• 21
    Cheers

    Cheers

    Follow
    NBC (ended 1993)
    Sam (Ted Danson), a former pitcher for the Boston Red Sox, owns and runs Cheers, a cozy bar in Boston. Somewhat snobby, beautiful and intelligent Diane (Shelley Long) -- forced to become a waitress when her fiance jilts her -- constantly bickers with Sam. Eventually, they fall in love. Several wacky characters make the bar their home-away-from-home, including sarcastic waitress Carla (Rhea Perlman), beer-loving Norm (George Wendt) and Boston letter carrier Cliff (John Ratzenberger) A few seasons later, Sam sells the bar to buy a boat and sail around the world. But his boat sinks and he returns to bartending. Rebecca (Kirstie Alley), the new (more ambitious) manager, hires him back. They love to hate each other and eventually get together as well. Intro Theme: Making your way in the world today takes everything you got. Taking a break from all your worries sure would help a lot. Wouldn't you like to get away? Sometimes you wanna go where everybody knows your name, And they're always glad you came. You wanna be where you can see our troubles are all the same. You wanna be where everybody knows your name. You wanna go where people know people are all the same. You wanna go where everybody knows your name. Nielsen Ratings: #75 in the 1982-1983 season #13 in the 1984-1985 season #5 in the 1985-1986 season #3 in the 1986-1987 season #3 in the 1987-1988 season #4 in the 1988-1989 season #3 in the 1989-1990 season #1 in the 1990-1991 season #4 in the 1991-1992 season #9 in the 1992-1993 seasonmoreless
  • 22
    Garfield & Friends

    Garfield & Friends

    Follow
    CBS (ended 1994)
    Based on the highly popular comic strip by Jim Davis, Garfield and Friends was considered the best long-running cartoon on CBS. This Saturday morning series featured the adventures of that lovable, hungry fat cat Garfield, his yellow dog friend Odie, and their cartoonist bachelor master Jon Arbuckle. Garfield cartoons shared the spot with a new cartoon series created for this series called U.S. Acres (also based on a comic strip by Jim Davis). U.S. Acres was a cartoon about a group of barnyard animals who run a farm. The leader was Orson Pig, the bookish and perceptive pig. His friends had many different qualities: Wade Duck was the scaredy-cat duck who runs away from everything, no kidding; Booker was a crafty little chick whose main goal was to chase a worm, and his brother Sheldon was nothing more than an egg with two legs sticking out; Roy Rooster was the practical joking rooster who puts everyone in trouble with his jokes; and two sheep, Bo and Lanolin, were always bickering with each other about nearly everything. Bo being a nice guy and Lanolin a cruel girl. Each episode, they had to protect the farm from Orson's big bad brothers and a crafty weasel. Before this series, Garfield cartoons were shown as yearly specials on CBS, and the specials were so great that CBS decided to turn Garfield into a cartoon series. In the first season, each 30-minute episode was packed with three 8-minute shorts, two Garfield shorts and one U.S. Acres short. In the second season, Garfield and Friends expanded to an hour, consisting of four Garfield cartoons and two U.S. Acres cartoons. It remained at this format until the show ended in 1994. 'Garfield:The Movie' was released on June 11,2004 & so far has made over $75 million at the box office. Thanks to the success of the movie, 20th Century Fox is now working on a CGI/live action movie version of 'Alvin & The Chipmunks' & coming to theathers on December 25th is 'Fat Albert', which is of course a live action version of the classic 1974-1984 cartoon 'Fat Albert & The Cosby Kids'. DVD Releases Garfield As Himself - June 29,2004 Garfield & Friends Volume One - July 27,2004 Garfield:The Movie - October 19th,2004 Garfield's Holiday Celebrations - October 26th,2004 Garfield & Friends Volume Two - December 7th,2004 Garfield's Travel Adventures- February 15,2005 Garfield & Friends Volume Three- April 19th,2005 TV Theme Lyrics! (from Seasons 1-2): Ladies and Gentleman, Garfield & Friends Friends Are There To Help You Get Started, To Give You A Push On Your Way Friends Are There To Turn You Around, Get Your Feet On The Ground For A Brand New Day They'll Pick You Up When You're Down Help You Swallow Your Pride When Something Inside's Got To Break On Through To The Other Side Friends Are Someone You Can Open Up To When You Feel Like You're Ready To Flip When You Got The World On Your Shoulders Friends Are There To Give You A Tip Friends Are There When You Need Them Their Even There When You Don't For A Walk In The Park, For A Shot In The Dark Friends Are There (garfield) I Don't Care But Friends Will Care For You-u-u-u-u-u-u! (different dialogue for each show) TV Theme Lyrics! (effective from Season 3-7): Ladies and Gentleman, Garfield & Friends We're (We're) ready (ready) to (to) party! (let's go!) We're ready to party, we're ready! I hope you bring lot's of spaghetti! (don't forget) Come on in , come to the place where fun never ends! Come on in, it's time to party with Garfield and friends! Dancing , Fiesta! , Romancing, Siesta! , Samba , La Bamba, Eye Carumba! Disguises (Disguises) Surprises (Surprises) and pies of,(and pies of) All sizes! Come on in, come to the place where fun never ends. Come on in, it's time to party with Garfield and Friends! Garfield and friends! -Garfield says something funny-moreless
  • 23
    Mister Rogers' Neighborhood

