• 221
    The New Adventures of Old Christine

    The New Adventures of Old Christine

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    CBS (ended 2010)
    The New Adventures of Old Christine is a comedy about a 35-year-old divorced mom (Julia Louis-Dreyfus, Seinfeld), who runs a 30-minute female-only gym with Barbara 'Barb'(Wanda Sykes), and tries to keep peace with everyone around her. That includes the judgmental stay-at-home moms at her son Richie's (Trevor Gagnon) private school, her ex-husband, Richard (Clark Gregg, The West Wing), and his new girlfriend (Emily Rutherfurd, The Ellen Show), whose name is also Christine, Old Christine's brother, Matthew (Hamish Linklater, Fantastic Four) lives with her. From writer-exec producer Kari Lizer, Will & Grace and Warner Bros. TV. Music by Matters.moreless
  • 222
    Drawn Together

    Drawn Together

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    Comedy Central (ended 2007)
    In this spoof of reality TV shows, such as ''The Real World'' and ''Big Brother'', eight distinct - and dysfunctional - cartoon archetypes (who also spoof the archetypes you might see on a more normal reality series) are flung together and forced to put up with each other. Through various misadventures ranging from scintillating to shocking to downright strange, these eight roomies probe each others' personalities and push each others' buttons.moreless
  • 223
    Blue's Clues

    Blue's Clues

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    Nickelodeon (ended 2013)
    "To empower, to challenge, and build the self-esteem of preschoolers...all while making them laugh!" --- show slogan Blue's Clues celebrated its tenth anniversary in 2006. Blue gained a new baby brother who was later added to the series Blue's Room. The fun of the anniversary has ended, but you can continue to enjoy Blue's Clues in repeats on Noggin. Blue's Clues is a colorful and learning series that is targeted at the younger crowd, but can be enjoyed by all. Seasons 1-4 - It's Me, Steve! Have You Seen Blue, My Puppy? In the first four seasons of the program, host Steve Burns invited viewers daily into the Blue's Clues house to help him out, learn and have fun. From doing things like imitating Elvis Presley, to picking up a guitar and singing, acting like animals and more, Steve was always ready to do something funny and surprising. The show, was, and still is, based around the host looking for three clues that Blue provides by labeling them with a pawprint to figure something out. In a segment called "Blue Skidoo," Blue takes us into someplace that could be anything from a storybook world to a gameboard. Finally, "Mailtime" explores the theme of the episode using real kids. The program underwent many changes throughout the first four seasons of the show, including the release of a direct-to-video movie, the introduction of new characters such as Periwinkle and Cinnamon and even visits from occasional special guests. The schedule is highly variable, so keep an eye on listings for both Nick Jr. and Noggin. Additionally, many episodes of all versions of the program are available on commercial video and DVD. Season 5 - Joe Moves In In Season 5, long-time host Steve Burns left the program. The real Steve Burns began actively pursuing a musical career, while on the program it was said that he went to college. In order to fill in the role of host, the program introduced his "brother" Joe (Donovan Patton) to watch over the characters and play Blue's Clues in Steve's absence. Joe brings his own unique style to the program, from the colored shirts he wears that change from day-to-day, to his own personal interests, such as ducks. Season 6 - The Legend of the Blue Puppy In an episode shown in primetime viewers learned that Blue was born with a key that unlocks a playroom she can visit. In this playroom, Blue is transformed into a puppet. As a puppet, she can talk and interact with many new characters in the playroom, such as Rory the dinosaur, her stuffed friend Polka Dots, and a girl who goes by "Fred." Meanwhile, the show continues with Joe as the host and many of the normal features that viewers have come to know and love. Blue's Clues returned with a special episode in August 2006. This special episode celebrated the program's tenth anniversary. Cast listed in the guide as "Steve's Friends" or "Joe's Friends" are either additional voices or kids who appeared in Mailtime. These are listed under Co-Stars and are either one-shot guests, or sometimes recurring. Additional voices could be anything from a kid yelling "A Clue! A Clue!" to an auxiliary character such as a "Felt Friend." Additionally, a "Blue's Friends" section was added in later Season 6, for additional voices in "Blue's Room." Note that in Seasons 1 and 2, voices of regular characters also appears under "Steve's Friends." In Season 3, they are moved to a separate section, but it's a generic credits screen that doesn't reflect the characters that appear in the episode. From Season 4 onward, only voices actually used in the episode are credited. Blue's Clues currently has a number of DVD releases, but still no complete season releases, or anything more than basic special features, except for Blue's Big Musical Movie. If you'd like to see more new releases, visit TV Shows on DVD where you can vote on the types of releases you'd like to see and even leave comments for the powers-that-be. You must be registered with the site to vote, but registration is free and only requires a small amount of personal information to prevent people from voting more than once.moreless
  • 224
    The Proud Family

    The Proud Family

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    Disney Channel (ended 2005)
    How embarrassing must it be to have a crazy family? Only 14-year-old Penny Proud knows what that's like, with her over-protective Dad Oscar, her over-loving but wacky Mom Trudy, her funny Grandma Suga Mama, and twin siblings Bee Bee and Cee Cee. Then there are her friends - her best girl Dijonay Jones, her geeky friend Zoey, her popular, yet not-all-the-time friend LaCienega, her cool, "with-it" friend Sticky, plus the Gross Sisters bullying everyone...Penny Proud has ALOT of stuff on her hands. Reruns of The Proud Family can be seen daily on Disney Channel at 3:00am EST. The Proud Family Theme Song What? You and me will always be tight Family every single day and night Even when you starts acting like a fool You know I'm loving every single thing you do I know that I can always be myself Around you more than anybody else And everyday after school You know there's no one I love just what you do Family a family Proud Family They'll make you scream Make you wanna sing Its a family thing A family Proud proud family Proud Family They'll push your buttons Make you wanna hug 'em Big family A family A proud proud familymoreless
  • 225
    Home Improvement

