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    Disneyland

    Disneyland

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    ABC (Returning October 9, 2017)
    Walt Disney, one of Hollywood's most ambitious producers, was first approached to do television in 1950, when The Coca-Cola Company offered him a one-hour special. The one hour special, "One Hour in Wonderland," aired December 25, 1950 on NBC and garnered 90% of the television viewing audience. A second special, "The Walt Disney Christmas Special," aired December 25, 1951 on CBS. When Walt had drawn up plans for a theme park, known as Disneyland, he found a hard time obtaining funding; critics, including Walt's brother Roy, thought that it was unfeasible and that it would be a fiasco. At the same time, the ABC television network offered him a deal for a television anthology series. Walt wouldn't agree to it unless they put up partial financing for Disneyland (a term that had kept CBS and NBC from signing with him). ABC agreed, and also paid him $50,000 per program, an exorbitant sum for the time. The show, titled Disneyland, premiered on October 27, 1954 and was an immediate success. Historically, the show is significant for two reasons. First, with thirty-four seasons, it is the longest-running prime time network series in history (not counting news programs; if one were to count news programs, 60 Minutes would take that title). Second, it was the first original television production by a major Hollywood studio. Other studios resented television for fear that it would keep people from going out to the movies. Thus, they refused to produce television programs, and they refused to let networks or stations use any of their more recent or better-known material. Walt Disney was the first Hollywood producer to do so. Disneyland was a mixture of cartoons, live-action adventures, documentaries, and nature stories. Some of these were made expressly for television, but others were former theatrical releases. Many of the early programs were designed to promote upcoming theatrical releases. One particular early success of the Disneyland series was the Davy Crockett trilogy. This was a phenomenal success in every aspect; the merchandising bonanza that followed sold $300 million worth of Crockett memorabilia. Thus, ABC wanted more adventure stories along the lines of Davy Crockett. Disney provided them, but none were nearly as successful. Along the way, in 1958, it was retitled Walt Disney Presents. Eventually the show became more reliant on original material, though pre-existing material was used at times. In 1961, his contract with ABC expired. He moved his show to NBC where he could broadcast it in color (ABC would not have the capability for color broacasting until 1962). It was rechristened Walt Disney's Wonderful World of Color, with an original theme song by Richard M. Sherman and Robert B. Sherman (who went on to write the song scores to such well-known Disney films as Mary Poppins, The Jungle Book, The Many Adventures of Winnie-the-Pooh and Bedknobs and Broomsticks). It premiered on NBC on Sunday, September 24, 1961. On NBC, he was able to re-air many of the ABC shows in color, as they had been filmed that way as insurance for possible future airings once color broadcasting, or "colorcasting," took hold. In September of 1966, doctors told Walt Disney, a lifetime chain-smoker, that he had lung cancer. Though the cancerous lung was removed, doctors told him that the cancer had been detected too late, and he died on Thursday, December 15, 1966. Knowing full well that no one could replace him as a host, Walt Disney Productions dropped the hosted introduction segments after the season's end. Luckily, Walt had filmed that all of that season's host segments before it was too late. The show changed its name to The Wonderful World of Disney on September 14, 1969, and dropped the Sherman Brothers theme song in favor of various alternating medleys of well-known songs from Disney movies and parks. The trusted Disney name continued to insure high ratings for the next few years. As popular tastes changed dramatically during the late 1960s and early 1970s, the public seemed to have largely begun to turn away from anything Disney (except theme parks and merchandise), seeing the name as symptomatic of a square, uptight, and unhip mindset that young people were coming to reject. The studio itself suffered from the lack of hit movies and accusations of incompetent management at the time. The ratings of the anthology series, however, remained reasonably stable, enough so that NBC renewed Disney's contract through 1978. In the fall of 1975, the show began a ratings decline when it was moved back to 7 PM from 7:30 PM. Disney's ratings fell from the Top 30 and continued to fall every year afterwards. The following year went face to with CBS's 60 Minutes. Though it had begun in 1968 and was scheduled on Tuesday, the CBS newsmagazine had been scheduled on Sunday evenings since the 1971-1972 season, and had been held back until after football season due to the risk of pre-emptions; it was this year that the show finally began its season in the fall. The show was easily able to beat ABC's Sunday night offerings but trailed the CBS newsmagazine by a wide margin. As the number of original installments decreased every year, so, too, did the ratings. In 1979, NBC (which, as a network, was also in the midst of a very public, humiliating decline) threatened Disney with cancellation unless the ratings improved. That fall, Walt Disney Productions rechristened the anthology series Disney's Wonderful World and commissioned a new, original theme song by John Debney and John Klawitter, new opening and closing credits, and a new announcer, Gary Owens (longtime announcer Dick Wesson committed suicide in January of that year). In a flashback to the original themed format, many episodes initially were divided into one of four categories: "Fantasy Night," "Adventure Night," "Comedy Night," and "Animation Night." Beneath the "happy new face" sung of in the new theme song, however, was more of the same: too little original material, airings of theatrical movies, and far too many reruns. In spite of this, the face-lift helped the ratings, so the show was renewed for the 1980-1981 season. But the next season saw only 10 installments that had not been aired on the anthology series before, and pre-emptions were far more frequent. Ratings for the show's 27th season did not improve, and in on December 30, 1980 NBC announced that it would not be renewing the series for next season. All was not lost that year, as the show was then immediately picked up by CBS. It was moved from its longtime Sunday night slot to Saturday night at 8 