• 161
    Ally McBeal

    Ally McBeal

    Follow
    FOX (ended 2002)
    FOX's hit dramatic and humorous show tells the story of the trials and tribulations of a 28-year-old lawyer by the name of Ally McBeal (Calista Flockhart), who is just fresh out of Harvard Law School. Ally was harassed at the firm where she was originally working, and when she told the firm's partners, she ended up losing her job. However, she then runs into an old friend and he offers her a new job at his brand new firm where she meets tons of new people and her old boyfriend, Billy with who she'll lead her new life full of cases and Ally's fantasies.

    Once the darling of the network, rumors of anorexia plagued star Calista Flockhart. The second and third seasons, therefore, introduced more and more eccentric characters who were given essentially "nothing" to do, and original seriesa regulars Gil Bellows and Courtney Thorne-Smith both left to pursue other projects.

    Ally McBeal was revitalized in its fourth season with the addition of Robert Downey Jr. as the lead character's love interest, Larry Paul. However, Downey's personal problems and numerous arrests, eventually wore out Kelley's patience and he was dropped. Lisa Nicole Carson, who played Ally's roommate, also left at the end of the fourth season following a brief stint in an institution and admitted problems with substance abuse.

    Without Downey, the fifth season had floundered more than ever; bringing in Jon Bon Jovi as a love interest, and giving Ally a daughter played by Hayden Panettiere) hadn't helped. Lucy Liu's character was dropped to a recurring role, while James LeGros left. James Marsden and Julianne Nicholson were added to the cast, only to be dropped a few weeks later. David E. Kelley decided then to cancel the show instead of having FOX executives do it for him.

    Awards/Nominations:

    EMMY AWARDS:

    > 1998 - Nominated - Outstanding Writing for a Comedy Series [David E. Kelley; for episode "Theme Of Life"] > 1998 - Nominated - Outstanding Single Camera Picture Editing for a Series [Tom Moore; for episode "Cro-Magnon"] > 1998 - Nominated - Outstanding Lead Actress in a Comedy Series [Calista Flockhart] > 1998 - Nominated - Outstanding Directing for a Comedy Series [Allan Arkush; for episode "Cro-Magnon"] > 1998 - Nominated - Outstanding Directing for a Comedy Series [James Frawley; for episode 1] > 1998 - Nominated - Outstanding Costuming for a Series [for episode "Cro-magnon"] > 1998 - Nominated - Outstanding Comedy Series > 1998 - Nominated - Outstanding Casting for a Series > 1998 - Nominated - Outstanding Art Direction for a Series (for episode "Boy to the World") > 1998 - Won! - Outstanding Sound Mixing for a Comedy Series or a Special (for episode "Boy to the World") > 1999 - Nominated - Outstanding Writing for a Comedy Series [David E. Kelley; for episode "Sideshow"] > 1999 - Nominated - Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Comedy Series [Lucy Liu] > 1999 - Nominated - Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Comedy Series [Peter MacNicol] > 1999 - Nominated - Outstanding Single Camera Picture Editing for a Series [Philip Carr Neel] > 1999 - Nominated - Outstanding Lead Actress in a Comedy Series [Calista Flockhart] > 1999 - Nominated - Outstanding Guest Actor in a Comedy Series [John Ritter; for episodes "George Madison"; "It's My Party" & "Story of Love"] > 1999 - Nominated - Outstanding Directing for a Comedy Series [Arlene Sanford; for episode "Those Lips, That Hand"] > 1999 - Nominated - Outstanding Costume Design for a Series [Rachael Stanley; for episode "Making Spirits Bright"] > 1999 - Nominated - Outstanding Casting for a Series > 1999 - Nominated - Outstanding Art Direction for a Series [for episode "Making Spirits Bright"] > 1999 - Won! - Outstanding Guest Actress in a Comedy Series [Tracey Ullman; for episodes "Tracy Clark" & "Sideshow"] > 1999 - Won! - Outstanding Comedy Series > 1999 - Won! - Outstanding Sound Mixing for a Comedy Series or a Special [for episode "Love's Illusion"] > 2000 - Nominated - Outstanding Directing for a Comedy Series [Bill D'Elia; for episode "Ally McBeal: The Musical"] > 2000 - Nominated - Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Comedy Series [Peter Macnicol] > 2000 - Won! - Outstanding Sound Mixing for a Comedy Series or a Special [for episode "Car Wash"] > 2001 - Nominated - Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Comedy Series [Robert Downey Jr.] > 2001 - Nominated - Outstanding Lead Actress in a Comedy Series [Calista Flockhart] > 2001 - Nominated - Outstanding Guest Actress in a Comedy Series [Bernadette Peters; for episode "Cassandra Lewis"] > 2001 - Nominated - Outstanding Guest Actress in a Comedy Series [jami gertz; for episode "Kimmy Bishop"] > 2001 - Nominated - Outstanding Cinematography for a Single Camera Series [Billy Dickinson; for episode "Cloudy Skies, Chance Of Parade"] > 2001 - Won! - Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Comedy Series [Peter MacNicol] > 2001 - Won! - Outstanding Casting for a Comedy Series > 2002 - Nominated - Outstanding Cinematography for a Single Camera Series [Billy Dickinson; for episode "Reality Bites"]

    GOLDEN GLOBE AWARDS:

    > 1998 - Won! - Best TV-Series - Comedy/Musical > 1998 - Won! - Best Performance by an Actress in a TV-Series - Comedy/Musical [Calista Flockhart] > 1999 - Nominated - Best Performance by an Actress in a TV-Series - Comedy/Musical [Calista Flockhart] > 1999 - Nominated - Best Performance by an Actress in a Supporting Role in a Series, Mini-Series or Motion Picture [jane Krakowski] > 1999 - Won! - Best TV-Series - Comedy/Musical > 2000 - Nominated - Best Performance by an Actress in a TV-Series - Comedy/Musical [Calista Flockhart] > 2000 - Nominated - Best TV-Series - Comedy/Musical > 2001 - Nominated - Best Performance by an Actress in a TV-Series - Comedy/Musical [Calista Flockhart] > 2001 - Nominated - Best TV-Series - Comedy/Musical > 2000 - Won! - Best Performance by an Actor in a Supporting Role in a Series, Mini-Series or Motion Picture Made for TV [Robert Downey Jr.] > 2002 - Nominated - Best Performance by an Actress in a Television Series - Musical or Comedy [Calista Flockhart] > 2002 - Nominated - Best Television Series - Musical or Comedy

    Theme Song: "Searching My Soul" by Vonda Shepard

    FOX Broadcast History September 1997 - May 2002 -- Mondays 9:00 PMmoreless
  • 162
    The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy

    The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy

    Follow
    BBC Two (ended 1981)
    Don't Panic! The Hitch Hikers' Guide to the Galaxy is a classic British television series from the early 1980s, starting out as a BBC Radio series of six episodes which grew to twelve episodes, then five best-selling books and a hugely successful TV series (this one). Finally, a feature film appeared in 2005. The creator, the late Douglas Adams, had been a script editor on Doctor Who and he once said the idea for the show came to him while he was lying drunk in a field near Innsbruck. Quirky British humour runs through all formats of the Guide, but what sets this version apart from the others of is the animated graphics created by Rod Lord – unlike anything seen on British TV until then. They inspired the animation in a TVO educational series called Landscape of Geometry (1983). The show won several awards, including BAFTA Awards in 1982 for Best Graphics (Rod Lord), and Best Sound Supervisor (Michael McCarthy), as well as an RTS Television Award 1982 for Most Original Programme.moreless
  • 163
    One Day at a Time

