• 81
    Here's Lucy

    Here's Lucy

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    CBS (ended 1974)
    HERE'S LUCY. This often forgotten and critically bashed series from Lucille Ball, her 3rd, is arguably superior to the LUCY SHOW. Probably unjustly misaligned by critics due to a difficult and weak opening season, HERE"S LUCY improved with every season and contains some of the best work of Lucille Ball's career. The wonderfully abstract LUCY SHOW plays more as a variety show than sitcom, and certainly has its share of classic episodes. Missing from the Lucy Show, however, is the character development , focus, and warmth ( that made I LOVE LUCY so successful). HERE"S LUCY switches formats and focus' on widower Lucy Carter, single-working Mom and life with her two children (Ball's own children with Desi Arnaz), and their Uncle Harry. Played by Gale Gordon, Uncle Harry was also Lucy's over-bearing boss. As the seasons pass, Uncle Harry softens and Lucy, Kim, and Craig play more as a family unit. Like Lucy Ricardo, Lucy Carter still loved to get into the show, and her work at the "Unique Employment Agency" often allowed her the chance to sing and dance with top guest stars. Carol Burnett, Jack Benny, and Vivian Vance make numerous, nearly seasonal guest appearances, and other famous guests included Liz Taylor and Richard Burton, Flip Wilson, Ann-Margret, Johnny Carson, Milton Berle, Helen Hays, and Ginger Rogers. Still featuring Lucille Ball's amazing talents for physical comedy and turning a funny line, HERE"S LUCY features dozens of iconic "LUCY" moments. Lucy as down-trodden Dirty Gertie, Lucy wielding a jackhammer on cement, Lucy sky-diving through the roof of a lodge, the famous stuck-on-her-finger Liz Taylor diamond ring, Lucy in a giant pickle outfit, and Lucy and Mannix tied to chairs, physically jumping, bouncing the chairs to comedic perfection, and of course, the moment zany Lucy Carter meets superstar actress Lucille Ball! Many episodes are written by her I LOVE LUCY writers, as well as other tops-in-their field scribes such as Bob O'Brien, the Fox-Jacob's team, and Lou Derman (many of these writer's were presenting their best work simultaneously to ALL IN THE FAMILY). Even with numerous top directors at the helm�Herbert Kenwith, Jerry Paris, Jack Donohue, Jay Sandrich, and Coby Ruskin� it is often repeated that Lucille Ball really directed the shows, but offered deference to the directors she most trusted and respected. This show is rarely seen in syndication despite relatively high ratings during the intital run (Season 1 #9, Season 2 #6, Season 3 #3, Season 4 #11, Season 5 #15, Season 6 #29). It had a daytime run on CBS in 1977. This was followed by it's debut in off-network syndication in Fall of 1981 by Telepictures. Most stations aired the show in latenight after the first few months. Now the show is seen mostly in international markets or on independant stations. PAX TV ran the series briefly in the late 90's. A DVD with 24 episodes was released in 2005 and features lots of great bonus features. Here's Lucy Season sets will be coming out starting with Season One in August 2009, Season Two in November 2009, Season 3 in mid 2010 and continuing until Dec 2012 with the entire series to come out on MPI video. The DVDs will have a ton of special features.moreless
  • 82
    B.J. and the Bear

    B.J. and the Bear

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    NBC (ended 1981)
    What kind of trouble can a monkey and a trucker get into? This classic series explores just that! BJ McKay was a good-looking young trucker who traveled around the country in his big red & white rig, with a single companion - his pet chimp, Bear. B.J. was based in rural Georgia and was confronted by a succession of corrupt local sheriffs - Elroy P. Lobo (who was later given his own series, Lobo); Sgt. Wiley of Winslow County and his two fellow lawmen, Sheriffs Cain and Masters. The only honest cop B.J. seemed to encounter was the Fox, who spent much of her time trying to trap the crooked local cops. Tommy was a lady trucker friend and Bullets ran the local hangout, the Country Comfort Truck Stop. In 1981, B.J. settled down to run a trucking business in Los Angeles called Bear Enterprises. His new adversary was Rutherford T. Grant, a corrupt politician who headed the state Special Crimes Action Team. Grant was a silent partner in TransCal, the largest trucking firm in California and stopped at nothing to stomp out potential competition. Because of Grant's intervention, B.J. found it impossible to get regular truck drivers to work for him and had to settle for a crew of 7 young, beautiful lady truckers, including a pair of identical twins and Grant's daughter, Cindy. The Theme Song was written by Glen A Larson and sung by Greg Eviganmoreless
  • 83
    Rhoda