    Mister Rogers' Neighborhood

    Follow
    PBS (ended 2001)
    "In a little toy neighborhood, a tiny trolley rolls past a house at the end of a street. Welcome toMister Rogers' Neighborhood." In the annals of children's TV, Mister Rogers' Neighborhood ranks among the longest-lasting and beloved shows. Upon its conclusion, Mister Rogers' Neighborhood was the longest-running series in PBS history (a record eclipsed by Sesame Street in 2003). Host Fred Rogers (known to millions as simply "Mister Rogers") used his gentle charm and mannerisms to communicate with his audience of children. Topics centered on nearly every inconceivable matter of concern to children, ranging from everyday fears related to going to sleep, getting immunizations and disappointment about not getting one's way to losing a loved one to death and physical handicaps. Rogers used simple songs and, on nearly every show, segments from the Neighborhood of Make-Believe (NOM) to make his point. A scale-model trolley was often (but not always) used to segue into the Make-Believe segments, said neighborhood being inhabited by puppet characters including King Friday XIII, Lady Elaine Fairchild and Daniel Striped Tiger. Many shows also featured visits from cast members – most often Mr. McFeely (tagline: "Speedy Delivery"), Robert Trow, Joe Negri and Chef Brockett (the local baker). Many times, Rogers also visited the neighborhood shops of both the regulars and guests. Each show began and ended with a camera panning over a scale neighborhood (said to represent the town where Rogers lived). Production History While today's longer-running PBS Kids shows reinvent themselves every five years, Mister Rogers' Neighborhood achieved, throughout its 31 seasons, that rarest of elements: consistency. It is a legacy that can all be traced through every aspect of Fred Rogers' television career. Some of the characters in Mister Rogers' Neighborhood, both real and imagined, had appeared in two of Fred Rogers' earlier programs, The Children's Corner for Pittsburgh's WQED in 1954 and the CBC's Misterogers in 1963. It was for Misterogers that Fred first appeared on-camera. Rogers returned to WQED in Pittsburgh to begin writing and hosting Mister Rogers' Neighborhood May 22, 1967. Several other public television stations from Chicago to Boston carried the show on a trial basis that year. Beginning February 19, 1968, the Mister Rogers' Neighborhood program that we know today, began airing nationwide on National Educational Television (NET), the predecessor to PBS. This was also the year David Newell, returned from Europe, began work for Rogers. He was in charge of the production as well as the neighborhood's Speedy Delivery service. (AN ASIDE: Rogers wanted to call the delivery man Mr. McCurdy after the man at the Sears-Roebuck Foundation, whose support launched Mister Rogers' Neighborhood. But the people at Sears-Roebuck called Rogers and said "Mr. McCurdy" was too self-serving. Thus Rogers went to his roots to rename Newell's deliveryman. "McFeely" was Rogers' middle name and the last name of his maternal grandfather.) Shows were produced as a daily strip from 1968 to 1976, at which time production was suspended. Counting black-and-white episodes, 590 shows were produced in that span. Production resumed at the beginning of the remote video age in 1979. Rogers went on location more, supervising videos of how people make things (a precursor to the TVO series Here's How!). Other characters would be introduced in the subsequent two decades. In all, 305 new programs were taped from 1979 through 2001. Of that volume, the most notable shows came in 1991, with Rogers focusing on calming children's fears during the first U.S. war with Iraq. PBS gradually narrowed the window for the 460 "pre-79" episodes with each new season from 1980 onward. When the number of "post-75" episodes was enough to cover entire years, the classic shows were retired, last airing on PBS in the summer of 1995. Despite the production stoppage and the subsequent passing of Fred Rogers on February 27, 2003, PBS continues to repeat Mister Roger's Neighborhood in all its original glory–an accomplishment unique among all PBS Kids shows.moreless
  • 24
    The Many Loves of Dobie Gillis

    The Many Loves of Dobie Gillis

    Follow
    CBS (ended 1963)
    The life and loves of a young dreamer as he progresses from high school to a stint in the army and then college. Stories related Dobie's continual thoughts about the future, his running battle with his father over the prospect of acquiring work, his relationship with his "good buddy", slacker Maynard G. Krebs, and his endless romantic heartaches, most of which center around Thalia Menniger, a beautiful, but greedy and self-centered young woman who struggles to improve Dobie and find him the job that will enable him to make "oodles and oodles of money" though not for her, the last hope her family has, but for her family, a sixty-year-old father with a kidney condition, a mother who isn't getting any younger, a sister who married a loafer, and a brother who is becoming a public charge. Season three related Dobie and Maynard's experiences as army privates. In season four, after completing their military service, and still undecided about life, Dobie and Maynard enrolled in college.moreless
  • 25
    The Muppet Show

    The Muppet Show

    Follow
    (ended 1981)
    After the success of Sesame Street in 1969, Muppet creator Jim Henson wanted to have a chance at his own series. In 1974, Henson shot a Muppet special called The Muppets' Valentine Show, which would later become a precursor for The Muppet Show. The special starred famous muppet, Kermit the Frog, with a cast of new muppets including: George the Janitor, Droop the Anteater, Crazy Donald (later named Crazy Harry), Brewsters the oldtimer, Mildred the goose, and Rufus (later named Muppy). Many of these characters were used during the first season of The Muppet Show, and quickly faded away to background characters. The special featured actress Mia Farrow, who taught the muppets about love, and that everyone loves something. Afterwards in 1975, Henson shot the failed pilot for the Muppet Show: Sex and Violence. Amazingly, Kermit the Frog was not in the pilot at all! Instead, the host was wimpy, Nigel, who Jim Henson wrote out of the show soon afterwards. After about a year, the muppet team went to the United Kingdom and were given the green light for the Muppet Show. The show became one of the top syndicated comedies of all time! The show featured a new group of Muppet characters including: Fozzie Bear, Miss Piggy, Gonzo, Scooter, Beauregard, Rowlf the Dog, and The Electric Mayhem. Each show featured a celebrity guest star, who were either personal friends of Henson, or his manager. The Muppet Show lasted for 5 years, and 120 episodes, two spin offs, and several movies. Theme Song: It's time to play the music It's time to light the lights It's time to meet the Muppets On the Muppet Show tonight It's time to put on makeup It's time to dress up right It's time to raise the curtain On the Muppet Show tonight Why do we always come here I guess we'll never know It's like a kind of torture To have to watch the show And now lets get things started Why don't you get things started It's time to get things started On the most sensational Inspirational Celebrational Muppetational This is what we call the Muppet Show! Characters Kermit the Frog Originally from "Sam & Friends" (1955), then later Sesame Street (1969), Kermit is the host of The Muppet Show. Miss Piggy Self-centered, yet very persuasive. Wants to marry Kermit. Fozzie Bear Furry, fuzzy, funny, fabulous, free-willing, fast, and frantic....he's Fozzie Bear. The Great Gonzo A "whatever". Scooter the Go-Fer Kermit's stage assistant. Rizzo the Rat Gonzo's sidekick. A rat with rat-itude. Rowlf the Dog Originally from The Jimmy Dean Show, Rowlf is a piano playing dog, and the first muppet to become a national star. Statler and Waldorf The two old-timers who sat in the balcony. Doctor Bunsen Honeydew The Muppet Show's scientist. Beeker Meep Meep Meep's meep. Beauregard: The Muppet Show's slow-witted janitor. Pops: Greeted the guests at the begining. The Swedish Chef Bork bork bork. The Eletric Mayhem The Muppet Show's band including: Dr. Teeth (lead vocalist and piano player), Sgt. Floyd Pepper (Bass, and Janice's boyfriend), Janice (guitarist, Floyd's girlfriend), Zoot (sax is his act), Lips (trumpet player), and Animal (HE WANT TO BAT DRUM!) First Telecast: September 27, 1976 Last Telecast: June 8, 1981 Episodes: 120 color episodes Spin-Offs: Muppet Babies and Muppets Tonight! Spin Offs: * Muppet Babies was Jim Henson's first animated series. The show featured familiar Muppet faces, only as babies. New characters included Nanny (the nanny of the nursery), and Skeeter (Scooter's twin sister). * Muppets Tonight! was basically a modern remake of The Muppet Show, featuring celebrity guest stars who at the peak of perfection at the time. New characters included: Pepe (the king prawn, okay?), Clifford (the cool hippie muppet)and Johnny Fiami and Sal Movies * The Muppet Movie (1979) * The Great Muppet Caper (1981) * The Muppets Take Manhattan (1984) * The Muppet Christmas Carol (1993) * Muppet Treasure Island (1996) * Muppets From Space (1999) * Kermit's Swamp Years (2002) * It's a Very Merry Muppet Christmas Movie (2002) * The Muppets' Wonderful Wizard of Oz (2005)moreless
  • 26
    Looney Tunes