    Home Improvement

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    ABC (ended 1999)
    Home Improvement is a sitcom about Tim Taylor, the accident prone host of a Detroit, Michigan television program about tools, who raises his dysfunctional family. Main Characters: Dr. Timothy "Tim" 'The Tool Man' Taylor is the accident prone host of Tool Time who teases his co-host Al. Jillian "Jill" Taylor is Tim's wife who wants to be a psychiatrist. Dr. Wilson Wilson, Jr. is the Taylors' strange neighbor who enjoys learning about other cultures and never shows his entire face. Albert "Al" Borland is Tim's flannel-wearing co-host. Heidi Keppert is the attractive Tool Time girl from season three through season eight, who is married with one child. Bradley "Brad" Michael Taylor is the Taylors' eldest son who is hoping for a soccer scholarship. Randall "Randy" William Taylor is the Taylors' middle child who is off at an environmental research study in Costa Rica. Mark Taylor is the youngest son who is frequently tortured by his older brothers. Tool Time: Tim's show themed around tools and cars. Tool Time aired between 1989 and 1999 with host Tim Taylor, assistant Al Borland and Toolgirl Heidi Keppert. Tool Time airs on Channel 112 every day @ 4:30. Tool Time can be seen on Channel 97 everyday @ 3:00 in Alpena,MI. Tool Time can be seen nationally via Comcast satellites! El Tiempo del instrumento se puede ver los sábados en 4:30 en el canal 97 Runtime: 30 min (204 episodes, 8 years) Glenview Road: The Taylors' and Wilson's street. Recurring Characters: Marty and Jeff Taylor are Tim's brothers. Lucille Taylor is his mother. Nancy is Marty's ex-wife. Claire and Gracie Taylor are Marty's twin daughters. Lisa is the attractive Tool Time girl in seasons one and two. Bud Harper is Tim's boss. Tim's friends include Harry, Benny Baroni, Eddie McCormack, and Felix Myman. Delores is Harry's wife. Marie Morton is the Taylors' neighbor and Jill's friend. Carrie is Jill's sister. Jill's other friends include Patty, Marge, and Karen. Lillian Patterson is Jill's mother. Willow Wilson is Wilson's niece. Dr. Ilene Markham is Al's girlfriend in seasons three through six. Trudy Borland is Al's girlfriend and wife in season eight. Jennifer Sudarsky is Brad's girlfriend in seasons one and two. Angela is Brad's girlfriend in seasons five and six. Jason is Brad's friend. Ronny is Mark's friend. Lauren is Randy's girlfriend in seasons six through eight. Rock Lannigan, Pete Bilker, and Dwayne Hoover are all construction workers for K&B Construction and frequent guests on Tool Time. Milton is a construction worker and frequent Tool Time guest. George "Sparky" Henderson is a mechanic and another frequent Tool Time guest. Antonio is a waiter at a restaurant frequently visited by the Taylors. Home Improvement Rating History •1991-92: Ranked 5th among All TV Programs (4th among non-news programs), First Season. •1992-93: Ranked 3rd among All TV Programs (2nd among non-news programs), Second Season. •1993-94: The #1 Non-News Program in the Nation, 2nd only to "60 Minutes", Third Season. •1994-95: Ranked 3rd among all TV Programs, Fourth Season. •1995-96: Ranked 7th among all TV programs, 5th-highest sitcom, Fifth Season. •1996-97: Ranked 9th among all TV programs, 7th-highest sitcom, Sixth Season. •1997-98: Ranked 11th among all TV programs, 6th-highest sitcom, Seventh Season. •1998-99; Ranked 10th among all TV programs, 5th-highest sitcom, 8th & Final Season. ABC Broadcast History •September 1991-August 1992---Tuesdays-8:30 p.m. •August 1992-September 1994---Wednesdays-9:00 p.m. •March 1994-May 1994---Wednesdays-8:00 p.m. •September 1994-May 1999---Tuesdays 9:00 p.m. Trivia for Home Improvement •The "Tool Time" audience is "Home Improvement"'s actual live studio audience. •While taping some episodes of Tool Time, Tim sometimes asks an unseen character Klaus to play music for Tool Time segments. Klaus Landsberg worked in the sound department on "Home Improvement". •Colleges and universities in Michigan sent star 'Allen, Tim' sweaters and T-shirts to wear on the air, and he did. •The name Binford Tools, the company that sponsor's the Tool Time show, is named after an anthropologist who made several new discoveries regarding stone age and tools. •There is a running gag regarding the Taylor's neighbor, Wilson; his face is always concealed from about the nose down. In most episodes, Wilson was being shot from behind a fence, but in later episodes where he got out more often, camera shots, actor movements, and prop placements were carefully orchestrated so that his full face was not revealed. In fact, during all the curtain calls for the show (except the series finale curtain call, where his entire face was shown), actor Earl Hindman, who played Wilson, would bring a miniature picket fence to hold in front of his face so that it would remain hidden from view. •The character Wilson is based on Tim Allen's childhood memories where he was too short to see over a fence, and was therefore unable to see his neighbor. •Originally, actress Frances Fisher was cast as Jill Taylor but was replaced with Patricia Richardson 4 days before the pilot episode was taped. •Richard Karn's wife, Tudi Roche, would occasionally make appearances on the show as Jill's sister Carrie. •The full names of the older two Taylor boys were Bradley Michael Taylor and Randall William Taylor. (Mark's full name isn't mentioned during the series.) •The label "WLS" was frequently used to cover up real corporate logos. WLS is the Chicago affiliate of ABC. •While meeting with Bud Harper, Tim is told "...Heidi tested better than Santa Claus." Tim Allen played Santa Claus in Santa Clause, The (1994). •As a running gag, whenever Tim enters the basement, he always bangs his head on a large pipe hanging overhead. •The character 'Tim Taylor' was ranked #20 in TV Guide's list of the "50 Greatest TV Dads of All Time" (20 June 2004 issue). Awards and Nominations •Won the 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, and 1992 ASCAP Award for Top TV Series (Dan Foliart) •Won the 1999, 1998 and 1997 Emmy Award for Outstanding Lighting Direction (Electronic) for a Comedy Series (Donald A. Morgan - "Mark's Big Break" (1999) and "A Night To Dismember" (1998)) and nominated for the same award in 1997 (I Was A Teenage Taylor). •Won the 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, and 1992 Emmy Award for Outstanding Individual Achievement in Lighting Direction (Electronic) for a Comedy Series (Donald A. Morgan - "Room Without a View" (1996), "My Dinner With Wilson" (1995), "Twas the Blight" (1994), "Bye Bye Birdie" (1993), and "Luck Be A Taylor Tonight" (1992)) •Nominated for the 1999 Emmy Award for Outstanding Music and Lyrics (Dan Foliart songs, "We've Got It All") •Nominated for the 1999, 1998, and 1997 Emmy Award for Outstanding Sound Mixing for a Comedy Series or a Special ("Love's Labor Lost, Part 1" (1999), "A Night To Dismember" (1998), and "Wilson's World" (1997)) •Nominated for the 1996, 1995, and 1994 Emmy Award for Outstanding Individual Achievement in Sound Mixing for a Comedy Series or a Special ("A Taylor Runs Through It" (1996), "Don't Tell Momma" (1995), and "5th Anniversary Show" (1994)) •Nominated for the 1999, 1998, 1996, 1995, 1994, and 1993 Emmy Award for Outstanding Technical Direction/Camera/Video for a Series ("The Long And Winding Road, Part 3" (1999) and "A Night To Dismember" (1998), "The Longest Day" (1996), "Tool Time After Dark" (1995), "5th Anniversary Show" (1994), and "Rites and Wrongs of Passage" (1993)) •Nominated for the 1998, 1997, 1996, and 1994 Emmy Award for Outstanding Lead Actress in a Comedy Series (Patricia Richardson) •Nominated for the 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, and 1992 Outstanding Individual Achievement in Editing for a Series - Multi-Camera Production (Roger Berger (1994-1996), Alex Gimenex (1992-1993) Marco Zappia - "The Longest Day" (1996), "Don't Tell Momma" (1995), "It Was the Best of Tim's it Was the Worst of Tim's" (1994), "Build or not to Build" (1993), and "Stereo Typical" (1992)) •Nominated for the 1995, 1993, and 1992 Emmy Award for Outstanding Comedy Series (Gayle S. Maffeo and John Pasquin (1992-1993)) •Nominated for the 1993 Emmy Award for Outstanding Lead Actor in a Comedy Series (Tim Allen) •Nominated for the 1997, 1996, 1994, and 1993 Golden Globe Award for Best Performance by an Actor in a TV-Series - Comedy/Musical (Tim Allen) and Tim Allen won the same award in 1995 •Nominated for the 1995 and 1994 Golden Globe Award for Best Performance by an Actress in a TV-Series - Comedy/Musical (Patricia Richardson) •Nominated for the 1995 and 1994 Golden Globe Award for Best TV-Series - Comedy/Musical •Nominated for the 1998 Golden Satellite Award for Best Performance by an Actor in a Television Series - Comedy or Musical (Tim Allen) •Won the 1999 TV Guide Award for Favourite Actor in a Comedy (Tim Allen) •Nominated for the 2000 Young Artist Award for Best Performance in a TV Comedy Series - Supporting Young Actress (Courtney Peldon) and for Best Performance in a TV Comedy Series - Young Performer Age Ten or Under (Ashley Trefger and Lindsey Trefger) •Won the 1999 Young Artist Award for Best Performance in a TV Comedy Series - Guest Starring Young Actress (Ashley Trefger and Lindsey Trefger) and for Best Performance in a TV Drama or Comedy Series - Leading Young Actor (Zachery Ty Bryan) •Nominated for the 1999 Young Artist Award for Best Performance in a TV Comedy Series - Guest Starring Young Actress (Courtney Peldon) and for the 1999 Young Artist Award Best Performance in a TV Drama or Comedy Series - Leading Young Actor (Taran Noah Smith) •Won the 1997 Young Artist Award for Best Performance in a TV Comedy: Guest Starring Young Performer (Courtney Peldon) •Won the 1996 Young Artist Award for Best Performance by a Young Actress: Guest Starring Role TV Series (Kimberly Cullum) •Won the 1995 and 1993 Michael Landon Award •Won the 1994 Young Artist Award for Outstanding Youth Ensemble in a Television Series (Zachery Ty Bryan, Taran Noah Smith, and Jonathan Taylor Thomas) •Nominated for the 1993 Young Artist Award for Best Young Actor Starring in a Television Series (Zachery Ty Bryan and Jonathan Taylor Thomas), for the 1993 Young Artist Award for Best Young Actress Recurring in a Television Series (Jessica Wesson), and for the 1993 Young Artist Award for Outstanding Actor under 10 in a Television Series (Taran Noah Smith) •Won the 1992 Young Artist Award for Exceptional Performance by a Young Actor under Ten (Taran Noah Smith) •Nominated for the 1992 Young Artist Award for Best New Family Television Series •Won the 1999 YoungStar Award for Best Performance by a Young Actor in a Comedy TV Series (Zachery Ty Bryan) •Nominated for the 1998 and 1997 Best Performance by a Young Actor in a Comedy TV Series (Jonathan Taylor Thomas) Home Improvement is now airing in syndication. Check your local listings! In Memory of Earl Hindman (1942-2003)moreless
  • 226
    The Partridge Family

