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    Good Times

    Good Times

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    CBS (ended 1979)
    Good Times first aired in February 1974 as a mid-season replacement and went on for six years. This spinoff of the TV series, Maude, centered on the Evans family. In Maude Esther Rolle had portrayed Florida Evans, the black housekeeper, but in Good Times Florida and her family were struggling to survive in a South Side ghetto in Chicago. Florida was married to James Evans (in Maude his name was Henry) and they had three children, J.J., Thelma and Michael. The Evans family also had a next door neighbor, Willona Woods who was also a main character. At the beginning of 1976-1977 season, John Amos, who portrayed James, left the series. The writers decided to kill him off in a car accident, leaving Florida to run the household by herself. But then a year later, Esther Rolle decided to leave. She was not happy with the direction of the series. Especially the direction the character, J.J. had taken. In the 1977-1978 season, with both John Amos and Esther Rolle gone, stories centered around Willona and J.J. In this season, Willona adopted an abused girl, Penny Gordon. Also, the character of Nathan Bookman became a more prominent member of the cast. Bookman was the building superintendent. In the final season, Esther Rolle returned to the role of Florida. Also that season, Thelma married Keith Anderson and where expecting a child by the final episode. Spinoff of: Maude NOTE: Good Times debuted on February 8, 1974. Some resources mistakenly list it as having debuted on February 1, 1974. CBS seemed to leave 3 episode unaired. CBS Broadcast History February-September 1974----Fridays----8:30 p.m. September 1974-March 1976----Tuesdays----8:00 p.m. March-August 1976----Tuesdays----8:30 p.m. September 1976-January 1978----Wednesdays----8:00 p.m. January-May 1978----Mondays----8:00 p.m. June-September 1978----Mondays----8:30 p.m. September-December 1978----Saturdays----8:30 p.m. December 1978-January 1979----Wednesdays----8:30 p.m. May-August 1979----Wednesdays----8:30 p.m. Nielsen Ratings: (Top 30 or Better) #17 in the 1973-1974 Season #7 in the 1974-1975 Season #24 in the 1975-1976 Season #26 in the 1976-1977 Season First Telecast: February 8, 1974 Last Telecast: August 1, 1979 Episodes: 133 Color Episodes Theme Song: "Good Times" Written by: Alan and Marilyn Bergman and David Grusin Sung by: Jim Gilstrap and Blinky Williams Theme Song: "Good Times" Written by: Alan and Marilyn Bergman and David Grusin Sung by: Jim Gilstrap and Blinky Williams Good Times. Any time you meet a payment. Good Times. Any time you need a friend. Good Times. Any time you're out from under. Not getting hassled, not getting hustled. Keepin' your head above water, making a wave when you can. Temporary lay offs. Good Times. Easy credit rip offs. Good Times. Scratchin' and surviving. Good Times. Hangin in a chow line. Good Times. Ain't we lucky we got 'em. Good Times.moreless
  • 62
    The Jetsons

    The Jetsons

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    ABC (ended 1987)
    With the success of The Flintstones, the modern Stone Age family, Hanna-Barbera decided to make a similar family cartoon, but set in their vision of the Space Age in the 21st century. This new series that debuted September 23, 1962 became The Jetsons. Set mainly in sky-high Orbit City, the show featured the family of George Jetson, Jane, his wife, their daughter Judy, and son Elroy living the average life in the future with flying space cars, instant transport tubes, and various robots and gadgets than can get their work done for them in a matter of seconds.

    George brought in the family income by working at Spacely Space Sprockets, run by his stocky, ill-tempered boss Cosmo Spacely, who's usually quick to fire George for any reason he could find. But somehow, he always managed to get his job back and continue supporting his family. He works as an indexer and is teamed with his helpful computer R.U.D.I. Other than the threats of firing by Spacely, George would also have to worry about any schemes carried out by Mr. Spacely's top business rival W.C. Cogswell, owner and president of Cogswell Cogs. If there's a dispute between the two businessmen, it's almost certain George would wind up in the middle of it. Most times, though, things always worked out in the end.

    Jane is the housewife who tends to the home, but loves to shop for the latest fashions and various items that can be a help to the family, like new gadgets that can help them in new ways. She's assisted by the family's robot maid Rosey (which can also be spelled Rosie). She's one of the older-fashioned models compared to most of the advanced robot maids of the future, but the Jetsons love her and regard her as a member of the family.

    Judy is the Jetsons' teenage daughter who attends Orbit High School and goes for the latest teen fashions, trends, and music, and seems to have a different boyfriend in most episodes. If she's lucky, she can even wind up dating a celebrity, like her favorite rock star Jet Screamer, much to her father's chagrin.

    Elroy is the Jetsons' genius son who attends Little Dipper Elementary School and is a straight-A student. He's a part-time inventor and can make new creations in hope to make a better future, and if fortunate, a little money on the side. But most times, he likes to be an average boy by playing various sports, and with his faithful companion, the family's dog Astro, who at times is overly affectionate, and can annoy George at times. But like Rosey, he's regarded as a member of the family.

    The Jetsons reside at the Skypad Apartments, which are properly cared for by superintendant Henry Orbit, who like Elroy is a mechanical genius. At times, he can invent gadgets that can help him with his maintenance work. His greatest accomplishment is his robot assistant Mac, who can get his work at the Skypad Apartments done in half the time. But he does have feelings for Rosey as the two are occasionally seen as a couple, but are mainly friends.

    Other recurring characters in this series include Mr. Spacely's family, particularly his wife Stella (sometimes called Petunia, likely her nickname), one of few people who can actually put a scare in him if he rubs her the wrong way. And they have a young son close to Elroy's age named Arthur. Common characters at Spacely Sprockets are Uniblab, an underling robot who at times is a stool pigeon for Mr. Spacely to George's dismay, as well as Spacely's secretary Miss Galaxy. Cogswell also had a few subordinates of his own. Among them were his assistant Harlan and his scientist Moonstone.