    Looney Tunes

    Follow
    Cartoon Network
    Looney Tunes is a show that reruns classic cartoons featuring Bugs Bunny, Daffy Duck, Tweety, Sylvester, Pepe le Pew, Road Runner, Wile E. Coyote, Foghorn Leghorn and more. These classic characters were featured in 1000+ theatrical cartoons and many prime-time specials made for TV as well as numerous classic cartoon excerpts. Looney Tunes was originally aimed at an adult audience when it aired for the first time in 1955, but unfortunately it was censored. It eventually became a show for children known as The Bugs Bunny Show in 1960, which aired on ABC. Looney Tunes made it's way to Nickelodeon along with numerous Warner Bros. classic cartoons including some of their oldest black-and-whites and almost their complete canon of '60s cartoons. This show started in 1988 and ended in 1999. Now, the Boomerang block on Cartoon Network is the only place in the US where you can still see these timeless classic characters and their animated antics.moreless
  • 27
    The Flintstones

    The Flintstones

    Follow
    ABC (ended 2001)
    The Flintstones was a parody on modern suburban life, set in the Stone Age. The characters in the cartoon series all behaved and spoke in a contemporary manner, though they lived in the prehistoric city of Bedrock. Fred worked as operator of a dinosaur-powered crane at Rock Hard & Quarry Cave Construction Co. (slogan: "Own Your Own Cave and Be Secure"). Around their split-level cave the Flintstones enjoyed such conveniences as Wilma's Stoneway piano, a hi-fi on which Fred could play his "rock" music (it consisted of a turntable and a bird with a long beak to serve as a needle), a vacuum cleaner (a baby elephant with a long trunk), and an automatic garbage disposal unit (a famished buzzard stashed under the sink). Their car, which sported tail fins, also came equipped with steamroller wheels--to smooth out the rocky road. Then one day in 1963 they were blessed with a baby daughter, whom they named Pebbles. Not to be outdone, their neighbors the Rubbles adopted an orphan boy named Bamm Bamm. (The two kids later had a Saturday morning cartoon series of their own, Pebbles and Bamm Bamm.) The Flintstones was always as much adult satire as children's fun. In many respects it resembled Jackie Gleason's popular Honeymooners, especially in the relationships of the principals. A wide range of caricatures passed through the stories: Lollobrickida, a pretty cook; Ann-Margrock, whose voice was supplied by Ann-Margret; attorney Perry Masonry (he never lost a case); Ed Sullystone, a TV host; Eppy Brianstone, a teenage impresario; and Weirdly and Creepella Gruesome, the strange couple who with their son Goblin moved into a cave nearby (this was a parody on The Addams Family and The Munsters, then popular). The Gruesomes thought that they were normal, and everyone else in Bedrock was odd. The Flintstones and its spin-offs had a highly successful run on Saturday mornings--on NBC from January 1967-September 1970, on CBS from September 1972-January 1974, back on NBC from February 1979-September 1984, and on ABC with The Flintstone Kids from September 1986-September 1989. This series has also many movies and specials (about 10 specials). Some of them are:"A Flintstones Christmas Carol", a flintstones version of the famous Charles Dickens book, "A Flintstones Christmas" where Fred replaces Santa Claus (Pebbles and Bamm Bamm are speaking now), "I Yabba Dabba Do" where Pebbles and Bamm Bamm are grown up and get married, and "Holly-Rock-a-bye Baby" where Pebbles gives birth.moreless
  • 28
    Family Matters

    Family Matters

    Follow
    ABC (ended 1998)
    A perfect spin-off from Perfect Strangers: Family Matters focused on Harriet Winslow (the elevator operator from the Chronicle) and her family of sorts. Carl Winslow, her husband, was a dutiful cop, and a gruff and lovable father to three kids: Eddie Winslow, the rebel son; Laura Winslow, the smart-aleck daughter; and cute little Judy Winslow. They had opened their home to Harriet's sister, Rachel Crawford and her little baby son Richie, and in the very first episode, Carl had to open his home to his cool and streetwise mother, Estelle Winslow, whether he wanted to or not.

    Everything was going along just fine until one day, Steve Urkel, the inventive nerd, barged into their home and eventually, into their hearts. Steve had a killer crush on Laura, but she would never give him the time of day. Steve Urkel was intended to be a one-shot appearance, but his popularity with the fans won him the number-one spot as America's favorite nerd.

    As the show went on, the characters and the stories evolved. Richie grew from a little baby into a rambunctious and impressionable little boy. The stories started revolving around Steve and his incredible inventions, which became the greatest sight gags on the show. In almost every episode, Steve ends up breaking furniture, windows, and Carl's patience. Eddie and Laura each had best buddies to hang out with: Eddie had dim-witted yet lovable Waldo Geraldo Faldo,and Laura had faithful and true-blue gal pal Maxine. The greatest mystery of Family Matters is Judy and Rachel's sudden disappearances from the show, but Rachel made guest appearances whenever possible.

    To stop Steve from chasing her, Laura matched him up with perky-yet-pushy Myra Monkhouse. Steve loved Myra physically, but his emotions will always go to Laura. Eddie had his share of steady girlfriends, and even he had an Urkel chasing him- Myrtle May Urkel, Steve's cousin from Biloxi (Jaleel White also). Every so often, Steve uses one of his inventions to turn himself into debonair, irresistable lover Stefan Urquelle or karate hero Bruce Lee to draw Laura closer to him, much to Myra's chagrin.

    At the end of season 6, the Winslows welcomed Steve into their home when Steve's family went to Russia. Pretty soon, Richie hung out with 3J, a tough, streetwise kid always running from the children's home. The Winslows then adopted 3J as one of their kids, as they did with Steve.

    In the final season, Family Matters - along with Step by Step - moved to CBS, and Steve slowly matured from the annoying nerd that he used to be. This was when Laura started falling in love with Steve, and Myra got kicked to the curb, but she vowed to get her "Stevie-kins" back. Also, the original Harriette, JoMarie Peyton, had left the show in mid-season and Judyann Elder took her role. Steve and Laura got engaged, but they never had a wedding because CBS dropped the ax on the show. But, nevertheless, Family Matters had a great successful run and is one of the longest running African-American comedies ever. In Germany the show is known as Alle unter einem Dach ("Under One Roof").
    In Spain it is known as Cosas de casa.
    In France it is known as La Vie de famille ("Life of the Family").
    In Italy it is known as Otto sotto un tetto ("Eight Under One Roof").
    In Sweden it is known as R�kna med br�k. In Croatia it is known as ''Pod istim krovom''moreless
  • 29
    Taxi