    One Day at a Time

    Follow
    CBS (ended 1984)
    One Day at a Time began in December of 1975 and aired for 9 years on CBS. It was also a Sunday night staple for many years. The series centered around Ann Romano, a recently divorced mother of two, who lives in Indianapolis with her two daughters, Julie and Barbara. Most episodes centered around Ann trying to raise two headstrong daughters and have a career at the same time. As the years went by, the girls grew up, got married and started families of their own. Julie married Max Horvath in 1979 and a few years later, in 1982, Barbara married Mark Royer. Other in the cast include, Dwayne Schneider, the building superintendent, Katherine Romano, Ann's mother and Francine Webster, Ann's business partner. Over the years, Ann became involved with a number of different men, including David Kane who proposed but she turned him down. Nick Handris became a serious boyfriend who had a son from a previous marriage, Alex. When Nick died in 1981, Alex moved in with Ann, and became the son, she never had. In 1982, Ann became involved with Sam Royer, Mark's dad and they eventually wed. First Telecast: December 16, 1975 Last Telecast: September 2, 1984 Episodes: 209 Color Episodes CBS Broadcast History December 1975-July 1976----Tuesdays----9:30 p.m. September 1976-January 1978----Tuesdays----9:30 p.m. January 1978-January 1979----Mondays----9:30 p.m. January-March 1979----Wednesdays----9:00 p.m. March 1979-September 1982----Sundays----8:30 p.m. September 1982-March 1983----Sundays----9:30 p.m. March-May 1983----Mondays----9:30 p.m. June 1983-February 1984----Sundays----8:30 p.m. March-May 1984----Wednesdays----8:00 p.m. May-August 1984----Mondays----9:00 p.m. August-September 1984----Sundays----8:00 p.m. Nielsen Ratings: (Top 25 or Better) #12 in the 1975-1976 Season #8 in the 1976-1977 Season #10 in the 1977-1978 Season #18 in the 1978-1979 Season #10 in the 1979-1980 Season #11 in the 1980-1981 Season #10 in the 1981-1982 Season #16 in the 1982-1983 Season Theme Song: "One Day at a Time" Written by: Jeff Barry and Nancy Barry Sung by: This is it. (This is it.) This is life, the one you get, so go and have a ball. This is it. (This is it.) Straight ahead and rest assured, you can't be sure at all. So while you're here enjoy the view. Keep on doing what you do. So hold on tight we'll muddle through, One day at a time. (One day at a time.) So up on your feet. (Up on your feet.) Somewhere there's music playing. Don't you worry none We'll just take it like it comes. One day at a time. (One day at a time.) One day at a time. (One day at a time.) One day at a time. (One day at a time.) One day at a time. (One day at a time.)moreless
  • 164
    Jessie

    Jessie

    Follow
    Disney Channel
    Jessie (Age 18) moves from her home in Texas to the Big Apple to follow her dreams and literally is thrown into a job as a nanny for four children, Emma, the only biological Ross child, Luke, who likes to cause mischief and hits on Jessie, Ravi, the newest addition to the family (along with his Asian Water Monitor, Mr. Kipling) and Zuri, The Youngest Ross child who brings home imaginary friends.moreless
  • 165
    Home Improvement

    Home Improvement

    Follow
    ABC (ended 1999)
    Home Improvement is a sitcom about Tim Taylor, the accident prone host of a Detroit, Michigan television program about tools, who raises his dysfunctional family. Main Characters: Dr. Timothy "Tim" 'The Tool Man' Taylor is the accident prone host of Tool Time who teases his co-host Al. Jillian "Jill" Taylor is Tim's wife who wants to be a psychiatrist. Dr. Wilson Wilson, Jr. is the Taylors' strange neighbor who enjoys learning about other cultures and never shows his entire face. Albert "Al" Borland is Tim's flannel-wearing co-host. Heidi Keppert is the attractive Tool Time girl from season three through season eight, who is married with one child. Bradley "Brad" Michael Taylor is the Taylors' eldest son who is hoping for a soccer scholarship. Randall "Randy" William Taylor is the Taylors' middle child who is off at an environmental research study in Costa Rica. Mark Taylor is the youngest son who is frequently tortured by his older brothers. Tool Time: Tim's show themed around tools and cars. Tool Time aired between 1989 and 1999 with host Tim Taylor, assistant Al Borland and Toolgirl Heidi Keppert. Tool Time airs on Channel 112 every day @ 4:30. Tool Time can be seen on Channel 97 everyday @ 3:00 in Alpena,MI. Tool Time can be seen nationally via Comcast satellites! El Tiempo del instrumento se puede ver los sábados en 4:30 en el canal 97 Runtime: 30 min (204 episodes, 8 years) Glenview Road: The Taylors' and Wilson's street. Recurring Characters: Marty and Jeff Taylor are Tim's brothers. Lucille Taylor is his mother. Nancy is Marty's ex-wife. Claire and Gracie Taylor are Marty's twin daughters. Lisa is the attractive Tool Time girl in seasons one and two. Bud Harper is Tim's boss. Tim's friends include Harry, Benny Baroni, Eddie McCormack, and Felix Myman. Delores is Harry's wife. Marie Morton is the Taylors' neighbor and Jill's friend. Carrie is Jill's sister. Jill's other friends include Patty, Marge, and Karen. Lillian Patterson is Jill's mother. Willow Wilson is Wilson's niece. Dr. Ilene Markham is Al's girlfriend in seasons three through six. Trudy Borland is Al's girlfriend and wife in season eight. Jennifer Sudarsky is Brad's girlfriend in seasons one and two. Angela is Brad's girlfriend in seasons five and six. Jason is Brad's friend. Ronny is Mark's friend. Lauren is Randy's girlfriend in seasons six through eight. Rock Lannigan, Pete Bilker, and Dwayne Hoover are all construction workers for K&B Construction and frequent guests on Tool Time. Milton is a construction worker and frequent Tool Time guest. George "Sparky" Henderson is a mechanic and another frequent Tool Time guest. Antonio is a waiter at a restaurant frequently visited by the Taylors. Home Improvement Rating History •1991-92: Ranked 5th among All TV Programs (4th among non-news programs), First Season. •1992-93: Ranked 3rd among All TV Programs (2nd among non-news programs), Second Season. •1993-94: The #1 Non-News Program in the Nation, 2nd only to "60 Minutes", Third Season. •1994-95: Ranked 3rd among all TV Programs, Fourth Season. •1995-96: Ranked 7th among all TV programs, 5th-highest sitcom, Fifth Season. •1996-97: Ranked 9th among all TV programs, 7th-highest sitcom, Sixth Season. •1997-98: Ranked 11th among all TV programs, 6th-highest sitcom, Seventh Season. •1998-99; Ranked 10th among all TV programs, 5th-highest sitcom, 8th & Final Season. ABC Broadcast History •September 1991-August 1992---Tuesdays-8:30 p.m. •August 1992-September 1994---Wednesdays-9:00 p.m. •March 1994-May 1994---Wednesdays-8:00 p.m. •September 1994-May 1999---Tuesdays 9:00 p.m. Trivia for Home Improvement •The "Tool Time" audience is "Home Improvement"'s actual live studio audience. •While taping some episodes of Tool Time, Tim sometimes asks an unseen character Klaus to play music for Tool Time segments. Klaus Landsberg worked in the sound department on "Home Improvement". •Colleges and universities in Michigan sent star 'Allen, Tim' sweaters and T-shirts to wear on the air, and he did. •The name Binford Tools, the company that sponsor's the Tool Time show, is named after an anthropologist who made several new discoveries regarding stone age and tools. •There is a running gag regarding the Taylor's neighbor, Wilson; his face is always concealed from about the nose down. In most episodes, Wilson was being shot from behind a fence, but in later episodes where he got out more often, camera shots, actor movements, and prop placements were carefully orchestrated so that his full face was not revealed. In fact, during all the curtain calls for the show (except the series finale curtain call, where his entire face was shown), actor Earl Hindman, who played Wilson, would bring a miniature picket fence to hold in front of his face so that it would remain hidden from view. •The character Wilson is based on Tim Allen's childhood memories where he was too short to see over a fence, and was therefore unable to see his neighbor. •Originally, actress Frances Fisher was cast as Jill Taylor but was replaced with Patricia Richardson 4 days before the pilot episode was taped. •Richard Karn's wife, Tudi Roche, would occasionally make appearances on the show as Jill's sister Carrie. •The full names of the older two Taylor boys were Bradley Michael Taylor and Randall William Taylor. (Mark's full name isn't mentioned during the series.) •The label "WLS" was frequently used to cover up real corporate logos. WLS is the Chicago affiliate of ABC. •While meeting with Bud Harper, Tim is told "...Heidi tested better than Santa Claus." Tim Allen played Santa Claus in Santa Clause, The (1994). •As a running gag, whenever Tim enters the basement, he always bangs his head on a large pipe hanging overhead. •The character 'Tim Taylor' was ranked #20 in TV Guide's list of the "50 Greatest TV Dads of All Time" (20 June 2004 issue). Awards and Nominations •Won the 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, and 1992 ASCAP Award for Top TV Series (Dan Foliart) •Won the 1999, 1998 and 1997 Emmy Award for Outstanding Lighting Direction (Electronic) for a Comedy Series (Donald A. Morgan - "Mark's Big Break" (1999) and "A Night To Dismember" (1998)) and nominated for the same award in 1997 (I Was A Teenage Taylor). •Won the 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, and 1992 Emmy Award for Outstanding Individual Achievement in Lighting Direction (Electronic) for a Comedy Series (Donald A. Morgan - "Room Without a View" (1996), "My Dinner With Wilson" (1995), "Twas the Blight" (1994), "Bye Bye Birdie" (1993), and "Luck Be A Taylor Tonight" (1992)) •Nominated for the 1999 Emmy Award for Outstanding Music and Lyrics (Dan Foliart songs, "We've Got It All") •Nominated for the 1999, 1998, and 1997 Emmy Award for Outstanding Sound Mixing for a Comedy Series or a Special ("Love's Labor Lost, Part 1" (1999), "A Night To Dismember" (1998), and "Wilson's World" (1997)) •Nominated for the 1996, 1995, and 1994 Emmy Award for Outstanding Individual Achievement in Sound Mixing for a Comedy Series or a Special ("A Taylor Runs Through It" (1996), "Don't Tell Momma" (1995), and "5th Anniversary Show" (1994)) •Nominated for the 1999, 1998, 1996, 1995, 1994, and 1993 Emmy Award for Outstanding Technical Direction/Camera/Video for a Series ("The Long And Winding Road, Part 3" (1999) and "A Night To Dismember" (1998), "The Longest Day" (1996), "Tool Time After Dark" (1995), "5th Anniversary Show" (1994), and "Rites and Wrongs of Passage" (1993)) •Nominated for the 1998, 1997, 1996, and 1994 Emmy Award for Outstanding Lead Actress in a Comedy Series (Patricia Richardson) •Nominated for the 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, and 1992 Outstanding Individual Achievement in Editing for a Series - Multi-Camera Production (Roger Berger (1994-1996), Alex Gimenex (1992-1993) Marco Zappia - "The Longest Day" (1996), "Don't Tell Momma" (1995), "It Was the Best of Tim's it Was the Worst of Tim's" (1994), "Build or not to Build" (1993), and "Stereo Typical" (1992)) •Nominated for the 1995, 1993, and 1992 Emmy Award for Outstanding Comedy Series (Gayle S. Maffeo and John Pasquin (1992-1993)) •Nominated for the 1993 Emmy Award for Outstanding Lead Actor in a Comedy Series (Tim Allen) •Nominated for the 1997, 1996, 1994, and 1993 Golden Globe Award for Best Performance by an Actor in a TV-Series - Comedy/Musical (Tim Allen) and Tim Allen won the same award in 1995 •Nominated for the 1995 and 1994 Golden Globe Award for Best Performance by an Actress in a TV-Series - Comedy/Musical (Patricia Richardson) •Nominated for the 1995 and 1994 Golden Globe Award for Best TV-Series - Comedy/Musical •Nominated for the 1998 Golden Satellite Award for Best Performance by an Actor in a Television Series - Comedy or Musical (Tim Allen) •Won the 1999 TV Guide Award for Favourite Actor in a Comedy (Tim Allen) •Nominated for the 2000 Young Artist Award for Best Performance in a TV Comedy Series - Supporting Young Actress (Courtney Peldon) and for Best Performance in a TV Comedy Series - Young Performer Age Ten or Under (Ashley Trefger and Lindsey Trefger) •Won the 1999 Young Artist Award for Best Performance in a TV Comedy Series - Guest Starring Young Actress (Ashley Trefger and Lindsey Trefger) and for Best Performance in a TV Drama or Comedy Series - Leading Young Actor (Zachery Ty Bryan) •Nominated for the 1999 Young Artist Award for Best Performance in a TV Comedy Series - Guest Starring Young Actress (Courtney Peldon) and for the 1999 Young Artist Award Best Performance in a TV Drama or Comedy Series - Leading Young Actor (Taran Noah Smith) •Won the 1997 Young Artist Award for Best Performance in a TV Comedy: Guest Starring Young Performer (Courtney Peldon) •Won the 1996 Young Artist Award for Best Performance by a Young Actress: Guest Starring Role TV Series (Kimberly Cullum) •Won the 1995 and 1993 Michael Landon Award •Won the 1994 Young Artist Award for Outstanding Youth Ensemble in a Television Series (Zachery Ty Bryan, Taran Noah Smith, and Jonathan Taylor Thomas) •Nominated for the 1993 Young Artist Award for Best Young Actor Starring in a Television Series (Zachery Ty Bryan and Jonathan Taylor Thomas), for the 1993 Young Artist Award for Best Young Actress Recurring in a Television Series (Jessica Wesson), and for the 1993 Young Artist Award for Outstanding Actor under 10 in a Television Series (Taran Noah Smith) •Won the 1992 Young Artist Award for Exceptional Performance by a Young Actor under Ten (Taran Noah Smith) •Nominated for the 1992 Young Artist Award for Best New Family Television Series •Won the 1999 YoungStar Award for Best Performance by a Young Actor in a Comedy TV Series (Zachery Ty Bryan) •Nominated for the 1998 and 1997 Best Performance by a Young Actor in a Comedy TV Series (Jonathan Taylor Thomas) Home Improvement is now airing in syndication. Check your local listings! In Memory of Earl Hindman (1942-2003)moreless
  • 166
    Good Times