    The Jetsons ran for only one season on ABC, but the series was more successful in syndication. This led to a revival in 1985 with new episodes with more advanced animation that was richer in color and made the series even more futuristic than the 1960's version of the 21st century. New characters were introduced as well, including a new alien gremlin pet for the Jetsons, named Orbitty, who has springlike legs and suction cup feet, enabling him to hang upside down. He could also tinker with machines and change color in accordance to emotion. Another new animal for the revival was a robot dog for Cogwell named Sentro, who served as a guard dog and a spy often used against Mr. Spacely in efforts to beat him to the punch on his latest projects.

    These episodes aired in syndication, which generated the same level of success as the originals when they went in that direction. This led to 10 more episodes to finalize the series in 1987, as well as two TV movies, the music-themed Rockin' with Judy Jetson, which was preceded by the epic crossover The Jetsons Meet the Flintstones, which brought the Space Age and the Stone Age together as Hanna-Barbera's most famous families had a grand adventure spanning two eras. The Jetsons had its true finale when Jetsons: The Movie hit the theaters in 1990, as this would be among the last voice work for actors George O'Hanlon (George Jetson) and Mel Blanc (Mr. Spacely) for they both had died just prior to the movie's release.

    Overall, The Jetsons may not have had the supreme popularity of The Flintstones, but it did have a wide appeal for families of any generation and certainly had a place in the heart for those who would turn on and watch the series.

    The Jetsons, like many Hanna-Barbera series, can be seen on Boomerang from Cartoon Network. Check your local listings. And the majority of the series can be seen on DVD, so it would be a good means to build your cartoon collection.moreless
  • 63
    Disneyland