    Taxi

    Follow
    ABC (ended 1983)
    Taxi's television history is filled with contradictions. Produced by some of television comedy's most well-regarded talent, the show was canceled by two different networks. Despite winning fourteen Emmy Awards in only five seasons, the program's ratings were rock-bottom for its final seasons. Although it thrives in syndication and is still well-loved by many viewers, Taxi will be best remembered as the ancestral bridge between two of the most successful sit-coms of all time: The Mary Tyler Moore Show and Cheers. In the mid-1970s, MTM Productions had achieved huge success with both popularity and critical appraisal. So it was an unexpected move when four of the company's finest writers and producers, James L. Brooks, Stan Daniels, David Davis, and Ed. Weinberger, jumped off the stable ship of MTM in 1978 to form their own production company, John Charles Walters Company. To launch their new venture, they looked back to an idea that Brooks and Davis had previously considered with MTM: the daily life of a New York City taxi company. From MTM head Grant Tinker they purchased the rights to the newspaper article that had initiated the concept and began producing this new show at Paramount for ABC. They brought a few other MTM veterans along for the ride, including director James Burrows and writer/producers Glen and Les Charles. Although Taxi certainly bore many of the trademark signs of "quality television" as exemplified by MTM, other changes in style and focus distinguished this from an MTM product. After working on the middle-class female-centered worlds of The Mary Tyler Moore Show, Rhoda, and Phyllis for years, the group at John Charles Walters wanted to create a program focusing on blue-collar male experience. MTM programs all had clearly defined settings, but Taxi's creators wanted a show that was firmly rooted in a city's identity--Taxi's situations and mood were distinctly New York. Despite MTM Productions innovations in creating ensemble character comedy, there was always one central star around which the ensemble revolved. In Taxi Judd Hirsch's Alex Reiger was a main character, but his importance seemed secondary to the centrality of the ensemble and the Sunshine Cab Company itself. While The Mary Tyler Moore Show proudly proclaimed that "you're going to make it on your own," the destitute drivers of Taxi were doomed to perpetual failure; the closest any of them came to happiness was Reiger's content acceptance of his lot in life--to be a cabby. Taxi debuted on 12 September 1978, amidst a strong ABC Tuesday night line-up. It followed Three's Company, a wildly-successful example of the type of show MTM "quality" sit-coms reacted against. Taxi used this strong position to end the season ninth in the ratings and garner its first of three straight Emmys for Outstanding Comedy Series. The show's success was due to its excellent writing, Burrows's award-winning directing using his innovative four-camera technique, and its largely unknown but talented cast. Danny DeVito's Louie DePalma soon became one of the most despised men on television--possibly the most unredeemable and worthless louse of a character ever to reside on the small screen. Andy Kaufman's foreign mechanic Latka Gravas provided over-the-top comedy within an ensemble emphasizing subtle character humor. But Kaufman sometimes also brought a demonic edge to the character, an echo of his infamous appearances on Saturday Night Live as a macho wrestler of women and Mighty Mouse lip-syncher. In the second season Christopher Lloyd's Reverend Jim Ignatowski was added to the group as television's first drugged-out '60s burn-out character. But Lloyd's Emmy-winning performance created in Jim more than just a storehouse of fried brain cells; he established a deep, complex humanity that moved far beyond mere caricature. The program launched successful movie careers for DeVito and Lloyd, as well as the fairly-notable television careers of Tony Danza and Marilu Henner; Kaufman's controversial career would certainly have continued had he not died of cancer in 1984. In its third season ABC moved Taxi from beneath Three's Company's protective wing to a more competitive Wednesday night slot; the ratings plummeted and Taxi finished the next two years in 53rd place. ABC canceled the show in early 1982 as part of a larger network push away from "quality" and toward the Aaron Spelling-produced popular fare of Dynasty and The Love Boat. HBO bid for the show, looking for it to become the first ongoing sitcom for the pay channel, but lost out to NBC, which scheduled the series for the 1982-83 season. Ironically, this reunited the show's executive producers with their former boss Tinker, who had taken over NBC. Tinker's reign at NBC was focused, not surprisingly, on "quality" programming which he hoped would attract viewers to the perennially last-place network. Taxi was partnered with a very compatible show on Thursday night--Cheers, created by Taxi veterans Charles, Burrows, and Charles. Although this line-up featured some of the great programs in television history--the comedies were sandwiched by dramas Fame and Hill St. Blues--the ratings were dreadful and Taxi finished the season in 73rd place. NBC was willing to stick by Cheers for another chance, but felt Taxi had run its course and canceled it at the end of the season. Had Taxi been given another year or two, it would have been part of one of the most successful nights on television, featuring The Cosby Show (co-created by Taxi creator Weinberger), Family Ties, Hill St. Blues, L.A. Law, and eventual powerhouse Cheers. Taxi lives on in syndication, but its most significant place in television history is as the middle generation between The Mary Tyler Moore Show and Cheers. It served as a transition between the star-driven middle-class character comedy of MTM programs and the location-centered ensemble comedy inhabited by the losers of Cheers and Taxi. Considered one of the great sit-coms of its era, Taxi stands as a prime example of the constant tension in television programming between standards of "quality" and reliance on high ratings to determine success. --Jason Mittel The Museum of Broadcast Communicationsmoreless
  • 30
    The Jeffersons

    The Jeffersons

    Follow
    CBS (ended 1985)
    The Jeffersons first aired in January of 1975 on CBS as a mid-season replacement. The series was a spinoff ofAll in the Family in which the Jeffersons were Archie and Edith Bunker's next door neighbors. In 1975, The Jeffersons moved on up when George found success in a dry cleaning business. This allowed him and his wife, Louise and their son Lionel to "move on up" into a spacious high rise apartment. At the beginning of the series, Lionel was attending college and graduated in February 1976. He married Jenny Willis in December of the same year and they had a daughter in 1979, Jessica Jefferson. Other members of the cast include, Tom and Helen Willis were upstairs neighbors and also Jenny's parents. Florence Johnston was the Jefferson's sassy maid who was hired as a part-time maid in the first episode but in October 1976 moved in and became a full-time maid. Mother Jefferson was George's fiesty mother who forever put Louise down but deep down loved her. Harry Bentley was the handsome British, next door neighbor. Besides being quite eccentric and forever borrowing things from the Jeffersons, Bentley worked as a translator at the United Nations. In 1981, Bentley was written out as being transferred to Russia, but returned in 1983. Ralph was the building doorman who forever begged for tips from George and the other tennents in the building. Tom and Helen Willis were controversial characters since they were most likely TV's first interracial couple. Helen was Louise's best friend and they ran a Help Center which opened in 1977. As for Tom and George, it took the entire run of the series to develop their love/hate friendship. The series was unceremoniously pulled from the air with no warning, so the cast, bitter that they never got to shoot an appropriate finale episode, later reunited for a theatrical stage play. Sherman and Isabel also reprised their roles as George and Louise Jefferson on a couple episodes of The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air in the mid-90's and have most recently reprised their roles on Denny's commercials. Spinoff of: All in the Family Spinoffs: Checking In CBS Broadcast History January-August 1975----Saturdays----8:30 p.m. September 1975-October 1976----Saturdays----8:00 p.m. November 1976-January 1977----Wednesdays----8:00 p.m. January 1977-August 1977----Mondays----8:00 p.m. September 1977-March 1978----Saturdays----9:00 p.m. April-May 1978----Saturdays----8:00 p.m. June-September 1978----Mondays----8:00 p.m. September 1978-January 1979----Wednesdays----8:00 p.m. January-March 1979----Wednesdays----9:30 p.m. March-June 1979----Wednesdays----8:00 p.m. June 1979-September 1982----Sundays----9:30 p.m. September 1982-December 1984----Sundays----9:00 p.m. January-March 1985----Tuesdays----8:00 p.m. June-July 1985----Tuesdays----8:00 p.m. Nielsen Ratings: (Top 30 or Better) #4 in the 1974-1975 Season #21 in the 1975-1976 Season #24 in the 1976-1977 Season #8 in the 1979-1980 Season #6 in the 1980-1981 Season #3 in the 1981-1982 Season #12 in the 1982-1983 Season #19 in the 1983-1984 Season #56 in the 1984-1985 Season Never hit the top 30 First Telecast: January 18, 1975 Last Telecast: July 23, 1985 Episodes: 253 Color Episodes Theme Song: "Movin' On Up" Written by: Jeff Barry and Ja'net DuBois Sung by: Ja'net DuBois Well we're movin on up,to the east side. To a deluxe apartment in the sky. Movin on up, to the east side. We finally got a piece of the pie. Fish don't fry in the kitchen; Beans don't burn on the grill. Took a whole lotta tryin', just to get up that hill. Now we're up in the big leagues, gettin' our turn at bat. As long as we live, it's you and me baby, and there ain't nothin' wrong with that. Well we're movin on up, to the east side. To a deluxe apartment in the sky. Movin on up, to the east side. We finally got a piece of the pie.moreless
  • 31
    Saved by the Bell