    The Partridge Family

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    ABC (ended 1974)
    In 1970, the Partridge Family was among the top-selling recording acts, not to mention one of the top-rated TV shows of its time. Either way, it made David Cassidy a successful teen idol until the show's cancellation in 1974.

    The Partridge Family consisted of Shirley Partridge (keyboards, vocals) and her five kids: Keith (lead vocalist and guitar), Laurie (keyboards, vocals), Danny (bass guitar, vocals), Chris (drums), and Tracy (tambourine). Rounding out the cast was their manager, Reuben Kincaid.

    With the exception of Shirley Jones and David Cassidy, none of the actors on the show actually sang or played on the group's records. In fact this was done by professional studio musicians and singers, with the family lip-synching to the tracks on camera. In fact, David Cassidy was originally hired for his looks, but when the producers found out that he could sing they realized that they could use him in the real band.

    Many of the episode plots draw upon the comedic relationship between Reuben (Dave Madden) and Danny (Danny Bonaduce). These two were good friends both on and off the set. Other plot devices were Keith's good looks and popularity at school, Laurie's 70's style activism and some of the strange encounters that the family had when on the road in their bus.

    The Partridge Family was true wholesome family programming. At the time Shirley Partridge was one of the the first single mother's to be featured on a television show. Originally the scripts called for her to be divorced, but this was changed to describe her as a widow.

    Telecast: ABC September 25, 1970 - August 31, 1974 Broadcast History (all ET): Sept. 1970 - Jun. 1973, ABC Friday 8:30 - 9:00 P.M. Jun. 1973 - Aug. 1974, ABC Saturday 8:00 - 8:30 P.M. 96 Episodes In Color On Film.moreless
  • 227
    Family Affair

    Family Affair

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    CBS (ended 1971)
    Family Affair was one of those successful family comedies of the 1960's. Bill Davis' carefree existence as a swinging bachelor was just about perfect. A highly paid consulting engineer, he maintained an elegant apartment off Fifth Avenue in Manhattan and had his domestic needs cared for by a very English gentleman's gentleman, Mr. French. Into this life of independence came three young orphans, the 6-year old twins Buffy and Jody and 15-year-old Cissy. Their parents, Bill's brother and sister-in-law, had died in an accident, and other relatives felt that Bill could best provide for them. Despite initial misgivings, Bill and French became very attached to the children and learned to adjust their lifestyle to make room for the new members of the household. Mr. French, a stickler for neatness and order, had the toughest adjustment to make, he was with the children all the time while Bill was often out of town on assignments. All in all, they were a happy family. Family Affair aka Fedderson & Hartmann's Family Affair is A DON FEDDERSON PRODUCTION in association with the CBS Television Network. Distributed by Paramount-VIACOM Television and CBS Television Network Distribution. ----------------------------------------------------------------- Broadcast History: {CBS Nighttime} Sep. 12, 1966-Sep. 15, 1969, CBS Monday at 9:30-10:00pm Sep. 25, 1969-Sep. 9, 1971, CBS Thursday at 7:30-8:00pm. {CBS Daytime} Sep. 7, 1970-Sep. 1, 1972 at 11:00-11:30am on CBS-TV Sep. 4, 1972-Jan. 12, 1973 at 4:00-4:30pm on CBS-TV. ---------------------------------------------------------------- Ranks in the top 30 Nielsen Ratings No. 14 (tie) in the 1966-1967 Season (with "The Dean Martin Show") No. 4 (tie) in the 1967-1968 Season (with "Gunsmoke" & "Bonanza") No. 5 in the 1968-1969 & 1969-1970 Seasons No Ranking in the 1970-1971 Season.moreless
  • 228
    Penn & Teller: Bullshit!