    Good Times

    Follow
    CBS (ended 1979)
    Good Times first aired in February 1974 as a mid-season replacement and went on for six years. This spinoff of the TV series, Maude, centered on the Evans family. In Maude Esther Rolle had portrayed Florida Evans, the black housekeeper, but in Good Times Florida and her family were struggling to survive in a South Side ghetto in Chicago. Florida was married to James Evans (in Maude his name was Henry) and they had three children, J.J., Thelma and Michael. The Evans family also had a next door neighbor, Willona Woods who was also a main character. At the beginning of 1976-1977 season, John Amos, who portrayed James, left the series. The writers decided to kill him off in a car accident, leaving Florida to run the household by herself. But then a year later, Esther Rolle decided to leave. She was not happy with the direction of the series. Especially the direction the character, J.J. had taken. In the 1977-1978 season, with both John Amos and Esther Rolle gone, stories centered around Willona and J.J. In this season, Willona adopted an abused girl, Penny Gordon. Also, the character of Nathan Bookman became a more prominent member of the cast. Bookman was the building superintendent. In the final season, Esther Rolle returned to the role of Florida. Also that season, Thelma married Keith Anderson and where expecting a child by the final episode. Spinoff of: Maude NOTE: Good Times debuted on February 8, 1974. Some resources mistakenly list it as having debuted on February 1, 1974. CBS seemed to leave 3 episode unaired. CBS Broadcast History February-September 1974----Fridays----8:30 p.m. September 1974-March 1976----Tuesdays----8:00 p.m. March-August 1976----Tuesdays----8:30 p.m. September 1976-January 1978----Wednesdays----8:00 p.m. January-May 1978----Mondays----8:00 p.m. June-September 1978----Mondays----8:30 p.m. September-December 1978----Saturdays----8:30 p.m. December 1978-January 1979----Wednesdays----8:30 p.m. May-August 1979----Wednesdays----8:30 p.m. Nielsen Ratings: (Top 30 or Better) #17 in the 1973-1974 Season #7 in the 1974-1975 Season #24 in the 1975-1976 Season #26 in the 1976-1977 Season First Telecast: February 8, 1974 Last Telecast: August 1, 1979 Episodes: 133 Color Episodes Theme Song: "Good Times" Written by: Alan and Marilyn Bergman and David Grusin Sung by: Jim Gilstrap and Blinky Williams Theme Song: "Good Times" Written by: Alan and Marilyn Bergman and David Grusin Sung by: Jim Gilstrap and Blinky Williams Good Times. Any time you meet a payment. Good Times. Any time you need a friend. Good Times. Any time you're out from under. Not getting hassled, not getting hustled. Keepin' your head above water, making a wave when you can. Temporary lay offs. Good Times. Easy credit rip offs. Good Times. Scratchin' and surviving. Good Times. Hangin in a chow line. Good Times. Ain't we lucky we got 'em. Good Times.moreless
  • 167
    My Three Sons

    My Three Sons

    Follow
    ABC (ended 1972)
    "MY THREE SONS" is the story of a Mid-West Aeronautical Engineer who watches his family grow up. This seemingly innocuous and simple, but effective sitcom, was a huge hit and a cornerstone of television's 'family programming' era in the 1960s. Second next to "The Adventures Of Ozzie & Harriet" as television's longest running family sitcom, "My Three Sons" was created by former "Leave It To Beaver" alumnus George Tibbles (1913-87). Executive Producer Don Fedderson (1913-94) campaigned the series as a probable vehicle for movie veteran Fred MacMurray (1908-91), who was reluctant to star in it at all. He spoke to Robert Young, of "Father Knows Best" fame and his suspicions were confirmed. He'd be working seven days a week and would barely see his real life family. Finally he gave in after the Producers guaranteed that they could have enough scripts available ahead of time to warrant filming the show within a set sixty five day period. He agreed to this, and so for example, all the scenes set in the kitchen of many different episodes were all shot together in one day, all out of sequence, which were then later edited into each episode in order. Co-star William Frawley (1887-1966), used to years of filming "I Love Lucy" in sequence before a captive studio audience and performed like a play, never got used to this schizophrenic method of filming. And thus this technique was dubbed 'The MacMurray Method' and was also used by Brian Keith on the "Family Affair" series, coincidentally also a Don Fedderson Production. Of course, the "MacMurray Method" isn't particularly novel in its creation (it is, after all, how most feature films are shot, and a method probably most comfortable and familiar to the film actor MacMurray), but its introduction to TV production methods was certainly innovative at the time.

