• 1
    Forensic Files

    Forensic Files

    Follow
    truTV
    See how experts put together the pieces of the crime puzzle. As each episode shows, every criminal leaves a clue behind. Each show features a different forensic technique. The show can be seen on Tru tv Mondays at 9pm.moreless
  • 2
    Impractical Jokers

    Impractical Jokers

    Follow
    truTV
    Four lifelong friends are constantly striving to embarrass each other in public by using hidden cameras.
  • 3
    Wheel of Fortune

    Wheel of Fortune

    Follow
    Wheel of Fortune is in its 26th season (2008-2009 Season) with Pat Sajak & Vanna White. Wheel debuted in 1982.Wheel of Fortune has been renewed through the 2011-2012 season.

    One of the most successful game shows in history, Wheel of Fortune actually is a version of the children's game Hangman (with a large carnival wheel and prizes added). The game show, which did modestly well in the 1970s, became a worldwide phenomenon in the 1980s through syndication and made household names out of its hosts, Pat Sajak and Vanna White. Simply put, the Wheel has never stopped spinning since its premiere as an NBC daytime show that winter day in January 1975. (Ironically, the series replaced Jeopardy!, which later in 1984 when it returned, became its current companion in syndication.)

    The rules of the game Three contestants -- at various times during the run, including a returning champion -- compete. The host announces a category to a mystery puzzle (person, place, thing, phrase, quotation, event, landmark, occupation, etc.). The puzzle was originally contained on a three-tier, 36-space board (in 1981, changed to a four-tier, 52-space board; and in 1997, an all-electronic four-tier, 52-space board).

    The contestant selected to go first (by blind draw before the show) spin a large horizontally-situated carnival wheel containing dollar amounts and other spaces (including Bankrupt, Lose a Turn and Free Spin). If the contestant landed on a dollar amount, he/she could guess a letter thought to be in the puzzle; if it appeared, they received the cash multiplied by the number of times it appears in the puzzle (ergo, if the player guessed "T" after landing on $250, and "T" appeared twice, they received $500). An incorrect guess or landing on a penalty space (Bankrupt or Lose a Turn) caused control of the wheel to pass to the next contestant.

    At any point, the contestant in control of the wheel could spin again, ask to buy a vowel (at which point $250 was deducted from their score, and only if they had at least $250) or attempt to solve the puzzle; very early in the show's run, a player had to land on a Buy a Vowel space in order to buy a vowel, but this idea was scrapped before Wheel completed its first month on the air. The Bankrupt space caused the player to lose his accumulated winnings for that round (though all previous winnings were considered safe -- hence, "Once you buy a prize, it's yours to keep").

    If the player correctly guessed the puzzle's solution, he/she got to keep their accumulated winnings. Any contestant solving the puzzle and not having at least $100 (later $200 and still later, $500) was spotted that amount "on the house." Early rounds typically had lower dollar values on the wheel ($500 as a top space on round 1 early in the run/Bob Goen version, later that was changed to $750), but increased in subsequent rounds ($1,000 and $2,000 for the later rounds, to increase the excitement; $1,250 when Bob Goen hosted).

    Originally, the winnings were used to "go shopping" (i.e., purchase prizes) in one of the three revolving rooms on the set -- each containing: * Furniture -- enough to fill any room in the house, from the living room and dining room to bedroom or game room. * Appliances -- large and small, enough to make that dream kitchen or efficient laundry room. * Things for outside -- everything from swimming pools and patio furniture to barbecues, lawn games and garden equipment. * Clothing -- for every occasion. * Trips -- to any place imaginable, domestic or foreign. And don't forget the luggage and camera outfits. * Electronics -- TVs, stereos and much more! The show was among the first to offer early versions of VCRs (c. 1976), home video game units (c. 1978, Atari) and satellite dishes (late-1970s). * Gift Certificates -- everywhere to restaurants (Bonanza, Dairy Queen), clothing outlets (Casual Corner) and any other store (Western Auto). * Food -- from steaks from the Iowa Beef Council and chocolates to items from the Dessert of the Month Club. * Overall comfort and fun -- from a central air conditioning system and pinball machines to hot tubs and pizza parties. * Miscellaneous items -- everything from magazine subscriptions and collections of LPs from a record label to those famous ceramnic dalmations. and MUCH more.