    Penn & Teller: Bullshit!

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    Showtime (ended 2010)
    In society, there are many products and ideas that we buy in to. Some of these products, services or ideas are just plain bullsh**. Well-known magicians, Penn and Teller, are here to knock some sense into people in a humorous and informal way and to explain why some things in life are just plain bullsh**.moreless
  • 229
    Outnumbered

    Outnumbered

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    BBC (ended 2014)
    BBC's family comedy following a beleaguered mother and father of three.
  • 230
    Eastwick

    Eastwick

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    ABC (ended 2009)
    In the rustic suburban village of Eastwick, there live three seemingly ordinary women who possess unique personalities and lead very distinctive lives. Roxanne "Roxie" Torcolleti, an uninhibited artist and a financially-challenged single mom, Kat Gardener, a frustrated wife and an overworked mother of five, and Joanna Frankel, a shy and subdued newspaper reporter, are suddenly brought together thru a strange encounter at the town park. Different they may be from each other, they quickly learn that all of them have one common yearning -- to excite and experience change in their lives. Incidentally, a charismatic yet enigmatic man named Darryl Van Horne (Paul Gross) arrives in town determined to make their wishes come true. With Van Horne's help, Roxie (Rebecca Romijn), Kat (Jaime Ray Newman), and Joanne (Lindsay Price) soon discover their extraordinary talents and harness them to fulfill their innermost desires. As these enchanting women unleash their magical powers, Eastwick, once peaceful and idyllic, is never quite the same. Based on the novel of John Updike and the popular 1987 film adaptation, Eastwick also stars Ashley Benson as Roxie's daughter Mia, Jon Bernthal as Kat's husband Raymond, Johann Urb as Joanna's boss Will, Sara Rue as Roxie's best friend Penny, and Veronica Cartwright as Bun Waverly, the head of the Eastwick Historical Society. Created by Maggie Friedman for the small screen, the ABC dramedy is produced by Warner Bros. Television. Acting as executive producer along with Friedman is David S. Rosenthal.moreless
  • 231
    California Dreams

    California Dreams

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    NBC (ended 1997)
    California Dreams is a show about a group of high school teens that form their own band, The California Dreams. The show follows the group through their problems in high school as well as their problems in trying to score a record deal. The theme song to California Dreams is an original song performed by the season's current bandmates. The lyrics are as follows:

    Surf dudes with attitudes (Kinda groovy) Laid back moods Sky above, sand below (Good vibrations) Feelin' mellow Won't give it up Don't wanna stop Don't wake me up Don't wake me up if I'm dreamin' California dreams Just let me lay here in the sun Until my dream is done

    All actors sang their own songs in each and every episode, with the exception of Jay Anthony Franke (Jake) and Aaron Jackson (Mark), whose characters were voiced by Barry Coffing and Zachary Throne.moreless
  • 232
    Father of the Pride

    Father of the Pride

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    NBC (ended 2004)
    From DreamWorks animation comes the first primetime CGI-animated series with a feature film quality look to it. Each episode costs $1.6 million and 9 months to make. This CGI-animated series is about a family of white lions who work as performers in the Las Vegas act of illusionists Siegfried & Roy. The show stars Larry, a hard-working white lion in the revue with his wife Kate, a white lioness. Sarmoti, another white lion who is Kate's father - and Larry's father-in-law - clashes with Larry on every subject imaginable. Rounding out the group is Snack, a mischievous gopher and Larry's best friend. It should be noted that the name Sarmoti is actually the acronym S.A.R.M.O.T.I., which stands for Siegfried and Roy: Masters of the Impossible. The show was in jeopardy when in October 2003, Roy Horn was mauled by one of his tigers during a stage show that left Horn in critical condition. Executives at NBC and DreamWorks didn't know whether or not to go on with the show, but as Roy showed signs of improvement, both Siegfried and Roy urged the show to move forward in production. When the show debuted in late August 2004, it got off to a good start with strong ratings. The ratings continued to show good promise for the show through early September 2004, until the ratings started to rapidly decline. The show faced more trouble when it was pulled from November 2004 sweeps, undoubtedly signaling the end was near. In early December 2004, Jeffrey Katzenberg, DreamWorks Animation CEO and show creator, announced that the show was cancelled. A few of the remaining episodes were burned off in late December 2004. The whole series, which consists of one season of episodes and extra features, is now available on DVD for the public to buy. Theme Song "Viva Las Vegas" performed by John Goodman NBC Broadcast History August 2004 - December 2004 --- Tuesday 9:00 pm (Simulcast in HDTV) First Telecast: August 31, 2004 Last Telecast: December 28, 2004 Episodes: 13 Episodes (2 Unaired)moreless
  • 233
    The Addams Family

    The Addams Family

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    ABC (ended 1966)
    The Addams Family centers around one of the two "creepy" families that premiered on television in 1964. ABC aired The Addams Family and CBS aired The Munsters.

    The Addams Family consisted of Gomez and Morticia Addams and their two children, Pugsley and Wednesday. Also included are Uncle Fester, Grandmama, the hairy Cousin Itt, the butler Lurch and Thing! The series is based on a one-panel cartoon created by Charles Addams that had appeared in The New Yorker magazine since the 1930s. The show's title came from the cartoonist's name; The family in the cartoon is never referred to by name. The finger-snapping theme song was written by Vic Mizzy, who also write the theme for Green Acres. The series lasted two seasons, yet gained much more success in syndication. The series was later transformed into a the 1991 feature film starring Raul Julia and Angelica Huston.