    Saved by the Bell

    Follow
    NBC (ended 1993)
    Saved By the Bell focused on Zack Morris and his friends: Samuel "Screech" Powers, Kelly Kapowski, Jessie Spano, A.C. Slater and Lisa Turtle. They had adventures and funny moments at Bayside High School in Palisades, California. They often tried to fool the gullible principal, Mr. Richard Belding, but also sometimes got advice from him. They regularly hung out at a burger joint called "The Max," which was owned in the first season by a magician named Max.

    As the years went by, they had adventures and relationships that lasted a long time. In the third season, the gang spent the summer at Malibu Sands, an exclusive beach club owned by Mr. Carosi, and his daughter Stacey Carosi, whom Zack fell in love with.

    The final season saw the arrival of a new cast member, Tori Scott, who took the place of Kelly and Jessie when Tiffani-Amber Thiessen and Elizabeth Berkley left the show in mid-season. The show ended with the gang graduating and heading off to college in the spin-off series Saved by the Bell: the College Years. There was also another spin-off to this show called Saved by the Bell: TNC.

    Saved By the Bell began as a short-lived comedy/drama series named Good Morning, Miss Bliss, which focused on teacher Miss Bliss and her students at John F. Kennedy Junior High School in Indianapolis, Indiana. After the show was cancelled by the Disney Channel, NBC picked up 4 of the characters (Zack, Screech, Lisa and Mr. Belding) and turned it into a new Saturday morning series called Saved by the Bell, which became more of a comedy concentrating on the antics of the students and was re-located to Bayside High School in Pacific Palisades, California.moreless
  • 32
    ALF

    ALF

    Follow
    NBC (ended 1990)
    Gordon Shumway, last known survivor from the planet Melmac, crash-lands his spaceship into the Tanner family's suburban garage. Willie dubs him "ALF", short for Alien Life Form. After convincing a military officer that they are not harboring a space creature, the Tanners decide to take ALF in as a member of the family.moreless
  • 33
    Disneyland