    Rhoda

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    CBS (ended 1978)
    Rhoda which began in the fall of 1974, began each episode (at least the 1st season) with Valerie Harper stating: "My name is Rhoda Morgenstern. I was born in the Bronx, New York in December, 1941. I've always felt responsible for World War II. The first thing I remember liking that liked me back was food. I had a bad puberty, it lasted 17 years. I'm a high school graduate, I went to art school. My entrance exam was on a book of matches. I decided to move out of the house when I was 24, my mother still refers to this as the time I ran away from home. Eventually I ran to Minneapolis where it's cold, and I figured I'd keep better. Now I'm back in Manhattan. New York, this is your last chance!" Rhoda is the successful spin-off to the classic The Mary Tyler Moore Show. Rhoda returns to New York where she eventually marries Joe Gerard, and later divorces him. She finds comfort from her sister, Brenda (Julie Kavner). Her biggest problem is her mother, Ida (Nancy Walker). In 1978, after 110 episodes, Rhoda went off the air. It being the second most successful spin-off from The Mary Tyler Moore Show - the first being Lou Grant. During its short run Rhoda earned two Emmys (one for Valerie Harper in 1975, and one for Julie Kavner in 1978) and two Golden Globes (one for Harper and one for the series itself, both in 1975). All together it earned 11 Emmy nominations and 7 Golden Globe nominations. The series has since earned itself a reputation as a classic in its own right. NOTE: CBS left four episodes unaired. Spinoff of: The Mary Tyler Moore Show First Telecast: September 9, 1974
    Last Telecast: December 9, 1978
    Episodes: 110 Color Episodes CBS Broadcast History September 1974-September 1975----Mondays----9:30 p.m.
    September 1975-January 1977----Mondays----8:00 p.m.
    January 1977-September 1978----Sundays----8:00 p.m.
    September-December 1978----Saturdays----8:00 p.m.
    Nielsen Ratings: (Top 25 or Better) #6 in the 1974-1975 Season
    #8 in the 1975-1976 Season
    #25 in the 1977-1978 Season
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  • 84
    Match Game '73

