• 61
    Here's Lucy

    Here's Lucy

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    CBS (ended 1974)
    HERE'S LUCY. This often forgotten and critically bashed series from Lucille Ball, her 3rd, is arguably superior to the LUCY SHOW. Probably unjustly misaligned by critics due to a difficult and weak opening season, HERE"S LUCY improved with every season and contains some of the best work of Lucille Ball's career. The wonderfully abstract LUCY SHOW plays more as a variety show than sitcom, and certainly has its share of classic episodes. Missing from the Lucy Show, however, is the character development , focus, and warmth ( that made I LOVE LUCY so successful). HERE"S LUCY switches formats and focus' on widower Lucy Carter, single-working Mom and life with her two children (Ball's own children with Desi Arnaz), and their Uncle Harry. Played by Gale Gordon, Uncle Harry was also Lucy's over-bearing boss. As the seasons pass, Uncle Harry softens and Lucy, Kim, and Craig play more as a family unit. Like Lucy Ricardo, Lucy Carter still loved to get into the show, and her work at the "Unique Employment Agency" often allowed her the chance to sing and dance with top guest stars. Carol Burnett, Jack Benny, and Vivian Vance make numerous, nearly seasonal guest appearances, and other famous guests included Liz Taylor and Richard Burton, Flip Wilson, Ann-Margret, Johnny Carson, Milton Berle, Helen Hays, and Ginger Rogers. Still featuring Lucille Ball's amazing talents for physical comedy and turning a funny line, HERE"S LUCY features dozens of iconic "LUCY" moments. Lucy as down-trodden Dirty Gertie, Lucy wielding a jackhammer on cement, Lucy sky-diving through the roof of a lodge, the famous stuck-on-her-finger Liz Taylor diamond ring, Lucy in a giant pickle outfit, and Lucy and Mannix tied to chairs, physically jumping, bouncing the chairs to comedic perfection, and of course, the moment zany Lucy Carter meets superstar actress Lucille Ball! Many episodes are written by her I LOVE LUCY writers, as well as other tops-in-their field scribes such as Bob O'Brien, the Fox-Jacob's team, and Lou Derman (many of these writer's were presenting their best work simultaneously to ALL IN THE FAMILY). Even with numerous top directors at the helm�Herbert Kenwith, Jerry Paris, Jack Donohue, Jay Sandrich, and Coby Ruskin� it is often repeated that Lucille Ball really directed the shows, but offered deference to the directors she most trusted and respected. This show is rarely seen in syndication despite relatively high ratings during the intital run (Season 1 #9, Season 2 #6, Season 3 #3, Season 4 #11, Season 5 #15, Season 6 #29). It had a daytime run on CBS in 1977. This was followed by it's debut in off-network syndication in Fall of 1981 by Telepictures. Most stations aired the show in latenight after the first few months. Now the show is seen mostly in international markets or on independant stations. PAX TV ran the series briefly in the late 90's. A DVD with 24 episodes was released in 2005 and features lots of great bonus features. Here's Lucy Season sets will be coming out starting with Season One in August 2009, Season Two in November 2009, Season 3 in mid 2010 and continuing until Dec 2012 with the entire series to come out on MPI video. The DVDs will have a ton of special features.moreless
  • 62
    Rhoda