    Disneyland

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    ABC (ended 1990)
    Walt Disney, one of Hollywood's most ambitious producers, was first approached to do television in 1950, when The Coca-Cola Company offered him a one-hour special. The one hour special, "One Hour in Wonderland," aired December 25, 1950 on NBC and garnered 90% of the television viewing audience. A second special, "The Walt Disney Christmas Special," aired December 25, 1951 on CBS. When Walt had drawn up plans for a theme park, known as Disneyland, he found a hard time obtaining funding; critics, including Walt's brother Roy, thought that it was unfeasible and that it would be a fiasco. At the same time, the ABC television network offered him a deal for a television anthology series. Walt wouldn't agree to it unless they put up partial financing for Disneyland (a term that had kept CBS and NBC from signing with him). ABC agreed, and also paid him $50,000 per program, an exorbitant sum for the time. The show, titled Disneyland, premiered on October 27, 1954 and was an immediate success. Historically, the show is significant for two reasons. First, with thirty-four seasons, it is the longest-running prime time network series in history (not counting news programs; if one were to count news programs, 60 Minutes would take that title). Second, it was the first original television production by a major Hollywood studio. Other studios resented television for fear that it would keep people from going out to the movies. Thus, they refused to produce television programs, and they refused to let networks or stations use any of their more recent or better-known material. Walt Disney was the first Hollywood producer to do so. Disneyland was a mixture of cartoons, live-action adventures, documentaries, and nature stories. Some of these were made expressly for television, but others were former theatrical releases. Many of the early programs were designed to promote upcoming theatrical releases. One particular early success of the Disneyland series was the Davy Crockett trilogy. This was a phenomenal success in every aspect; the merchandising bonanza that followed sold $300 million worth of Crockett memorabilia. Thus, ABC wanted more adventure stories along the lines of Davy Crockett. Disney provided them, but none were nearly as successful. Along the way, in 1958, it was retitled Walt Disney Presents. Eventually the show became more reliant on original material, though pre-existing material was used at times. In 1961, his contract with ABC expired. He moved his show to NBC where he could broadcast it in color (ABC would not have the capability for color broacasting until 1962). It was rechristened Walt Disney's Wonderful World of Color, with an original theme song by Richard M. Sherman and Robert B. Sherman (who went on to write the song scores to such well-known Disney films as Mary Poppins, The Jungle Book, The Many Adventures of Winnie-the-Pooh and Bedknobs and Broomsticks). It premiered on NBC on Sunday, September 24, 1961. On NBC, he was able to re-air many of the ABC shows in color, as they had been filmed that way as insurance for possible future airings once color broadcasting, or "colorcasting," took hold. In September of 1966, doctors told Walt Disney, a lifetime chain-smoker, that he had lung cancer. Though the cancerous lung was removed, doctors told him that the cancer had been detected too late, and he died on Thursday, December 15, 1966. Knowing full well that no one could replace him as a host, Walt Disney Productions dropped the hosted introduction segments after the season's end. Luckily, Walt had filmed that all of that season's host segments before it was too late. The show changed its name to The Wonderful World of Disney on September 14, 1969, and dropped the Sherman Brothers theme song in favor of various alternating medleys of well-known songs from Disney movies and parks. The trusted Disney name continued to insure high ratings for the next few years. As popular tastes changed dramatically during the late 1960s and early 1970s, the public seemed to have largely begun to turn away from anything Disney (except theme parks and merchandise), seeing the name as symptomatic of a square, uptight, and unhip mindset that young people were coming to reject. The studio itself suffered from the lack of hit movies and accusations of incompetent management at the time. The ratings of the anthology series, however, remained reasonably stable, enough so that NBC renewed Disney's contract through 1978. In the fall of 1975, the show began a ratings decline when it was moved back to 7 PM from 7:30 PM. Disney's ratings fell from the Top 30 and continued to fall every year afterwards. The following year went face to with CBS's 60 Minutes. Though it had begun in 1968 and was scheduled on Tuesday, the CBS newsmagazine had been scheduled on Sunday evenings since the 1971-1972 season, and had been held back until after football season due to the risk of pre-emptions; it was this year that the show finally began its season in the fall. The show was easily able to beat ABC's Sunday night offerings but trailed the CBS newsmagazine by a wide margin. As the number of original installments decreased every year, so, too, did the ratings. In 1979, NBC (which, as a network, was also in the midst of a very public, humiliating decline) threatened Disney with cancellation unless the ratings improved. That fall, Walt Disney Productions rechristened the anthology series Disney's Wonderful World and commissioned a new, original theme song by John Debney and John Klawitter, new opening and closing credits, and a new announcer, Gary Owens (longtime announcer Dick Wesson committed suicide in January of that year). In a flashback to the original themed format, many episodes initially were divided into one of four categories: "Fantasy Night," "Adventure Night," "Comedy Night," and "Animation Night." Beneath the "happy new face" sung of in the new theme song, however, was more of the same: too little original material, airings of theatrical movies, and far too many reruns. In spite of this, the face-lift helped the ratings, so the show was renewed for the 1980-1981 season. But the next season saw only 10 installments that had not been aired on the anthology series before, and pre-emptions were far more frequent. Ratings for the show's 27th season did not improve, and in on December 30, 1980 NBC announced that it would not be renewing the series for next season. All was not lost that year, as the show was then immediately picked up by CBS. It was moved from its longtime Sunday night slot to Saturday night at 8 PM, as the network would not displace its highly-rated pride and joy 60 Minutes. Retitled Walt Disney, the show promised to present more original programming than it had in its final years on NBC. On September 26, 1981, after a huge advertising campaign by the network, the series premiered on CBS. Ratings improved against mediocre competition, and the show was renewed for another season (its 29th on network television). A few of these shows were pilots for series that were never picked up. The second CBS year saw an increase in the number of reruns (as opposed to last year's increase in new episodes), and the ratings dropped. Disney did, however, produce several midseason replacement series for CBS, but all of them failed. On Monday, April 18, 1983, Walt Disney Productions and Westinghouse Broadcasting launched The Disney Channel, a cable network created to showcase the large library of Disney cartoons, movies, and TV shows (the anthology series was rerun under the name Walt Disney Presents). Thus, in the eyes of CBS, the anthology series had outlived its purpose and was canceled. There were occasional network and syndicated specials, but all of Disney's television resources were concentrated on the cable service. When Michael Eisner became CEO of Walt Disney Productions in September of 1984, one of the first things he and his new regime did was express an interest in reviving Disney's presence on network TV. He had some success, as the Emmy-winning, Touchstone-produced sitcom The Golden Girls and the Saturday morning cartoon (a medium with which Walt Disney himself had refused to get involved due to fears of compromised quality) Disney's Adventures of the Gummi Bears both premiered on NBC on Saturday, September 14, 1985 and lasted several years. However, these particular shows were the exception, not the rule; a number of series that the new regime eventually launched failed (Wildside and The Ellen Burstyn Show, for instance). Also, of course, did the company plan to revive the anthology series. Now known as The Disney Sunday Movie, it made its much-hyped return to network television on February 2, 1986 after a hiatus of 2 years, 4 months, and eight days, replacing the dismally-rated Ripley's Believe it or Not. Just as Walt Disney had hosted the original until his death, Michael Eisner appeared in an introductory segment at the beginning of each episode. Nostalgia and ratings were high initially, but both eventually wore off. The show premiered at a two-hour length, but in the fall of 1987, once again being soundly beaten in the ratings regularly by 60 Minutes in its first hour, and by Murder, She Wrote in its second, it was shortened to one hour for its third and final season on ABC. NBC, which had not been able to launch a hit show in Disney's old time slot in the seven years since the show was axed by that network, picked up the show, which was renamed The Magical World of Disney. At first, a rotating "wheel" format was used, utilizing three different genres; every fourth week would be a special. This lasted until a few months into the following season. Eisner continued to host the show, but ratings on NBC were no better than they had been on ABC, and it limped through a two-year run here before the network pulled the plug for good. After 36 years (save for the September 1983-January 1986 hiatus), one of television's last remaining institutions from its golden age came to an unceremonious end. In 1995, The Walt Disney Company announced plans to buy out the ABC television network, which went through in January of 1996. In the fall of 1997, a family-oriented movie time slot was set aside on ABC and christened The Wonderful World of Disney. Ratings to date have been middling. Though the show is not currently repeated anywhere (The Disney Channel dropped it and all vintage Disney programming in September of 2002), episodes are slowly being released on DVD in the United States, and its legacy of quality television entertainment for all members of the family lives on in the hearts and minds of many. Here is a chronology of titles used for the series: Disneyland: October 27, 1954-September 3, 1958
    Walt Disney Presents: September 12, 1958-September 17, 1961
    Walt Disney's Wonderful World of Color: September 24, 1961-September 7, 1969
    The Wonderful World of Disney: September 14, 1969-September 2, 1979
    Disney's Wonderful World: September 9, 1979-September 13, 1981
    Walt Disney: September 26, 1981-September 24, 1983
    The Disney Sunday Movie: February 2, 1986-September 11, 1988
    The Magical World of Disney: October 9, 1988-September 9, 1990 The final name was used as an umbrella title for Disney movie airings on cable's The Disney Channel from September 23, 1990 to August 25, 1996. ABC Broadcast History (1954-1961):
    October 27, 1954-September 3, 1958: Wednesday, 7:30 PM-8:30 PM
    September 12, 1958-September 25, 1959: Friday, 8:00 PM-9:00 PM
    October 2, 1959-September 23, 1960: Friday, 7:30 PM-8:30 PM
    September 25, 1960-September 17, 1961: Sunday, 6:30 PM-7:30 PM NBC Broadcast History (1961-1981):
    September 24, 1961-August 31, 1975: Sunday, 7:30 PM-8:30 PM
    September 14, 1975-September 11, 1977: Sunday, 7:00 PM-8:00 PM
    September 18, 1977-October 23, 1977: Sunday, 7:00 PM-9:00 PM
    October 30, 1977-September 13, 1981: Sunday, 7:00 PM-8:00 PM CBS Broadcast History (1981-1983):
    September 26, 1981-January 1, 1983: Saturday, 8:00 PM-9:00 PM
    January 4, 1983-February 15, 1983: Tuesday, 8:00 PM-9:00 PM
    July 9, 1983-September 24, 1983: Saturday, 8:00 PM-9:00 PM
    (two irregularly scheduled airings on May 3, 1983 and May 21, 1983) ABC Broadcast History (1986-1988):
    February 2, 1986-September 6, 1987: Sunday, 7:00 PM-9:00 PM
    September 13, 1987-September 11, 1988: Sunday, 7:00 PM-8:00 PM NBC Broadcast History (1988-1990):
    October 9, 1988-July 2, 1989: Sunday, 7:00 PM-8:00 PM
    July 9, 1989-July 23, 1989: Sunday, 8:00 PM-9:00 PM
    August 6, 1989-February 25, 1990: Sunday, 7:00 PM-8:00 PM
    March 4, 1990-April 15, 1990: Sunday, 7:00 PM-9:00 PM
    April 22, 1990-May 6, 1990: Sunday, 7:00 PM-8:00 PM
    May 27, 1990-July 22, 1990: Sunday, 7:00 PM-9:00 PM
    August 5, 1990-September 9, 1990: Sunday, 7:00 PM-8:00 PM
    First Telecast: October 27, 1954
    Last Telecast: September 9, 1990 Episodes: 751 (180 black and white episodes, 571 color episodes [as far as the format in which they were first broadcast]) (NOTE: many of these were originally theatrical releases, and a small number were specials aired at other times, but for purposes of their first airing on the anthology series they are counted as episodes)moreless
  • 64
    One Day at a Time