    Match Game '73

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    CBS (ended 1979) (Returning GSN)
    This is the classic version of the ultimate classic game show that most people came to know and love. Originally intended to be simply an expanded CBS-TV remake of the popular 1962-1969 NBC-TV game show called The Star-Studded Big Money Match Game 73 (and it's annual updates) soon grew into a bonafide, no-holds-barred comedy fest, full of innuendos, double-entendres, pouting celebrities and much more debuts including one as the show's return on June 25-29, 1973 on CBS-TV. Host Gene Rayburn played straight man to the antics of the 6-star panel but frequently aided the fun. The game itself was straightforward. 2 contestants that's including a returning champion are competed. The challenger chose 1 of the questions (marked "A" & "B") in 2 rounds (marked "1" & "2") for which Rayburn read the question. While the questions were rather pedestrian early in the run (e.g., "Name a foreign car"), the questions quickly grew wild and wacky. Frequently, the questions involved a recurring list of characters such as Dumb Donald, Weird Willie and Old Man Periwinkle (the latter brilliantly portrayed by Rayburn); celebrities, politicians and news events of the time were also the butt of many of the questions. For example: "Wendy the waitress really likes it if you give her good tips. Give her a $10 bill, she'll put a sliced cherry in your drink. Don't tip her and she'll put in a _____." It was that blank that the six(6) celebrities separately wrote in on index cards. The contestant then was asked for his/her answer. One by one, Rayburn – who frequently critiqued the contestant's answer (he or she might say "cherry bomb" or "cyanide," which would be the definitive answer, while "dirt" would be a rotten answer) – then the audience critized each celebrity for his or her answer. The player scored 1 point for every match. Two rounds were player with the challenger going 1st in the second round of questions (or the champion if the challenger matched all 6 stars); celebrities who matched a player in the first round didn't participate in the second-round question for that contestant. The player in the lead after two rounds wins the game and $100 and played the Big Money Super Match. A tie-breaker round was played if necessary with gameplay like as before. If the tie wasn't broken after two(2) tie-breaker rounds, then a sudden-death fill-in-the-blank tiebreaker was played. A fill-in-the-blank phrase (e.g., _____ Bunny) was shown; each player wrote their response and the celebrities were polled from the audience for their answers. The first to match won the game. In the highly unlikely event that both players provided the same answer or there still was not a match, then (after a typical Rayburn comment like, "Gee, we're really doing well, aren't we?") the sudden-death tie-breaker was played again until there was a match. The sudden-death format was used right away for ties in the weekly syndicated Match Game PM (because of time constraints) that started in the 1975-1976 season only regulars Richard Dawson, Brett Somers and Charles Nelson Reilly played. The Super Match was played in 2 parts. In the 1st part (dubbed Audience Match), Rayburn read a fill-in-the-blank phrase in which had been given to a previous studio audience of 100 people (e.g., Cookie ______). The contestant asked 3 celebrities 1 at a time for suggested answers after which he or she could choose one or come up with one of his or her own. The three top answers were listed, with the No. 3 choice worth $100, the second-most popular worth $250 and the top choice worth $500. If the champion matched one of the top 3 answers, he/she won that amount of money and played the Head-to-Head Match for 10 times their winnings (equals ergo: $1000, $2500 or $5000). The player chose a celebrity, who was given another fill-in-the-blank phrase as before. If there was an exact match, the champion wins the Big Money. Even if the player didn't match, the champion kept his/her Audience Match winnings and faced a new challenger. Players returned until defeated or surpassing CBS's $25,000 winnings limit (done just once in March 1979). Richard Dawson was initially the only regular Match Game 73 celebrity; Charles Nelson Reilly and Brett Somers became regulars in September 1973. Dawson was far and away the most popular Head-to-Head Match celebrity partner (one history of the show reported he was responsibile for greater than $1 million in the champion's winnings). In 1976 as the show then called Match Game 76 Dawson parlayed his success in the highly-successful ABC-TV run of Family Feud. On June 28, 1978...The Star Wheel was added to the Super Match on Match Game 78 which the contestant spun to determine his or her celebrity partner. If the wheel stopped on certain areas of the wheel called the gold star area (designated "double"), the player played for 20 times their Audience Match cash (up to $10,000 on the CBS-TV show; $20,000 on Match Game PM); otherwise, they played for their regular jackpot. Some fans of the show believe the addition of the Star Wheel hastened Dawson's departure from the show on August 23, 1978 and though that's purely speculation. Match Game 73 as fans came to know, had many classic moments during its 7 Season run on CBS-TV (too many to list here). The show also spawned a successful syndicated entry (the once-a-week Match Game PM, which offered even higher cash prizes). After the CBS-TV show (and then called Match Game 79) ended its run on April 20, 1979. 5 Months later it continued its life as a 5-day-a-week entry on September 10-14, 1979 that series continued through September 10, 1982. A short-lived pairing with The Hollywood Squares in 1983-1984 on NBC-TV plus 2 self-contained revivals (ABC-TV in 1990-1991 and Syndicated TV in 1998-1999), soon followed. None managed to recapture the audience (or particularly in the latter version, the magic) of the one-of-a-kind original. Reruns of the classic Match Game 73 have perpetually been among the highest-rated shows on Game Show Network (now GSN). THE BROADCAST HISTORY of MATCH GAME 73: June 25-December 31, 1973 at 3:30-4:00pm on CBS-TV MATCH GAME 74: January 2-December 31, 1974 at 3:30-4:00pm on CBS-TV MATCH GAME 75: January 2-August 15, 1975 at 3:30-4:00pm on CBS-TV August 18-November 28, 1975 at 3:00-3:30pm on CBS-TV December 1-31, 1975 at 3:30-4:00pm on CBS-TV MATCH GAME 76: January 2-December 31, 1976 at 3:30-4:00pm on CBS-TV MATCH GAME 77: January 3-November 4, 1977 at 3:30-4:00pm on CBS-TV November 7-December 9, 1977 at 11:00-11:30am on CBS-TV December 12, 1977-January 3, 1978 at 4:00-4:30pm on CBS-TV MATCH GAME 78 : January 4, 1978-January 2, 1979 at 4:00-4:30pm on CBS-TV MATCH GAME 79 : January 3-April 20, 1979 at 4:00-4:30pm on CBS-TV. Syndicated on every TV Market from September 10, 1979 to September 10, 1982 and Distributed By JIM VICTORY TELEVISION, INC. "MATCH GAME 73-79" is A MARK GOODSON-BILL TODMAN PRODUCTION in association with The CBS-TV Network.moreless
  • 85
    The Electric Company 1970s