    ABC Broadcast History: Sept 1964-Sept 1966 Fridays 8:30 p.m.moreless
  • 234
    Teletubbies

    Teletubbies

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    BBC (ended 2001)
    The Teletubbies started in the U.K. and proved to be a popular children's show. In April 1998, the U.S.A. picked up the Teletubbies on PBS, and proved to be popular with American children too. Teletubbies is a show about creatures known as Teletubbies (so called because they're tubby, and have TV screens in their stomachs). The Teletubbies live in Teletubbyland, and faraway place inhabited by only the Teletubbies, talking flowers, talking trumpets, a baby sun, the Noo-Noo, a bunch of rabbits, and the narrator. There house is known as "The Tubby-Tronic Superdome", and has everything they need, four beds, a tubby-toast maker, a tubby-custard makers, and a slide used as an alternate entrance. In the middle of their dome, they have a panel of switches and buttons and their tubby sponges which they use to bathe themselves. Each day, the Teletubbies discover new things together, watch videos on their tubby-screens, and have fun together. In Teletubbyland, there's a large windmill, and when it spins pink dust, it let's the teletubbies know that something magical is about to happen. The Teletubbies were developed in U.K. by Ragdoll and BBC. Characters Tinky-Winky The largest of the four teletubbies. He is purple, and has a triangle antenna (because of these features, critics assume he is gay, but rest assure, he isn't, he may be a tom-girl, but he's not gay.) His favorite thing is his hand-bag which he can amazingly fit large things in. His best friends are Dipsy and Po. He may be large, but he's quiet and gentle. His song is "Tinkle-Winkle, Tinky-Winky" Dipsy The second largest teletubby. He is green with a dipstick antenna. His favorite thing is his black and white tie-dye top hat. His best friends are Tinky-Winky and Laa-Laa. He's more of a loner teletubby, and doesn't like "cute" stuff. His song has a reggae beat. Laa-Laa The second smallest teletubby. She is yellow, with a spiral antenna. Her favorite thing his her giant orange ball that she seems to have no control of. Her best friends are all of the teletubbies. She has a free-spirit and can always find away to enjoy things, her favorite word is "nice." Her song is "La la la la la la la la." Po The smallest teletubby. She is red, with an "O" shaped antenna. Her favorite thing is her red and blue scooter which she can ride at an alarming speed. Her best friends are Tinky-Winky and Laa-Laa. She is very quiet and usually shy, but loves to go fast. Her song is "Fidy Fidy, Mar Mar Mar" Noo-Noo The Teletubbie's vacuum cleaner that can suck up anything in his path, even things twice his size. He lives inside the Tubby-tronic Superdome. Trumpets Trumpets that come out of the ground and sing songs or recite poems for the Teletubbies to enjoy. Baby Sun A sun with a baby's face in it. Narrator Basically tells the story, or what the Teletubbies "what to do". Show Secrets -The teletubbies in real-life are huge, the costumes can reach up to 10 feet! -After ten minutes, the actors have to remove the Teletubby heads from their costumes due to carbon dioxide build up. -Nikki Smedley landed the part of Laa-Laa when she was make-believing she was a table at the audition. -The Noo-Noo is operated by a small man inside him. Alot of people have been saying that Teletubbies is teaching their kids to be gay. That is a lie. Teletubbies is a show for kids to have fun. Opening Sequence (Sun rises) Narrator: Over the hills and far away, Teletubbies come to play. Narrator: 1! Tinky-Winky: 1! Narrator: 2! Dipsy: 2! Narrator: 3! Laa-Laa: 3! Narrator: 4! Po: 4! Narrator: Teletubbies! Trumpet: Time for Teletubbies! x4 (Bouncy Music plays and everyone talks in a sing-song voice) Narrator: Tinky-Winky Tinky-Winky: Tinky-Winky! Narrator: Dipsy Dipsy: Dipsy! Narrator: Laa-Laa Laa-Laa: Laa-Laa! Narrator: Po Po: Po! Narrator: Teletubbies Teletubbies: Teletubbies! Narrator: Say Hello! Teletubbies: Eh-oh! (Their way of saying hello) Narrator: Tinky-Winky, Dipsy, Laa-Laa, Po, Teletubbies Teletubbies: Teletubbies! (Music Stops playing) Teletubbies and Narrator: Big Hug! (Windmill spins) Teletubbies: Uh oh! (They all hide) Trumpet: Where have the teletubbies gone? Closing Sequence Trumpet: Time for tubby bye-bye! x3 Teletubbies: Awww! Narrator: Goodbye Tinky-Winky Tinky-Winky: Ba-bye! Narrator: Goodbye Dipsy Dipsy: Ba-bye! Narrator: Goodbye Laa-Laa Laa-Laa: Ba-bye! Narrator: Goodbye Po Po: Ba-bye! Teletubbies (in random order): Boo! Narrator: No Teletubbies: No Narrator: Goodbye Tinky-Winky Tinky-Winky: Ba-bye! Narrator: Goodbye Dipsy Dipsy: Ba-bye! Narrator: Goodbye Laa-Laa Laa-Laa: Ba-bye! Narrator: Goodbye Po Po: Ba-bye! Narrator: The sun is setting in the sky, Teletubbies say goodbye (Music starts playing) Tinky-Winky: Ba-bye! Dipsy: Ba-bye! Laa-Laa: Ba-bye! Po: Ba-bye! Tinky-Winky: Ba-bye! Dipsy: Ba-bye! Laa-Laa: Ba-bye! Po: Ba-bye! (Music stops playing and sun sets)moreless
  • 235
    Disneyland