    Rhoda

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    CBS (ended 1978)
    Rhoda which began in the fall of 1974, began each episode (at least the 1st season) with Valerie Harper stating: "My name is Rhoda Morgenstern. I was born in the Bronx, New York in December, 1941. I've always felt responsible for World War II. The first thing I remember liking that liked me back was food. I had a bad puberty, it lasted 17 years. I'm a high school graduate, I went to art school. My entrance exam was on a book of matches. I decided to move out of the house when I was 24, my mother still refers to this as the time I ran away from home. Eventually I ran to Minneapolis where it's cold, and I figured I'd keep better. Now I'm back in Manhattan. New York, this is your last chance!" Rhoda is the successful spin-off to the classic The Mary Tyler Moore Show. Rhoda returns to New York where she eventually marries Joe Gerard, and later divorces him. She finds comfort from her sister, Brenda (Julie Kavner). Her biggest problem is her mother, Ida (Nancy Walker). In 1978, after 110 episodes, Rhoda went off the air. It being the second most successful spin-off from The Mary Tyler Moore Show - the first being Lou Grant. During its short run Rhoda earned two Emmys (one for Valerie Harper in 1975, and one for Julie Kavner in 1978) and two Golden Globes (one for Harper and one for the series itself, both in 1975). All together it earned 11 Emmy nominations and 7 Golden Globe nominations. The series has since earned itself a reputation as a classic in its own right. NOTE: CBS left four episodes unaired. Spinoff of: The Mary Tyler Moore Show First Telecast: September 9, 1974
    Last Telecast: December 9, 1978
    Episodes: 110 Color Episodes CBS Broadcast History September 1974-September 1975----Mondays----9:30 p.m.
    September 1975-January 1977----Mondays----8:00 p.m.
    January 1977-September 1978----Sundays----8:00 p.m.
    September-December 1978----Saturdays----8:00 p.m.
    Nielsen Ratings: (Top 25 or Better) #6 in the 1974-1975 Season
    #8 in the 1975-1976 Season
    #25 in the 1977-1978 Season
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  • 63
    The Many Loves of Dobie Gillis

    The Many Loves of Dobie Gillis

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    CBS (ended 1963)
    The life and loves of a young dreamer as he progresses from high school to a stint in the army and then college. Stories related Dobie's continual thoughts about the future, his running battle with his father over the prospect of acquiring work, his relationship with his "good buddy", slacker Maynard G. Krebs, and his endless romantic heartaches, most of which center around Thalia Menniger, a beautiful, but greedy and self-centered young woman who struggles to improve Dobie and find him the job that will enable him to make "oodles and oodles of money" though not for her, the last hope her family has, but for her family, a sixty-year-old father with a kidney condition, a mother who isn't getting any younger, a sister who married a loafer, and a brother who is becoming a public charge. Season three related Dobie and Maynard's experiences as army privates. In season four, after completing their military service, and still undecided about life, Dobie and Maynard enrolled in college.moreless
  • 64
    The Electric Company 1970s

