• 81
    Soap

    Soap

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    ABC (ended 1981)
    Soap is a tale about two sisters, Mary Campbell & Jessica Tate. While the Tates are a rich family, the Campbells are just another blue-collared family, but they go through amazing and crazy situations. This series will make you travel through a world of crazy and funny situation that happen all in the family.

    #13 in the 1977-1978 Season

    #19 in the 1978-1979 Season

    #25 in the 1979-1980 Season

    Not in Top 30 in the 1980-1981 Season

    From September 1977 to March 1978 it was aired on Tuesdays from 9:00 to 9:30pm

    From September 1978 to March 1980 it was aired on Thursdays from 9:00 to 9:30pm

    From October 1980 to January 1981 it was aired on Wednesdays from 9:00 to 9:30pm

    From March to April 1981 it was aired on Mondays from 10:30 to 11:00pmmoreless
  • 82
    Match Game '73

    Match Game '73

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    CBS (ended 1979) (Returning GSN)
    This is the classic version of the ultimate classic game show that most people came to know and love. Originally intended to be simply an expanded CBS-TV remake of the popular 1962-1969 NBC-TV game show called The Star-Studded Big Money Match Game 73 (and it's annual updates) soon grew into a bonafide, no-holds-barred comedy fest, full of innuendos, double-entendres, pouting celebrities and much more debuts including one as the show's return on June 25-29, 1973 on CBS-TV. Host Gene Rayburn played straight man to the antics of the 6-star panel but frequently aided the fun. The game itself was straightforward. 2 contestants that's including a returning champion are competed. The challenger chose 1 of the questions (marked "A" & "B") in 2 rounds (marked "1" & "2") for which Rayburn read the question. While the questions were rather pedestrian early in the run (e.g., "Name a foreign car"), the questions quickly grew wild and wacky. Frequently, the questions involved a recurring list of characters such as Dumb Donald, Weird Willie and Old Man Periwinkle (the latter brilliantly portrayed by Rayburn); celebrities, politicians and news events of the time were also the butt of many of the questions. For example: "Wendy the waitress really likes it if you give her good tips. Give her a $10 bill, she'll put a sliced cherry in your drink. Don't tip her and she'll put in a _____." It was that blank that the six(6) celebrities separately wrote in on index cards. The contestant then was asked for his/her answer. One by one, Rayburn – who frequently critiqued the contestant's answer (he or she might say "cherry bomb" or "cyanide," which would be the definitive answer, while "dirt" would be a rotten answer) – then the audience critized each celebrity for his or her answer. The player scored 1 point for every match. Two rounds were player with the challenger going 1st in the second round of questions (or the champion if the challenger matched all 6 stars); celebrities who matched a player in the first round didn't participate in the second-round question for that contestant. The player in the lead after two rounds wins the game and $100 and played the Big Money Super Match. A tie-breaker round was played if necessary with gameplay like as before. If the tie wasn't broken after two(2) tie-breaker rounds, then a sudden-death fill-in-the-blank tiebreaker was played. A fill-in-the-blank phrase (e.g., _____ Bunny) was shown; each player wrote their response and the celebrities were polled from the audience for their answers. The first to match won the game. In the highly unlikely event that both players provided the same answer or there still was not a match, then (after a typical Rayburn comment like, "Gee, we're really doing well, aren't we?") the sudden-death tie-breaker was played again until there was a match. The sudden-death format was used right away for ties in the weekly syndicated Match Game PM (because of time constraints) that started in the 1975-1976 season only regulars Richard Dawson, Brett Somers and Charles Nelson Reilly played. The Super Match was played in 2 parts. In the 1st part (dubbed Audience Match), Rayburn read a fill-in-the-blank phrase in which had been given to a previous studio audience of 100 people (e.g., Cookie ______). The contestant asked 3 celebrities 1 at a time for suggested answers after which he or she could choose one or come up with one of his or her own. The three top answers were listed, with the No. 3 choice worth $100, the second-most popular worth $250 and the top choice worth $500. If the