    The Electric Company 1970s

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    PBS (ended 1977)
    On the heels of its fabulously successful Sesame Street, the Children's Television Workshop (CTW) created The Electric Company. With its roots in Motown Sound, Broadway and Rowan & Martin's Laugh-In, The Electric Company drew attention for six years as the most popular instructional television show. It would win an Emmy for Outstanding Children's Series, and its soundtrack album earned a Grammy. Targeting children ages 6 through 10, The Electric Company aimed to teach basic reading and grammar skills to the young viewers. The show's cast of skit players helped teach these concepts through the use of skits, songs, cartoon and blackout segments and regular features; all of them revolved around sound clusters (e.g., sh-, -ly, -oo-), contractions, punctuation marks, etc. The series provided material for elementary schools, as CTW published a biweekly TEC Teacher's Guide detailing program contents. Quickly, the cast members began to establish themselves with various personas: • Skip Hinnant (who had played Schroeder in the off-Broadway production of You're a Good Man, Charlie Brown) had one of the best known characters: Fargo North, Decoder. Early in the run, this Peter Sellers knock-off interpreted messages that people gave to him when they couldn't understand what had been written. • The show also made Morgan Freeman. He created Easy Reader, the cool dude who loved reading anything he could get his hands on. Freeman also played radio disc jockey Mel Mounds, who usually introduced The Short Circus tunes (see below). • Rita Moreno created her tagline, "Hey You Guys!", while playing Millie, the Milkman's helper. She put the same fire into playing Otto the Director, who fumed as her actors didn't read their lines properly. • Judy Graubart, alumnus of The Second City in Chicago, became Jennifer of the Jungle, teaching bits of phonetics to her friend Paul the Gorilla. • And who can forget J. Arthur Crank? Jimmy Boyd (B. 1939) created the character, strictly as a voice on a telephone during the first season. In all future years, Crank was seen as that bad-tempered loud dresser. Complimenting the adults in the cast was The Short Circus, a group of five teenaged performers usually involved in songs or dances. Members of The Short Circus drew names from a hat to determine what would be their character name. While the Short Circus changed its talents from one season to the next, they did keep one member constant: June Angela. The show also set itself apart with the cloud sets by Nat Mongioi (which members of the cast called "Limbo Land"), cool music by the late Joe Raposo and others, unique sound effects Dick Maitland pinned to punctuation marks, and the high-tech computer animation. The logo above can only suggest these elements, which seemed to represent the New Era back in the 1970s. Among the most popular of the regular features was Spiderman, a live-action segment added during the series' fourth season. The Spiderman segments (for which there were about two dozen or so made) featured The Electric Company cast as various characters. Beginning in 1972, there was also The Adventures of Letterman cartoon series. The evil Spell Binder would cause trouble by using his magic wand, replacing key letters to make the worse of situations (e.g.: Train into Rain). Then Letterman would take the letter(s) off his varsity sweater and correct the hazard. Muppet characters from Sesame Street (including Big Bird, Oscar the Grouch and Grover) also visited on occasion through the years. A total of 780 episodes of The Electric Company aired from 1971 to 1977 on PBS; reruns of the final two seasons aired through the fall of 1985. Programs always ended with one of its cast members stating: The Electric Company gets its power from The Children's Television Workshop. This was followed by a superimposed caption: The Electric Company is a trademark and service mark of the Children's Television Workshop. © Copyright Children's Television Workshop 1971 to 1977 In 1972, CTW began issuing The Electric Company magazine. Appropriately enough, the mag contained feature articles, games and other activities featuring members of the show's cast. It was published until the late-1980s, when replaced with a magazine called Kid City. A sister magazine, Spidey Super Stories (also issued and endorsed by The Electric Company's producers) contained children's reading level-versions of the web slinger's battles with his arch-enemies plus comic strip versions of the The Electric Company Spiderman segments. Spidey Super Stories were published from October 1974 to January 1982. Sixty-five episodes of The Electric Company from various seasons – a good share from the 1972-1973 and 1973-1974 seasons – began airing on Nickelodeon's new Noggin network in the spring of 1999 (kicked off with a two-hour retrospective of the show on TV Land, another Nickelodeon sister network). The shows were edited slightly, removing all program numbers and show-ending teases (see Notes within Show 131). Also for the Noggin run, CTW gave credit to Marvel Comics, which had never received a copyright notice on the original run. Thus all episodes from Seasons 4 to 6 had their copyrights redisplayed: The Electric Company is a trademark and service mark of the Children's Television Workshop. © Copyright Children's Television Workshop 1974 to 1976 The use of the character Spiderman was provided as a courtesy to the Children's Television Workshop by Marvel Comics Group. © Copyright Marvel Comics Group 1974 to 1976 At first, Noggin aired The Electric Company during several daytime and overnight time slots seven days a week. By the time CTW was renamed Sesame Workshop in 2000, however, the show's timeslots were downgraded to late-nights and then, in 2002, only a couple of weekend overnight airings. In early 2003, with the value of Sesame Workshop's interest in Noggin even less (if not zero), The Electric Company was pulled from Noggin's schedule altogether. (Note: Classic episodes of Sesame Street, which were shown under the title Sesame Street Unpaved, had also been a part of Noggin's schedule. Noggin had shown 65 classic episodes (originally airing between 1969 to 1986) of the series. Like The Electric Company, Sesame Street Unpaved had originally aired weekdays before being placed in downgraded timeslots (eventually weekend overnights). Both shows had attracted primarily adults (who had watched the show as children) and college-aged fans, and both shows were too dated for their intended childhood audience. Noggin underwent a total personality change beginning April 1, 2002, placing more emphasis on original programming (in addition to airing reruns of Nickelodeon kiddie shows). The general effect of removing The Electric Company from the airwaves, has not been a pleasant one for American society. Some people believe Sesame Workshop discusses The Electric Company only when lowering the wrecker's ball on those who have violated their copyrights. (To this day, The Electric Company™ and the logo are trademarks and service marks of Sesame Workshop, © 1971-1977.) Though it appears Sesame Workshop chooses not to live in the past, it has been digitizing segments from all its old shows in preparation for DVD releases. The first DVD of The Electric Company is scheduled for release in 2006. (This is the result of an independent campaign for a TEC DVD release; see below.) The Electric Company will always be remembered by its fans as an entertaining series which taught children to read. Elementary classroom teachers regularly scheduled their days so their students could watch the show, and reading scores increased as a result of in-class and home viewing. Hey You Guys! petersmith among them We're gonna turn it on We're gonna bring you the power We're gonna light up The dark of night Like the brightest day In a whole new way We're gonna turn it on We're gonna bring you the power It's coming down the line Strong as it can be Through the courtesy Of The Electric Company™ from The Electric Company Theme Music and Lyrics by Joe Raposo © 1971 Jonico Musicmoreless
  • 86
    All Creatures Great and Small