    HISTORICAL OVERVIEW: When the series began in 1960, the boys were aged 18 (Mike), 14 (Robbie) and 8 (Chip). They were played by Tim Considine, Don Grady and Stanley Livingston, respectively. At the beginning of the series, storylines centred on the family's adventures in suburbia, and was perhaps the hybrid of what was to become the era of the Dom-Com (Domestic Sitcom). Steve Douglas also spent a good deal of time fending off attractive women who wanted to marry him and take over that loveable ready made family. The 'woman' in their lives was Bub O'Casey, Steve's maternal father in law, who did all the cooking, cleaning and chores. Other regulars in the early years were Peter Brooks as Robbie's best friend Hank Ferguson, and Ricky Allen as Sudsy Pfeiffer, Chip's best friend. The first of the show's format changes began at the start of the 1963-64 season. Meredith MacRae (1944-2000) was introduced as Sally Morrison, the girlfriend to eldest son Mike. They would become engaged and eventually marry. Meanwhile, Chip's new pal Ernie Thompson (co-star Stanley Livingston's real-life brother, Barry) was introduced and he would ultimately become a permanent part of the Douglas household. During the 1964-65 season, Frawley left the show for health reasons and Bub was written out of the show and replaced with his cantankerous younger brother Charley, a retired sailor played by William Demarest (1892-1983), whose crusty disposition masked a soft heart. At the start of the 1965-66 season, when the show moved from ABC to CBS, Mike and Sally got married in the very first Color episode, and moved back East so that Mike could accept a job teaching psychology on the college level. (Actor Tim Considine had at 24, outgrown the role and wanted out of the series to pursue a Directing career, which ultimately never eventuated). To re-establish the 'three sons', Steve subsequently adopted orphan child Ernie, who was not permitted to accompany his foster parents in their move to the orient. Things went along much the same for the next two seasons, although now the sons were Robbie, Chip and Ernie. Mike would never be referred to again after a few episodes.
    In a dramatic production move, the series, which for the first seven seasons was filmed mainly on Stage 11 at Desilu Studios in Hollywood, had to up anchor and begin filming at the former Republic Studios site, now rechristened the CBS Studio Center in Studio City, California. This necessitated moves behind and in front of the cameras. Lucille Ball, who by 1962 had bought out her ex-husband Desi Arnaz to take total control of Desilu, was, in February, 1967 talked into a deal by chief executive Charles Bludhorn of the giant Gulf and Western conglomerate, into selling Desilu. As G&W now owned Paramount Studios, Desilu was absorbed into this operation. To facilitate the placement of schedules for various TV series that lensed their shows at Desilu, all were forced to find other burgeoning accommodations. "My Three Sons" complimented the move to the CBS Studio Center (the Columbia Broadcasting System now owning the show) by introducing a new storyline at the start of the 1967-68 season, where Steve Douglas transfers to California, and the family moves to North Hollywood. (Thus, a new house, and new studio facilities). Although the adjustment was not too pleasant many of the Douglas's new acquaintances were not too friendly at first, there were good sides to the move. Robbie fell in love with college student Kathleen Miller (Tina Cole), and their romance blossomed into marriage. At the beginning of the following season 1968-69, the newly weds discovered that Katie was pregnant, and during the season she gave birth to triplets; three sons of course. Season 1969-70 brought new love to father Steve Douglas in the form of Barbara Harper (Beverly Garland), Ernie's English teacher. They were eventually married and Barbara's five year old daughter Dodie (Dawn Lyn), whom Steve subsequently adopted, also joined the family.

    Even original youngest son Chip (who was by now 18) got into the act, eloping with fellow college student Pauline ('Polly') Williams (Ronne Troup) in the 1970-71 season. Adopted brother Ernie was the only one of the sons not to get married on the show. As if the sprawling family had not gotten big enough already, the start of the final season (1971-72) saw a four part related episode that was sort of a continuation of a storyline that began in the 1963-64 season. Steve's Scottish nobleman cousin Fergus McBain Douglas (enacted by Fred MacMurray; voiced by Alan Caillou) came to the United States in search of a wife to take back to Scotland. In its later years, as the of the Douglas family grew on "My Three Sons" and separated into individual households, episodes could very rarely include the entire group. More and more often, they dealt with the specific problems of a large cast of regulars, with different members taking the spotlight from episode to episode. These multi-story elements were the brainchild of the show's creator and head writer for its twelve seasons, George Tibbles, who penned a massive 95 scripts of the series during this period. 16 of these were as a co-writer, in addition to him overseeing the work of the contributing staff writers during his tenure as Story Editor/Supervisor.

    "My Three Sons" never changed much in only in structure, its format changes having been discussed with the writing staff which increased the show's longevity with natural progressions for each character. For its time and of its type, the show was extremely well written and the writing of the series doesn't get enough credit to this day. As the series only filmed several months out of the year, the same Director was usually employed, which gave the show the behind the scenes continuity it probably needed. When the show was finally cancelled it had been running for twelve years and in reruns has run many, many more. By today's standards it appears wholesome, tame and perhaps slightly dated, but it's a slice of life that all of us can appreciate and learn from. One thing is certain. For all of its detractors, the series remains a favourite all over the world. The show's huge catalogue of 380 half hour episodes is a lasting legacy for Fred MacMurray and his TV family that will never be forgotten. While never a top ten hit during its original run, thanks to syndication the show remains extremely popular and continues to win new fans, young and old for its effective way of depicting an all-male family that did all-male things, even in its simplicity and its naiveté. The original Black and White episodes, considered by most fans as the show's best, were held back from syndication until the 1980s and enjoyed a new lease of life on Cable Television until the late 90s. The Color episodes are in constant syndication and are the only ones being distributed across the U.S. as of this writing (Jan. 2002). As long as TV stations are in need of quality programming the series will hopefully be played regularly to a whole new generation of audience.

    WHERE ARE THEY NOW? Fred MacMurray (b. August 30, 1908 in Kankakee, Illinois) died on November 5, 1991 aged 83, of pneumonia as a result of contracting chronic lymphocytic leukemia. MacMurray's off-screen role in the series was purely financial. A deal with Executive Producer Don Fedderson named MacMurray a silent partner, in effect giving him a 50% ownership stake in the series. In his 70s after he had all but retired from the business as one of Hollywood's wealthiest citizens, thanks to shrewd property investment deals among other business ventures, Fred suffered for a while with throat cancer. Sadly missed by all of us. The plaque in his mausoleum crypt at Holy Cross cemetery in Culver City, California says "Forever in the hearts of your family" (indeed!) which was arranged by his second wife, actress June Haver, to whom he was married for 37 years until his death. (June passed away aged 79 in 2005 and is now interred with him). He is survived by four children; two were adopted during his first marriage to the late actress Lillian LaMont, (Robert and Susan), and then in 1956 he and June adopted twin baby girls Katie and Laurie. Known as a devoted husband and father, no one ever talks of Fred as ever being a great actor, but when you think of it he never really gave a bad performance, and for the sheer number of movies and television shows he made, that's a pretty good epitaph for anybody in show business.

    William Frawley (b. February 26, 1887 in Burlington, Iowa) died on March 3, 1966 a week after his 79th Birthday from a massive coronary, while strolling down Hollywood Boulevard after seeing a movie. His constant companion, a male nurse, carried him into the nearby Hollywood Roosevelt Hotel but he was pronounced dead on arrival at Hollywood Receiving Hospital. His funeral was held at the Church of the Blessed Sacrament in Los Angeles and he is buried in the San Fernando Mission Cemetery in Mission Hills, California. Tracing his show business roots back to vaudeville, he was also a prolific character actor who appeared in more than 150 feature films from as early as 1916 and usually but not always was featured in comedic roles. Bill is best remembered for his long running role on "I Love Lucy" (1951-57) as the irascible Fred Mertz. Perhaps appropriately, his last performance was a cameo on an episode of "The Lucy Show" which aired in late 1965.

    William Demarest (b. February 27, 1892 in St. Paul, Minnesota) died on December 27, 1983 aged 91, from a heart attack, after a long battle with prostate cancer. One of the true stalwarts of the entertainment industry, he is one of the few performers who can lay claim to being there from the very beginning; he appeared uncredited alongside Al Jolson in Warner Bros. first ever talking motion picture, "The Jazz Singer" in 1927. He was a welcome face in many vintage movies where he usually played in support of the leads, and was instantly recognizable to audiences even if people didn't know his name. His career started when he was a headliner in vaudeville in the days before World War I and his last appearance was in a 1978 telemovie which capped off a remarkable 73-year career in show business. He was retired and living in Palm Springs, California at the time of his death, and he is buried at Forest Lawn Memorial Park in Glendale, California.