champion matched one of the top 3 answers, he/she won that amount of money and played the Head-to-Head Match for 10 times their winnings (equals ergo: $1000, $2500 or $5000). The player chose a celebrity, who was given another fill-in-the-blank phrase as before. If there was an exact match, the champion wins the Big Money. Even if the player didn't match, the champion kept his/her Audience Match winnings and faced a new challenger. Players returned until defeated or surpassing CBS's $25,000 winnings limit (done just once in March 1979). Richard Dawson was initially the only regular Match Game 73 celebrity; Charles Nelson Reilly and Brett Somers became regulars in September 1973. Dawson was far and away the most popular Head-to-Head Match celebrity partner (one history of the show reported he was responsibile for greater than $1 million in the champion's winnings). In 1976 as the show then called Match Game 76 Dawson parlayed his success in the highly-successful ABC-TV run of Family Feud. On June 28, 1978...The Star Wheel was added to the Super Match on Match Game 78 which the contestant spun to determine his or her celebrity partner. If the wheel stopped on certain areas of the wheel called the gold star area (designated "double"), the player played for 20 times their Audience Match cash (up to $10,000 on the CBS-TV show; $20,000 on Match Game PM); otherwise, they played for their regular jackpot. Some fans of the show believe the addition of the Star Wheel hastened Dawson's departure from the show on August 23, 1978 and though that's purely speculation. Match Game 73 as fans came to know, had many classic moments during its 7 Season run on CBS-TV (too many to list here). The show also spawned a successful syndicated entry (the once-a-week Match Game PM, which offered even higher cash prizes). After the CBS-TV show (and then called Match Game 79) ended its run on April 20, 1979. 5 Months later it continued its life as a 5-day-a-week entry on September 10-14, 1979 that series continued through September 10, 1982. A short-lived pairing with The Hollywood Squares in 1983-1984 on NBC-TV plus 2 self-contained revivals (ABC-TV in 1990-1991 and Syndicated TV in 1998-1999), soon followed. None managed to recapture the audience (or particularly in the latter version, the magic) of the one-of-a-kind original. Reruns of the classic Match Game 73 have perpetually been among the highest-rated shows on Game Show Network (now GSN). THE BROADCAST HISTORY of MATCH GAME 73: June 25-December 31, 1973 at 3:30-4:00pm on CBS-TV MATCH GAME 74: January 2-December 31, 1974 at 3:30-4:00pm on CBS-TV MATCH GAME 75: January 2-August 15, 1975 at 3:30-4:00pm on CBS-TV August 18-November 28, 1975 at 3:00-3:30pm on CBS-TV December 1-31, 1975 at 3:30-4:00pm on CBS-TV MATCH GAME 76: January 2-December 31, 1976 at 3:30-4:00pm on CBS-TV MATCH GAME 77: January 3-November 4, 1977 at 3:30-4:00pm on CBS-TV November 7-December 9, 1977 at 11:00-11:30am on CBS-TV December 12, 1977-January 3, 1978 at 4:00-4:30pm on CBS-TV MATCH GAME 78 : January 4, 1978-January 2, 1979 at 4:00-4:30pm on CBS-TV MATCH GAME 79 : January 3-April 20, 1979 at 4:00-4:30pm on CBS-TV. Syndicated on every TV Market from September 10, 1979 to September 10, 1982 and Distributed By JIM VICTORY TELEVISION, INC. "MATCH GAME 73-79" is A MARK GOODSON-BILL TODMAN PRODUCTION in association with The CBS-TV Network.moreless
  • 83
    Chico and the Man

    Chico and the Man

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    NBC (ended 1978)
    Chico and the Man debuted in 1974 on NBC. The setting was East Los Angeles in a small run down garage. The owner, Ed Brown, became partners in the business with a young Chicano, Chico Rodriguez. Major changes occured toward the end of the 3rd season when Freddie Prinze, who played Chico, committed suicide. The final three episodes of the third season where filmed explaining Chico had gone to Mexico for a visit. The following season, Chico was written out of the show as going into business with his father. A new "Chico" was introduced at the beginning of the fourth and final season in Raul Garcia, a young boy whom Ed calls Chico. Other characters include, Louie Wilson, the garbage man who dropped by the garage and Della Rogers who ran a food stand not far from the garage. NBC Broadcast History September 1974-January 1976----Fridays----8:30 p.m.
    January-March 1976----Wednesdays----9:00 p.m.
    April-August 1976----Wednesdays----9:30 p.m.
    August 1976-February 1978----Fridays----8:30 p.m.
    June-July 1978----Fridays----8:30 p.m.moreless
  • 84
    The Good Life