    The Electric Company 1970s

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    PBS (ended 1977)
    On the heels of its fabulously successful Sesame Street, the Children's Television Workshop (CTW) created The Electric Company. With its roots in Motown Sound, Broadway and Rowan & Martin's Laugh-In, The Electric Company drew attention for six years as the most popular instructional television show. It would win an Emmy for Outstanding Children's Series, and its soundtrack album earned a Grammy. Targeting children ages 6 through 10, The Electric Company aimed to teach basic reading and grammar skills to the young viewers. The show's cast of skit players helped teach these concepts through the use of skits, songs, cartoon and blackout segments and regular features; all of them revolved around sound clusters (e.g., sh-, -ly, -oo-), contractions, punctuation marks, etc. The series provided material for elementary schools, as CTW published a biweekly TEC Teacher's Guide detailing program contents. Quickly, the cast members began to establish themselves with various personas: • Skip Hinnant (who had played Schroeder in the off-Broadway production of You're a Good Man, Charlie Brown) had one of the best known characters: Fargo North, Decoder. Early in the run, this Peter Sellers knock-off interpreted messages that people gave to him when they couldn't understand what had been written. • The show also made Morgan Freeman. He created Easy Reader, the cool dude who loved reading anything he could get his hands on. Freeman also played radio disc jockey Mel Mounds, who usually introduced The Short Circus tunes (see below). • Rita Moreno created her tagline, "Hey You Guys!", while playing Millie, the Milkman's helper. She put the same fire into playing Otto the Director, who fumed as her actors didn't read their lines properly. • Judy Graubart, alumnus of The Second City in Chicago, became Jennifer of the Jungle, teaching bits of phonetics to her friend Paul the Gorilla. • And who can forget J. Arthur Crank? Jimmy Boyd (B. 1939) created the character, strictly as a voice on a telephone during the first season. In all future years, Crank was seen as that bad-tempered loud dresser. Complimenting the adults in the cast was The Short Circus, a group of five teenaged performers usually involved in songs or dances. Members of The Short Circus drew names from a hat to determine what would be their character name. While the Short Circus changed its talents from one season to the next, they did keep one member constant: June Angela. The show also set itself apart with the cloud sets by Nat Mongioi (which members of the cast called "Limbo Land"), cool music by the late Joe Raposo and others, unique sound effects Dick Maitland pinned to punctuation marks, and the high-tech computer animation. The logo above can only suggest these elements, which seemed to represent the New Era back in the 1970s. Among the most popular of the regular features was Spiderman, a live-action segment added during the series' fourth season. The Spiderman segments (for which there were about two dozen or so made) featured The Electric Company cast as various characters. Beginning in 1972, there was also The Adventures of Letterman cartoon series. The evil Spell Binder would cause trouble by using his magic wand, replacing key letters to make the worse of situations (e.g.: Train into Rain). Then Letterman would take the letter(s) off his varsity sweater and correct the hazard. Muppet characters from Sesame Street (including Big Bird, Oscar the Grouch and Grover) also visited on occasion through the years. A total of 780 episodes of The Electric Company aired from 1971 to 1977 on PBS; reruns of the final two seasons aired through the fall of 1985. Programs always ended with one of its cast members stating: The Electric Company gets its power from The Children's Television Workshop. This was followed by a superimposed caption: The Electric Company is a trademark and service mark of the Children's Television Workshop. © Copyright Children's Television Workshop 1971 to 1977 In 1972, CTW began issuing The Electric Company magazine. Appropriately enough, the mag contained feature articles, games and other activities featuring members of the show's cast. It was published until the late-1980s, when replaced with a magazine called Kid City. A sister magazine, Spidey Super Stories (also issued and endorsed by The Electric Company's producers) contained children's reading level-versions of the web slinger's battles with his arch-enemies plus comic strip versions of the The Electric Company Spiderman segments. Spidey Super Stories were published from October 1974 to January 1982. Sixty-five episodes of The Electric Company from various seasons – a good share from the 1972-1973 and 1973-1974 seasons – began airing on Nickelodeon's new Noggin network in the spring of 1999 (kicked off with a two-hour retrospective of the show on TV Land, another Nickelodeon sister network). The shows were edited slightly, removing all program numbers and show-ending teases (see Notes within Show 131). Also for the Noggin run, CTW gave credit to Marvel Comics, which had never received a copyright notice on the original run. Thus all episodes from Seasons 4 to 6 had their copyrights redisplayed: The Electric Company is a trademark and service mark of the Children's Television Workshop. © Copyright Children's Television Workshop 1974 to 1976 The use of the character Spiderman was provided as a courtesy to the Children's Television Workshop by Marvel Comics Group. © Copyright Marvel Comics Group 1974 to 1976 At first, Noggin aired The Electric Company during several daytime and overnight time slots seven days a week. By the time CTW was renamed Sesame Workshop in 2000, however, the show's timeslots were downgraded to late-nights and then, in 2002, only a couple of weekend overnight airings. In early 2003, with the value of Sesame Workshop's interest in Noggin even less (if not zero), The Electric Company was pulled from Noggin's schedule altogether. (Note: Classic episodes of Sesame Street, which were shown under the title Sesame Street Unpaved, had also been a part of Noggin's schedule. Noggin had shown 65 classic episodes (originally airing between 1969 to 1986) of the series. Like The Electric Company, Sesame Street Unpaved had originally aired weekdays before being placed in downgraded timeslots (eventually weekend overnights). Both shows had attracted primarily adults (who had watched the show as children) and college-aged fans, and both shows were too dated for their intended childhood audience. Noggin underwent a total personality change beginning April 1, 2002, placing more emphasis on original programming (in addition to airing reruns of Nickelodeon kiddie shows). The general effect of removing The Electric Company from the airwaves, has not been a pleasant one for American society. Some people believe Sesame Workshop discusses The Electric Company only when lowering the wrecker's ball on those who have violated their copyrights. (To this day, The Electric Company™ and the logo are trademarks and service marks of Sesame Workshop, © 1971-1977.) Though it appears Sesame Workshop chooses not to live in the past, it has been digitizing segments from all its old shows in preparation for DVD releases. The first DVD of The Electric Company is scheduled for release in 2006. (This is the result of an independent campaign for a TEC DVD release; see below.) The Electric Company will always be remembered by its fans as an entertaining series which taught children to read. Elementary classroom teachers regularly scheduled their days so their students could watch the show, and reading scores increased as a result of in-class and home viewing. Hey You Guys! petersmith among them We're gonna turn it on We're gonna bring you the power We're gonna light up The dark of night Like the brightest day In a whole new way We're gonna turn it on We're gonna bring you the power It's coming down the line Strong as it can be Through the courtesy Of The Electric Company™ from The Electric Company Theme Music and Lyrics by Joe Raposo © 1971 Jonico Musicmoreless
  • 65
    Mayberry R.F.D.