    Disneyland

    Follow
    ABC (ended 1990)
    Walt Disney, one of Hollywood's most ambitious producers, was first approached to do television in 1950, when The Coca-Cola Company offered him a one-hour special. The one hour special, "One Hour in Wonderland," aired December 25, 1950 on NBC and garnered 90% of the television viewing audience. A second special, "The Walt Disney Christmas Special," aired December 25, 1951 on CBS. When Walt had drawn up plans for a theme park, known as Disneyland, he found a hard time obtaining funding; critics, including Walt's brother Roy, thought that it was unfeasible and that it would be a fiasco. At the same time, the ABC television network offered him a deal for a television anthology series. Walt wouldn't agree to it unless they put up partial financing for Disneyland (a term that had kept CBS and NBC from signing with him). ABC agreed, and also paid him $50,000 per program, an exorbitant sum for the time. The show, titled Disneyland, premiered on October 27, 1954 and was an immediate success. Historically, the show is significant for two reasons. First, with thirty-four seasons, it is the longest-running prime time network series in history (not counting news programs; if one were to count news programs, 60 Minutes would take that title). Second, it was the first original television production by a major Hollywood studio. Other studios resented television for fear that it would keep people from going out to the movies. Thus, they refused to produce television programs, and they refused to let networks or stations use any of their more recent or better-known material. Walt Disney was the first Hollywood producer to do so. Disneyland was a mixture of cartoons, live-action adventures, documentaries, and nature stories. Some of these were made expressly for television, but others were former theatrical releases. Many of the early programs were designed to promote upcoming theatrical releases. One particular early success of the Disneyland series was the Davy Crockett trilogy. This was a phenomenal success in every aspect; the merchandising bonanza that followed sold $300 million worth of Crockett memorabilia. Thus, ABC wanted more adventure stories along the lines of Davy Crockett. Disney provided them, but none were nearly as successful. Along the way, in 1958, it was retitled Walt Disney Presents. Eventually the show became more reliant on original material, though pre-existing material was used at times. In 1961, his contract with ABC expired. He moved his show to NBC where he could broadcast it in color (ABC would not have the capability for color broacasting until 1962). It was rechristened Walt Disney's Wonderful World of Color, with an original theme song by Richard M. Sherman and Robert B. Sherman (who went on to write the song scores to such well-known Disney films as Mary Poppins, The Jungle Book, The Many Adventures of Winnie-the-Pooh and Bedknobs and Broomsticks). It premiered on NBC on Sunday, September 24, 1961. On NBC, he was able to re-air many of the ABC shows in color, as they had been filmed that way as insurance for possible future airings once color broadcasting, or "colorcasting," took hold. In September of 1966, doctors told Walt Disney, a lifetime chain-smoker, that he had lung cancer. Though the cancerous lung was removed, doctors told him that the cancer had been detected too late, and he died on Thursday, December 15, 1966. Knowing full well that no one could replace him as a host, Walt Disney Productions dropped the hosted introduction segments after the season's end. Luckily, Walt had filmed that all of that season's host segments before it was too late. The show changed its name to The Wonderful World of Disney on September 14, 1969, and dropped the Sherman Brothers theme song in favor of various alternating medleys of well-known songs from Disney movies and parks. The trusted Disney name continued to insure high ratings for the next few years. As popular tastes changed dramatically during the late 1960s and early 1970s, the public seemed to have largely begun to turn away from anything Disney (except theme parks and merchandise), seeing the name as symptomatic of a square, uptight, and unhip mindset that young people were coming to reject. The studio itself suffered from the lack of hit movies and accusations of incompetent management at the time. The ratings of the anthology series, however, remained reasonably stable, enough so that NBC renewed Disney's contract through 1978. In the fall of 1975, the show began a ratings decline when it was moved back to 7 PM from 7:30 PM. Disney's ratings fell from the Top 30 and continued to fall every year afterwards. The following year went face to with CBS's 60 Minutes. Though it had begun in 1968 and was scheduled on Tuesday, the CBS newsmagazine had been scheduled on Sunday evenings since the 1971-1972 season, and had been held back until after football season due to the risk of pre-emptions; it was this year that the show finally began its season in the fall. The show was easily able to beat ABC's Sunday night offerings but trailed the CBS newsmagazine by a wide margin. As the number of original installments decreased every year, so, too, did the ratings. In 1979, NBC (which, as a network, was also in the midst of a very public, humiliating decline) threatened Disney with cancellation unless the ratings improved. That fall, Walt Disney Productions rechristened the anthology series Disney's Wonderful World and commissioned a new, original theme song by John Debney and John Klawitter, new opening and closing credits, and a new announcer, Gary Owens (longtime announcer Dick Wesson committed suicide in January of that year). In a flashback to the original themed format, many episodes initially were divided into one of four categories: "Fantasy Night," "Adventure Night," "Comedy Night," and "Animation Night." Beneath the "happy new face" sung of in the new theme song, however, was more of the same: too little original material, airings of theatrical movies, and far too many reruns. In spite of this, the face-lift helped the ratings, so the show was renewed for the 1980-1981 season. But the next season saw only 10 installments that had not been aired on the anthology series before, and pre-emptions were far more frequent. Ratings for the show's 27th season did not improve, and in on December 30, 1980 NBC announced that it would not be renewing the series for next season. All was not lost that year, as the show was then immediately picked up by CBS. It was moved from its longtime Sunday night slot to Saturday night at 8 PM, as the network would not displace its highly-rated pride and joy 60 Minutes. Retitled Walt Disney, the show promised to present more original programming than it had in its final years on NBC. On September 26, 1981, after a huge advertising campaign by the network, the series premiered on CBS. Ratings improved against mediocre competition, and the show was renewed for another season (its 29th on network television). A few of these shows were pilots for series that were never picked up. The second CBS year saw an increase in the number of reruns (as opposed to last year's increase in new episodes), and the ratings dropped. Disney did, however, produce several midseason replacement series for CBS, but all of them failed. On Monday, April 18, 1983, Walt Disney Productions and Westinghouse Broadcasting launched The Disney Channel, a cable network created to showcase the large library of Disney cartoons, movies, and TV shows (the anthology series was rerun under the name Walt Disney Presents). Thus, in the eyes of CBS, the anthology series had outlived its purpose and was canceled. There were occasional network and syndicated specials, but all of Disney's television resources were concentrated on the cable service. When Michael Eisner became CEO of Walt Disney Productions in September of 1984, one of the first things he and his new regime did was express an interest in reviving Disney's presence on network TV. He had some success, as the Emmy-winning, Touchstone-produced sitcom The Golden Girls and the Saturday morning cartoon (a medium with which Walt Disney himself had refused to get involved due to fears of compromised quality) Disney's Adventures of the Gummi Bears both premiered on NBC on Saturday, September 14, 1985 and lasted several years. However, these particular shows were the exception, not the rule; a number of series that the new regime eventually launched failed (Wildside and The Ellen Burstyn Show, for instance). Also, of course, did the company plan to revive the anthology series. Now known as The Disney Sunday Movie, it made its much-hyped return to network television on February 2, 1986 after a hiatus of 2 years, 4 months, and eight days, replacing the dismally-rated Ripley's Believe it or Not. Just as Walt Disney had hosted the original until his death, Michael Eisner appeared in an introductory segment at the beginning of each episode. Nostalgia and ratings were high initially, but both eventually wore off. The show premiered at a two-hour length, but in the fall of 1987, once again being soundly beaten in the ratings regularly by 60 Minutes in its first hour, and by Murder, She Wrote in its second, it was shortened to one hour for its third and final season on ABC. NBC, which had not been able to launch a hit show in Disney's old time slot in the seven years since the show was axed by that network, picked up the show, which was renamed The Magical World of Disney. At first, a rotating "wheel" format was used, utilizing three different genres; every fourth week would be a special. This lasted until a few months into the following season. Eisner continued to host the show, but ratings on NBC were no better than they had been on ABC, and it limped through a two-year run here before the network pulled the plug for good. After 36 years (save for the September 1983-January 1986 hiatus), one of television's last remaining institutions from its golden age came to an unceremonious end. In 1995, The Walt Disney Company announced plans to buy out the ABC television network, which went through in January of 1996. In the fall of 1997, a family-oriented movie time slot was set aside on ABC and christened The Wonderful World of Disney. Ratings to date have been middling. Though the show is not currently repeated anywhere (The Disney Channel dropped it and all vintage Disney programming in September of 2002), episodes are slowly being released on DVD in the United States, and its legacy of quality television entertainment for all members of the family lives on in the hearts and minds of many. Here is a chronology of titles used for the series: Disneyland: October 27, 1954-September 3, 1958
    Walt Disney Presents: September 12, 1958-September 17, 1961
    Walt Disney's Wonderful World of Color: September 24, 1961-September 7, 1969
    The Wonderful World of Disney: September 14, 1969-September 2, 1979
    Disney's Wonderful World: September 9, 1979-September 13, 1981
    Walt Disney: September 26, 1981-September 24, 1983
    The Disney Sunday Movie: February 2, 1986-September 11, 1988
    The Magical World of Disney: October 9, 1988-September 9, 1990 The final name was used as an umbrella title for Disney movie airings on cable's The Disney Channel from September 23, 1990 to August 25, 1996. ABC Broadcast History (1954-1961):
    October 27, 1954-September 3, 1958: Wednesday, 7:30 PM-8:30 PM
    September 12, 1958-September 25, 1959: Friday, 8:00 PM-9:00 PM
    October 2, 1959-September 23, 1960: Friday, 7:30 PM-8:30 PM
    September 25, 1960-September 17, 1961: Sunday, 6:30 PM-7:30 PM NBC Broadcast History (1961-1981):
    September 24, 1961-August 31, 1975: Sunday, 7:30 PM-8:30 PM
    September 14, 1975-September 11, 1977: Sunday, 7:00 PM-8:00 PM
    September 18, 1977-October 23, 1977: Sunday, 7:00 PM-9:00 PM
    October 30, 1977-September 13, 1981: Sunday, 7:00 PM-8:00 PM CBS Broadcast History (1981-1983):
    September 26, 1981-January 1, 1983: Saturday, 8:00 PM-9:00 PM
    January 4, 1983-February 15, 1983: Tuesday, 8:00 PM-9:00 PM
    July 9, 1983-September 24, 1983: Saturday, 8:00 PM-9:00 PM
    (two irregularly scheduled airings on May 3, 1983 and May 21, 1983) ABC Broadcast History (1986-1988):
    February 2, 1986-September 6, 1987: Sunday, 7:00 PM-9:00 PM
    September 13, 1987-September 11, 1988: Sunday, 7:00 PM-8:00 PM NBC Broadcast History (1988-1990):
    October 9, 1988-July 2, 1989: Sunday, 7:00 PM-8:00 PM
    July 9, 1989-July 23, 1989: Sunday, 8:00 PM-9:00 PM
    August 6, 1989-February 25, 1990: Sunday, 7:00 PM-8:00 PM
    March 4, 1990-April 15, 1990: Sunday, 7:00 PM-9:00 PM
    April 22, 1990-May 6, 1990: Sunday, 7:00 PM-8:00 PM
    May 27, 1990-July 22, 1990: Sunday, 7:00 PM-9:00 PM
    August 5, 1990-September 9, 1990: Sunday, 7:00 PM-8:00 PM
    First Telecast: October 27, 1954
    Last Telecast: September 9, 1990 Episodes: 751 (180 black and white episodes, 571 color episodes [as far as the format in which they were first broadcast]) (NOTE: many of these were originally theatrical releases, and a small number were specials aired at other times, but for purposes of their first airing on the anthology series they are counted as episodes)moreless
  • 34
    The Greatest American Hero