PM, as the network would not displace its highly-rated pride and joy 60 Minutes. Retitled Walt Disney, the show promised to present more original programming than it had in its final years on NBC. On September 26, 1981, after a huge advertising campaign by the network, the series premiered on CBS. Ratings improved against mediocre competition, and the show was renewed for another season (its 29th on network television). A few of these shows were pilots for series that were never picked up. The second CBS year saw an increase in the number of reruns (as opposed to last year's increase in new episodes), and the ratings dropped. Disney did, however, produce several midseason replacement series for CBS, but all of them failed. On Monday, April 18, 1983, Walt Disney Productions and Westinghouse Broadcasting launched The Disney Channel, a cable network created to showcase the large library of Disney cartoons, movies, and TV shows (the anthology series was rerun under the name Walt Disney Presents). Thus, in the eyes of CBS, the anthology series had outlived its purpose and was canceled. There were occasional network and syndicated specials, but all of Disney's television resources were concentrated on the cable service. When Michael Eisner became CEO of Walt Disney Productions in September of 1984, one of the first things he and his new regime did was express an interest in reviving Disney's presence on network TV. He had some success, as the Emmy-winning, Touchstone-produced sitcom The Golden Girls and the Saturday morning cartoon (a medium with which Walt Disney himself had refused to get involved due to fears of compromised quality) Disney's Adventures of the Gummi Bears both premiered on NBC on Saturday, September 14, 1985 and lasted several years. However, these particular shows were the exception, not the rule; a number of series that the new regime eventually launched failed (Wildside and The Ellen Burstyn Show, for instance). Also, of course, did the company plan to revive the anthology series. Now known as The Disney Sunday Movie, it made its much-hyped return to network television on February 2, 1986 after a hiatus of 2 years, 4 months, and eight days, replacing the dismally-rated Ripley's Believe it or Not. Just as Walt Disney had hosted the original until his death, Michael Eisner appeared in an introductory segment at the beginning of each episode. Nostalgia and ratings were high initially, but both eventually wore off. The show premiered at a two-hour length, but in the fall of 1987, once again being soundly beaten in the ratings regularly by 60 Minutes in its first hour, and by Murder, She Wrote in its second, it was shortened to one hour for its third and final season on ABC. NBC, which had not been able to launch a hit show in Disney's old time slot in the seven years since the show was axed by that network, picked up the show, which was renamed The Magical World of Disney. At first, a rotating "wheel" format was used, utilizing three different genres; every fourth week would be a special. This lasted until a few months into the following season. Eisner continued to host the show, but ratings on NBC were no better than they had been on ABC, and it limped through a two-year run here before the network pulled the plug for good. After 36 years (save for the September 1983-January 1986 hiatus), one of television's last remaining institutions from its golden age came to an unceremonious end. In 1995, The Walt Disney Company announced plans to buy out the ABC television network, which went through in January of 1996. In the fall of 1997, a family-oriented movie time slot was set aside on ABC and christened The Wonderful World of Disney. Ratings to date have been middling. Though the show is not currently repeated anywhere (The Disney Channel dropped it and all vintage Disney programming in September of 2002), episodes are slowly being released on DVD in the United States, and its legacy of quality television entertainment for all members of the family lives on in the hearts and minds of many. Here is a chronology of titles used for the series: Disneyland: October 27, 1954-September 3, 1958
    Walt Disney Presents: September 12, 1958-September 17, 1961
    Walt Disney's Wonderful World of Color: September 24, 1961-September 7, 1969
    The Wonderful World of Disney: September 14, 1969-September 2, 1979
    Disney's Wonderful World: September 9, 1979-September 13, 1981
    Walt Disney: September 26, 1981-September 24, 1983
    The Disney Sunday Movie: February 2, 1986-September 11, 1988
    The Magical World of Disney: October 9, 1988-September 9, 1990 The final name was used as an umbrella title for Disney movie airings on cable's The Disney Channel from September 23, 1990 to August 25, 1996. ABC Broadcast History (1954-1961):
    October 27, 1954-September 3, 1958: Wednesday, 7:30 PM-8:30 PM
    September 12, 1958-September 25, 1959: Friday, 8:00 PM-9:00 PM
    October 2, 1959-September 23, 1960: Friday, 7:30 PM-8:30 PM
    September 25, 1960-September 17, 1961: Sunday, 6:30 PM-7:30 PM NBC Broadcast History (1961-1981):
    September 24, 1961-August 31, 1975: Sunday, 7:30 PM-8:30 PM
    September 14, 1975-September 11, 1977: Sunday, 7:00 PM-8:00 PM
    September 18, 1977-October 23, 1977: Sunday, 7:00 PM-9:00 PM
    October 30, 1977-September 13, 1981: Sunday, 7:00 PM-8:00 PM CBS Broadcast History (1981-1983):
    September 26, 1981-January 1, 1983: Saturday, 8:00 PM-9:00 PM
    January 4, 1983-February 15, 1983: Tuesday, 8:00 PM-9:00 PM
    July 9, 1983-September 24, 1983: Saturday, 8:00 PM-9:00 PM
    (two irregularly scheduled airings on May 3, 1983 and May 21, 1983) ABC Broadcast History (1986-1988):
    February 2, 1986-September 6, 1987: Sunday, 7:00 PM-9:00 PM
    September 13, 1987-September 11, 1988: Sunday, 7:00 PM-8:00 PM NBC Broadcast History (1988-1990):
    October 9, 1988-July 2, 1989: Sunday, 7:00 PM-8:00 PM
    July 9, 1989-July 23, 1989: Sunday, 8:00 PM-9:00 PM
    August 6, 1989-February 25, 1990: Sunday, 7:00 PM-8:00 PM
    March 4, 1990-April 15, 1990: Sunday, 7:00 PM-9:00 PM
    April 22, 1990-May 6, 1990: Sunday, 7:00 PM-8:00 PM
    May 27, 1990-July 22, 1990: Sunday, 7:00 PM-9:00 PM
    August 5, 1990-September 9, 1990: Sunday, 7:00 PM-8:00 PM
    First Telecast: October 27, 1954
    Last Telecast: September 9, 1990 Episodes: 751 (180 black and white episodes, 571 color episodes [as far as the format in which they were first broadcast]) (NOTE: many of these were originally theatrical releases, and a small number were specials aired at other times, but for purposes of their first airing on the anthology series they are counted as episodes)moreless
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    What's My Line?