    Disneyland

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    ABC (ended 1990)
    Walt Disney, one of Hollywood's most ambitious producers, was first approached to do television in 1950, when The Coca-Cola Company offered him a one-hour special. The one hour special, "One Hour in Wonderland," aired December 25, 1950 on NBC and garnered 90% of the television viewing audience. A second special, "The Walt Disney Christmas Special," aired December 25, 1951 on CBS. When Walt had drawn up plans for a theme park, known as Disneyland, he found a hard time obtaining funding; critics, including Walt's brother Roy, thought that it was unfeasible and that it would be a fiasco. At the same time, the ABC television network offered him a deal for a television anthology series. Walt wouldn't agree to it unless they put up partial financing for Disneyland (a term that had kept CBS and NBC from signing with him). ABC agreed, and also paid him $50,000 per program, an exorbitant sum for the time. The show, titled Disneyland, premiered on October 27, 1954 and was an immediate success. Historically, the show is significant for two reasons. First, with thirty-four seasons, it is the longest-running prime time network series in history (not counting news programs; if one were to count news programs, 60 Minutes would take that title). Second, it was the first original television production by a major Hollywood studio. Other studios resented television for fear that it would keep people from going out to the movies. Thus, they refused to produce television programs, and they refused to let networks or stations use any of their more recent or better-known material. Walt Disney was the first Hollywood producer to do so. Disneyland was a mixture of cartoons, live-action adventures, documentaries, and nature stories. Some of these were made expressly for television, but others were former theatrical releases. Many of the early programs were designed to promote upcoming theatrical releases. One particular early success of the Disneyland series was the Davy Crockett trilogy. This was a phenomenal success in every aspect; the merchandising bonanza that followed sold $300 million worth of Crockett memorabilia. Thus, ABC wanted more adventure stories along the lines of Davy Crockett. Disney provided them, but none were nearly as successful. Along the way, in 1958, it was retitled Walt Disney Presents. Eventually the show became more reliant on original material, though pre-existing material was used at times. In 1961, his contract with ABC expired. He moved his show to NBC where he could broadcast it in color (ABC would not have the capability for color broacasting until 1962). It was rechristened Walt Disney's Wonderful World of Color, with an original theme song by Richard M. Sherman and Robert B. Sherman (who went on to write the song scores to such well-known Disney films as Mary Poppins, The Jungle Book, The Many Adventures of Winnie-the-Pooh and Bedknobs and Broomsticks). It premiered on NBC on Sunday, September 24, 1961. On NBC, he was able to re-air many of the ABC shows in color, as they had been filmed that way as insurance for possible future airings once color broadcasting, or "colorcasting," took hold. In September of 1966, doctors told Walt Disney, a lifetime chain-smoker, that he had lung cancer. Though the cancerous lung was removed, doctors told him that the cancer had been detected too late, and he died on Thursday, December 15, 1966. Knowing full well that no one could replace him as a host, Walt Disney Productions dropped the hosted introduction segments after the season's end. Luckily, Walt had filmed that all of that season's host segments before it was too late. The show changed its name to The Wonderful World of Disney on September 14, 1969, and dropped the Sherman Brothers theme song in favor of various alternating medleys of well-known songs from Disney movies and parks. The trusted Disney name continued to insure high ratings for the next few years. As popular tastes changed dramatically during the late 1960s and early 1970s, the public seemed to have largely begun to turn away from anything Disney (except theme parks and merchandise), seeing the name as symptomatic of a square, uptight, and unhip mindset that young people were coming to reject. The studio itself suffered from the lack of hit movies and accusations of incompetent management at the time. The ratings of the anthology series, however, remained reasonably stable, enough so that NBC renewed Disney's contract through 1978. In the fall of 1975, the show began a ratings decline when it was moved back to 7 PM from 7:30 PM. Disney's ratings fell from the Top 30 and continued to fall every year afterwards. The following year went face to with CBS's 60 Minutes. Though it had begun in 1968 and was scheduled on Tuesday, the CBS newsmagazine had been scheduled on Sunday evenings since the 1971-1972 season, and had been held back until after football season due to the risk of pre-emptions; it was this year that the show finally began its season in the fall. The show was easily able to beat ABC's Sunday night offerings but trailed the CBS newsmagazine by a wide margin. As the number of original installments decreased every year, so, too, did the ratings. In 1979, NBC (which, as a network, was also in the midst of a very public, humiliating decline) threatened Disney with cancellation unless the ratings improved. That fall, Walt Disney Productions rechristened the anthology series Disney's Wonderful World and commissioned a new, original theme song by John Debney and John Klawitter, new opening and closing credits, and a new announcer, Gary Owens (longtime announcer Dick Wesson committed suicide in January of that year). In a flashback to the original themed format, many episodes initially were divided into one of four categories: "Fantasy Night," "Adventure Night," "Comedy Night," and "Animation Night." Beneath the "happy new face" sung of in the new theme song, however, was more of the same: too little original material, airings of theatrical movies, and far too many reruns. In spite of this, the face-lift helped the ratings, so the show was renewed for the 1980-1981 season. But the next season saw only 10 installments that had not been aired on the anthology series before, and pre-emptions were far more frequent. Ratings for the show's 27th season did not improve, and in on December 30, 1980 NBC announced that it would not be renewing the series for next season. All was not lost that year, as the show was then immediately picked up by CBS. It was moved from its longtime Sunday night slot to Saturday night at 8 PM, as the network would not displace its highly-rated pride and joy 60 Minutes. Retitled Walt Disney, the show promised to present more original programming than it had in its final years on NBC. On September 26, 1981, after a huge advertising campaign by the network, the series premiered on CBS. Ratings improved against mediocre competition, and the show was renewed for another season (its 29th on network television). A few of these shows were pilots for series that were never picked up. The second CBS year saw an increase in the number of reruns (as opposed to last year's increase in new episodes), and the ratings dropped. Disney did, however, produce several midseason replacement series for CBS, but all of them failed. On Monday, April 18, 1983, Walt Disney Productions and Westinghouse Broadcasting launched The Disney Channel, a cable network created to showcase the large library of Disney cartoons, movies, and TV shows (the anthology series was rerun under the name Walt Disney Presents). Thus, in the eyes of CBS, the anthology series had outlived its purpose and was canceled. There were occasional network and syndicated specials, but all of Disney's television resources were concentrated on the cable service. When Michael Eisner became CEO of Walt Disney Productions in September of 1984, one of the first things he and his new regime did was express an interest in reviving Disney's presence on network TV. He had some success, as the Emmy-winning, Touchstone-produced sitcom The Golden Girls and the Saturday morning cartoon (a medium with which Walt Disney himself had refused to get involved due to fears of compromised quality) Disney's Adventures of the Gummi Bears both premiered on NBC on Saturday, September 14, 1985 and lasted several years. However, these particular shows were the exception, not the rule; a number of series that the new regime eventually launched failed (Wildside and The Ellen Burstyn Show, for instance). Also, of course, did the company plan to revive the anthology series. Now known as The Disney Sunday Movie, it made its much-hyped return to network television on February 2, 1986 after a hiatus of 2 years, 4 months, and eight days, replacing the dismally-rated Ripley's Believe it or Not. Just as Walt Disney had hosted the original until his death, Michael Eisner appeared in an introductory segment at the beginning of each episode. Nostalgia and ratings were high initially, but both eventually wore off. The show premiered at a two-hour length, but in the fall of 1987, once again being soundly beaten in the ratings regularly by 60 Minutes in its first hour, and by Murder, She Wrote in its second, it was shortened to one hour for its third and final season on ABC. NBC, which had not been able to launch a hit show in Disney's old time slot in the seven years since the show was axed by that network, picked up the show, which was renamed The Magical World of Disney. At first, a rotating "wheel" format was used, utilizing three different genres; every fourth week would be a special. This lasted until a few months into the following season. Eisner continued to host the show, but ratings on NBC were no better than they had been on ABC, and it limped through a two-year run here before the network pulled the plug for good. After 36 years (save for the September 1983-January 1986 hiatus), one of television's last remaining institutions from its golden age came to an unceremonious end. In 1995, The Walt Disney Company announced plans to buy out the ABC television network, which went through in January of 1996. In the fall of 1997, a family-oriented movie time slot was set aside on ABC and christened The Wonderful World of Disney. Ratings to date have been middling. Though the show is not currently repeated anywhere (The Disney Channel dropped it and all vintage Disney programming in September of 2002), episodes are slowly being released on DVD in the United States, and its legacy of quality television entertainment for all members of the family lives on in the hearts and minds of many. Here is a chronology of titles used for the series: Disneyland: October 27, 1954-September 3, 1958
    Walt Disney Presents: September 12, 1958-September 17, 1961
    Walt Disney's Wonderful World of Color: September 24, 1961-September 7, 1969
    The Wonderful World of Disney: September 14, 1969-September 2, 1979
    Disney's Wonderful World: September 9, 1979-September 13, 1981
    Walt Disney: September 26, 1981-September 24, 1983
    The Disney Sunday Movie: February 2, 1986-September 11, 1988
    The Magical World of Disney: October 9, 1988-September 9, 1990 The final name was used as an umbrella title for Disney movie airings on cable's The Disney Channel from September 23, 1990 to August 25, 1996. ABC Broadcast History (1954-1961):
    October 27, 1954-September 3, 1958: Wednesday, 7:30 PM-8:30 PM
    September 12, 1958-September 25, 1959: Friday, 8:00 PM-9:00 PM
    October 2, 1959-September 23, 1960: Friday, 7:30 PM-8:30 PM
    September 25, 1960-September 17, 1961: Sunday, 6:30 PM-7:30 PM NBC Broadcast History (1961-1981):
    September 24, 1961-August 31, 1975: Sunday, 7:30 PM-8:30 PM
    September 14, 1975-September 11, 1977: Sunday, 7:00 PM-8:00 PM
    September 18, 1977-October 23, 1977: Sunday, 7:00 PM-9:00 PM
    October 30, 1977-September 13, 1981: Sunday, 7:00 PM-8:00 PM CBS Broadcast History (1981-1983):
    September 26, 1981-January 1, 1983: Saturday, 8:00 PM-9:00 PM
    January 4, 1983-February 15, 1983: Tuesday, 8:00 PM-9:00 PM
    July 9, 1983-September 24, 1983: Saturday, 8:00 PM-9:00 PM
    (two irregularly scheduled airings on May 3, 1983 and May 21, 1983) ABC Broadcast History (1986-1988):
    February 2, 1986-September 6, 1987: Sunday, 7:00 PM-9:00 PM
    September 13, 1987-September 11, 1988: Sunday, 7:00 PM-8:00 PM NBC Broadcast History (1988-1990):
    October 9, 1988-July 2, 1989: Sunday, 7:00 PM-8:00 PM
    July 9, 1989-July 23, 1989: Sunday, 8:00 PM-9:00 PM
    August 6, 1989-February 25, 1990: Sunday, 7:00 PM-8:00 PM
    March 4, 1990-April 15, 1990: Sunday, 7:00 PM-9:00 PM
    April 22, 1990-May 6, 1990: Sunday, 7:00 PM-8:00 PM
    May 27, 1990-July 22, 1990: Sunday, 7:00 PM-9:00 PM
    August 5, 1990-September 9, 1990: Sunday, 7:00 PM-8:00 PM
    First Telecast: October 27, 1954
    Last Telecast: September 9, 1990 Episodes: 751 (180 black and white episodes, 571 color episodes [as far as the format in which they were first broadcast]) (NOTE: many of these were originally theatrical releases, and a small number were specials aired at other times, but for purposes of their first airing on the anthology series they are counted as episodes)moreless
  • 236
    Hey Arnold!