    The Greatest American Hero

    Follow
    ABC (ended 1983)
    This show was first aired in 1981, and was both a comedy and a drama. A special "power suit" that only works on him is given to the teacher by the aliens, and he is paired up with the gumshoe FBI agent who keeps them both busy with his scenarios. The suit of "unearthly powers" gives the power of strength, flight, invisibilty, flames, telekenesis, vision of events without being there, protection from bullets and firemoreless
  • 35
    The Facts of Life

    The Facts of Life

    Follow
    NBC (ended 1988)
    The Facts of Life began in August of 1979 and aired on NBC. It was a spin-off to the sitcom Diff'rent Strokes on which Charlotte Rae played Mrs. Garrett, housekeeper to Philip Drummond's household. In The Facts of Life, Mrs. Garrett has become headmistress to an exclusive girls school, Eastland. Although the series had a rocky start, including low ratings and a cast overhaul. The series went on to becomes one of the longest running sitcoms of the 80's. In the first season the stories revolved around Mrs. Garrett and her adjustment to her new job. The first season also introduced to us seven girls, Nancy, Blair, Sue Ann, Cindy, Molly, Natalie and Tootie. At the beginning of the second season, the cast was trimmed down to Mrs. Garrett and four primary girls, Blair, Tootie, Natalie and a new girl, Jo. These four girls would remain until the end of the series with Mrs. Garrett re-marrying and leaving in 1986 and Cloris Leachman coming in to play Mrs. Garrett's sister, Beverly Ann from 1986-1988. On November 18, 2001, ABC aired The Facts of Life Reunion, in which Mrs. Garrett, Natalie, Blair and Tootie reunite. First Telecast: August 24, 1979 Last Telecast: September 10, 1988 Episodes: 209 Color Episodes Theme Song: "The Facts of Life" Written by: Alan Thicke, Gloria Loring and Al Burton Sung by: Charlotte Rae (Season 1) and Gloria Loring (Seasons 2-9) Spin-off of : Diff'rent Strokes NBC Broadcast History August-September 1979----Fridays----8:30 p.m. March-May 1980----Fridays----8:30 p.m. June-July 1980----Wednesdays----9:30 p.m. August-October 1980----Fridays----8:30 p.m. November 1980-October 1981----Wednesdays----9:30 p.m. October 1981-August 1985----Wednesdays----9:00 p.m. September 1985-June 1986----Saturdays----8:30 p.m. June 1986-May 1987----Saturdays----8:00 p.m. June-July 1987----Wednesdays----9:00 p.m. July 1987-September 1988----Saturdays----8:00 p.m. Nielsen Ratings: (Top 35 or Better) #26 in the 1980-1981 Season #24 in the 1981-1982 Season #24 in the 1983-1984 Season #32 in the 1984-1985 Season #27 in the 1985-1986 Seasonmoreless
  • 36
    Get Smart

    Get Smart

    Follow
    NBC (ended 1970)
    In 1965 the cold war was made a little warmer and a lot funnier due in part to the efforts of an inept, underpaid, overzealous spy: Maxwell Smart, Agent 86. The hit comedy series 'Get Smart' is the creation of comic geniuses Buck Henry and Mel Brooks. Henry teamed with Brooks to create what has undoubtedly become one of the finest parody/satires of all time. The project seemed headed for success from the start: ABC had green lighted it based on the strength of the concept, and they had an actor already under contract to play Smart. Brooks was approached to write the pilot. As he was looking for a way to finance his new movie The Producers, he agreed. Deemed "not funny", the initial script was rejected by ABC. Undaunted, the production team shopped the script around and NBC accepted it with one minor change. They wanted Don Adams in the title role. And so, an unlikely legend was born. Set in Washington, D.C., the show features Agent 86 (Maxwell Smart), his boss (The Chief), Smart's partner and later wife (Agent 99) and a host of other agents both good and evil. Perhaps one of the most important elements of the show is the gadgetry created to help Smart in his quest to keep the free world free. On this show, anything including the kitchen sink can be a phone, a tape recorder, a camera or weapon. Looking for an Agent? Check under your seat cushion. Want a weapon? Try your finger-gun. Need to make a phone call? Open up that bologna sandwich. The show was painted in the broadest of strokes and played every moment for its own delightful reality. In order to give the agents of CONTROL, a series of worthy opponents, KAOS was created. Smart and 99 battled the likes of Mr. Big, The Claw, and Siegfried. On the home front, Max and 99 had a relationship that developed as the show ran and eventually they married. 99 soon gave birth to twins (a boy and a girl) and the Smart family (and the show) began to experience some growing pains. Get Smart ran from 1965 through 1970 on both NBC and CBS. For one month in 1995 FOX attempted to bring the series back with some changes; Max as the Chief, 99 as a Congresswoman, and the Smart twins were now inexplicably only one child. Despite the lack of success experienced by the sequel, Get Smart remains a favorite by agents and civilians alike. (TV Land) ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Telecast NBC September 18, 1965 - September 20, 1969 CBS September 26, 1969 - September 11, 1970 Broadcast History Sep 1965 - Sep 1968, NBC Sat 8:30-9:00 Sep 1968 - Sep 1969, NBC Sat 8:00-8:30 Sep 1969 - Feb/Apr - Sep 1970, CBS Fri 7:30-8:00 Episodes 138 Episodes On Film 1 Episode in Black And White; 137 Episodes In Color -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------moreless
  • 37
    Family Ties

    Family Ties

    Follow
    NBC (ended 1989)
    Family Ties first aired in September of 1982 on NBC and was one of the first of a wave of family comedies that emerged in the 1980's. With a rocky start in the ratings, Family Ties rose to number 2 after it was placed in the prized time-slot right after The Cosby Show and remained there from 1984 until 1987. The series centered around the Keaton family, Steven and his wife Elyse, both flower children of the 1960's. They had four children, Alex, Mallory, Jennifer and Andrew, who was born in 1985. What was unique about Family Ties was that it blended family comedy with politics. The 1960's flower children, Steven and Elyse clashed with the 1980's conservative, Alex. The show, in a way, showed the changing values during the Reagan era. Besides political views, Family Ties covered a number of controversial topics ranging from suicide to racism to drug dependency. Skippy was a neighbor who had a never-ending crush on Mallory. Ellen was Alex's first serious girlfriend. After breaking up with her, he became seriously involved with Lauren, a psychology student and Nick Moore was Mallory's serious boyfriend. First Telecast: September 22, 1982 Last Telecast: September 17, 1989 Episodes: 180 Color Episodes Theme Song: Without Us Written by: Jeff Barry and Tom Scott Sung by: Mindy Sterling and Dennis Tufano (1982) Johnny Mathis and Deniece Williams (1982-1989) NBC Broadcast History September 1982-March 1983----Wednesdays----9:30 p.m. March-August 1983----Mondays----8:30 p.m. August-December 1983----Wednesdays----9:30 p.m. January 1984-August 1987----Thursdays----8:30 p.m. August-September 1987----Sundays----8:00 & 8:30 p.m. September 1987-September 1989----Sundays----8:00 p.m. Nielsen Ratings: (Top 30 or Better) #5 in the 1984-1985 Season #2 in the 1985-1986 Season #2 in the 1986-1987 Season #17 in the 1987-1988 Seasonmoreless
  • 38
    Red Dwarf