    All Creatures Great and Small

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    BBC (ended 1990)
    This is a British comedy / drama that revolves around a veterinary practice owned by two brothers. A third vet comes to the practice and frequently finds himself caught up in the feuds between the brothers.moreless
  • 87
    Ellery Queen

    Ellery Queen

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    NBC (ended 1976)
    Welcome to the Ellery Queen guide at tv.com. This is one of the classic TV whodunits -- with a twist. The show's format was such that the audience would see everything that the show's namesake character would see, including all of the clues, and then, right before the final scene started (you know... the one where all the suspects are brought into the room for the "YOU... killed the victim. And you did it because..." scene, the star (Ellery Queen, of course) would turn to the TV audience and state "Okay, you've got all the clues. Do you know who did it? I think I do. Can you guess?" And the audience had the chance to be part of the show. Quite unique and half the fun. For books and more information on this character, check out [url]http://www.elleryqueen.com[/url]. For more information on the TV series, check out [url]http://www.elleryqueenshow.com[/url]. Finally, for a 12-DVD set on this series, check out this [url="http://www.raretelevision.com/store/view_product.php?product=ELLTWOA617"]Ellery Queen[/url] DVD set.moreless
  • 88
    Mayberry R.F.D.

    Mayberry R.F.D.

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    CBS (ended 1971)
    Mayberry R.F.D. premiered in 1968 as a spin off of The Andy Griffith Show (1960-68) with the highest ratings, at the time, of any new show in the history of television. Andy Griffith had grown tired of doing The Andy Griffith Show, so it was decided to continue the show using a different format. Sam Jones arrived in Mayberry during the final season of The Andy Griffith Show. He was very similar to Andy and, also, had a son. The last episode of The Andy Griffith Show served as the pilot for Mayberry R.F.D. In the first episode of Mayberry R.F.D., Andy and Helen were married. Don Knotts also gave a special appearance as Barney Fife. Shortly after Andy and Helen were married, they moved away. Most regulars from The Andy Griffith Show did stay including Howard Sprague, Emmett Clark, Goober Pyle, and, for the first two seasons, Bee Taylor. In 1971, Mayberry R.F.D. was cancelled by CBS in an effort to rid itself of its image as the "hillbilly" network. Main Title Theme Song "The Mayberry March" written by Earle Hagen and Carl Brandt CBS Broadcast History September 23, 1968 - September 6, 1971 ---- Mondays ---- 9:00 - 9:30 P.M. Nielsen Ratings Season 1 (1968-69) #4 (25.4) Season 2 (1969-70) #4 (24.4) Season 3 (1970-71) #15 (22.3) First Telecast: September 23, 1968 Last Telecast: March 29, 1971 Episodes: 78 color episodesmoreless
  • 89
    The Flying Nun