    Mayberry R.F.D.

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    CBS (ended 1971)
    Mayberry R.F.D. premiered in 1968 as a spin off of The Andy Griffith Show (1960-68) with the highest ratings, at the time, of any new show in the history of television. Andy Griffith had grown tired of doing The Andy Griffith Show, so it was decided to continue the show using a different format. Sam Jones arrived in Mayberry during the final season of The Andy Griffith Show. He was very similar to Andy and, also, had a son. The last episode of The Andy Griffith Show served as the pilot for Mayberry R.F.D. In the first episode of Mayberry R.F.D., Andy and Helen were married. Don Knotts also gave a special appearance as Barney Fife. Shortly after Andy and Helen were married, they moved away. Most regulars from The Andy Griffith Show did stay including Howard Sprague, Emmett Clark, Goober Pyle, and, for the first two seasons, Bee Taylor. In 1971, Mayberry R.F.D. was cancelled by CBS in an effort to rid itself of its image as the "hillbilly" network. Main Title Theme Song "The Mayberry March" written by Earle Hagen and Carl Brandt CBS Broadcast History September 23, 1968 - September 6, 1971 ---- Mondays ---- 9:00 - 9:30 P.M. Nielsen Ratings Season 1 (1968-69) #4 (25.4) Season 2 (1969-70) #4 (24.4) Season 3 (1970-71) #15 (22.3) First Telecast: September 23, 1968 Last Telecast: March 29, 1971 Episodes: 78 color episodesmoreless
  • 66
    School House Rock

    School House Rock

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    ABC (ended 1996)
    Release history:
    The soundtrack to Multiplication Rock was released on LP (Capitol 11174) in 1973 and on CD (Capitol 91253) in 1989. The discs are in stereo, but missing some foley from the broadcast versions. (see also reissues and covers) Filmstrips and 16mm films of Multiplication Rock, Grammar Rock, America Rock and Science Rock (hereafter The Big Four) were available to schools and libraries from Xerox Films. The film prints (and possibly the filmstrips) came with teachers' aides which included lyrics, questions for students and activities. In 1987 The Big Four were released by Golden Book Video on four VHS tapes. Cloris Leachman and "a group of young friends" sang and danced to new between-segment songs not produced by the original team. The tapes were missing The Good Eleven, Little Twelvetoes, and Three-Ring Government and America Rock was renamed History Rock. The videos were re-released on VHS (Aug. 8, 1995) and laserdisc (Dec. 13, 1995) by Capital Cities/ABC Video Publishers, restoring the missing segments and removing Ms. Leachman and friends. CD-ROMs and at least two music folios were released in 1996. Released Apr. 9, 1996 School House Rock! Rocks featured new versions of SHR songs performed by contemporary rock stars. School House Rock, the Box Set was released June 18, 1996 and featured 41 songs on 4 CDs. Disc 1 featured the stereo versions of Multiplication Rock plus a bonus track, My Hero, Zero by The Lemonheads. Discs 2-4 featured mono versions of the songs (probably directly from film) except The Preamble which is in stereo, and Verb which has an extremely small amount of separation. Episodes made in the 1990s were made in stereo and are presented in stereo in the box. The four discs were released separately, minus The Lemonheads track, on Apr. 1, 1997. Another tribute album, School House Rocks the Vote was released Aug. 18, 1998. It featured various artists covering School House Rock songs. Among the artists were Grady Tate singing Messin' with My Bill of Rights!, I'm Just a Bill by Joan Osborne and South Park's Isaac Hayes, and The Campaign Trail by Bob Dorough. A sampler CD, The Best of School House Rock was released Nov. 3, 1998, featuring songs by the original artists. I Got Six was named Best Picture of 1973 by ASIF-East, a chapter of the International Animated Film Association. Multiplication Rock received honors from Action for Children's Television. Bob Dorough received an Grammy nomination in 1974 for the Multiplication Rock LP, probably for Best Recording for Children (the winner was Winnie the Pooh and Tigger Too). Most impressive was SHR's 4 Emmys, beating out shows like Sesame Street and Mr. Rogers' Neighborhood Each discipline has been given its own season. Years of first airing are listed below as original airdates are likely lost forever. 1973 Multiplication Rock (season 1) (premiered 06-Jan-73) 1973-1977 Grammar Rock (season 2) (premiered 08-Sep-73) 1975-1979 America Rock (season 3) 1978-1979 Science Rock (season 4) (premiered 11-Mar-78) 1983-1984 Scooter Computer & Mr. Chips (season 5) (premiered 08-Jan-83) (last show 31-Aug-85) 1995-1996 Money Rock (season 6) Years of first broadcast for each episode are given in the production code field. moreless
  • 67
    Top Cat