    What's My Line?

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    CBS (ended 1967)
    Welcome to the What's My Line? guide at TV.com! Show Type: Game Show with Panel. First Telecast: February 2, 1950. Last Telecast: September 3, 1967. Producers: Mark Goodson & Bill Todman. Schedule: Currently not being aired on GSN or any other station. Synopsis: What's My Line? was one of network television's longest running and most beloved prime time game shows with a broadcast run of seventeen and one-half years. The game consisted of four panelists trying to guess the occupation of a guest contestant. As the questioning rotated, a panel member asked questions and the guest would answer either "yes" or "no." A contestant received $5 for each "no" answer. Ten "no" answers ended the game in favor of the contestant. A mystery guest segment was also included in which the panelists were blindfolded. The mystery guests were paid $500 as an appearance fee whether they won or lost the game. This was in addition to the maximum $50 game winnings. Guest panelists were paid $750 as an appearance fee. The regular panelists were under contract and were paid "much more" stated Gil Fates in his 1978 What's My Line? book. From 1950-1967, John Daly hosted the "classic" CBS What's My Line?, to which this site is devoted. In September 1968, What's My Line? was revived as a syndicated daily show (M-F) which lasted until 1975. Thanks for visiting us! Enjoy your stay! And now... TIME FOR EVERYBODY'S FAVORITE GUESSING GAME!moreless
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    Mister Rogers' Neighborhood

    Mister Rogers' Neighborhood

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    PBS (ended 2001)
    "In a little toy neighborhood, a tiny trolley rolls past a house at the end of a street. Welcome toMister Rogers' Neighborhood." In the annals of children's TV, Mister Rogers' Neighborhood ranks among the longest-lasting and beloved shows. Upon its conclusion, Mister Rogers' Neighborhood was the longest-running series in PBS history (a record eclipsed by Sesame Street in 2003). Host Fred Rogers (known to millions as simply "Mister Rogers") used his gentle charm and mannerisms to communicate with his audience of children. Topics centered on nearly every inconceivable matter of concern to children, ranging from everyday fears related to going to sleep, getting immunizations and disappointment about not getting one's way to losing a loved one to death and physical handicaps. Rogers used simple songs and, on nearly every show, segments from the Neighborhood of Make-Believe (NOM) to make his point. A scale-model trolley was often (but not always) used to segue into the Make-Believe segments, said neighborhood being inhabited by puppet characters including King Friday XIII, Lady Elaine Fairchild and Daniel Striped Tiger. Many shows also featured visits from cast members – most often Mr. McFeely (tagline: "Speedy Delivery"), Robert Trow, Joe Negri and Chef Brockett (the local baker). Many times, Rogers also visited the neighborhood shops of both the regulars and guests. Each show began and ended with a camera panning over a scale neighborhood (said to represent the town where Rogers lived). Production History While today's longer-running PBS Kids shows reinvent themselves every five years, Mister Rogers' Neighborhood achieved, throughout its 31 seasons, that rarest of elements: consistency. It is a legacy that can all be traced through every aspect of Fred Rogers' television career. Some of the characters in Mister Rogers' Neighborhood, both real and imagined, had appeared in two of Fred Rogers' earlier programs, The Children's Corner for Pittsburgh's WQED in 1954 and the CBC's Misterogers in 1963. It was for Misterogers that Fred first appeared on-camera. Rogers returned to WQED in Pittsburgh to begin writing and hosting Mister Rogers' Neighborhood May 22, 1967. Several other public television stations from Chicago to Boston carried the show on a trial basis that year. Beginning February 19, 1968, the Mister Rogers' Neighborhood program that we know today, began airing nationwide on National Educational Television (NET), the predecessor to PBS. This was also the year David Newell, returned from Europe, began work for Rogers. He was in charge of the production as well as the neighborhood's Speedy Delivery service. (AN ASIDE: Rogers wanted to call the delivery man Mr. McCurdy after the man at the Sears-Roebuck Foundation, whose support launched Mister Rogers' Neighborhood. But the people at Sears-Roebuck called Rogers and said "Mr. McCurdy" was too self-serving. Thus Rogers went to his roots to rename Newell's deliveryman. "McFeely" was Rogers' middle name and the last name of his maternal grandfather.) Shows were produced as a daily strip from 1968 to 1976, at which time production was suspended. Counting black-and-white episodes, 590 shows were produced in that span. Production resumed at the beginning of the remote video age in 1979. Rogers went on location more, supervising videos of how people make things (a precursor to the TVO series Here's How!). Other characters would be introduced in the subsequent two decades. In all, 305 new programs were taped from 1979 through 2001. Of that volume, the most notable shows came in 1991, with Rogers focusing on calming children's fears during the first U.S. war with Iraq. PBS gradually narrowed the window for the 460 "pre-79" episodes with each new season from 1980 onward. When the number of "post-75" episodes was enough to cover entire years, the classic shows were retired, last airing on PBS in the summer of 1995. Despite the production stoppage and the subsequent passing of Fred Rogers on February 27, 2003, PBS continues to repeat Mister Roger's Neighborhood in all its original glory–an accomplishment unique among all PBS Kids shows.moreless
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    Glee