    One Day at a Time

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    CBS (ended 1984)
    One Day at a Time began in December of 1975 and aired for 9 years on CBS. It was also a Sunday night staple for many years. The series centered around Ann Romano, a recently divorced mother of two, who lives in Indianapolis with her two daughters, Julie and Barbara. Most episodes centered around Ann trying to raise two headstrong daughters and have a career at the same time. As the years went by, the girls grew up, got married and started families of their own. Julie married Max Horvath in 1979 and a few years later, in 1982, Barbara married Mark Royer. Other in the cast include, Dwayne Schneider, the building superintendent, Katherine Romano, Ann's mother and Francine Webster, Ann's business partner. Over the years, Ann became involved with a number of different men, including David Kane who proposed but she turned him down. Nick Handris became a serious boyfriend who had a son from a previous marriage, Alex. When Nick died in 1981, Alex moved in with Ann, and became the son, she never had. In 1982, Ann became involved with Sam Royer, Mark's dad and they eventually wed. First Telecast: December 16, 1975 Last Telecast: September 2, 1984 Episodes: 209 Color Episodes CBS Broadcast History December 1975-July 1976----Tuesdays----9:30 p.m. September 1976-January 1978----Tuesdays----9:30 p.m. January 1978-January 1979----Mondays----9:30 p.m. January-March 1979----Wednesdays----9:00 p.m. March 1979-September 1982----Sundays----8:30 p.m. September 1982-March 1983----Sundays----9:30 p.m. March-May 1983----Mondays----9:30 p.m. June 1983-February 1984----Sundays----8:30 p.m. March-May 1984----Wednesdays----8:00 p.m. May-August 1984----Mondays----9:00 p.m. August-September 1984----Sundays----8:00 p.m. Nielsen Ratings: (Top 25 or Better) #12 in the 1975-1976 Season #8 in the 1976-1977 Season #10 in the 1977-1978 Season #18 in the 1978-1979 Season #10 in the 1979-1980 Season #11 in the 1980-1981 Season #10 in the 1981-1982 Season #16 in the 1982-1983 Season Theme Song: "One Day at a Time" Written by: Jeff Barry and Nancy Barry Sung by: This is it. (This is it.) This is life, the one you get, so go and have a ball. This is it. (This is it.) Straight ahead and rest assured, you can't be sure at all. So while you're here enjoy the view. Keep on doing what you do. So hold on tight we'll muddle through, One day at a time. (One day at a time.) So up on your feet. (Up on your feet.) Somewhere there's music playing. Don't you worry none We'll just take it like it comes. One day at a time. (One day at a time.) One day at a time. (One day at a time.) One day at a time. (One day at a time.) One day at a time. (One day at a time.)moreless
  • 65
    Dad's Army

    Dad's Army

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    BBC (ended 1977)
    Intoducing the Walmington-On-Sea home guard, a bunch of hapless old and young men who have kept people all over the world very amused for the past forty years. Creator/Writers David Croft and Jimmy Perry made each episode of Dad's Army as funny as the previous one, with an element of humour which has survived decades. It has the most memorable catch phrases of any sitcom and due to our fondness of it, it's probably the most re-run show ever. The BBC keep an episode of it queued up incase of a fault at TV centre and it even successfully invaded the big screen with a memorable, well loved Dad's Army feature film made by Columbia pictures.moreless
  • 66
    Here's Lucy