    The Good Life

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    BBC (ended 1978)
    The Good Life stars Richard Briers and Felicity Kendal as Tom and Barbara Good, a middle class suburban couple who on Tom's 40th birthday decide to turn their Surbiton home into a self sufficient allotment. They grow their own food, keep farm animals and have sold or bartered all of their electrical appliances as they have no electricity. This creates friction with their best friends and next door neighbours, the Leadbetters (Jerry and Margo) played by Paul Eddington and Penelope Keith. But even though the Goods have lowered the tone of the neighbourhood in the Leadbetters eyes they still can't help but be best of friends.moreless
  • 85
    The New Dick Van Dyke Show

    The New Dick Van Dyke Show

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    CBS (ended 1974)
    The New Dick Van Dyke Show was Dick Van Dyke's return to television after pursuing movie roles, following the highly sucessful run of the Dick Van Dyke Show.

    In this incarnation he was Dick Preston, a talk show host and later a soap-opera actor. The show focused on his work and his home life with wife Jenny (Hope Lange) and daughter Annie (Angela Powell). The show ran on CBS from 1971 to 1974.

    For the first two seasons, the Prestons lived in Arizona. Dick hosted a local talk/variety show called "The Dick Preston Show." His sister/secretary was "Mike" Preston, and he and Jenny's best friends were Bernie Davis and his wife Carol. Dick's boss was Ted Atwater, a money-greedy type of man.

    For the last season, Dick, Jenny, and Annie left Arizona (after Dick's talk show was cancelled) for Hollywood, where Dick got an acting job on the soap opera "Those Who Care." New characters were Richard and Connie Richardson. Sadly, when the first format was just kicking up, the second format came in and caused the ratings to decline. The second format was made because of the fact that Carl Reiner left the show after 1973 because of a censorship dispute. Famously, the show had filmed an episode where the Powell's daughter walked in at a delicate time. Nothing shocking was shown on-screen, but the network demanded the whole episode be cut and reworked. Carl claimed censorship and walked away from the whole show.

    Airdate History Season 1 1971-72 CBS Saturdays 9:00pm EST Season 2 1972-73 CBS Sundays 9:00pm EST (Sept72 through Dec72) CBS Sundays 7:30pm EST (Jan73 through Summer73) Season 3 1973-74 CBS Mondays 9:30pm ESTmoreless
  • 86
    Till Death Us Do Part

    Till Death Us Do Part

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    BBC (ended 1975)
    Welcome to the Till Death Us Do Part guide. British sitcom; pilot episode aired on July 22, 1965
  • 87
    The Brian Keith Show

    The Brian Keith Show

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    NBC (ended 1974)
    Brian Keith played Dr. Sean Jamison, who ran a free clinic with his daughter Anne (Shelley Fabares). Filmed in Hawaii, this show was called "The Little People" in its first season before being re-titled "The Brian Keith Show" in its second and last season.moreless
  • 88
    The David Steinberg Show