    Meredith MacRae (b. May 30, 1944 in Houston, Texas) died on July 14, 2000 aged 56, of complications from surgery for brain cancer. The daughter of the late actor Gordon MacRae, Meredith had her own talk show in the 1980s called "Mid-Morning L.A." and she won an Emmy for her work on the show in 1986. Married three times, her only child Allison was born in 1975 during her second marriage (1969-87) to actor Greg Mullavey. She became a successful producer and garnered many awards during her long career. She did a series of acclaimed lectures to major companies and organizations, taught a in film and TV production at Chapman University, and recorded over a dozen best-selling books on tape. Former L.A. mayor Tom Bradley called her one of that city's most outstanding businesswomen. As per her wishes and because her hobbies had included water skiing and scuba diving she was cremated and her ashes were scattered into the Pacific Ocean.
    Beverly Garland
    (b. October 17, 1926 in Santa Cruz, California) died on December 5, 2008 aged 82 after a short illness. Beverly was the widow of land developer Fillmore Crank to whom she was married for 39 years until his death in 1999. She ran with the help of three of four of her grown children, the Beverly Garland Holiday Inn, located in North Hollywood which is a few blocks from Universal Studios. Until her death she was still occasionally active in show business, and was bestowed the honor of of being inducted into the Pacific Pioneer Broadcasters Hall of Fame, and celebrated the beginning of her "second" fifty years in show business in 2001. In recent years she had a recurring role on the series "Seventh Heaven". Garland's hotel is also the Los Angeles site of the famed annual celebrity autograph & collector's conventions.

    Don Grady
    (b. June 8, 1944 in San Diego, California) died on June 27, 2012 aged 68 after a long battle with cancer. Don began his career in show business and started where so many others have, at Disney. Don was one of the original Mousketeers, before landing his long-running role on "My Three Sons". During the series he was able to parlay his interest in music into a second career and left the show to become a reputable composer of film and television, although it took him almost ten years to finally make a living from it. His most recent credits include music for theme park attractions at Universal Studios as well as productions on the Lifetime and Discovery Channels. Married for the second time to Ginny, he is the father of two children, Joey and Tessa. Born Don Agrati, he is the son of a former talent agent and was the older brother of the late actress Lani O'Grady (1954-2001) who played Mary Bradford on the TV series "Eight Is Enough" (1977-81). In a recent TV Guide interview, Don said he still got mail from people who remembered the show and are thankful for its family values. He also said he grew extremely proud of the show over the years. Be sure to stop by www.dongrady.com - now his tribute site, to check out all about Don's musical career. 2008 also marked Don's 50th Anniversary in show business!

    Tim Considine (b. December 31, 1940 in Los Angeles, California): Tim, is now a well known sports photographer and writer involved in auto racing, which takes him all over the country. His most recent book, "American Grand Prix Racing: A Century of Drivers & Cars" - is an award winning definitive account of U.S. drivers in Grand Prix events, and was published in 1997. Divorced from actress Charlotte Stewart, he is now re-married to Willett Hunt and has a 29 year old son named Chris. Now basically retired from acting, Tim isn't afraid to go back to his roots however; he appeared in the reunion movie "The New Adventures Of Spin and Marty" in 2000 reprising the role of the original Spin Evans, the character he portrayed on the old Walt Disney series of shorts from 1955-58, which began as "The Adventures of Spin and Marty", a segment of "The Mickey Mouse Club". Recently as 2003 Tim also appeared as a supporting actor in the family TV movie, "The Monster Makers".

    Stanley Livingston (b. November 24, 1950 in Los Angeles, California): Stan is now the founder and Chief Executive Officer of "Kids In Show Biz, Inc". He has written feature films and directed commercials. Through his production company Premier Entertainment Group, he produced a feature film called "Checkers" in 2000 and the following year directed all 20 Episodes of a new children's TV Series for PBS. He was married to a dancer named Sandra at age 18 and the union which lasted six years, produced a daughter named Samantha, born in 1970. In recent years he has created stained glass artwork for celebrity clients including Tom Hanks and Lorenzo Lamas. He often sold his items through e-bay, but these days is all about showing actors and parents of actors the pitfalls of the industry and what to do to combat that. Check out his informative website at www.theactorsjourney.com

    Barry Livingston (b. December 17, 1953 in Los Angeles, California): Barry has had the most active post-series career. Married to Karen, with two children named Hailey and Spencer, Barry continued acting with roles in a host of made for TV movies of the week. This was followed by summer acting workshops and off-Broadway productions in New York. In the 90s, had a semi-recurring role on "Lois and Clark: The Adventures of Superman". Like his older brother Stanley, Barry has dabbled in directing and writing, but he's mainly a character actor. His most recent credits include guest star appearances on the popular television shows "Ally McBeal", "The West Wing", "Will and Grace", "Boston Public" and "Roswell". In 2011, he released his autobiography, aptly titled 'The Importance of Being Ernie'.
    Tina Cole
    (b. August 4, 1943 in Hollywood, California): Tina, the daughter of Yvonne King and the late Buddy Cole (of "The King Family" singers fame) is divorced from her second husband, Fillmore Crank Jr., stepson of her "My Three Sons" co-star Beverly Garland. In the last decade, she has worked with a "looping group" doing voice-over work for national television series and movies. With a teenaged son and a six month old baby boy (from her first marriage to producer Volney Howard III) Tina moved to Sacramento in 1982, and she has been the resident director of the Junior League of that city's Children's Theater for some years. By 1985 two daughters completed her family. Although divorced in 1995, her life still centers around her four children. Now remarried, a mom and a mother-in-law, apart from a recent local morning television talk show in 1999, her latest theatrical credits include the musical "I Do, I Do" and a starring role in the play "Six Women with Brain Death" in 2001. Tina also taught acting at a prominent local drama school for a few years but is now retired. Still stunningly beautiful, it's hard to believe that Tina is now in her late 60s!

    Dawn Lyn (b. January 11, 1963 in Hollywood, California): Dawn found it difficult to make the transition from child star to young adult. While she managed to appear in a few guest star roles during her teens like "Barnaby Jones", "The Streets of San Francisco" and "Wonder Woman", in effect, her career was stymied by her small stature and youthful appearance. The younger sister of former pop idol Leif Garrett, Dawn left the entertainment industry to pursue other interests. She married an architect named Michael Whitby in 1990, but it ended in divorce after nine years. Today, Dawn is happy and living her life out of the spotlight. She has a great time being involved with the local community theater and civic/volunteer activities, is still in contact with her co-stars and loves them like family. Dawn remarried in 2006 to John Reese, and as a result of her husband's career, she relocated in September 2007 to Germany to be with him. They lived there for nearly five years and have now returned to California as of late 2012. Like her co-stars, she was deeply saddened to hear that her TV mother Beverly Garland (with whom she had always kept in touch) passed away at the end of 2008. Ronne Troup (b. June 10, 1945): Ronne, who is now in her late 60s has kept a low profile with guest appearances but still occasionally acts and does commercials. The daughter of the late Bobby Troup and stepdaughter of the late Julie London, she had a recurring role on the night-time soap "Knots Landing" in the 80s and has appeared recently on programs like "The Practice", "E.R." and "The West Wing". Ronne is the younger sister of Cynnie, who was a script editor on their father's series "Emergency" in the early 70s. She has been maried twice and has been very happy in her own life, and is blessed to have two daughters, Bridget and Jamie Lawrence, and a wonderful husband, Bob Bayles. In spite of a career in acting, she has always enjoyed writing, since her days at UCLA when she imagined being a writer. I believe that in recent years, apart from the odd guest appearance on shows like "Coldcase" she has been teaching elementary school in the Los Angeles area.

    The Todd Triplets (Joseph, Michael & Daniel) (b. August 5, 1967): After being contacted by the boys' mother Lynn and their stepfather David, I can let you know (at the time of this writing) that Joe, his wife and two kids are living in Colorado Springs. Joe has now retired from active service. He was an 'E7' in the medical unit. Mike is also in the army, and is based in Washington. He too is an 'E7' and will retire in two years. He is now divorced and has two daughters in Hawaii where he spent four years on active duty before going to Washington. Danny is married and lives in Houston. He spent five years in the Army and settled in Houston where he is the owner of a company that installs yard water and lighting systems. The boys have spent many years overseas and all speak several languages. According to their Mom, they are happy and haven't done any TV work since they were 16 years old.