    Top Cat

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    ABC (ended 1962)
    The misadventures of a smart-aleck, street-wise alley cat name T.C., and his pals Benny, Choo Choo, Fancy, Brain and Spook; who get into many acts of trouble with Officer Charlie Dibble, and always have each other. Watch Top Cat on Boomerang. Like The Flintstones, Top Cat was another situation cartoon created by Hanna-Barbera Theme song lyrics: Top Cat The most effec-tu-al Top Cat Who's intellectual close friends get to call him T. C. Providing it's with dignity Top Cat The indisputable leader of the gang He's the boss He's the VIP He's a championship He's the most tip top - Top Cat Yes he's the chief He's the king, but above everything He's the most tip top - Top Cat!moreless
  • 68
    Nanny and the Professor

    Nanny and the Professor

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    ABC (ended 1971)
    Juliet Mills plays Phoebe Figalily ("Nanny"), a nanny who spreads love and also laughter in this gentle comedy. She comes to help widowed college professor Harold Everett (Richard Long) whose kids have frustrated previous nannys by being troublesome. Now, it's Phoebe's turn to help Harold raise his three kids, Hal, Butch and Prudence. History: Jan-Aug 1970 (ABC) Wednesdays:7:30 - 8:00 Sept '70-Sept '71 (ABC) Fridays-8:00-8:30 Sept '71-Dec '71 (ABC) Mondays-8:00-8:30moreless
  • 69
    Rocky and Bullwinkle and Friends

    Rocky and Bullwinkle and Friends

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    Classic Media
    Rocky and Bullwinkle and Friends is a classic early 1960s cartoon comedy show produced by Jay Ward Productions. The show ran for 5 years and aired on both the ABC and NBC television network. The show's two main characters are Rocky J. Squirrel, a brave flying squirrel and his best pal, Bullwinkle, a dumb and clumsy moose living in the town of Frostbite Falls, Minnesota. The series usually involves their misadventures involving enemies Boris and Natasha, the dastardly Russian spy duo bent on ending the noble antics of "moose and squirrel" and thereby gaining power over the fictional nation of Pottsylvania. Rocky and Bullwinkle and Friends also featured short bookend stories- most notably Dudley Do-Right, the clueless Canadian Mountie always saving damsels from the villainous Snidely Whiplash, and another bookend involving Sherman and Peabody, a boy and dog brainiac who travel through time to discover the real story behind historical events and right the wrongs to make sure the events actually happen. Fun, vintage and famous for using groan-worthy puns, Rocky and Bullwinkle and Friends is great for kids and kids at heart.moreless
  • 70
    Hong Kong Phooey

    Hong Kong Phooey

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    ABC (ended 1976)
    Hong Kong Phooey was a Saturday morning cartoon created by Hanna-Barbera back in 1974. There were only 16 episodes that ever aired on the television network, ABC. After the show was cancelled, NBC purchased the rights to re-air the original 16 episodes from 1977 to 1979.

    The show is about a janitor named Penrod "Penry" Pooch, who works along with Sarge and Rosemary at the local police station. Whenever Penry overhears a crime being committed, he "jumps" into action. Actually, it's a filing cabinet that Penry jumps into. But shortly after, out comes Hong Kong Phooey. Ready to put the criminals where they belong-- Jail!

    But to get to the crime scene, he uses the Phooeymobile. This vehicle can change into anything Hong Kong Phooey needs it for (Car, boat...), with a swift "bong of the gong."