    The David Steinberg Show

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    CTV (ended 1977)
    Relatively short-lived Canadian series featuring comedian David Steinberg playing himself, hosting a fictional variety show. While the series depicted the on-air humour, it also depicted the comic adventures behind the scenes. It featured a slew of Second City performers, most of whom later starred in "Second City TV", which was much more sucessful. Joe Flaherty's alter-ego, Kirk Dirkwood, was the somewhat neurotic stage manager who always wanted to be a performer, and finally did near the end. He would appear as a different patient every week for an eccentric psychiatrist played by Steinberg on the show. Dave Thomas played James MacGregor, a hot-tempered Scottish security guard. Martin Short played Johnny Del Bravo, David's narcistic cousin and a whiny, untalented singer. John Candy was Spider Reichman, the 60's-oriented musician, and Andrea Martin played Julie Liverfoot, Steinberg's lazy, sleazy secretary and Reichman's singer. Many shades of SCTV characters can be seen in this series: The straight man character so personalized by Flaherty, the smug, cheerful music maker played by Candy... there were even specific characters that can be seen, like Thomas' Angus Crock in MacGregor and Short's Jackie Rogers, Jr in Del Bravo. They weren't the only co-stars, however; in fact, the other two almuni both played multiple roles. Bill Saluga played Vinnie DeMilo, the Italian-accented, fast-talking owner of the Hello Deli, located across the street from the studio (who was also Kirk's agent) and Raymond J. Johnson, Jr, the confused direction-seeker who appeared out of nowhere randomly throughout the show. Trudy Young doubled as actress Bambi Markowitz and Margie, the sassy waitress at the Deli. It should be noted that Saluga's character of Raymond J. Johnson, Jr ("Now, you can call me Ray, and you can call me Ray J..." was always the beginning of his lengthy response to whoever called him Mr. Johnson) had been being performed in Las Vegas since as early as the 50's, and appeared on variety show "Red Foxx" and guest starred on many others, always unexpectedly appearing and wondering where he was. Recently, he even appeared on an episode of "The Simpsons". As for David Steinberg himself? He became a television director, working on such sitcoms as "The Parent Hood", "Newhart", "The Golden Girls", "Seinfeld", "Mad About You", "Friends", and "Designing Women".moreless
  • 89
    Bridget Loves Bernie

    Bridget Loves Bernie

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    CBS (ended 1973)
    Bridget Loves Bernie was a reasonably successful 1970s situation comedy about the marriage of two young people from vastly different backgrounds. The show starred Meredith Baxter as a Catholic girl from a wealthy family and David Birney as a Jewish boy with ambitions to be a writer (the two married in real life after the program ended).

    The series focused on the differences between the families and how the young married couple tried to bridge the gaps between them. Though Bridget Loves Bernie had good ratings and aired between All in the Family and The Mary Tyler Moore Show, it was somewhat controversial among some religious groups and CBS cancelled the show after one season.moreless
  • 90
    Big Eddie

    Big Eddie

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    CBS (ended 1975)
    "Big" Eddie Smith is the owner of the Big E sports arena in New York, trying to leave his past as a gambler behind him. He lives with his wife Honey, and their granddaughter Ginger. Cancelled after ten episodes.moreless
  • 91
    Archie Bunker's Place

    Archie Bunker's Place

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    CBS (ended 1983)
    Archie Bunker's Place premiered in 1979 as a continuation of the very popular CBS series All in the Family. When the new series began, the focus of the series shifted from Archie and Edith's home life to Archie's bar, Archie's Place, which was now being expanded into a short-order restaurant. Some new regulars were introduced into the series such as Archie's new business partner, Murray Klein, cook Veronica Rooney, and some of Archie's friends, who were formerly recurring guest stars were now regulars or even costars. Edith was seen less frequently in the first season. Then at the beginning of the second season, the unthinkable happened. Edith suddenly died of a stroke, leaving Archie to care for little Stephanie all by himself. Archie later became full owner of the bar and grill with financial advice coming from lawyer/business manager Gary Rabinowitz, who happened to be in love with Archie's niece Billie, who had also come to stay with Archie. Archie Bunker's Place left CBS in 1983. Spinoff of: All in the Family Spinoffs: Gloria CBS Broadcast History: Sep 1979--Mar 1983; Sun 8:00-8:30 Mar 1983--May 1983; Mon 8:00-8:30 May 1983--Jun 1983; Sun 8:00-8:30 Jun 1983--Jun 1983; Mon 9:30-10:00 Jun 1983--Sep 1983; Wed 8:00-8:30 Nielsen Ratings: #11 1979-1980 Season #20 1980-1981 Season #13 1981-1982 Season #26 1982-1983 Season Awards for Archie Bunker's Place: Sheree North was nominated for an Emmy Award for Outstanding Lead Actress in a Comedy Series in 1980. Linda Day was nominated for an Emmy Award for Outstanding Directing in a Comedy Series for Tough Love in 1981. Anne Meara was nominated for an Emmy Award for Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Comedy or Variety or Music Series for Relapse in 1981. Carroll O'Connor won a Peabody Personal Award for Edith's Death in 1981. Danielle Brisebois was nominated for a Young Artist Award for Best Young Actress in a Television Series in 1981. Anne Meara was nominated for an Emmy Award for Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Comedy or Variety or Music Series for Relapse in 1982. Danielle Brisebois was nominated for Golden Globes, USA Award for Best Supporting Actress in a Series, Mini-Series or Motion Picture Made for TV in 1982. Danielle Brisebois won a Young Artist Award for Best Young Actress in a Television Series in 1982. Marco Zappia was nominated for an Emmy Award for Outstanding Video Tape Editing for a Series for Three Women in 1983. Danielle Brisebois was nominated for a Young Artist Award for Best Young Actress in a Television Series in 1983. Danielle Brisebois was nominated for a Young Artist Award for Best Young Actress in a Television Series in 1984.moreless
  • 92
    Dad's Army