    Glee

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    FOX (ended 2015)
    Glee is a musical comedy that depicts Will Schuester's (Matthew Morrison) efforts to save McKinley High's Glee Club from cheerleading coach Sue Sylvester (Jane Lynch). Glee's musical numbers, underdog characters, and rousing soundtracks have all helped make Glee a runaway pop-culture hit. It is created by Ryan Murphy (Nip/Tuck) and is a Golden Globe-winning Fox musical comedy. The series won 6 Emmy Awards for Outstanding Sound Mixing for a Comedy or Drama Series (One Hour) - The Power of Madonna, Outstanding Guest Actor in a Comedy Series - Neil Patrick Harris: Dream On, Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Comedy Series - Jane Lynch, Outstanding Directing for a Comedy Series - Pilot - Director's Cut, Outstanding Casting for a Comedy Series and Outstanding Guest Actress in a Comedy Series - Gwyneth Paltrow.moreless
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    Fresh Off the Boat

    Fresh Off the Boat

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    ABC
    In this semi-autobiographical ethnic comedy, 12 year old Eddie Huang and his family move from DC's Chinatown to Orlando and suffers culture shock. His easygoing father owns a western steakhouse, and his outspoken, politically incorrect mother wants him to stay true to his Chinese immigrant culture. But hip-hop loving Eddie, supported by his little brothers Emery and Evan, desperately wants to become American and fit in with his schoolmates. Set in the 1990's, the first season featured narration from today's grownup Eddie, (the real life Eddie Huang).moreless
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    black-ish

    black-ish

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    ABC (Returning October 3, 2017)
    A father living in an upper-middle class neighborhood struggles to raise his children while ensuring they have a sense of cultural identity. Complicating his efforts is the fact that there are constant contradictions coming from his liberal wife, old-school father and his own color-blind kids.moreless
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    The Goldbergs

    The Goldbergs

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    ABC
    The Goldbergs are your typical '80s family, solving one problem at a time with family values, yelling and a complete disregard for political correctness.
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    Everybody Loves Raymond

    Everybody Loves Raymond

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    CBS (ended 2005)
    Everybody Loves Raymond revolves around Ray Barone, a successful sportswriter living on Long Island with his wife, Debra, daughter, Ally, and twin sons, Geoffrey and Michael. That's the good news. The bad news? Ray's meddling parents, Frank and Marie, live directly across the street and embrace the motto "Su casa es mi casa," infiltrating their son's home to an extent unparalleled in television history. Frank's favorite expression, "Holy Crap," is shouted at regular intervals, and Marie's "cooking advice" is less than appreciated by Debra. Brother Robert, a divorced policeman, is constantly moving in and out of his parents' house, and loves to drop over and resent Ray's successful career and happy family life. Ray and Debra just wish someone would knock once in awhile. The series won 15 Emmy Awards for Outstanding Lead Actress in a Comedy Series - Patricia Heaton, Outstanding Multi-Camera Sound Mixing for a Series or a Special - Italy-1-2, Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Comedy Series - Doris Roberts, Outstanding Lead Actress in a Comedy Series - Patricia Heaton, Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Comedy Series - Brad Garrett, Outstanding Lead Actor in a Comedy Series - Ray Romano, Outstanding Multi-Camera Sound Mixing for a Series or Special - She's the One, Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Comedy Series - Brad Garrett, Outstanding Writing for a Comedy Series - Baggage, Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Comedy Series - Doris Roberts, Outstanding Comedy Series, Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Comedy Series - Brad Garrett, Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Comedy Series - Doris Roberts and Outstanding Comedy Series.
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    Petticoat Junction

    Petticoat Junction

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    CBS (ended 1970)
    Petticoat Junction centered around Kate Bradley, who ran the Shady Rest Hotel, located directly between the farming valley of Hooterville and its only slightly more "evolved" neighbor of Pixley. The only way to reach the place was by the Hooterville Cannonball, an old train which made regular stops along the way, though never adhered to a strict schedule so as to better assist those living along the rail line. Kate, an expert cook and ever hospitable, had three beautiful daughters, Billie Jo (the eldest, blonde and generally boy-crazy), Bobbie Jo (the brunette, astute and literate) and Betty Jo (the redheaded, a tomboy). Also living at the hotel was Uncle Joe Carson, a genial old gentleman who fancied himself the hotel's "General Manager", though when work was to be done, would find any way of getting out of it. In 1965, the series was changed to color and also marked the change to a different actress playing Billie Jo and Bobbie Jo. A year later, another actress took over the role of Billie Jo. Then in 1967, Bea Benaderet fell ill from cancer complications, and Kate Bradley was then seen only occasionally until her death in 1968. At that point, Uncle Joe took over running the Shady Rest (though still managed to get out of work) and June Lockhart was introduced as a lady doctor whose office was located right in the lobby. Other characters included Charlie & Floyd who were the engineer and conductor of the Cannonball. Steve was the former Air Force pilot turned crop duster who eventually won the heart of Betty Jo in 1967. They eventually wed and had a daughter, Kathy Jo. Sam Drucker ran the General Store in town. Homer Bedloe was the recurring "villain", who worked for the C&FW Railroad, and incessively attempted to shutdown the Cannonball. Petticoat Junction was one of a number of rural comedies to emerge in the 1960's. It came about due to Paul Henning's success with The Beverly Hillbillies. He was essentially given carte blanche with making a "sister" series for the show, not even needing to shoot a pilot. Paul intended to make the series a vehicle for Bea Benaderet, who had been playing the recurring role of Cousin Pearl on "Hillbillies". He also loosely based it upon his wife's youth living in a hotel in the midwest. First Telecast: September 24, 1963 Last Telecast: September 12, 1970 Episodes: 222 Episodes (74 B&W and 148 Color) Spinoff: Green Acres CBS Broadcast History September 1963-September 1964----Tuesdays----9:00 p.m. September 1964-August 1967----Tuesdays----9:30 p.m. September 1967-September 1970----Saturdays----9:30 p.m. Nielsen Ratings: (Top 25 or Better) #4 in the 1963-1964 Season #15 in the 1964-1965 Season #21 in the 1965-1966 Season #23 in the 1966-1967 Seasonmoreless
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    Jem