    First Telecast: September 29, 1960 on ABC. Last Telecast: August 24, 1972 on CBS. Number of Episodes: 380 (x half-hours). (184 Black and White, 196 Color). A Don Fedderson Production, Distributed Worldwide by CBS Television Distribution International Ltd. Original Broadcast History: ABC Sept. 1960-Sept.1963 Thurs. 9:00-9:30pm Sept. 1963-Sept.1965 Thurs. 8:30-9:00pm CBS Sept. 1965-Aug. 1967 Thurs. 8:30-9:00pm Sept. 1967-Sept.1971 Sat. 8:30-9:00pm Sept. 1971-Dec. 1971 Mon. 10:00-10:30pm Jan. 1972-Aug. 1972 Thurs. 8:30-9:00pmmoreless
  • 168
    Taxi

    Taxi

    Follow
    ABC (ended 1983)
    Taxi's television history is filled with contradictions. Produced by some of television comedy's most well-regarded talent, the show was canceled by two different networks. Despite winning fourteen Emmy Awards in only five seasons, the program's ratings were rock-bottom for its final seasons. Although it thrives in syndication and is still well-loved by many viewers, Taxi will be best remembered as the ancestral bridge between two of the most successful sit-coms of all time: The Mary Tyler Moore Show and Cheers. In the mid-1970s, MTM Productions had achieved huge success with both popularity and critical appraisal. So it was an unexpected move when four of the company's finest writers and producers, James L. Brooks, Stan Daniels, David Davis, and Ed. Weinberger, jumped off the stable ship of MTM in 1978 to form their own production company, John Charles Walters Company. To launch their new venture, they looked back to an idea that Brooks and Davis had previously considered with MTM: the daily life of a New York City taxi company. From MTM head Grant Tinker they purchased the rights to the newspaper article that had initiated the concept and began producing this new show at Paramount for ABC. They brought a few other MTM veterans along for the ride, including director James Burrows and writer/producers Glen and Les Charles. Although Taxi certainly bore many of the trademark signs of "quality television" as exemplified by MTM, other changes in style and focus distinguished this from an MTM product. After working on the middle-class female-centered worlds of The Mary Tyler Moore Show, Rhoda, and Phyllis for years, the group at John Charles Walters wanted to create a program focusing on blue-collar male experience. MTM programs all had clearly defined settings, but Taxi's creators wanted a show that was firmly rooted in a city's identity--Taxi's situations and mood were distinctly New York. Despite MTM Productions innovations in creating ensemble character comedy, there was always one central star around which the ensemble revolved. In Taxi Judd Hirsch's Alex Reiger was a main character, but his importance seemed secondary to the centrality of the ensemble and the Sunshine Cab Company itself. While The Mary Tyler Moore Show proudly proclaimed that "you're going to make it on your own," the destitute drivers of Taxi were doomed to perpetual failure; the closest any of them came to happiness was Reiger's content acceptance of his lot in life--to be a cabby. Taxi debuted on 12 September 1978, amidst a strong ABC Tuesday night line-up. It followed Three's Company, a wildly-successful example of the type of show MTM "quality" sit-coms reacted against. Taxi used this strong position to end the season ninth in the ratings and garner its first of three straight Emmys for Outstanding Comedy Series. The show's success was due to its excellent writing, Burrows's award-winning directing using his innovative four-camera technique, and its largely unknown but talented cast. Danny DeVito's Louie DePalma soon became one of the most despised men on television--possibly the most unredeemable and worthless louse of a character ever to reside on the small screen. Andy Kaufman's foreign mechanic Latka Gravas provided over-the-top comedy within an ensemble emphasizing subtle character humor. But Kaufman sometimes also brought a demonic edge to the character, an echo of his infamous appearances on Saturday Night Live as a macho wrestler of women and Mighty Mouse lip-syncher. In the second season Christopher Lloyd's Reverend Jim Ignatowski was added to the group as television's first drugged-out '60s burn-out character. But Lloyd's Emmy-winning performance created in Jim more than just a storehouse of fried brain cells; he established a deep, complex humanity that moved far beyond mere caricature. The program launched successful movie careers for DeVito and Lloyd, as well as the fairly-notable television careers of Tony Danza and Marilu Henner; Kaufman's controversial career would certainly have continued had he not died of cancer in 1984. In its third season ABC moved Taxi from beneath Three's Company's protective wing to a more competitive Wednesday night slot; the ratings plummeted and Taxi finished the next two years in 53rd place. ABC canceled the show in early 1982 as part of a larger network push away from "quality" and toward the Aaron Spelling-produced popular fare of Dynasty and The Love Boat. HBO bid for the show, looking for it to become the first ongoing sitcom for the pay channel, but lost out to NBC, which scheduled the series for the 1982-83 season. Ironically, this reunited the show's executive producers with their former boss Tinker, who had taken over NBC. Tinker's reign at NBC was focused, not surprisingly, on "quality" programming which he hoped would attract viewers to the perennially last-place network. Taxi was partnered with a very compatible show on Thursday night--Cheers, created by Taxi veterans Charles, Burrows, and Charles. Although this line-up featured some of the great programs in television history--the comedies were sandwiched by dramas Fame and Hill St. Blues--the ratings were dreadful and Taxi finished the season in 73rd place. NBC was willing to stick by Cheers for another chance, but felt Taxi had run its course and canceled it at the end of the season. Had Taxi been given another year or two, it would have been part of one of the most successful nights on television, featuring The Cosby Show (co-created by Taxi creator Weinberger), Family Ties, Hill St. Blues, L.A. Law, and eventual powerhouse Cheers. Taxi lives on in syndication, but its most significant place in television history is as the middle generation between The Mary Tyler Moore Show and Cheers. It served as a transition between the star-driven middle-class character comedy of MTM programs and the location-centered ensemble comedy inhabited by the losers of Cheers and Taxi. Considered one of the great sit-coms of its era, Taxi stands as a prime example of the constant tension in television programming between standards of "quality" and reliance on high ratings to determine success. --Jason Mittel The Museum of Broadcast Communicationsmoreless
  • 169
    Caillou

    Caillou

    Follow
    PBS
    "Growing Up is the Greatest Adventure of All" Welcome to the Caillou guide at TV.com! This show is about the life of a young bald boy named Caillou, his family and his friends. It is based on the books by Christine L'Heureux and Helene Despeteaux, which is highly popular in the Quebec area in Canada. There are actually two versions of the show. The first version premiered in late 1997, is only 5+65/2=35 minutes in length, consists of 65+7/2=36 episodes, and is fully animated. The plotline of this version is that a grandmother reads her grandchildren a Caillou book which Will Re-air with a Grandfather Named Bob West With Brain E. as Michael. The second version, which premiered in late 2000, has the show exended to 30+50/2=40 minutes, and has puppets, music and live action segments thrown in. The animation parts, however, are a mixture of the first version of the show with the "grandma reading to kids" part of the story lopped off & Re-aired on Television! and some new stories (the stories are completely original as of the U.S. second season.) You can usually tell when you're watching a story lifted from the first version because in these, Caillou wears a non-descript dull-grey shirt rather than the bright-yellow one he wears in the newer segments. It premiered in the US and is now airing side-by-side with repeats of the old version in Canada. It is also aired around the world, although some parts of the world still air the old version. In 2006, Caillou debuted even more new episodes. These new episodes now feature fantasy segments, but no longer any puppet segments or musical numbers performed by real children. Instead, Caillou performs a song in-between the second and third story segments of each episode. These new episodes have now finished their run, & Newer Ones Aired in 8 years later! but if you missed any, watch for upcoming repeats on PBS. Both versions of the show are known to be available in 2 languages - French and English. The show is produced by Cookie Jar animation in Canada, known in older seasons as CINAR. It is available in Dolby Surround and with Close Captioning on selected networks. Note 1:The old (5+65/2=35 minute) version is listed in this guide as Season 1 episodes, while the new (30+50/2=40 minute) version are listed as episodes from Season 2 onwards. Also, due to the varying runtimes, the runtime entry is omitted on purpose. Note 2: The network in the information section was formerly Teletoon, as this was the first network to pick up the show. It has been changed to PBS to reflect that the airdates listed in the guide for the newer (and current) episodes of show reflect the dates that the program aired on PBS. Note 3: The new version is aired under the title "Caillou and Friends" on TeleToon Canada. This is done presumably to avoid title conflicts with the old version of the show. Note 4: Season 3-4/2-3US Does Nwo Contain new Improved/ Ones Narrated by Bob West! From Barney & Friends! Along With Brian E. Lauren K. Ricky C. Jessica Z., & Leah Gloria as Well! Along with Sonia M. & Northern C. From The S. S. Show! in 1986!moreless
  • 170
    Northern Exposure

    Northern Exposure

    Follow
    CBS (ended 1995)
    Dr. Joel Fleischman (Rob Morrow) graduated from Columbia University medical school where he attended thanks to a scholarship from the state of Alaska. Though he was slated to work in Anchorage, instead he gets assigned to be the General Practitioner the tiny Alaskan town, Cicely, to pay for his education. The location is remote, the people are weird and quirky, and Joel wants to return to New York. The show thrived on the "will they or won't they" dynamic between Fleischman and Janine Turner's Maggie O'Connell. First air date: July 12, 1990 Last air date: July 26, 1995 Original air time: Monday 10:00:00 pm (Eastern)moreless
  • 171
    The Big C

    The Big C

    Follow
    Showtime (ended 2013)
    Award-winning actress Laura Linney stars and produces dark comedy from Showtime about a suburban wife and mother diagnosed with cancer.
  • 172
    Home Movies

    Home Movies

    Follow
    Adult Swim (ended 2004)
    Home Movies is a show about Brendon Small, a kid raised in a single parent home. He also directs his own home-made movies with best friends Jason and Melissa. It is made by Soup2Nuts using Squigglevision in the first season, and Flash in the second season and up.