    Dad's Army

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    BBC (ended 1977)
    Intoducing the Walmington-On-Sea home guard, a bunch of hapless old and young men who have kept people all over the world very amused for the past forty years. Creator/Writers David Croft and Jimmy Perry made each episode of Dad's Army as funny as the previous one, with an element of humour which has survived decades. It has the most memorable catch phrases of any sitcom and due to our fondness of it, it's probably the most re-run show ever. The BBC keep an episode of it queued up incase of a fault at TV centre and it even successfully invaded the big screen with a memorable, well loved Dad's Army feature film made by Columbia pictures.moreless
  • 93
    Ellery Queen

    Ellery Queen

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    NBC (ended 1976)
    Welcome to the Ellery Queen guide at tv.com. This is one of the classic TV whodunits -- with a twist. The show's format was such that the audience would see everything that the show's namesake character would see, including all of the clues, and then, right before the final scene started (you know... the one where all the suspects are brought into the room for the "YOU... killed the victim. And you did it because..." scene, the star (Ellery Queen, of course) would turn to the TV audience and state "Okay, you've got all the clues. Do you know who did it? I think I do. Can you guess?" And the audience had the chance to be part of the show. Quite unique and half the fun. For books and more information on this character, check out [url]http://www.elleryqueen.com[/url]. For more information on the TV series, check out [url]http://www.elleryqueenshow.com[/url]. Finally, for a 12-DVD set on this series, check out this [url="http://www.raretelevision.com/store/view_product.php?product=ELLTWOA617"]Ellery Queen[/url] DVD set.moreless
  • 94
    School House Rock