    Jem

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    ABC (ended 1988)
    Showtime, Synergy. Those famous words were spoken by Jem throughout her three year run from 1985-1988. Jem was a beloved 80s rock cartoon that capitalized on the popularity of MTV that perfectly captured the decade's music, fashion and lingo. To this day, Jem is still considered a Truly Outrageous animated series that celebrates the power of love, friendship, ambition and rock 'n roll.

    Jerrica Benton's father left her a very special gift after he died. That gift was Synergy, a holographic computer system that can create realistic holograms of virtually anything. Using special star-shaped earrings, Synergy transforms Jerrica into the glamorous pop singer, Jem. Along with Kimber, Aja and Shana whom are called the Holograms, they have many adventures that take them to places in the US, France, China and Italy.

    Not far behind are their competition, the Misfits, a group led by Pizzazz with her friends Roxy and Stormer. Eventually both groups add a new member to their bands. Raya becomes the new drummer while Shana goes to guitar, and Jetta becomes the new saxophonist for the Misfits. With their additions, both Jem and the Holograms and the Misfits have many new adventures in Mexico, England, Shangri-La and across the U.S.

    The Stingers, a new trio, come to the States and begin to shake things up between Jem and the Holograms and the Misfits. Riot, Rapture and Minx begin to cause problems, all on their own. All three groups have a unique music showcased in the musical videos that appear in every episode.

    Jem originally premiered in 1985 in short segment cartoon inserts between two boys cartoons called Super Saturday/Sunday. Jem ran for three seasons from fall 1985 to spring 1988 with 65 total episodes. The show was then re-aired on the USA Network into early 1990.

    Cast of Characters Jerrica Benton is the owner and CEO of Starlight Music Company and The Starlight Foundation, which is a home to take care of foster girls. Both of these were inherited from her father, Emmet Benton, after he passed away. She grew up around musicians and technicians and is an independent business woman. Jem, Jerrica's singing persona, is the lead singer of the band Jem and the Holograms. Touching her star-shaped earrings and saying Showtime, Synergy or Show's over, Synergy, the Jem holographic image is created or disappears. Only The Holograms know that Jem and Jerrica are the same person. As Jem, Jerrica can let her hair down and let loose. Kimber Benton is Jerrica's younger sister. She is co-owner of Starlight Music Company and The Starlight Foundation. She plays keyboards and is the main songwriter/lyricist for the group. She is often impulsive, falling for the cute or dangerous guys. Aja Leith was the first foster girl to be adopted by Jacqui and Emmett Benton. She plays lead guitar in the Holograms. She is Jerrica's best friend. She is smart and very athletic. She is a jack-of-all trades on knowing how to do anything. Shana Elmsford was the second foster girl adopted by the Benton's. She played the drums until she left to work for a famous designer. She came back after The Talent Search and switched to her guitar. She designs the clothes for the Holograms and Starlight Girls. She has also had her fashions shown in Venice, Italy. Raya Carmen Alonso is the newest member of the Holograms. When Shana left the group, Raya won the Talent Search to be the new drummer. Coming from a Mexican background, Raya's the only girl among three brothers. Her father owns and operates a greenhouse. Synergy is a holographic computer built by Emmett Benton. She is contacted through Jerrica's earrings which project holographic images, sound and light. Synergy is kept at Starlight Mansion. She has all of the Holograms' music stored on file as well as Jacqui Benton's. Rio Pacheco is the road manager/engineer of Jem and the Holograms and Jerrica's boyfriend. He is also interested in Jem but has no clue that she and Jerrica are the same person. He doesn't like liars and deception. Countess Danielle Du Voisin is a very wealthy, renowned fashion designer that lives in Venice. She helps finance some of the Holograms' projects. She knows about fashions from all over the world. She is good friends with Howard Sands. Howard Sands is one of the top movie producers in the world. He helped produce the movie Starbright. Anthony Julian is a music director who is involved with Shana. He also directed the movie Starbright. Danse is a choreographer and naturally gifted dancer that works at a charity house called Haven House. Her real name is Giselle Dvorak. Her mother was a famous prima ballerina in Zagreb, Yugoslavia. She is good friends with Video. Video is an aspiring filmmaker. Her real name is Vivian Montgomery. She is a companion to the Holograms and shoots most of their music videos. Lin-Z Pierce is a Music TV Show Host. She travels to many places and stays on top of the music world. She is good friends with Anthony Julian and Video. The Misfits Pizzazz is the lead singer and plays guitar. Her real name is Phyllis Gabor but she gets easily angered when she is called by it. Her father is very rich and has given her everything that she's ever asked for. She's a spoiled, selfish, rich girl that wants money and fame. She craves her father's attention. She later has an obsession with Riot of the Stingers when they come to town. She uses Roxy and Stormer to her advantage. Roxy plays guitar. Her real name is Roxanne Pelligrini and is originally from Philadelphia, the town where she dropped out of high school. She is a very street wise and tough as nails. She takes credit for things that she did not create and goes to any length to get her way, even if it meant lying, cheating and stealing to do it. Stormer plays keyboard and sometimes guitar. She is the main song writer of the Misfits. Her real name is Mary Phillips. She has a brother, Craig, who dates Aja. Stormer is more sympathetic to causes that the other Misfits oppose. Jetta is the newest member that plays saxophone. Her real name is Sheila Burns and comes from England. She was playing with the Tinkerbellies when the Misfits decided to add her as a new member. With Pizzazz's father's influence and money, she was able to attain her green card. Eric Raymond used to work for Emmett Benton. He inherited half of Starlight Music when Emmet died but lost it when Jem and the Holograms won it back in the Battle of the Bands. He became owner of Misfits Music which later became Stingers Sound. He is a crook in the music business that manipulates, blackmails and embezzles his way through to get what he wants. He also knows the right kind of lawyers to bail him out of any situation. Clash is the Misfits biggest fan. She is constantly trying to join the Misfits but doesn't get her chance. Her real name is Constance Montgomery and she is cousin to Video Montgomery. She tries to make Jem and the Holograms as well as Video's life miserable. The Stingers Riot is the lead singer and has a romantic interest in Jem. His real name is Rory Llewellen, who was once in the army and went AWOL when he joined a rock band, Nivana, in Germany. He has a rocky relationship with his father. He is a master charmer. Rapture plays lead guitar. Her real name is Phoebe Ashe. She is a mischief maker and con-artist who gets anyone to believe what she has to say. Minx is the keyboardist of the group. Her real name is Ingrid Keith and she has a romantic interest in Rio. She is an electronics genius. Toy Line In 1985, Hasbro debuted the Jem doll line starting with 12" dolls such as Jem/Jerrica, Aja, Kimber, Shana, Rio, Pizzazz, Stormer and Roxy. All of the 1st issue dolls came with a flap that their character was on. Each doll came with their own musical instrument and Jem a microphone and Rio a brief case. Each doll, except Jem, had cassette tapes with songs on one side and the instrumental song on the other side. In 1986, the doll line came out with a 2nd generation of the Holograms and the Misfits, though Holograms came in different outfits. Added to the line up were Danse, Video, Raya, Synergy, Glitter 'N Gold Jem/Jerrica, Glitter 'N Gold Rio, Rock 'N Curl Jem, Flash 'N Sizzle Jem/Jerrica, Jetta and Clash. The 2nd and 3rd edition dolls came without a flap on them.
    In 1987, the last of the line came out with only 3 of the Starlight girls: Ashley, Krissie and Banee. It was rumored that a Stingers doll line was suppose to come out also but nothing came of it. Along with a fashionable clothing line, play sets, vehicles, stages, coloring books, reading books, posters, games, lunch boxes, clothes, watches and make-up were also made available.