    The Flying Nun

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    ABC (ended 1970)
    The Flying Nun was a one of the many fantasy sitcoms on the 1960s. It was about Elsie Enthrington, a surfer girl, who became a nun. Now named Sister Bertrille, the young novice discovered that she had the ability to fly. She only weighed 90 pounds and when the wind was right she could put on her cornette and fly.

    In 1967, she arrived at the Convent San Tanco in San Juan, Puerto Rico. The Reverand Mother who ran the place was a strict conservative who usually had to put up with Bertrille's mishaps. Sister Jaqueline, a wise nun with a sense of humor became Sister Bertrille's friend (Sister Jaqueline also narrated the show). The sister was also friends with Sister Sixto, a Puerto Rican nun who was struggling with her English language, and Sister Ana, another younger nun.

    She had a special relationship with Carlos Ramirez, a playboy who owned the Carlos-A-Go Go discoteque. Carlos was usually disturbed by Sister Bertrille right in the middle of hot dates, and because of this he dreaded her visits. Deep down, though, Carlos was a great friend to the airborne novice.

    For three years, The Flying Nun was a favorite among kids and adults, and was praised by actual Catholic nuns for its portrayal of convent life. While it is rarely shown on cable, it was recently seen in a regular timeslot on TVLand.

    Broadcast Information
    1967 to 1969---ABC---Thursdays 8:00pm ET
    1969 to 1970---ABC---Wednesdays 7:30pm ET

    For its first two seasons, The Flying Nun was seen on ABC's "It's Your Move" lineup along with Bewitched and That Girl.moreless
  • 90
    Charlie Brown

    Charlie Brown

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    CBS
    Charles Schulz's classic comic strip Peanuts started in 1950. Fifteen years later, A Charlie Brown Christmas debuted. When The Little Christmas Special that Could proved to be an unexpected success, the stage was set for successive television specials. To date, over forty have been made. The Charlie Brown specials focus on one round-headed kid, his goofy but intelligent beagle, and their vast array of friends. Each has distinctive qualities: Lucy, the crabby, self-proclaimed psychiatrist; Linus, the blanket-toting theologian; Schroeder, the Beethoven worshiper whose black piano keys are only painted on; Peppermint Patty, the tomboy whose affections toward "Chuck" are only outweighed by her sports abilities; and so on. The wit, the charm, the pleasantness of these specials make them appropriate not just for children, but for the whole family.moreless
  • 91
    The Bugs Bunny Show

    The Bugs Bunny Show

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    ABC (ended 1972)
    The Bugs Bunny Show was ABC's second prime-time animated series, along with The Flintstones and aired at 7:30 pm on Sundays. Not only was it one of the earliest broadcasts of Looney Tunes and Merrie Melodies on televsion, it was popular for kids since it was a cartoon. Each episode was directed by a handful of senior Warner staffers, including, Friz Freleng, Chuck Jones, Robert McKimson, and Maurice Noble. The show would open with Bugs and Daffy marching out on stage singing "This Is It" which became an instint musical hit among animation and television fans. Then Bugs would introduce a theme or a special guest host. Three cartoons would run and segments were placed between each one. After the second segment a commerical would run. The commerical would exclusively feature one or more of Warner cartoon star which was usually Bugs adverising either Kool-Aid, Tang, or Post Cereals. At the end "Coming Attractions" would be viewed as a sort of "sneak preview" of next week's show. The show was compised of exclusively post-1948 Warner cartoons since it was ownership of the shorts was divided-which Guild Films had owned most of the black and white cartoons while A.A.P. owned all the pre-1948 color shorts-and the 1931-1933 black and white Merrie Melodies. ABC stopped running The Bugs Bunny Show and soon CBC in Canada started showing an/the entire 3rd season in the early 70s, since ABC had cancelled The Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Hour for "Welcome Back, Kotter". These "new" episodes were actually just color version of the older episodes-with the three cartoons changed. With this additional 3rd "cheater" season, there were 78 episodes total. Today The Bugs Bunny Show remains one of the best and most memorable programs in television history. MORE INFORMATION Until 1966 all 52 episodes were originally shown in black and white. Later all 52 episodes were put into color. In September, 1971, the half-hour Bugs Bunny Show reappeared, on Saturday mornings.moreless
  • 92
    You Can't Do That on Television