    Hey Arnold!

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    Nickelodeon (ended 2004)
    Hey Arnold! is a much-loved and popular Nicktoon on Nickelodeon. The whole basis of the show is Helga's love for Arnold, but a lot of episodes and storylines focus on Arnold and his friends. Hey Arnold! shows a variety of different characters - even the background characters have 1 or 2 episodes on themselves. Arnold is a good person and tries to do things right. People at his school seek him for advice and see him as their own advisor.

    Characters:

    Arnold - Arnold is the main character of Hey Arnold!, Arnold is very helpful to others but gets too much into their business sometimes. Helga loves Arnold more than anyone else. But Arnold doesnt know it. Arnold's last name isn't revealed in any episode, but will be in the 2004 sequel, Hey Arnold 2! Arnold's nickname is "Football Head".

    Gerald - Gerald is Arnold's cool best friend and the all-time keeper for the ancient legends of Arnold's neighborhood.

    Helga - Helga is the meanest kid in Arnold's neighborhood for one reason - she loves Arnold! And no one else knows that! Helga's best friend and sidekick is Phoebe.

    Harold - Harold is big and fat bully, and could swallow 50 Mr. Fudgie-bars whole! He's mostly hanging out with Stinky or Sid. Harold also thinks hes so tough but he always cries for his mommie.

    Phoebe - Phoebe is the Smartie! She's very useful when Helga needs help with something... or needs her to do Helga's homework. Phoebe loves Gerald, so does Gerald but its hard to tell what's gonna happen. Phoebe also knows Helga's big-deep-dark secret about Arnold, but is positive she won't let it out.

    Rhonda - Rhonda is the rich/cool girl. She's always depending on people to have a good fashion scene, though it never works. Rhonda is best friends with Nadine. Nadine likes everything the opposite of Rhonda and so does Rhonda but they still work out their fights.

    Stinky - Though his name is Stinky, he's really not. This farm-yard boy is taller than any other and is always sharing his love about lemon puddin'.

    Sid - Sid is always pessimistic about everything. He is very gullible and will believe anything anyone says. He's best friends with Stinky and Harold.

    Eugene - Eugene is the clutz! Whether he turns a good day into a nasty storm, he's very optimistic about everything. He's also known as a geek to many others.

    Grandpa and Grandma (Phil and Pookie) - Arnold's "substitute parents" are the craziest, most loving "substitute Parents" a kid could want! They're also Arnold's grandparents.

    Oskar - Oskar is a resident of the boarding house that Arnold lives in. He loves money (but relies on his wife Susie for it), he can be very lazy at times.

    Susie - Susie is Oskar's wife. She mainly does all the cooking, cleaning, and works since Oskar has only a paper route, and can be irratted by that sometimes.

    Ernie - Ernie also lives in the boarding house and is a construction worker. His room his filled with blocks, each telling a story. Ernie is very short, but has a very big heart.

    Mr. Hyunh - Mr. Hyunh is an asian man who came to the boarding house from China during Vietnam. He has a daughter and also a very good voice.

    Mr. Green - Mr. Green owns the meat shop called "Green Meats". He's always there to help, and sell meat of course.

    Curly - Curly is the cookoo one. He's always crazy like one time he locked himself in the principle's office and threw dodgeballs at people. Crazy, huh?

    Ms. Vitello - Ms. Vitello is the very old, nice, and tender owner of the flower shop on Arnold's block.

    Big Bob (Helgas Father) - Big Bob owns a beeper shop called Big Bobs Beepers. He is a bossy meanie(where Helga gets it from).

    Arnold's Mom and Dad - From the episodes "Parents Day" and "The Journal", Arnold's parents write in a journal about all the adventures they had in the wild, saving people's lives and then having Arnold. From what everyone knows, they've never came back to where they went.