    VHS and DVD Release
    Family Home Entertainment or f.h.e. released Jem on VHS tapes in 1986 starting with the Full Length Animated Feature Movie Truly Outrageous. There are a lot scenes that either added or expanded on from the original movie showing. Last Resorts, The Music Awards, Hot Time In Hawaii, The Princess and the Singer, Jem Jam, Culture Clash, Glitter 'N Gold and the Talent Search were all released in the 1987 year. Rhino Entertainment picked up a couple of the episodes in 1999 and 2000. They first came out with Passport to Rock Volume 1 featuring The World Hunger Shindig and Adventure In China and Fashion Fiasco Volume 2 with In Stitches and Culture Clash. Harmony Entertainment also came out with a Girls Rule! Volume 1 Featuring Jem and the Holograms with The Beginning and Disaster. Also on the DVD were Lady LovelyLocks with Lake of Reflections and Menace of Mirror Lake and finally with Rainbow Brite's episodes Mom and A Horse of a Different Color Girls Rule! Volume 2 Featuring Popples. Jem starts it off with Kimber's Rebellion, Frame Up and Battle of the Bands then She-Ra: Princess of Power episodes The Anxious Apprentice and A Talent for Trouble and finally with Popples episodes Popples Panic, College Of Popple Knowledge and Treasure of Popple Beach Rhino finally released Jem on DVD March 2004 in a four DVD set including 26 episodes of the first and second seasons. This set includes interviews with Jem speaking voice, Samantha Newark and Jem creator and writer, Christy Marx. Season three, part one was released in Sept. 2004 with 19 episodes that includes an interviews with Jem's singing voice Britta Philips, and commentary by Christy Marx and Writer Roger Slifer.moreless
  • 71
    Kevin Can Wait

    Kevin Can Wait

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    CBS
    Kevin James returns to TV a decade after The King of Queens ended with a new CBS sitcom. Kevin is a retired police officer who soon finds that the joys of quitting his job need to be put on a hold as his living situation changes.moreless
  • 72
    The Last Man on Earth

    The Last Man on Earth

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    FOX (Returning Fall 2017)
    Phil Miller is the last man on Earth. Which makes him the world's greatest: handyman, athlete, lover, driver, collector, bowler, shopper, mixologist, marksman, plumber, slugger, daredevil, and survivor. The Last Man On Earth is an end-of-the-world comedy that chronicles the life and adventures of an average man who discovers what life is like when no one is telling you what you can and cannot do.moreless
  • 73
    Saturday Night Live Weekend Update Thursday

    Saturday Night Live Weekend Update Thursday

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    NBC
    Saturday Night Live Weekend Update Thursday is an American limited-run series broadcast on NBC. It is a political satire news show spin-off from Saturday Night Live, featuring that show's "Weekend Update" segment. It initially ran for three 30-minute episodes in October 2008, during the lead-up to the 2008 United States presidential election. The show aired again in 2009 for another three episodes, which were much less successful. The show returns again in 2012 to lead up to the 2012 presidential election.moreless
  • 74
    Royal Pains