    But as we know, for every great superhero, there is the superhero's trusty side-kick. And for Hong Kong Phooey, this would be Spot, a cat who can't speak, only mumbles/grumbles at everything he knows Honk Kong Phooey is doing wrong..... which is EVERYTHING! So, even though we secretly know Spot may be the smart one here... Hong Kong Phooey is the one given the credit in the end.moreless
  • 71
    Tattletales

    Tattletales

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    CBS (ended 1984)
    Tattletales was an updated version of the Goodson-Todman game show He Said, She Said, where celebrity couples answered questions about their marriage. As before, the idea was to match responses and win prizes for audience members. But this revision had quite a few differences that made it one of the more respectable hits of the 1970s - and not just with the sometimes outrageous responses that were commonplace in that decade. Tattletales went through two distinct formats during its two runs from 1974-1978 and again from 1982-1984. The one constant, however was that each couple represented a specific section of the 122-member audience - the Red section, the Blue section and the "Bananas" (the Yellow section) and the couple assigned to them would try to win money to be split amongst the audience members of that section by matching responses. The rules were as follows: Format 1 (February to about June 1974): The wives or husbands were onstage while their husbands or wives were secluded in an soundproof room. Host Convy posed a question to the women or men (e.g.: "What's the first thing your husband gripes about in the morning?") and the first to ring in related an appropriate story and a one- or two-word clue she or he believed her or his husband or wife would be able to recognize the story from. Convy then read the question to the husbands or the wives - shown from the isolation room via the television screen - and the clue. The husband or the wife who believed he was being talked about rang in and tried to tell the story. If the correct husband or wife rang in and his or her response was essentially similar, the couple won $100 for their rooting section on 1-Clueword or 2-Clueword worth $50 for their rooting section. After the question had been played twice (with a second set of spouses getting to vie for the cash), Convy asked a "Tattletales Quickie." Here, each spouse was posed a question as before (though usually multiple choice or yes/no). $100 was paid off among the couples who matched. Round 2 was played as before, only now the male or female halves of the couples were brought on stage and the wives or the husbands had to match. At the end of the second round, the couple(s) with the most money earned or split a $1000 bonus ($334 if all 3 tied; $500 for the 2 top money-winners and $1000 for a sole winner). Since several shows were taped at a time, the couples switched rooting sections each day (i.e., the couple who represented the Bananas on Monday would play for the Red or Blue sections on Tuesday and so on). Format 2 (June 1974-rest of run): All questions were now of the "Tattletales Quickies" variety. As before, they could be multiple choice or yes/no, but now they were open-ended; since this was the 1970s and a game show that frequently encouraged double-entendre, there were many wild and outrageous responses and while most of the questions were designed to get laughs (e.g., "Who was at the door the last time your husband answered ... and he was totally in the buff?"), some questions were deadly serious ("Would you allow a 5-year-old boy to take refuge in your home if he said his father hits him?"). Rewards were split this time ($50 for all three couples, $75 if two couples were correct and $150 if just one couple was right) and the rules for winning were also the same. If no couple was right, the pot was carried over to the next question ($300 or $450). Although the final question of the day had $300 available and sometimes additional questions (worth $150 or $300) were played if time allowed. For those who find such matters interesting, the maximum possible payout for a couple was $1750 (which has been achieved as has all 3 couples winning $0 for the entire show). In the 80's version, it wasn't always married couples. Special weeks featured mother-sons (Isabel Sanford and her son racked up $1600 for their rooting section), best friends (all male panel), sisters (all female panel) and television couples (who shared on-stage secrets). Tattletales lived three different lives - twice on CBS (February 1974 to March 1978 and January 1982 to June 1984) and a 1-year run in once-a-week syndication during the 1977-1978 season. During each of the runs, it was traditional for a beautiful young woman to hand Bert the microphone more than once Convy engaged in a passionate liplock! When Bert played the game (on several occassions), it was usually Gene Rayburn who took over the hosting duties. ----------------------------------------------------------------- THE BROADCAST HISTORY of TATTLETALES: February 18, 1974-June 13, 1975 at 4:00-4:30pm on CBS-TV June 16, 1975-August 15, 1975 at 11:00-11:30am on CBS-TV August 18, 1975-November 28, 1975 at 3:30-4:00pm on CBS-TV December 1, 1975-November 4, 1977 at 4:00-4:30pm on CBS-TV November 7, 1977-December 9, 1977 at 3:30-4:00pm on CBS-TV December 12, 1977-March 31, 1978 at 10:00-10:30am on CBS-TV January 18, 1982-June 1, 1984 at 12Noon-12:30pm or 4:00-4:30pm on CBS-TV. On Syndicated from September 12, 1977 to September 3, 1978.moreless
  • 72
    The New Dick Van Dyke Show