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  • 237
    Less Than Perfect

    Less Than Perfect

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    ABC (ended 2006)
    Sara Rue stars as Claudia Casey, an enthusiastic assistant who loves her job working for GNB Network news anchor Will Butler, played by Eric Roberts. After two years, Claudia has become more adept at fending off her condescending co-workers, Kipp (Zachary Levi) and Lydia (Andrea Parker), who have been determined to get rid of her to further their own ambitions. Now, while continuing to spar with these snobs, she's being pestered in new ways: Lydia is obsessed with her upcoming wedding to on-air pundit Jeb (Patrick Warburton, new series regular), sharing all the details with everyone at the office -- especially Claudia -- and Kipp needs Claudia's counsel as he struggles with his new job as Jeb's assistant. Fortunately Claudia still has the support of three friends at GNB: the brash and blunt Ramona (Sherri Shepherd), the loyal but idiosyncratic Owen (Andy Dick), and her blowhard next-door neighbor, Carl (Will Sasso), who's also the cafeteria manager.moreless
  • 238
    The Weekenders

    The Weekenders

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    ABC (ended 2004)
    The Weekenders is a original Disney Channel show which focuses on a group of hardcore friends named Tino, Lor, Carver and Tish who spend their weekends trying to have as much fun as possible. While sometimes their weekends are far from what they plan, they usually manage to work together with the help of some advice from Tino's mother, and things usually work out in the end. Their weekends often consist of visiting various Pizza Parlors and ultimately to have the perfect weekend, though their weekends seldomly go as planned. The central setting of the cartoon is that it takes place only on the weekends, though in some cases it does show certain days of the week in order to show the cause of the episode or the end result thereof. It also has various quirks, like Tino's gray screen and the end-of-episode catchphrase, "Later days!". The Gang Tini Tonitini - Tino is the plan maker of the group even though his plans often turn into disasters while frequently adding to his list of phobias. Regardless, he greets every challenge with a sarcastic tone and is always reliable to help out his friends. He often asks his mother for help during dinner, though he usually would rather spend more time asking his mother for help than actually eating the bizarre dishes she cooks up. Lor McQuarrie - Lor is the tomboy of the group, which is likely credited to the fact that she has fourteen brothers. She is good at most sports and especially basketball, though her grades suffer due to her personality. She is a reliable friend in times of need and she does her best to help out when she can. She is usually eager to do most things, though when it comes to studying or speaking with her crush Thomson Oberman, she loses her nerve. Tish Katsufrakis - Tish is the brains and artist of the gang. She is a very nitpicky perfectionist and can get a little crazy at times in which she feels stressed. Many times her art can affect the gangs weekend but overall she is willing to use her abilities to help her friends and her family, though her complex nature often causes interesting circumstances despite her best efforts. Carver Decartes - Carver tries his best to be cool even though he isn't considered cool by the cool crowd. He is obsessed with his shoes and often times lead the gang to some bizarre ordeals. He tries not to feel bad about doing the wrong thing but usually his conscience catches up with him and comes back to help his friends when they need him. The Weekenders still comes on Toon Disney at various times and still is shown on The Disney Channel.moreless
  • 239
    Beavis and Butt-head

    Beavis and Butt-head

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    MTV - Music Television
    Beavis and Butt-head was first aired on the U.S. cable network MTV in March 1993. This show, which combined animation and music videos, was an example of the unique programming that MTV has consistently provided for its youthful demographics. The half-hour program alternated between a simple narrative, which focused on the exploits of two low-life adolescents, and clips from music videos, which the two teens commented on. Creator Mike Judge had penned the aimless duo for a festival of animation when Abby Turkuhle, MTV's senior vice president picked up an episode for the network's animated compendium Liquid Television. MTV immediately contracted for 65 episodes from Judge, with Turkuhle as producer, and placed Beavis and Butt-head in the 7:00 and 11:00 P.M. week-day time slots. The characters, Beavis and Butt-head, are rude, crude, and stupid, and can be placed in the "dumb comedy" tradition, which includes Abbott and Costello, The Three Stooges, Cheech and Chong, Saturday Night Live's Wayne and Garth, and FOX's The Simpsons. When the show debuted, television critics differed in their opinions, with some praising the show for daring to present the stupidity of male "metalheads" who watch too much television (effectively satirizing the core MTV audience), and others categorizing Beavis and Butt-head as another example of television's declining quality. Beavis and Butt-head did find an audience and began pulling in MTV's highest ratings. But the show was also quite controversial, instigating heated public debate on the interconnected issues of representations of violence in the media and generational politics surrounding youth subcultures. Beavis and Butt-head they found, was especially popular with those in their twenties. It turned out to be bothersome to many that young people enjoyed the show and laughed at its two imbecilic boys, even if these fans were much more intelligent and much less grating than Beavis and Butt-head. In this sense, Beavis and Butt-head raised the issue of generational taste cultures. Definitions of "taste," Pierre Bourdieu notes, "unite and separate, uniting those who are the product of similar conditions but only by distinguishing them from all others. And taste distinguishes in an essential way, since it is the basis of all that one has--people and things--and of all that one is for others, whereby one classifies oneself and is classified by others." To the degree that taste cultures agree, they are brought together into a subcultural formation; but to this degree they are also separated from those with whom they differ. It was the "bad taste" of Beavis and Butt-head's audience which bothered many, and this brings to the surface another one of the reasons why Beavis and Butt-head was so controversial. Cultural critics, educators, and concerned parents gathered skeptically, sternly, and anxiously in front of the television set and passed judgment upon the "tasteless" Beavis and Butt-head show. And in an ironic reversal, Beavis and Butt-head countered by ascending the cultural hierarchy. The two youths channel-surfed, looking for videos that didn't suck (i.e. those with heavy metal or hardcore rap, those that contained violence, or encouraged genital response.) In becoming the self-proclaimed Siskel and Ebert of music video, they served to evaluate pop culture with an unencumbered bottom line--does a music video "suck" or is it "cool?" Beavis and Butt-head as a television show, was certainly towards the lower end of traditional scales of cultural "quality." But these two animated "slackers" evaluated other media, and so pronounced their own critical opinions and erected their own taste hierarchies. Beavis and Butt-head had their own particular brand of "taste:" they determined acceptability and unacceptability, invoking, while simultaneously upending, notions of "high" and "low" culture. In this, they entered that hallowed sphere of criticism, where they competed with others in overseeing the public good and preserving the place and status of artistic evaluation. They disregarded other accepted forms of authority, refusing to acknowledge their own limited perspectives. But like other critics, this was an important part of their appeal. After all, critics are sought out for straightforward opinion, not muddled oscillation. In this recuperation of the critical discourse, Beavis and Butt-head joined with their audience, approximating the contradictory impulses of contemporary cynical youth, who mixed their self-delusion with self-awareness. In the case of fans of Beavis and Butt-head, these lines of demarcation indicated both a generational unity and the generation-based barriers between the baby boomers and the "baby busters." The reputed cynicism of the "twentynothings" was on view as Beavis and Butt-head evoked both a stunted adolescence which was long past and an unsure and seemingly inaccessible future.moreless
  • 240
    The Thundermans

    The Thundermans

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    Nickelodeon
    When a superhuman family move to Hiddenville, they struggle to adapt to keeping their powers a secret.
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