    Red Dwarf

    Follow
    BBC Two
    3 Million Years from Earth, the mining ship Red Dwarf Its crew: Dave Lister, the last crew member alive Arnold Rimmer, a hologram simulation of his dead bunkmate Cat, a humanoid, evolved from Lister's cat. Additional: The ship's crew has come across new members: Kryten, a series 4000 mechanoid rescued from the Nova 5 Navigation Officer Kristine Kochanski, from a parallel universe. I am Holly, the ship's computer with an IQ of 6000 (and rapidly decreasing). Message Ends. ========================== Welcome to the Red Dwarf guide. Enjoy the backstory and details of one of the best SF parodies ever created for TV.moreless
  • 39
    Mystery Science Theater 3000

    Mystery Science Theater 3000

    Follow
    Comedy Central (ended 1999)
    This is a show about an evil experiment where a guy is trapped on a satellite and is forced to watch bad films. He is forced to do this by Mad Scientists, who want to find a movie so bad that they can inflict it on the world and take over. We see the movie with the subject (Joel or later Mike) and his robot pals Crow and Servo, in silhouette at the bottom of the screen making jokes and wisecracks during the movie.

    Episodes: 197 color episodes, 9 specials, 1 unaired pilot, and 3 direct-to-video releases. Production Company: Best Brains, Inc.

    MST3K Broadcast History 1988-1989 -- KTMA TV 23, Minneapolis, MN 1989-1991 -- The Comedy Channel 1991-1996 -- Comedy Central 1997-1999 -- Sci-Fi Channel

    MST3K Syndication History MST3K was in syndication for only one year: from September 1995 to September 1996. During this time, several episodes from seasons 2, 3, and 4 aired on local network affiliate stations.

    MST3K Re-Run History After production of new episodes ended in 1999, Sci-Fi Channel continued to show re-runs of MST3K on Saturday mornings for several years. They stopped showing reruns in early 2004, with the last one airing on 1/31/04.

    MST3K commercially available episodes On DVD: 20 episodes from seasons 1-6, 3 episodes from season 8, 1 episode from season 9, 4 episodes from season 10. On VHS: 21 episodes from seasons 1-6, 1 episode from season 9, 3 episodes from season 10. See episode guide for exactly which episodes are available. "MST3K: The Movie": is available on VHS only. The DVD has been out of print for years. A new updated version was released in May 2008.

    MST3K Marathons 1991- 1st Annual Turkey Day marathon (30 hours) Theme: Dr. Forrester is trying to take over the world by forcing 30 hours of the world's worst films upon the earth. Meanwhile, Frank is trying to prepare Thanksgiving dinner. 1992- 2nd Annual Turkey Day marathon (30.5 hours) Theme: Dr. Forrester is force-feeding Frank 30 turkeys, each one dressed in the of a bad movie. 1993- 3rd Annual Turkey Day marathon (32 hours) Hosted by MST3000 fans at a Halloween party with by Debbie Tobin. 1994- 4th Annual Turkey Day marathon (28 hours) Hosted by Adam West. 1995- 5th Annual Turkey Day marathon (14.5 hours) Theme: Dr. Forrester must try to take over the world while entertaining guests that Frank invited for Thanksgiving.

    MST3K Conventions 1989 - "1st MiSTy Confab". Featured stand up from the show's cast, a showing of the never-aired pilot, and a display of some props. 1992 - "MST Alive". Live riffing of the film World Without End at the Downtown Theater in Minneapolis. Also short intro pieces featuring Dr. Forrester and TV's Frank. 1994 - "Conventio-Con-Expo-Fest-a-Rama". Featured prop museum, merchandise sale, viewing rooms that showed all episodes from seasons 1-5, keynote session featuring Q and A from the shows writers and cast, speeches by Beverly Garland, David Worth, and John Humphries, and autograph session, and a live riffing of the film This Island Earth, and a costume ball. 1996 - "Conventio-Con II: Electric Boogaloo". Featured a keynote session with the entire show's cast (including Trace Beaulieu, who had recently announced his departure from the show and Bill Corbett, who had just joined the cast), a celebrity panel with Kim Cattrall, Russel Johnson (TV's Professor), and Rex Reason, there were showings of scenes cut from MST3K: The Movie, as well as a showing of the short Assignment: Venezuela, there was a Doom competition where fans could play against Mike, and a shopping spree with Bridget Jones and Mary Jo Pehl.

    MST3K Awards and Award Nominations 1992-Nominated for Cable ACE Award for Best Comedy Series. 1993-Nominated for Cable ACE Award for Best Writing in a Comedy Series. 1993-Awarded 1993 Peabody Award for Outstanding Programming. 1994-Nominated for the following Cable ACE Awards: Art Direction in a Comedy Series, Best Comedy Series, Best Writing in a Comedy Series. 1994-Nominated for Emmy Award for Outstanding Writing in a Music or Variety Program. 1995-Nominated for Cable ACE Award for Best Comedy Series. 1995-Nominated for Emmy Award for Outstanding Writing in a Music or Variety Program. 1996-Nominated for Cable ACE Award for Best Comedy Series. 1997-Nominated for Cable ACE Award for Best Comedy Series.moreless
  • 40
    The Wonder Years

    The Wonder Years

    Follow
    ABC (ended 1993)
    "The Wonder Years" was a hit comedy series starring Fred Savage as Kevin Arnold the main character, a boy facing rites of passage on his way to adulthood. Kevin lives with his brother Wayne (Jason Hervey), his sister Karen (Olivia d'Abo), his father Jack (Dan Lauria), and his mother Norma (Alley Mills). Kevin grows up with his on-and-off girlfriend, Winnie Cooper (Danica McKellar), and his best friend, Paul Pfeiffer (Josh Saviano).

    The show had a successful 6 year run.

    Theme Song: "With a Little Help From My Friends" by John Lennon & Paul McCartney -- performed by Joe Cocker

    ABC Broadcasty History: January 1988 - April 1988 --- Tuesdays 8:30 October 1988 - February 1989 --- Wednesdays 9:00 February 1989 - August 1990 --- Tuesdays 8:30 August 1990 - August 1991 --- Wednesdays 8:00 August 1991 - February 1992 --- Wednesdays 8:30 March 1992 - September 1993 --- Wednesdays 8:00moreless
  • 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10