    Royal Pains

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    USA (ended 2016)
    A down and out surgeon has a chance to redeem himself as a small town physician in the wealthy beach community of East Hampton, NY. Royal Pains is produced and distributed by Universal Cable Productions and USA Network.moreless
  • 75
    Eureka

    Eureka

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    Syfy (ended 2012)
    Small town. Big secret. A car accident leads U.S. Marshal Jack Carter (Colin Ferguson) into the top-secret Pacific Northwest town of Eureka. For decades, the United States government has relocated the world's geniuses to Eureka, a town where innovation and chaos have lived hand in hand.moreless
  • 76
    The King of Queens

    The King of Queens

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    CBS (ended 2007)
    The King of Queens revolves around Doug Heffernan (Kevin James, Everybody Loves Raymond), a Queens, N.Y., parcel delivery man with simple desires. Among his prized possessions is a 70-inch television that his lovely wife, Carrie (Leah Remini, Fired Up), provided for him. However, now that Carrie's widowed father, Arthur (Jerry Stiller, Seinfeld), lives with them, Doug's television room has become Arthur's bedroom. Doug and his sports-watching buddies, Spence (Patton Oswalt, Crank Yankers) and Deacon (Victor Williams, The Animatrix)--and the beloved television--have been relegated to the garage, and Doug now shares his castle with a very eccentric father-in-law and his very unusual habits.

    Theme Song "My eyes are gettin' weary, My back is gettin' tight, I'm sittin' here in traffic, On the Queensborough bridge tonight, But I don't care cuz all I wanna do, Is cash my check and drive right home to you, Cuz baby all my life I will be driving home to you."moreless
  • 77
    George Lopez

    George Lopez

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    ABC (ended 2007)
    George Lopez, the hit family comedy starring popular standup comedian George Lopez, is on ABC. The series is from Bruce Helford, Deborah Oppenheimer and Robert Borden – all from ABC's long-running hit comedy series, The Drew Carey Show – and actress/producer Sandra Bullock (Miss Congeniality, Speed).

    George Lopez is a guy who has made lemonade from lemons at every turn. Since he became plant manager at an L.A. airplane parts factory, he has handled a complicated and tumultuous job, a strong but challenging marriage, two rebellious children and a mother who can't keep track of her own lies about his childhood -- all with his sense of humor intact.

    His affable compadre, Ernie (Valente Rodriguez, Erin Brokovich), still ribs George about his high-powered management position at the plant, but always lends a hand when George needs him. Ernie, who still lives with his mother and father, has learned some fathering skills of his own after foster-parenting a troubled twelve-year-old boy.

    Though their marriage has had some close calls, George and his devoted wife, Angie (Constance Marie), still chose to renew their vows recently. Angie deals with his questionable decisions and freewheeling approach to parenthood and his mother's insensitive wisecracks with the patience of a saint -- and some guidance from her father, Vic (Emiliano Díez) -- but her drive to build a still unprofitable wedding-planning business has nearly driven their family to the poor house.

    George's biggest test, both at work and home, is dealing with his tough and acerbic but loving mother, Benny (Belita Moreno, "Perfect Strangers"), while sifting through her vast assortment of lies about his family and childhood. After rediscovering and losing his father to kidney disease and learning of a long lost sister, George constantly wonders what, or who, is around the next corner.

    After running away from home, being expelled from school and falling in love with a handsome jock, sixteen year-old Carmen's (Masiela Lusha) free-spirited, teenage rebellion has left her parents at a total loss about what to do next. Always the practical joker, thirteen-year-old Max clearly maintains the sense of humor he inherited from his father, but continues to struggle with dyslexia and constantly tests his parents' limits by being drawn toward the wrong crowd.

    moreless
  • 78
    Scrubs

    Scrubs

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    NBC (ended 2010)
    This half-hour comedy focuses on the bizarre experiences of fresh-faced medical intern John "J.D." Dorian (Zach Braff) as he embarks on his healing career in a surreal hospital crammed full of unpredictable staffers and patients – where humor and tragedy can merge paths at any time.

    Joining the rumpled J.D. in his exhilarating brave new world are his college buddy, Chris Turk (Donald Faison, "Clueless"), an intern with a more elite surgical group, and J.D.'s fellow medical intern, the beautiful and driven Elliot Reid (Sarah Chalke, "Roseanne"). Keeping the new interns on their toes are: The fatherly chief of medicine, Dr. Bob Kelso (Ken Jenkins); the abrasive, worldly Dr. Perry Cox (John McGinley), and the caring but slightly jaded nurse Carla Espinosa (Judy Reyes). The hospital janitor (Neil Flynn) also never seems to miss an opportunity to harass his target.

    Scrubs is filmed in a real-life hospital. It's the North Hollywood Medical Center, which has gone under severe reconstruction to fit all the equipment and represent Sacred Heart Hospital. The Opening Theme Song: "Superman" performed by Lazlo Bane NBC Broadcast History: October 2001 - May 2002 --- Tuesdays, 9:30pm September 2002 - October 2003 --- Thursdays, 8:30pm November 2003 - January 2004 --- Thursdays, 9:30pm January 2004 - May 2004 --- Tuesdays, 9:30pm June 2004 - August 2004 --- Thursdays, 9:30pm August 2004 - December 2004 --- Tuesdays, 9:30pm January 2005 - May 2005 --- Tuesdays, 9:00pm January 2006 - March 2006 --- Tuesdays, 9:00pm & 9:30pm March 2006 - May 2006 --- Tuesdays, 9:00pm November 2006 - April 2007 --- Thursdays, 9:00pm April 2007 - May 2007 --- Thursdays, 9:30pm October 2007 - April 2007 --- Thursdays, 9:30pm April 2007 - May 2008 --- Thursdays, 8:30pm The show then moved to ABC for the 2009/2010 television season. ABC Broadcast History: January 2009 - February 2009 --- Tuesdays, 9:00pm and 9:30pm March 2009 - May 2009 --- Wednesdays, 8:00pm December 2009 --- Tuesdays, 9:00pm January 2010 - March 2010 --- Tuesdays, 8:00pm and 9:00pmmoreless
  • 79
    The Cosby Show