    The New Dick Van Dyke Show

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    CBS (ended 1974)
    The New Dick Van Dyke Show was Dick Van Dyke's return to television after pursuing movie roles, following the highly sucessful run of the Dick Van Dyke Show.

    In this incarnation he was Dick Preston, a talk show host and later a soap-opera actor. The show focused on his work and his home life with wife Jenny (Hope Lange) and daughter Annie (Angela Powell). The show ran on CBS from 1971 to 1974.

    For the first two seasons, the Prestons lived in Arizona. Dick hosted a local talk/variety show called "The Dick Preston Show." His sister/secretary was "Mike" Preston, and he and Jenny's best friends were Bernie Davis and his wife Carol. Dick's boss was Ted Atwater, a money-greedy type of man.

    For the last season, Dick, Jenny, and Annie left Arizona (after Dick's talk show was cancelled) for Hollywood, where Dick got an acting job on the soap opera "Those Who Care." New characters were Richard and Connie Richardson. Sadly, when the first format was just kicking up, the second format came in and caused the ratings to decline. The second format was made because of the fact that Carl Reiner left the show after 1973 because of a censorship dispute. Famously, the show had filmed an episode where the Powell's daughter walked in at a delicate time. Nothing shocking was shown on-screen, but the network demanded the whole episode be cut and reworked. Carl claimed censorship and walked away from the whole show.

    Airdate History Season 1 1971-72 CBS Saturdays 9:00pm EST Season 2 1972-73 CBS Sundays 9:00pm EST (Sept72 through Dec72) CBS Sundays 7:30pm EST (Jan73 through Summer73) Season 3 1973-74 CBS Mondays 9:30pm ESTmoreless
  • 73
    Fish

    Fish

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    ABC (ended 1978)
    Fish debuted in 1977 as a spin-off from ABC's Barney Miller. Detective Phil Fish and his wife Bernice move out of their apartment in New York and into a broken-down house. They then become foster parents to five children. Psychologist Charlie Harrison (Barry Gordon) tries to help with their venture, but his impractical ideas don't help. This leaves Bernice and Fish to tend to most of the children's problems by themselves.moreless
  • 74
    The Ant and The Aardvark

    The Ant and The Aardvark

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    NBC (ended 1971)
    A comical cartoon about an Aardvark who is desperately trying to catch a clever ant for food. Throughout the series, he tries many ways to catch the clever thing, but just cant seem to. In two of the episodes, a Green Aardvark battles with the aardvark to catch the ant also. The series was released theatrically from 1969 to 1971 by United Artists and in 1972, it became part of The Pink Panther Show, to replace "Inspector's" gap after airing all 34 shorts. This lasted 17 6-minute episodes. John Byner (Soap) provided both voices, he tried to inpersonate Jackie Mason for The Aardvarks voice, and Dean Martin for The Ant. The series can be seen twice a week with "Pink Panther" on Cartoon Network Japan.moreless
  • 75
    Ripping Yarns

    Ripping Yarns

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    BBC Two (ended 1979)
    Ripping Yarns is just that, a collection of tales of great adventure, mystery, suspense and high drama, that make for ripping good television. The series was created by Monty Python's Flying Circus alum Michael Palin and Terry Jones. Michael played the lead role in each tale and his main character's name is denoted in the episode description in bold; however, that however wasn't enough for Michael because he would also play various other small roles in each tale. If you look carefully you'll also see other Python alum John Cleese and Eric Idle making cameo appearances.moreless
  • 76
    Bless Me, Father

    Bless Me, Father

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    ITV (ended 1981)
    Produced by London Weekend Television, this series was written by Peter de Rosa and is based upon his autobiographical novels written as "Neil Boyd". The series is an engagingly idiosyncratic situation comedy based on the post-war experiences of a young priest sent to the parish of St. Jude's in the London suburb of Fairwater in 1950. Although it is not necessary to understand the sociological underpinnings to enjoy the comedy, the series gains extra bite from the relatively embattled situation of the parishioners as (mainly Irish) Catholics in a firmly Protestant Britain just recovering from the war and still smarting under Government rationing and other restrictions. (It should also be noted that St. Jude is the Catholic patron saint of lost causes...) Period detail is understated but convincing, particularly the hideous clothes worn by the pious women.