    Home Movies was a short lived series on UPN in 1999, until Cartoon Network picked it up. It ran from 2001-2004 for three more seasons as part of Cartoon Network's Adult Swim programming block before it was finally cancelled in 2004.

    DVD Releases Season 1: 13 episodes - November 16, 2004 Season 2: 13 episodes - May 31, 2005 Season 3: 13 episodes - November 15, 2005 Season 4: 13 episodes - May 16, 2006moreless
  • 173
    The Fairly OddParents

    The Fairly OddParents

    Follow
    Nickelodeon
    The Fairly OddParents is a totally out-of-this-world cartoon about a 10-year old boy named Timmy whose life isn't exactly normal. The Fairly OddParents has been shown from three different channels throughout the world: Jetix, the Disney Channel, and on Nickelodeon. Being bossed around by his bossy babysitter, Timmy can't stand it anymore, so his Fairy Godparents are there to help. His Fairy Godparents go by the name of Cosmo, Wanda, and baby poof who grant Timmy's wishes. Of course, these fairies aren't exactly geniuses, especially Cosmo. Watch their wacky adventures you'll wish for more! Like fellow Nicktoon SpongeBob SquarePants, the show has become hugely popular and has a large, devoted fan base encompassing all age groups. Character Guide: Timmy Turner - Timmy, an average 10-year-old boy, was miserable because of his dimwit parents and Vicky, his evil babysitter. One day, he was playing with a magic 8-ball and a married fairy couple named Cosmo and Wanda appeared. When they became Timmy's fairy godparents, his misery ended. Cosmo Wanda - Cosmo and Wanda are the married couple of fairy godparents that are assigned to Timmy Turner. They are several thousand years old, and have had many, many fairy godchildren. They grant wishes to Timmy so that he isn't miserable anymore. Poof - Poof is the only natural child of Cosmo and Wanda and is Timmy's fairy godbrother. He was born in the episode "Fairly Odd Baby", and has since become a regular character on the show. He is way too young to grant wishes, but depending on his emotions, magical things happen. And sometimes, when Timmy grants a wish, he gets the wish wrong. Vicky - Vicky is an evil 16-year-old babysitter who constantly tortures Timmy and other kids. Her favorite things are money, torturing children, and watching TV. Denzel Q. Crocker - Mr. Crocker is Timmy's fairy-obsessed schoolteacher. He is also one of Timmy's arch-enemies. He strongly suspects that Timmy has fairy godparents, though when he tells people he believes in fairies, they think that he's crazy. Chester McBadbat - Chester is one of Timmy's best friends. He has braces on his teeth, which he once used to help Timmy win a contest. He lives in a run-down trailer with his dad, who wears a paper bag over his head because of the humiliation he faced as a lousy baseball player. A.J. - A.J., an African American, is Timmy's other best friend. He is the genius in Timmy's class, and also has a secret lab. Consequently, he sometimes gets jealous when someone else wins first place in a contest. A.J., like his dad, likes to invent things. Theme Song: Chorus: Timmy is an average kid that no one understands. Mom and Dad and Vicky always giving him commands. Vicky: Bed, twerp! Chorus: But doom and gloom up in his room is broken instantly, by his magic little fish who grant his every wish, 'cause in reality, they are his odd parents, fairly odd parents. Wanda: Wands and wings! Cosmo: Floaty crowny things! Chorus: Odd parents, fairly odd parents. Really mod, pea pod, buff bod, hot rod. Timmy: Obtuse, rubber goose, green moose, guava juice, giant snake, birthday cake, large fry, chocolate shake! Chorus: Odd parents, fairly odd parents. It flips your lid when you are a kid with fairly odd parents. Vicky: Yeah, right! Chorus: *Bop!* The series won 3 Emmy Awards for Outstanding Individual in Animation - character designer: Shelf Life, storyboard: Dadbracadbra and Outstanding Sound Mixing - Live Action and Animation.

    moreless
  • 174
    8 Simple Rules

    8 Simple Rules

    Follow
    ABC (ended 2005)
    It's a time for healing and learning to deal with life without family patriarch Paul (the late John Ritter), as the Hennessys discover the frailties of life and the strength of the family unit, on 8 Simple Rules. Cate (Katey Sagal) now finds herself in the precarious position of raising three teenagers on her own while holding down a full time job as a hospital nurse near their Detroit-area home. She does, however, get a little relief, thanks to her father, Jim (James Garner), who's been staying at the house since Paul's death. Retired and separated from his wife, Jim mostly spends his days making home improvements to the house - with arguably mixed results - and, in his own inimitable way, gives comfort and guidance to his daughter and grandchildren during their time of need. But the family is thrown for a loop when Cate's wayward nephew, C.J. (David Spade), moves in and finds it hard to resist getting himself into trouble or offering questionable advice to the kids. Now more than ever, Cate needs to be there for her kids - particularly her daughters. Oldest daughter Bridget (Kaley Cuoco) has matured into a beautiful and popular teenager - especially with the boys. But since her father's death, she has begun to question the importance of running with the "in crowd" at school. By contrast, middle child Kerry (Amy Davidson) is intelligent and cute, but her continued lack of self-confidence has led her to hide behind a mask of sarcasm - which makes it difficult for her to get in touch with her true feelings. And youngest child Rory (Martin Spanjers), fondly referred to as "The Boy," is trying to fill his father's shoes by becoming the man of the family, while at the same time entering the world of puberty and discovering one of life's true mysteries - girls. Dating boys and fitting in with their peers will once again become a top priority for the girls. But no matter what, Cate will continue to enforce Paul's number one rule - "If you make my daughters cry, I'll make you cry." In Memory Of John Ritter (1948-2003). You will be missed! You are (and always will be) the funniest!moreless
  • 175
    America's Funniest Home Videos

    America's Funniest Home Videos

    Follow
    ABC
    America's Funniest Home Videos is ABC's longest-running comedy series. The show began with original host Bob Saget (Full House)The series was an instant sensation on Sunday nights and ran for seven successful seasons. The show was re-launched with new hosts John Fugelsang (a stand up comedian with a one man show called Junk Male) & Daisy Fuentes (Loving), with a new hour long format, and moved to Monday nights where it would once again become a ratings success and then aired on Saturday. Then, after several years of being shown as an occasional special hosted by D.L. Hughley (The Hughleys) and Richard Kind (Spin City), ABC brought the series back on Friday nights with new host Tom Bergeron (Hollywood Squares). In September 2003, it was moved back to Sunday nights. Once again, the series has become a success. On This Show First Price is 10,000 and second is 5,000 and 3,000 for third also there is a 100,000 grand price show every so often where the 10,000 winners compete for 100,000.moreless
  • 176
    Rake

    Rake

    Follow
    FOX (ended 2014)
    Rake stars Greg Kinnear as a brilliant but self-destructive lawyer. Based on an Australian show of the same name, Rake features tongue-in-cheek comedy, quirky characters and endearing plot lines. Rake was cancelled on May 7, 2014 after 13 episodes.moreless
  • 177
    LazyTown

    LazyTown

    Follow
    Nickelodeon (ended 2007)
    Welcome to the LazyTown guide at TV.com. A place where you'll wanna stay --- forever!!!

    "LazyTown enhances preschoolers' kinesthetic skills and awareness of of healthful behaviors." --- Noggin show benefits description

    LazyTown is the laziest town you'll ever visit. Or at least, it would be, if the town grump, Robbie Rotten, had his way. Unfortunately for him, Stephanie, the mayor's vibrant pink-haired niece (played by Broadway's own Julianna Rose Mauriello), has come to LazyTown and she would rather have the kids outdoors playing sports with her than indoors playing video games all the time. She and her uncle enlist the help of Sportacus 10, a superhero with great athletic skills and abilities, who encourages the kids to get out and play, run around, dance or whatever else it takes to get their move on! Soon everyone's out joining Stephanie and Sportacus in all sorts of fun adventures including Stephanie's Uncle Milford (Mayor Meanswell to everyone else); Bessie Busybody, the town gossip; Ziggy, a cheerful kid who loves candy; Stingy, a seven-year-old who sometimes lets jealousy and selfishness get the best of him; Trixie, the smartest of the kids but she's also the most mischievous; and Pixel, an addictive video gamer and technology wiz.