    School House Rock

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    ABC (ended 1996)
    Release history:
    The soundtrack to Multiplication Rock was released on LP (Capitol 11174) in 1973 and on CD (Capitol 91253) in 1989. The discs are in stereo, but missing some foley from the broadcast versions. (see also reissues and covers) Filmstrips and 16mm films of Multiplication Rock, Grammar Rock, America Rock and Science Rock (hereafter The Big Four) were available to schools and libraries from Xerox Films. The film prints (and possibly the filmstrips) came with teachers' aides which included lyrics, questions for students and activities. In 1987 The Big Four were released by Golden Book Video on four VHS tapes. Cloris Leachman and "a group of young friends" sang and danced to new between-segment songs not produced by the original team. The tapes were missing The Good Eleven, Little Twelvetoes, and Three-Ring Government and America Rock was renamed History Rock. The videos were re-released on VHS (Aug. 8, 1995) and laserdisc (Dec. 13, 1995) by Capital Cities/ABC Video Publishers, restoring the missing segments and removing Ms. Leachman and friends. CD-ROMs and at least two music folios were released in 1996. Released Apr. 9, 1996 School House Rock! Rocks featured new versions of SHR songs performed by contemporary rock stars. School House Rock, the Box Set was released June 18, 1996 and featured 41 songs on 4 CDs. Disc 1 featured the stereo versions of Multiplication Rock plus a bonus track, My Hero, Zero by The Lemonheads. Discs 2-4 featured mono versions of the songs (probably directly from film) except The Preamble which is in stereo, and Verb which has an extremely small amount of separation. Episodes made in the 1990s were made in stereo and are presented in stereo in the box. The four discs were released separately, minus The Lemonheads track, on Apr. 1, 1997. Another tribute album, School House Rocks the Vote was released Aug. 18, 1998. It featured various artists covering School House Rock songs. Among the artists were Grady Tate singing Messin' with My Bill of Rights!, I'm Just a Bill by Joan Osborne and South Park's Isaac Hayes, and The Campaign Trail by Bob Dorough. A sampler CD, The Best of School House Rock was released Nov. 3, 1998, featuring songs by the original artists. I Got Six was named Best Picture of 1973 by ASIF-East, a chapter of the International Animated Film Association. Multiplication Rock received honors from Action for Children's Television. Bob Dorough received an Grammy nomination in 1974 for the Multiplication Rock LP, probably for Best Recording for Children (the winner was Winnie the Pooh and Tigger Too). Most impressive was SHR's 4 Emmys, beating out shows like Sesame Street and Mr. Rogers' Neighborhood Each discipline has been given its own season. Years of first airing are listed below as original airdates are likely lost forever. 1973 Multiplication Rock (season 1) (premiered 06-Jan-73) 1973-1977 Grammar Rock (season 2) (premiered 08-Sep-73) 1975-1979 America Rock (season 3) 1978-1979 Science Rock (season 4) (premiered 11-Mar-78) 1983-1984 Scooter Computer & Mr. Chips (season 5) (premiered 08-Jan-83) (last show 31-Aug-85) 1995-1996 Money Rock (season 6) Years of first broadcast for each episode are given in the production code field. moreless
  • 95
    Fernwood 2Night

    Fernwood 2Night

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    (ended 1977)
    By the end of 1976, producer extraordinaire Norman Lear had a crisis on his hands. His cult-favorite sitcom Mary Hartman, Mary Hartman imploded when its star, Louise Lasser, went through emotional trauma that forced her to resign. But Hartman's hometown of Fernwood, Ohio (ZIP Code 45989) would not shrivel up. Toward the end of the next summer, a new set of characters emerged with a "talk show" called Fernwood 2Night, airing (originally) live from Channel 6 in Fernwood. The host of Fernwood 2Night was Barth Gimble, who had left a very successful talk show in Miami under circumstances similar to Louise Lasser's real-life breakdown. Barth returned to his home of Fernwood to start this new talk show on Channel 6. Immediately, he used it as a platform to deny the charges made against him in the Fernwood Courier ("There has never been a conviction"). But on the bright side, Barth did get in banter with interesting guests, his second banana Jerry Hubbard, and musical director Happy. Original production number: 127 Barth promotes the planned Garth Gimbel Memorial Tennis Classic. W.D. "Bud" Prize (Kenneth Mars) returns, and bows to public demands that he reveal the secret of his chinadonture treatment. In a rebuttal to Dr. Van Moot (aka Dr. Osgood), Phil Maltby (Morgan Upton) of Phil's Fashion Funwear and Medical Research Lab explains that leisure suits, far from causing cancer, actually can help cure disease. "Bud" Prize is so stimulated by this revelation that he falls asleep.moreless
  • 96
    Porridge

    Porridge

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    BBC (ended 1977)
    Series about Norman Stanley Fletcher, a criminal who is convicted of robbery and sent to Slade Prison for 5 years. He has been in prison many times before and knows the ins and outs of it. He becomes a father figure to most of the men inside and can easily get one over on the screws. The pilot episode aired on April 1, 1973.moreless
  • 97
    Nanny and the Professor