    Here's Lucy

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    CBS (ended 1974)
    HERE'S LUCY. This often forgotten and critically bashed series from Lucille Ball, her 3rd, is arguably superior to the LUCY SHOW. Probably unjustly misaligned by critics due to a difficult and weak opening season, HERE"S LUCY improved with every season and contains some of the best work of Lucille Ball's career. The wonderfully abstract LUCY SHOW plays more as a variety show than sitcom, and certainly has its share of classic episodes. Missing from the Lucy Show, however, is the character development , focus, and warmth ( that made I LOVE LUCY so successful). HERE"S LUCY switches formats and focus' on widower Lucy Carter, single-working Mom and life with her two children (Ball's own children with Desi Arnaz), and their Uncle Harry. Played by Gale Gordon, Uncle Harry was also Lucy's over-bearing boss. As the seasons pass, Uncle Harry softens and Lucy, Kim, and Craig play more as a family unit. Like Lucy Ricardo, Lucy Carter still loved to get into the show, and her work at the "Unique Employment Agency" often allowed her the chance to sing and dance with top guest stars. Carol Burnett, Jack Benny, and Vivian Vance make numerous, nearly seasonal guest appearances, and other famous guests included Liz Taylor and Richard Burton, Flip Wilson, Ann-Margret, Johnny Carson, Milton Berle, Helen Hays, and Ginger Rogers. Still featuring Lucille Ball's amazing talents for physical comedy and turning a funny line, HERE"S LUCY features dozens of iconic "LUCY" moments. Lucy as down-trodden Dirty Gertie, Lucy wielding a jackhammer on cement, Lucy sky-diving through the roof of a lodge, the famous stuck-on-her-finger Liz Taylor diamond ring, Lucy in a giant pickle outfit, and Lucy and Mannix tied to chairs, physically jumping, bouncing the chairs to comedic perfection, and of course, the moment zany Lucy Carter meets superstar actress Lucille Ball! Many episodes are written by her I LOVE LUCY writers, as well as other tops-in-their field scribes such as Bob O'Brien, the Fox-Jacob's team, and Lou Derman (many of these writer's were presenting their best work simultaneously to ALL IN THE FAMILY). Even with numerous top directors at the helm�Herbert Kenwith, Jerry Paris, Jack Donohue, Jay Sandrich, and Coby Ruskin� it is often repeated that Lucille Ball really directed the shows, but offered deference to the directors she most trusted and respected. This show is rarely seen in syndication despite relatively high ratings during the intital run (Season 1 #9, Season 2 #6, Season 3 #3, Season 4 #11, Season 5 #15, Season 6 #29). It had a daytime run on CBS in 1977. This was followed by it's debut in off-network syndication in Fall of 1981 by Telepictures. Most stations aired the show in latenight after the first few months. Now the show is seen mostly in international markets or on independant stations. PAX TV ran the series briefly in the late 90's. A DVD with 24 episodes was released in 2005 and features lots of great bonus features. Here's Lucy Season sets will be coming out starting with Season One in August 2009, Season Two in November 2009, Season 3 in mid 2010 and continuing until Dec 2012 with the entire series to come out on MPI video. The DVDs will have a ton of special features.moreless
  • 67
    The Bullwinkle Show