    The core of the series is naive and rather shy, Father Boyd's education at the hands of Father Duddleswell, an experienced parish priest whose staunch faith occasionally seems dangerously old-fashioned to Father Boyd but is usually revealed to be tempered by shrewd common sense and genuine goodness. Veteran character actor Arthur Lowe is quite magnificent in the role, conveying Father Duddleswell's limitations as well as his strengths, and making the growing affectionate bond between the two priests convincing and subtly moving. It is Father Duddleswell's nemesis Mother Stephen (head of the local convent) and Bishop Reilly who embody the hidebound and sometimes cruel aspects of the Church hierarchy. (It should be noted that novelist de Rosa is a formerpriest himself.) Daniel Abineri is convincingly earnest and gauche as the newly ordained curate embarrassed by his own good looks and appeal for the female members of the congregation. (So far as I know this is the only series Abineri appeared in.)

    Sharp-tongued housekeeper Mrs. Pring has a love-hate 40-year relationship with Father Duddleswell which produces some delightful insult matches, as does his conflict with next-door neighbour Billy Buzzle, a Cockney bookie and black-marketeer. Most of the Irish ethnic comedy is embodied in Doctor Daley, usually seen downing a whiskey with a fag end still in his mouth while reminiscing about the Connemarra childhood he shared with his oldest friend.moreless
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    Good Neighbours

    Good Neighbours

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    BBC
    Good Neighbours is the BBC comedy television series about the relationship between two couples who are polar opposites. On his 40th birthday, Tom Good (Richard Briers) and his wife Barbara (Felicity Kendal) tire of the rat race and decide to adopt a simple, back to nature lifestyle that includes pigs, chickens and animal waste induced electricity. The Good's newfound lifestyle doesn't go over well with their more conventional, social-climbing neighbors Jerry (Paul Eddington) and Margo Leadbetter (Penelope Keith).moreless
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    The Osmonds

    The Osmonds

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    ABC (ended 1972)
    Following the success of the Jackson 5 cartoon series, Rankin-Bass (Yes, the famous holiday cartoon/animagic company) sequels with The Osmonds. Sans Marie, the Osmond Brothers (including Jimmy) are goodwill ambassadors who go out into the world to spread their musical happiness. There wouldn't be another cartoon series based on a real musical group until 18 years later when New Kids On The Block came!moreless
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    Paul Sand in Friends and Lovers

    Paul Sand in Friends and Lovers

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    CBS (ended 1975)
    This show first aired on September 14, 1974 with Paul Sand portraying a bachelor who was a bass violist for the Boston Symphony Orchestra, and when he wasn't busy fiddling, he was likely to be found sorting out his romantic entanglements, refereeing disputes between his brother (Michael Pataki) and sister-in-law (Penny Marshall) while trying to overcome his habit of saying the wrong thing at the wrong time to the wrong people. This show did not last a full season and would later be replaced by the Jeffersons in January of 1975 even after managing to be ranked the 25th best show in America.moreless
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    The $1.98 Beauty Show

    The $1.98 Beauty Show

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    (ended 1979)
    Welcome to The $1.98 Beauty Show guide at TV.com. A parody of beauty contests, Rip Taylor hosts as 6 female contestants (one time a male dressed in drag) competed for the title of $1.98 Beauty Queen. There were three celebirty judges, but they didn't make the decisions. The producers did that. The first round introed the contestants one @ a time. The second round would feature them in talent & the third had them in swimsuits. When that was over, Rip announced the $1.98 Beauty of the Week (sometimes the ugliest). She would get a tacky plastic crown, rotten vegetables as a boquet & (more importantly) $1.98!moreless
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