    Nanny and the Professor

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    ABC (ended 1971)
    Juliet Mills plays Phoebe Figalily ("Nanny"), a nanny who spreads love and also laughter in this gentle comedy. She comes to help widowed college professor Harold Everett (Richard Long) whose kids have frustrated previous nannys by being troublesome. Now, it's Phoebe's turn to help Harold raise his three kids, Hal, Butch and Prudence. History: Jan-Aug 1970 (ABC) Wednesdays:7:30 - 8:00 Sept '70-Sept '71 (ABC) Fridays-8:00-8:30 Sept '71-Dec '71 (ABC) Mondays-8:00-8:30moreless
  • 98
    Rocky and Bullwinkle and Friends

    Rocky and Bullwinkle and Friends

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    Classic Media
    Rocky and Bullwinkle and Friends is a classic early 1960s cartoon comedy show produced by Jay Ward Productions. The show ran for 5 years and aired on both the ABC and NBC television network. The show's two main characters are Rocky J. Squirrel, a brave flying squirrel and his best pal, Bullwinkle, a dumb and clumsy moose living in the town of Frostbite Falls, Minnesota. The series usually involves their misadventures involving enemies Boris and Natasha, the dastardly Russian spy duo bent on ending the noble antics of "moose and squirrel" and thereby gaining power over the fictional nation of Pottsylvania. Rocky and Bullwinkle and Friends also featured short bookend stories- most notably Dudley Do-Right, the clueless Canadian Mountie always saving damsels from the villainous Snidely Whiplash, and another bookend involving Sherman and Peabody, a boy and dog brainiac who travel through time to discover the real story behind historical events and right the wrongs to make sure the events actually happen. Fun, vintage and famous for using groan-worthy puns, Rocky and Bullwinkle and Friends is great for kids and kids at heart.moreless
  • 99
    Felix The Cat

    Felix The Cat

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    (ended 1953)
    Felix the Cat follows the offbeat adventures of that curious feline, Felix. The first episodes where shown in black & white silent cartoons before it's relaunch in the 1960s. Throughout the 1920s, Felix was arguably the most popular of all silent-era cartoon characters. His image was mass-merchandised and used to sell dolls, baby oil, and many other products. He even had his own brand of cigars. Not only that, but he was also the first thing to be broadcasted on television. Sadly, he has be all but forgotten about by most.moreless
  • 100
    Rising Damp

    Rising Damp

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    ITV (ended 1978)
    Rumour has it that somewhere deep in the rain forests of South America, there still exist undiscovered tribes of people completely cut off from civilization, untouched by technology, and oblivious to the existence of the great world beyond the waterfall. If this is so, then these people are quite possibly the only humans on the entire planet that have never stood with hands on hips, nodded their heads vigorously back and forth and uttered the line "Yes, Miss Jones." Certainly everyone else, however, has. Such is the legendary status of one miserly, prejudiced, scheming and generally unlikeable bed-sit landlord called Rigsby. Rising Damp originated as a script for a stage play, The Banana Box, in 1970. It's author, Eric Chappell, was inspired by a newspaper article about a black man who had guested at a hotel for a year, pretending to be an African prince as a means of avoiding discrimination. The play enjoyed a short lived run in 1971, with Wilfred Brambell as landlord Rooksby, and again in 1973 where regular stars Leonard Rossiter, Don Warrington and Frances De La Tour were cast. It was on this final run that a Yorkshire Television executive was invited to see it, and recognised it's potential as sit-com material. In 1974, The Banana Box became one of six sit-com pilot episodes commissioned by YTV, the others being Badger's Set, Brotherly Love, Slater's Day, You'll Never Walk Alone and Oh No, It's Selwyn Frogit! During production of The Banana Box, the title was deemed unsuitable and changed to Rising Damp (after a line from the script). Also, due to a complaint from a real Mr Rooksby, the lead character's name was altered to the more familiar Rigsby after a flick through the phone book. Audience reaction to the pilot were deemed favourable enough for YTV to commission a series. In fact, the show ran to four series, a Christmas special and a successful feature film, winning multiple awards along the way.moreless
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