    The Bullwinkle Show

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    (ended 1963)
    The Bullwinkle Show is a funny animated cartoon about a dimwitted moose (Bullwinkle) and his spunky flying squrriel friend (Rocky) getting in and out of adventures and foiling the plans of their archenemies (Boris and Natasha). Rocky is the smarter of the two. He likes to fly in the air and cook salami soufflé. Bullwinkle isn't the brightest star in the sky, he likes to hang out with his buddy Rocky. Boris is the short bad guy with the black suit and is the one with the "brains." Natasha is a tall skiny dark haired lady that assists in Boris's evil scheme. Both are sent to do evil plots by their boss, Fearless Leader. First airing on ABC in 1959 with Rocky and Bullwinkle, the show was called "Rocky and his Friends". At that time, the show was in black and white. Later in 1961, the show moved to NBC with Bullwinkle's popularity, the show was renamed "The Bullwinkle Show". Then, the show began to run in color. The show would always air with a Bullwinkle segment, the "Fractured Fairy Tales" then "Mr. Know-it-All", "Peabody's Inprobabale History" Another Bullwinkle segment and finally "Bullwinkle's Corner". "Hello poetry lovers" One of segments on the Bullwinkle Show...Bullwinkle's Corner Bullwinkle always tries to recite a famous poem, but stuff always happens: Boris wrecks the poem, Rocky doesn't do his part right, or it's just plain Bullwinkle's fault! Rocky and Bullwinkle have been on TV for more than 40 years throughout various syndication. The show started in black and white called Rocky and His Friends, then went to color called The Bullwinkle Show. TV-G Characters Rocket J. "Rocky" Squirrel One of the main stars of the show. Rocky is just an all-american flying squrriel who wears a blue aviator's helmets. Bullwinkle J. Moose The Main Moose. Bullwinkle is a dimwitted moose who always goes anywhere without little buddy (Rocky). He and Rocky live in a little town of Frostbite Falls, Minnesota. Narrator The guy who lets ya' know what's going on. When narrating, he uses awful puns or confused words that makes you wanna laugh or wanna make Rocky, Bullwinkle, and everyone else get sore. Boris Badenov A Pottsyvainaian spy who is always wanting to "kill moose and squirrel" with his parter, Natasha. Natasha Fatale Boris's partner in crime. Fearless Leader Boris and Natasha's boss and the one who comes up with the plans to defeat Rocky and Bullwinkle. Mr. Big A midget villain who wanted Bullwinkle's upsidasium. Then was sent to the moon, where he made metal munching mice to destroy American TV. He appears in "Upsidasium" and "Metal-Munching Mice", Captain Peter Wrongway Peachfuzz One of Rocky and Bullwinkle's friends. His fullname is Wrongway Peachfuzz and no wonder because he does everything the wrong way. Gidney and Cloyd Moonman The moonmen duo and Rocky and Bullwinkle's friends. Gidney is the one with the moustache and Cloyd is the one with the scrootch-gun. They appeared in "Jet Fuel Formula" and "Metal-Munching Mice" Chaunzy and Edgar Two old timers that are frequently seen in the show. Usually you see them saying "Well there's something you don't see everyday Chauntzy" "What's that Edgar?" Uncle Dewlap Bullwinkle's dead uncle who was twice removed, once for vagrancy, and the other for loitering. Fairy She introduced Fratured Fairy Tales and is always getting squished by the fairy tale book. Edward Everett Horton The guy who let's you know what's going on in Fractured Fairy Tales. Mr. Peabody A Genius dog who can go back in time with his "WAYBAC" machine. SHERMAN was a orphen boy that Mr. Peabody adopted. Other Minor Characters Dudley Do-Right A mixed-up Canadian mounty who is "always there to save the day". He appears in Upsidasium, Buried Treasure and The Last Angry Moose. Nell Fenwick> Dudley's vision of lovelyness. Nell is the daughter of Ispector Fenwick. She appears in Upsidasium, Buried Treasure and The Last Angry Moose. Inspector Nathaniel Fenwick The Inspector of the R.C.M.P. (royal canadian mounted police) and Dudley's role model. He appears in Upsidasium, Buried Treasure and The Last Angry Moose. Horse Dudley's horse that Nell love. He appears in Upsidasium, Buried Treasure and The Last Angry Moose. Snidley K. Whiplash Dudley's archenemy and Nell's secret admirer. He appears in Upsidasium, Buried Treasure and The Last Angry Moose. Aesop An ancient Greek fableteller and alway's had a moral. He appears in Upsidasium, Metal-Munching Mice, Greenpernt Oogle, Rue Britannia, Buried Treasure, The Last Angry Moose, and Wailing Whale. Junior Aesops's son. He appears in Upsidasium, Metal-Munching Mice, Greenpernt Oogle, Rue Britannia, Buried Treasure, The Last Angry Moose, and Wailing Whale. History Rocky and Bullwinkle was originally to be part of the "Frostbite-Falls Revue." It was about a group of forest animals running a TV station. The group included Rocket J. Squirrel, Oski Bear, Canadian Moose (Bullwinkle), Sylvester Fox, Blackstone Crow, and Floral Fauna. The show was created by Jay Ward's former partner Alex Anderson, but it never sold. Airing format From seasons 1-2 were formated as one Bullwinkle and Rocky cartoon, then a Fractured Fairy Tale (or Aesop and Son), Mr. Know-it-All, then Peabody (or Dudley Do-Right), another Bullwinkle and Rocky cartoon, and finally Bullwinkle's Corner. Season 1 and 2was in black and white, although, some syndicated stations play the colorized season 1 episodes, but NO ONE plays the black and white season 2 episodes. From season 3-5 were formated as one Bullwinkle and Rocky cartoon, Mr. Know-it-All, then a Fractured Fairy Tale, another Bullwinkle and Rocky cartoon, and finally Bullwinkle's Corner, and one last B&R cartoon. Marathons of the Bullwinkle Show Rocky and Bullwinkle's You call this a marathon? Marathon This marathon was aired on July 2000 on Cartoon Network in response to the movie debut June 29, 2000. BOOMERANG Rocky and Bullwinkle Marathons In September 2003, BOOMERANG had 24 hr. R&B marathons every Friday starting a 8 AM. Original Air times But first, a little brief show info... ABC Years 1959-1961 at 6:30 PM Sundays, and Thursdays, 1964-1974 at 6:30 PM ?. NBC Years 1961-1964 at 6:3O PM Sundays FOX43 Years 2000-2001 at 6:30 AM Monday-Friday NICKELODEON Years 1990-199? at ?:?? ?? ?-? CARTOON NETWORK Years 1996-2001 at 11:00 pm Saturday-Sunday. BOOMERANG Years ?-2002 at 4:00 AM, 12:00 PM, and 8:00 PM/2003-present at 7:00 AM, 3:00 PM, and 11:00 PM. Current Line Up: BOOMERANG has Bullwinkle on at 7:00AM, 3:00PM, and 11:00PM. See "Boomerang" for complete up-to-date line-up.moreless
  • 68
    Charlie Brown

    Charlie Brown

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    CBS
    Charles Schulz's classic comic strip Peanuts started in 1950. Fifteen years later, A Charlie Brown Christmas debuted. When The Little Christmas Special that Could proved to be an unexpected success, the stage was set for successive television specials. To date, over forty have been made. The Charlie Brown specials focus on one round-headed kid, his goofy but intelligent beagle, and their vast array of friends. Each has distinctive qualities: Lucy, the crabby, self-proclaimed psychiatrist; Linus, the blanket-toting theologian; Schroeder, the Beethoven worshiper whose black piano keys are only painted on; Peppermint Patty, the tomboy whose affections toward "Chuck" are only outweighed by her sports abilities; and so on. The wit, the charm, the pleasantness of these specials make them appropriate not just for children, but for the whole family.moreless
  • 69
    Lancelot Link, Secret Chimp