    The Cosby Show

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    NBC (ended 1992)
    Dr. Heathcliff "Cliff" Huxtable was an OBGYN (obstetrician/gynecologist), and his wife Clair was a successful attorney. They had five children: Sondra, Denise, Theo, Vanessa and Rudy. Sondra was rarely seen during the first season because she was away at Princeton. She became a regular character in the second season, and was usually seen with her on-again off-again beau, Elvin. They eventually married and had twins; but not before stunning their families by announcing the fact that Elvin was dropping out of medical school to open a camping store, and Sondra was dropping out of law school to help her husband in his endeavor. Denise was the "unique" child, the black sheep of the family. She had her own way of doing things, right down to the style of clothing she wore. After graduating high school, she left for Hillman College in 1986 (a year later, this would become the setting for the spin-off A Different World), but returned two years later with news that she was dropping out. She eventually decided to become a photographer's assistant, and left for Africa for a year. When she returned, she had yet another bombshell: she had become a wife and mother while over in Africa. She married a navy man, Martin; who had a child, Olivia, from a previous marriage. During the final season, Denise travelled with Martin as he was stationed in Asia. Olivia stayed behind with Cliff and Clair. Theo, Vanessa and Rudy were probably the most popular of the five kids, due to the fact that they were seen more often then Sondra and Denise. Most of the stories revolved around the three youngest children. Stories dealt mainly with dating and school life, as well as Cliff's never-ending fear that his children would never leave home. In the final episode, Theo graduated from college. The Cosby Show was for the late '80s what Dallas was for the early eighties. Dallas was the number one show during most of the early eighties; but then situation comedies bumped all prime-time soaps down. The Cosby Show proved to be fierce competition, becoming the number one show from 1985-1990. In fact, in 8 years it never dropped below the top 20. NBC Broadcast History September 1984-June 1992----Thursdays----8:00 p.m. July 1992-September 1992----Thursdays----8:30 p.m. Nielsen Ratings: (Top 30 or Better) #3 in the 1984-1985 Season #1 in the 1985-1986 Season #1 in the 1986-1987 Season #1 in the 1987-1988 Season #1 in the 1988-1989 Season #1 in the 1989-1990 Season #5 in the 1990-1991 Season #18 in the 1991-1992 Season The most watched Cosby Show episode ever was "Say Hello to a Good Buy" which aired on January 22, 1987. The episode received a 41.3 rating, 56 share, and was seen by 64,980,000 viewers. Watch The Cosby Show on TBS. Weekdays at 1pm & 1:30pm The Cosby Show is also being shown in syndication, check local listings.moreless
  • 80
    All in the Family

    All in the Family

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    CBS (ended 1979)
    All in the Family was first seen in January of 1971 and immediately changed the face of television. Not only was this the number one television series from 1971 through 1976, but it also signified an avalanche of other situation comedies that dealt with controversial subjects in realistic ways. Including, Chico & the Man, The Jeffersons, Maude, Good Times and Sanford & Son.

    The series centered around the Bunker family who lived in a home located at 704 Houser Street in Queens, New York. Archie Bunker was the main character, and what a character he was. He was televisons most famous bigot, crass and down right rude. Yet he was loveable, with a soft side just beneath the surface. Edith Bunker was his somewhat dizzy wife whom he called "Dingbat". Edith put up with Archie and had qualities about her that made her one of television's most unforgetable characters. Also living in the Bunker household were Archie and Edith's daughter, Gloria, and her husband Mike, or "Meathead" as Archie called him.

    The stories revolved around many controversial topics including, rape, sex, homosexuality, death, and other topics that were relevant to the 1970's, especially political strife and inflation. Archie Bunker was probably the first character in a situation comedy to use racist remarks referring to blacks and other minorities, yet another first for television.

    Other frequent cast members include, the black neighbors, the Jeffersons, who got their own series, The Jeffersons in 1975. The Lorenzos were also neighbors. In 1975, Gloria had a son, Joey, and three years later in 1978, Gloria, Mike and Joey moved away to California, leaving Edith and Archie alone. Not for long, however. Soon they took in a niece, Stephanie Mills, who had been abandoned by her father.

    The original format ended in 1979 which was when the series was renamed Archie Bunker's Place. The new format centered around Archie running his local tavern which he bought in 1977.

    CBS Broadcast History

    Jan 1971-Jul 1971 Tuesdays 9:30 p.m. Sep 1971-Sep 1975 Saturdays 8:00 p.m. Sep 1975-Sep 1976 Mondays 9:00 p.m. Sep 1976-Oct 1976 Wednesdays 9:00 p.m. Nov 1976-Sep 1977 Saturdays 9:00 p.m. Oct 1977-Oct 1978 Sundays 9:00 p.m. Oct 1978-Sep 1979 Sundays 8:00 p.m.

    Nielsen Ratings: (Top 25 or Better)

    #1 1971-1972 Season #1 1972-1973 Season #1 1973-1974 Season #1 1974-1975 Season #1 1975-1976 Season #12 1976-1977 Season #5 1977-1978 Season #10 1978-1979 Seasonmoreless
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