multiple times, as the episodes featuring the Three Stooges, Batman and Robin, Don Knotts, and the Harlem Globetrotters only had one title. Overall, this was a fun and entertaining series and it was pretty cool to see Scooby and the gang interact with favorite stars from the old era. From the real life celebrities, to superheroes, and even their fellow H-B stars, the Scooby gang was always bound to have a grand adventure working alongside guest stars traveling the country and solving mysteries. The New Scooby-Doo Movies is among several Hanna-Barbera series that air every now and then on Boomerang from Cartoon Network. Check your local listings.moreless
  • 58
    Lou Grant

    Lou Grant

    Follow
    CBS (ended 1982)
    Lou Grant was a spinoff from "The Mary Tyler Moore Show" and premiered on CBS in September 1977. The series was a radical departure from its predecessor as it was a drama. It was the first successful one-hour show from MTM Enterprises. As the series began, Lou Grant had just been fired from his job at WJM-TV, and had moved to Los Angeles to work for a newspaper.moreless
  • 59
    Nanny and the Professor

    Nanny and the Professor

    Follow
    ABC (ended 1971)
    Juliet Mills plays Phoebe Figalily ("Nanny"), a nanny who spreads love and also laughter in this gentle comedy. She comes to help widowed college professor Harold Everett (Richard Long) whose kids have frustrated previous nannys by being troublesome. Now, it's Phoebe's turn to help Harold raise his three kids, Hal, Butch and Prudence. History: Jan-Aug 1970 (ABC) Wednesdays:7:30 - 8:00 Sept '70-Sept '71 (ABC) Fridays-8:00-8:30 Sept '71-Dec '71 (ABC) Mondays-8:00-8:30moreless
  • 60
    Rising Damp

    Rising Damp

    Follow
    ITV (ended 1978)
    Rumour has it that somewhere deep in the rain forests of South America, there still exist undiscovered tribes of people completely cut off from civilization, untouched by technology, and oblivious to the existence of the great world beyond the waterfall. If this is so, then these people are quite possibly the only humans on the entire planet that have never stood with hands on hips, nodded their heads vigorously back and forth and uttered the line "Yes, Miss Jones." Certainly everyone else, however, has. Such is the legendary status of one miserly, prejudiced, scheming and generally unlikeable bed-sit landlord called Rigsby. Rising Damp originated as a script for a stage play, The Banana Box, in 1970. It's author, Eric Chappell, was inspired by a newspaper article about a black man who had guested at a hotel for a year, pretending to be an African prince as a means of avoiding discrimination. The play enjoyed a short lived run in 1971, with Wilfred Brambell as landlord Rooksby, and again in 1973 where regular stars Leonard Rossiter, Don Warrington and Frances De La Tour were cast. It was on this final run that a Yorkshire Television executive was invited to see it, and recognised it's potential as sit-com material. In 1974, The Banana Box became one of six sit-com pilot episodes commissioned by YTV, the others being Badger's Set, Brotherly Love, Slater's Day, You'll Never Walk Alone and Oh No, It's Selwyn Frogit! During production of The Banana Box, the title was deemed unsuitable and changed to Rising Damp (after a line from the script). Also, due to a complaint from a real Mr Rooksby, the lead character's name was altered to the more familiar Rigsby after a flick through the phone book. Audience reaction to the pilot were deemed favourable enough for YTV to commission a series. In fact, the show ran to four series, a Christmas special and a successful feature film, winning multiple awards along the way.moreless
  • 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10