    You Can't Do That on Television

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    CTV (ended 1990)
    This was a sketch comedy show for young adults that was very popular in the 1980s. The series began life as a live variety show in Ottawa, Canada in 1979, which featured comedy sketches, music videos, and call-in contests. After the first season, the series was given a massive retooling and became a videotaped sketch comedy series. Its biggest success came when the series found its way south to the United States and became one of the trademark shows of Nickelodeon, a new cable channel aimed at children, where it aired until 1992. YCDTOTV may be long gone, but one of the shows trademarks, people getting covered in green slime (usually when they said "I don't know?"), has become a Nickelodeon staple.moreless
  • 93
    Land of the Lost

    Land of the Lost

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    NBC (ended 1976)
    Rick (a.k.a. Marshall) , Will, and Holly Marshall are on rafting trip and a earthquake sends them over a waterfall to the world known as, The Land of the Lost! Total Episodes: 43 For more info: landofthelost.com/ THE DINOSAURS Alice the Allosaur Grumpy the Tyrranosaur Dopey the baby Brontosaur Emily the Brontosaur Junior the baby Allosaur Spot the Coelophysis Spike the Triceratops Lulu the two headed monster Torchy the Dimetrodonmoreless
  • 94
    Scooby and Scrappy-Doo

    Scooby and Scrappy-Doo

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    ABC (ended 1985)
    Scooby and Scrappy-Doo premiered on September 22, 1979. This cartoon introduced another character to the cast: Scooby's nephew Scrappy-Doo, whose main purpose was to splat ghosts while the gang tries to run away from them. In November 1980, this show was known as The Richie Rich/Scooby Doo Hour, which only featured Shaggy, Scooby, and Scrappy in three 7-minute short segments, and was shared with Richie Rich, the adventures of Richie Rich and his dog Dollar and his robotic maid. These shows shared an hour for two seasons. In 1982, Scooby and Scrappy Doo shared an hour with a cartoon about Pete the Puppy and his friends and also had three short segments, the third being a Yabba-Doo cartoon, one of Scooby-Doo's cousins who lived in the Wild West. This show was known as The Scooby-Doo/Puppy Hour. The show was revamped as The New Scooby-Doo and Scrappy Doo Show in September 1983, and brought Daphne back to join Shaggy and the dogs in solving mysteries. This cartoon consisted of two segments, and was often combined with repeats from previous seasons. In 1984, the show underwent another name change and was called The New Scooby-Doo Mysteries, which brought back the original gang. Oh and in 1990 new episodes were aired!moreless
  • 95
    Chico and the Man

    Chico and the Man

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    NBC (ended 1978)
    Chico and the Man debuted in 1974 on NBC. The setting was East Los Angeles in a small run down garage. The owner, Ed Brown, became partners in the business with a young Chicano, Chico Rodriguez. Major changes occured toward the end of the 3rd season when Freddie Prinze, who played Chico, committed suicide. The final three episodes of the third season where filmed explaining Chico had gone to Mexico for a visit. The following season, Chico was written out of the show as going into business with his father. A new "Chico" was introduced at the beginning of the fourth and final season in Raul Garcia, a young boy whom Ed calls Chico. Other characters include, Louie Wilson, the garbage man who dropped by the garage and Della Rogers who ran a food stand not far from the garage. NBC Broadcast History September 1974-January 1976----Fridays----8:30 p.m.
    January-March 1976----Wednesdays----9:00 p.m.
    April-August 1976----Wednesdays----9:30 p.m.
    August 1976-February 1978----Fridays----8:30 p.m.
    June-July 1978----Fridays----8:30 p.m.moreless
  • 96
    The Good Life

    The Good Life

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    BBC (ended 1978)
    The Good Life stars Richard Briers and Felicity Kendal as Tom and Barbara Good, a middle class suburban couple who on Tom's 40th birthday decide to turn their Surbiton home into a self sufficient allotment. They grow their own food, keep farm animals and have sold or bartered all of their electrical appliances as they have no electricity. This creates friction with their best friends and next door neighbours, the Leadbetters (Jerry and Margo) played by Paul Eddington and Penelope Keith. But even though the Goods have lowered the tone of the neighbourhood in the Leadbetters eyes they still can't help but be best of friends.moreless
  • 97
    Lou Grant