    Lancelot Link, Secret Chimp

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    ABC (ended 1972)
    Lancelot Link, Secret Chimp was a parody of Get Smart, which was a parody of The James Bond movies. So how do you parody a parody? You add monkeys! Lance Link, a secret agent for APE (Agency to Prevent Evil), worked alongside his partner Mata Hairi and got his assignments from Commander Darwin. Lance fights the likes of CHUMP (Criminal Headquarters for Underworld Master Plan), headed by Baron von Butcher with his associates the Dragon Lady, Dr. Strangemind, Creto, Wang Fu, the Duchess, and Ali Assa Seen. Theme Song: Lancelot Link, Secret Chimp!
    He stands for justice.He has no fear.
    He's the agent to call when trouble is near.
    Lance Link, ya gotta come through.
    Everybody at APE is countin' on you!
    Here's Marta Hairi, an agent and friend.
    She sticks by his side right to the end.
    Darwin is the leader on the side of good.
    He traps CHUMP agents like a good ape should.
    Lance Link, whatcha gonna do?
    You've gotta stop CHUMP now. It's up to you.
    Here's Baron Von Butcher. You better beware.
    He's evil and he's cunning and he don't play fair.
    He's got an evil chauffer. Creto's his name.
    Dragon Woman's lovely, but she's wicked all the same!
    Lance Link, whatcha gonna do
    When mad Dr.Strangemind comes up to you?
    There's Ali Assassin, Wicked Wang Foo
    And the Duchess whose looks can really fool you.
    Lancelot Link, Secret Chimp!
    He stands for justice, he has no fear,
    He's the agent to call when trouble is near.
    Lance Link, whatcha gonna do?
    Show History For the first season, the show was an hour in length (9:00 AM-10:00 AM) and included cartoon segments, the second season was a half-hour of reruns (12:30 PM-1:00 PM) without the music and cartoon interludes. After cancellation, the show went into syndication and reruns were shown on Nick-at Nite in the early 90s, it was shown early on Comedy Central, and it was even on TVLAND.moreless
  • 70
    Tattletales

    Tattletales

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    CBS (ended 1984)
    Tattletales was an updated version of the Goodson-Todman game show He Said, She Said, where celebrity couples answered questions about their marriage. As before, the idea was to match responses and win prizes for audience members. But this revision had quite a few differences that made it one of the more respectable hits of the 1970s - and not just with the sometimes outrageous responses that were commonplace in that decade. Tattletales went through two distinct formats during its two runs from 1974-1978 and again from 1982-1984. The one constant, however was that each couple represented a specific section of the 122-member audience - the Red section, the Blue section and the "Bananas" (the Yellow section) and the couple assigned to them would try to win money to be split amongst the audience members of that section by matching responses. The rules were as follows: Format 1 (February to about June 1974): The wives or husbands were onstage while their husbands or wives were secluded in an soundproof room. Host Convy posed a question to the women or men (e.g.: "What's the first thing your husband gripes about in the morning?") and the first to ring in related an appropriate story and a one- or two-word clue she or he believed her or his husband or wife would be able to recognize the story from. Convy then read the question to the husbands or the wives - shown from the isolation room via the television screen - and the clue. The husband or the wife who believed he was being talked about rang in and tried to tell the story. If the correct husband or wife rang in and his or her response was essentially similar, the couple won $100 for their rooting section on 1-Clueword or 2-Clueword worth $50 for their rooting section. After the question had been played twice (with a second set of spouses getting to vie for the cash), Convy asked a "Tattletales Quickie." Here, each spouse was posed a question as before (though usually multiple choice or yes/no). $100 was paid off among the couples who matched. Round 2 was played as before, only now the male or female halves of the couples were brought on stage and the wives or the husbands had to match. At the end of the second round, the couple(s) with the most money earned or split a $1000 bonus ($334 if all 3 tied; $500 for the 2 top money-winners and $1000 for a sole winner). Since several shows were taped at a time, the couples switched rooting sections each day (i.e., the couple who represented the Bananas on Monday would play for the Red or Blue sections on Tuesday and so on). Format 2 (June 1974-rest of run): All questions were now of the "Tattletales Quickies" variety. As before, they could be multiple choice or yes/no, but now they were open-ended; since this was the 1970s and a game show that frequently encouraged double-entendre, there were many wild and outrageous responses and while most of the questions were designed to get laughs (e.g., "Who was at the door the last time your husband answered ... and he was totally in the buff?"), some questions were deadly serious ("Would you allow a 5-year-old boy to take refuge in your home if he said his father hits him?"). Rewards were split this time ($50 for all three couples, $75 if two couples were correct and $150 if just one couple was right) and the rules for winning were also the same. If no couple was right, the pot was carried over to the next question ($300 or $450). Although the final question of the day had $300 available and sometimes additional questions (worth $150 or $300) were played if time allowed. For those who find such matters interesting, the maximum possible payout for a couple was $1750 (which has been achieved as has all 3 couples winning $0 for the entire show). In the 80's version, it wasn't always married couples. Special weeks featured mother-sons (Isabel Sanford and her son racked up $1600 for their rooting section), best friends (all male panel), sisters (all female panel) and television couples (who shared on-stage secrets). Tattletales lived three different lives - twice on CBS (February 1974 to March 1978 and January 1982 to June 1984) and a 1-year run in once-a-week syndication during the 1977-1978 season. During each of the runs, it was traditional for a beautiful young woman to hand Bert the microphone more than once Convy engaged in a passionate liplock! When Bert played the game (on several occassions), it was usually Gene Rayburn who took over the hosting duties. ----------------------------------------------------------------- THE BROADCAST HISTORY of TATTLETALES: February 18, 1974-June 13, 1975 at 4:00-4:30pm on CBS-TV June 16, 1975-August 15, 1975 at 11:00-11:30am on CBS-TV August 18, 1975-November 28, 1975 at 3:30-4:00pm on CBS-TV December 1, 1975-November 4, 1977 at 4:00-4:30pm on CBS-TV November 7, 1977-December 9, 1977 at 3:30-4:00pm on CBS-TV December 12, 1977-March 31, 1978 at 10:00-10:30am on CBS-TV January 18, 1982-June 1, 1984 at 12Noon-12:30pm or 4:00-4:30pm on CBS-TV. On Syndicated from September 12, 1977 to September 3, 1978.moreless
  • 71
    Felix The Cat

    Felix The Cat

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    (ended 1953)
    Felix the Cat follows the offbeat adventures of that curious feline, Felix. The first episodes where shown in black & white silent cartoons before it's relaunch in the 1960s. Throughout the 1920s, Felix was arguably the most popular of all silent-era cartoon characters. His image was mass-merchandised and used to sell dolls, baby oil, and many other products. He even had his own brand of cigars. Not only that, but he was also the first thing to be broadcasted on television. Sadly, he has be all but forgotten about by most.moreless
  • 72
    The Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour

    The Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour

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    CBS (ended 1969)
    Spun-off from ABC's prime time series The Bugs Bunny Show and the CBS Saturday morning series The Road Runner Show.The Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour was the most succesful and popular attempt to bring the classic Looney Tunes cartoons to Saturday morning television where they became a mainstay for more than three decades. The series presented popular animated shorts which were originally produced for the silver screen, where they would appear right before a major motion picture, but here they were introduced by new segments as well as new title cards not shown in the original theatrical versions. Also included were Road Runner cartoons originally shown on the The Road Runner Show. Many people who grew up watching this show will most likely remember it by the opening theme "This Is It" performed by Bugs Bunny and Daffy Duck which was shown in black & white when it was created for The Bugs Bunny Show but then shown in color and remodified specifically for this Saturday morning series. In the late '70s The Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour eventually became The Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Show when CBS decided to add an additional 30 minutes to each episode.moreless
  • 73
    The Ant and The Aardvark

    The Ant and The Aardvark

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    NBC (ended 1971)
    A comical cartoon about an Aardvark who is desperately trying to catch a clever ant for food. Throughout the series, he tries many ways to catch the clever thing, but just cant seem to. In two of the episodes, a Green Aardvark battles with the aardvark to catch the ant also. The series was released theatrically from 1969 to 1971 by United Artists and in 1972, it became part of The Pink Panther Show, to replace "Inspector's" gap after airing all 34 shorts. This lasted 17 6-minute episodes. John Byner (Soap) provided both voices, he tried to inpersonate Jackie Mason for The Aardvarks voice, and Dean Martin for The Ant. The series can be seen twice a week with "Pink Panther" on Cartoon Network Japan.moreless
  • 74
    Tijuana Toads

    Tijuana Toads

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    (ended 1972)
    "Tijuana Toads" was DePatie-Freleng's fifth theatrical cartoon, which was released from August 6, 1969, through April 30, 1972, with total of 17 six and a half minutes cartoons. The series revolved around two toads, who is trying to live like toads, but was difficult because of location where they live (the title itself tells you where they live). Although they live in southern part of North America, they still manage to live like toads (catching flies, trying to escape from Crazylegs Crane, the cook, etc.), but in humorous way.

    The series was also became a ticket for other DFE cartoons. In "Hop and Chop", the two toads started chasing around a Japanese Beetle, who later became a character in DFE's 6th theatrical series "The Blue Racer", and speaking of the fast blue snake, the Blue Racer also first appeared in TT in the episode "A Snake in the Gracias". Crazylegs Crane received his own series after appearing in several toads episodes.

    The toads came back to TV in 1976 to be the part of "The Pink Panther Laugh and a Half Hour and a Half Show." Their only problem was that they thought these jokes were not PC and they were forced to re-title and re-dubb the toon to "Texas Toads" where the toads were renamed "Fatso" and "Banjo", and the settings were changed to Texas. Although there were no new episodes, they still created several new 30-second bridge played during the show. Although there were only 17 shorts, they still managed to become one of the top DFE cartoons.moreless
  • 75
    Robin's Nest

    Robin's Nest

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    ITV (ended 1981)
    Robin Tripp from Man about the House has left Chrssy and Jo behind and set up his own bistro along with his fiancee Victoria (Tessa Wyatt), with her father as a not-so-silent "silent partner". The spin-off series was once again created and written by Johnny Mortimer and Brian Cooke and aired on Thames Television from January 1977 to March 1981. Following the trend to Americanize the Man About the House/George & Mildred franchise, an American version of Robin's Nest was made, called Three's a Crowd.moreless
  • 76
    The Osmonds

    The Osmonds

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    ABC (ended 1972)
    Following the success of the Jackson 5 cartoon series, Rankin-Bass (Yes, the famous holiday cartoon/animagic company) sequels with The Osmonds. Sans Marie, the Osmond Brothers (including Jimmy) are goodwill ambassadors who go out into the world to spread their musical happiness. There wouldn't be another cartoon series based on a real musical group until 18 years later when New Kids On The Block came!moreless
  • 77
    Holmes and Yoyo

    Holmes and Yoyo

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    ABC (ended 1977)
    Detective Holmes is a veteran NYC cop who can't keep a partner because they always die. Then, a scientist finds a way to solve his problems: pair him with an android. This is where Detective Yoyonivich comes in; and the rest, as they say, is history.moreless
  • 78
    Joe and Sons

    Joe and Sons

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    CBS (ended 1976)
    Italian-American widower Joe Vitale lived in Hoboken, New Jersey, with two teenage sons. his best friend, Gus Duzik, worked with him at the Hoboken Sheet and Tube Company. as a typical middle class factory worker Joe did the best he could to raise his boys, hold down his job, and conduct some semblance of a social life. Helping him with the boys, and cooking an occasional meal for the family was Estelle, the cocktail waitress who lived in the apartment across the hall.moreless
  • 79
    Chicago Teddy Bears

    Chicago Teddy Bears

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    CBS (ended 1971)
    A short-lived sitcom a mobster who wants to take over his cousin's business in 1920s Chicago.
  • 80
    Grandpa Goes to Washington

    Grandpa Goes to Washington

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    NBC (ended 1979)
    Joe Kelley was a popular and outspoken professor of political science at a California university who, at age 66, was forced to retire. When a pair of candidates for the U.S. Senate were tarnished by scandal, Kelley jumped into the race--despite his lack of political experience--and won the election. Moving to Washington, D.C., Senator Kelley used his particularly honest and down-to-earth style to make his country a better place, despite the interference of his bumbling son Kevin, an Air Force general.moreless
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