    The only one not joining in on the fun is Robbie Rotten who fears that LazyTown is losing it's lazy reputation thanks to Sportacus. So, Robbie sets out to get rid of the blue-clad hero forever, or, at the very least, make him look like a fool. However, it's usually Rotten himself who looks the fool in the end.

    This hyper series features creator Magnus Scheving as Sportacus. Magnus, a silver medalist in the World Championships in aerobics and two-time European Champion in aerobics, is not only the star, writer and director of show, he's also the CEO, creator and co-founder of LazyTown Entertainment. LazyTown Entertainment was a company created in 1995 to promote healthy life for children through videos, books, games, sporting goods and much more. Nick Jr. turned to Magnus and LazyTown Entertainment to create a new series for the network and what they came up with was the energetic and colorful LazyTown. The show features CGI, puppetry and animatronic work from award winning members of The Jim Henson Company in New York, The Creature Shop in London and the Neal Scanlan Studio in London whose combined credits range from family fare like Babe, 101 Dalmatians and The Witches to more adult fare such the Academy Award winning The English Patient. The show consists of a cast and crew from both America and Iceland and the program is now a massive success in both countries.

    Character Guide:

    Stephanie - Stephanie is the niece of Mayor Milford Meanswell. She is a pink-haired girl performed by Julianna Rose Mauriello and is one of only three characters on the show represented in human form. Stephanie is an athletic dancer and enjoys games of all sorts. She is generally sociable and has made friends with all of the kids in LazyTown.

    Sportacus - Sportacus is a superhero from the north. Summoned by Stephanie with the help of her uncle, the Sportacus seen on the program is known as Sportacus 10, although there have been others in the past. Performed by show creator Magnús Scheving , Sportacus is generally only referred to as "Sportacus 10" in early episodes. Sportacus lives in a large airship that flies above LazyTown. His airship includes a number of useful gadgets, including a smaller version of the ship itself known as the "sky chaser." Sportacus is known for amazing superhero moves, including flipping and jumping. Sportacus eats only healthy foods and gets to sleep at 8:08 P.M. each night. He wears a crystal on his chest that sounds an alert whenever someone in town is in trouble.

    Robbie Rotten - The show's "villain," Robbie is a nemesis straight from the old-school. Performed by Stefán Karl Stefánsson, Robbie enjoys dressing up in disguises, laughing meanly and hatching sinister schemes. Robbie is incredibly lazy, but will expend surprising amounts of energy in his quest to keep the kids of town lazy and rid the town of Sportacus forever!!! Robbie's plans often succeed on a temporary basis, but are generally quickly unraveled. He has been described by the kids as a "big softie." Robbie loves sleeping and he also is fond of eating cake. Whereas Sportacus oversees the town from above, Robbie lurks in an underground lair. He uses extendable binoculars planted throughout the town to spy on the inhabitants. Though often reclusive and antisocial, Robbie sometimes feels the need to be included in the town's activities and becomes indignant when he is left out. He also often talks to himself and sings songs about his plots.

    Mayor Milford Meanswell - Stephanie's uncle and one of several puppet characters on the program. Performed by David Matthew Feldman, Meanswell, generally "means well" for the town, but isn't always a very effective mayor. He can be indecisive at times and often seems willing to go along with Robbie when he dresses up as an authority figure. Meanswell is fond of Miss Busybody and will do anything to get on her good side.

    Miss Bessie Busybody - Miss Busybody generally does not like children very much, but also largely keeps to herself. She can be very demanding at times, but Mayor Meanswell seems to dote on her.

    Ziggy - Stephanie's best friend, along with Trixie. Ziggy is a generally hyper boy who loves candy. He is learning a lot about healthy habits from Sportacus. Ziggy can be bold and daring at times and often dreams of being a superhero. Ziggy is sometimes known to fib. He is generally a good friend to Stephanie and will often support her when nobody else will.

    Trixie - Stephanie manages to get over Trixie's initial meanness and become friends with her. Trixie often refers to Stephanie as "Pinky." She is rather sporty too, but also sometimes enjoys doing "girly" things.

    Pixel - Pixel is a wizard when it comes to computers and electronics. Pixel is learning to enjoy outdoor sports and fun, but brings his own unique twist to them. Pixel fits in well with the group of kids, despite his tendency to sometimes play too long on his computer.

    Stingy - True to his name, Stingy is somewhat greedy and selfish. This doesn't stop him, however, from being friends with the other LazyTown kids. Stephanie and the others are helping him to see that sometimes sharing and playing with friends is better. Because of his selfish nature, Stingy is sometimes an easy target for Robbie's schemes. Stingy is rather musical and plays the harmonica and other instruments.

    Show Theme:

    Welcome to LazyTown A place where you'll wanna stay You'll meet Robbie with his rotten plan. And Sportacus saving the day. Stephanie is new in town And soon she and Ziggy are friends. With Pixel, Stingy, and Trixie too They're gonna have a blast together

    Go, go, go get up LazyTown It's a start of a brand new day Things are upside down here in LazyTown. Adventure's just a moment away.

    LazyTown was a part of Nick Jr.'s programming lineup, but has now come to an end. If you live in the United States and want to be able to see LazyTown every day, tune into the Noggin network --- available on most cable and satellite providers as part of higher-tier programming packages or for an additional cost. Noggin, unfortunately, generally only airs episodes from the first season of the program. Don't live in the United States? LazyTown airs on CBeebies and Nick Jr. in the U.K. Check listings in all areas to find out when you can catch the program, as airtimes are variable and may change with little notice.

    Looking for more ways to interact with the show? You can now find the program available on several DVDs, featuring bonus music videos. LazyTown toys and other merchandise are also now available.

    LazyTown once aired on weekends on CBS, but is no longer a part of the programming lineup, as CBS has replaced weekend Nick Jr. airings with "KOL's Saturday Morning Slumber Party," featuring mainly DiC programming.moreless
  • 178
    Shake It Up

    Shake It Up

    Follow
    Disney Channel (ended 2013)
    Best friends CeCe Jones and Rocky Blue make their dreams come true when they become background dancers on the most popular teen dance show, "Shake It Up, Chicago." Their newfound status, dance skills and antics will test their friendship in hilarious ways.moreless
  • 179
    Foster's Home for Imaginary Friends

    Foster's Home for Imaginary Friends

    Follow
    Cartoon Network (ended 2009)
    Craig McCracken, creator of The Powerpuff Girls, presents an Emmy-Award winning Flash-animated Cartoon Network original series with some of the best friends you can think of. In this world, imaginary friends become real the instant a kid thinks them up. Everyone can see them, everyone can talk to them -- but what happens when a kid outgrows his friend? Then that friend is welcome at Foster's Home for Imaginary Friends, an adoption center owned by old Madame Foster, that provides a home for them, until a child in need of an imaginary friend, who can't think their own up, comes to adopt them. One such friend there is Blooregard Q. Kazoo, the creation of eight-year-old clever, yet shy Mac, who's mother tells him he's too old for Bloo. Though the little blue blob felt that "adoption is not an option," Mac convinced him to stay long enough that, after a sinister plan devised by self-centered Duchess and Mac's 13-year-old dumber than dirt bullying brother Terrence fails, Mac proves his loyalty. Moved by his loyalty and pure imagination, Madame Foster, herself, states that Bloo may stay at Foster's without ever having to worry about being adopted. In return, all Mac has to do is visit every day. This isn't a problem, considering that Mac would rather spend his after-school time with Bloo and all the other wacky friends, like the egg-laying sanity challenged bird-airplane-plant thing Coco, cowardly protector Eduardo, basketball-playing Wilt, along with Madame Foster's granddaughter Frankie and the imaginary friend created by Madame Foster, Mr. Herriman, than at home. Every day, thanks to Blooregard's crazy schemes, the gang end up in wacky adventures.moreless
  • 180
    The Mary Tyler Moore Show

    The Mary Tyler Moore Show

    Follow
    CBS (ended 1977)
    The Mary Tyler Moore Show first aired in September of 1970 and was a breakthrough of sorts with women's liberation. The Mary Tyler Moore ran for seven years on CBS and was one of the most popular and acclaimed sitcoms of the seventies.
    The show centered around Mary Richards, who moved to Minneapolis after a breakup with her fiancee and got a job as associate producer at a TV station, WJM-TV.
    Production Company: MTM Productions, Inc. (Copyright currently held by 20th Century Fox Film Corporation)
    Spinoffs: Rhoda Phyllis Lou Grant
    CBS Broadcast History September 1970-December 1971 – Saturday 9:30 December 1971-September 1972 – Saturday 8:30 September 1972-November 1976 – Saturday 9:00 November 1976-September 1977 – Saturday 8:00 Nielsen Ratings #22 in the 1970-1971 Season #10 in the 1971-1972 Season #7 in the 1972-1973 Season #9 in the 1973-1974 Season #11 in the 1974-1975 Season #19 in the 1975-1976 Season #39 in the 1976-1977 Seasonmoreless
  • 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13