    Lou Grant

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    CBS (ended 1982)
    Lou Grant was a spinoff from "The Mary Tyler Moore Show" and premiered on CBS in September 1977. The series was a radical departure from its predecessor as it was a drama. It was the first successful one-hour show from MTM Enterprises. As the series began, Lou Grant had just been fired from his job at WJM-TV, and had moved to Los Angeles to work for a newspaper.moreless
  • 98
    Fernwood 2Night

    Fernwood 2Night

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    (ended 1977)
    By the end of 1976, producer extraordinaire Norman Lear had a crisis on his hands. His cult-favorite sitcom Mary Hartman, Mary Hartman imploded when its star, Louise Lasser, went through emotional trauma that forced her to resign. But Hartman's hometown of Fernwood, Ohio (ZIP Code 45989) would not shrivel up. Toward the end of the next summer, a new set of characters emerged with a "talk show" called Fernwood 2Night, airing (originally) live from Channel 6 in Fernwood. The host of Fernwood 2Night was Barth Gimble, who had left a very successful talk show in Miami under circumstances similar to Louise Lasser's real-life breakdown. Barth returned to his home of Fernwood to start this new talk show on Channel 6. Immediately, he used it as a platform to deny the charges made against him in the Fernwood Courier ("There has never been a conviction"). But on the bright side, Barth did get in banter with interesting guests, his second banana Jerry Hubbard, and musical director Happy. Original production number: 127 Barth promotes the planned Garth Gimbel Memorial Tennis Classic. W.D. "Bud" Prize (Kenneth Mars) returns, and bows to public demands that he reveal the secret of his chinadonture treatment. In a rebuttal to Dr. Van Moot (aka Dr. Osgood), Phil Maltby (Morgan Upton) of Phil's Fashion Funwear and Medical Research Lab explains that leisure suits, far from causing cancer, actually can help cure disease. "Bud" Prize is so stimulated by this revelation that he falls asleep.moreless
  • 99
    Lancelot Link, Secret Chimp

    Lancelot Link, Secret Chimp

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    ABC (ended 1972)
    Lancelot Link, Secret Chimp was a parody of Get Smart, which was a parody of The James Bond movies. So how do you parody a parody? You add monkeys! Lance Link, a secret agent for APE (Agency to Prevent Evil), worked alongside his partner Mata Hairi and got his assignments from Commander Darwin. Lance fights the likes of CHUMP (Criminal Headquarters for Underworld Master Plan), headed by Baron von Butcher with his associates the Dragon Lady, Dr. Strangemind, Creto, Wang Fu, the Duchess, and Ali Assa Seen. Theme Song: Lancelot Link, Secret Chimp!
    He stands for justice.He has no fear.
    He's the agent to call when trouble is near.
    Lance Link, ya gotta come through.
    Everybody at APE is countin' on you!
    Here's Marta Hairi, an agent and friend.
    She sticks by his side right to the end.
    Darwin is the leader on the side of good.
    He traps CHUMP agents like a good ape should.
    Lance Link, whatcha gonna do?
    You've gotta stop CHUMP now. It's up to you.
    Here's Baron Von Butcher. You better beware.
    He's evil and he's cunning and he don't play fair.
    He's got an evil chauffer. Creto's his name.
    Dragon Woman's lovely, but she's wicked all the same!
    Lance Link, whatcha gonna do
    When mad Dr.Strangemind comes up to you?
    There's Ali Assassin, Wicked Wang Foo
    And the Duchess whose looks can really fool you.
    Lancelot Link, Secret Chimp!
    He stands for justice, he has no fear,
    He's the agent to call when trouble is near.
    Lance Link, whatcha gonna do?
    Show History For the first season, the show was an hour in length (9:00 AM-10:00 AM) and included cartoon segments, the second season was a half-hour of reruns (12:30 PM-1:00 PM) without the music and cartoon interludes. After cancellation, the show went into syndication and reruns were shown on Nick-at Nite in the early 90s, it was shown early on Comedy Central, and it was even on TVLAND.moreless
  • 100
    Porridge

    Porridge

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    BBC (ended 1977)
    Series about Norman Stanley Fletcher, a criminal who is convicted of robbery and sent to Slade Prison for 5 years. He has been in prison many times before and knows the ins and outs of it. He becomes a father figure to most of the men inside and can easily get one over on the screws. The pilot episode aired on April 1, 1973.moreless
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