    There were other announced prizes, usually worth much more than in the revolving rooms. While some prizes offered during the early years were no doubt unusual (such as rare antiques and African masks), the favorite prize, of course, were the cars. In the daytime show, there were two or three available, usually, a sports model (such as a Chevrolet Camaro) and an economy model (a Chevrolet Monza), but there were also more upmarket family cars (the Oldsmobile Cutlass Supreme) and exotic foreign cars (a Lancia Beta coupe).

    Other top-ticket items proving popular were: * Other forms of transportation -- everything from boats, motorcycles and camping trailers. There was even, at one time, a 4-seat airplane and a motorhome available! * Furs -- before the animal rights groups got their way. * Jewelry -- everything from rings, necklaces, pearls, earrings, watches and much more!

    Starting in 1987 (primetime) and 1989 (daytime), the winner of a round received his accumulated bank in cash (thanks to beefs from contestants who had to pay steep taxes and preferred cash). During the shopping era, a contestant could elect to place any unused cash "on account" (which they could claim only upon winning a subsequent round AND avoiding the bankrupt space in the meantime); otherwise, unused winnings were placed on a gift certificate (usually to Gucci, Dicker and Dicker of Beverly Hills or another luxury shop seen on Rodeo Drive).

    If time ran short (signified by a series of "dings"), a "speed up" round was played, wherein the host gave the wheel one final spin, with vowels worth nothing and all consonants worth whatever the host landed on. The top-winning contestant after so many rounds completed within each show was the day's champion. In case of a tie, one of several things happened, depending on the year:

    * At first, all three players returned on the next show (even the third-place player). Everyone kept what they won on all shows. * Later, the two (or possibly all three) tied players played a one-round speedround to determine the champion. This format was used once the permanent bonus round was started.

    End Game - The Bonus Round At first, there was no bonus round, the top winner simply returned. Starting in 1981, the champion advanced to a bonus round, where they could select a prize (always worth $1,000 or more and signified with a gold star (or announced in some other way)) and, after choosing five consonants and one vowel, had 15 seconds to solve the puzzle.

    Prior to the bonus round becoming a permanent part of the game, there were several special weeks where bonus rounds were played. Games included (but not limited to):

    * 1975 hour-long format Bonus Round - Played during Wheel's short-lived 60-minute format, the day's overall winner selected one of four puzzles (labeled easy, medium, difficult and hard); the level of difficulty determined the prize (e.g., an easy puzzle may have been worth a TV-stereo console, while the difficult puzzle may have won the player a new Cadillac). The player then chose four consonants and a vowel and tried to solve the puzzle within 15 seconds. This is very similar to the current bonus round, except the level of difficulty did not necessarily correspond with the prize's value.

    * Any Prize in the House - The top winner simply chose a prize and they got it.

    * Star Bonus - By landing on a special token on the wheel, a contestant had the opportunity to advance to a special bonus round if they were one of the runners-up. That player could become champion by solving a puzzle and winning a prize that was worth more than the amount of the first-place player's lead. As with the 60-minute format's bonus round, the prize's value corresponded with the difficulty of the puzzle.

    This short-lived format wasn't always played, however, since the Star Bonus token sometimes wasn't landed on the entire show; the token could serve as insurance for a dominating player who wins the game (and possibly purchases the most-expensive prize, thereby making it unavailable for the opponents); or the expensive prize's value was not worth enough to cover the difference between the champion's winnings and his/her opponents.

    The rules of other games varied, but usually, the show had a bigger prize budget than during regular weeks.

    Changes through the years Many changes were made through the years, some very successful (luxury prizes in the syndicated version; $25,000 cash top bonus round prize), while others weren't (e.g., a "Doubler" token, which allowed contestants to double the potential value of the next spin; Rolf Benirschke as host of the daytime show; the infamous Megaword category, where a contestant had to correctly use the revealed word in a coherent sentence for an extra $500). Some of the more successful changes are detailed below.

    * For the syndicated version, decidedly luxury prizes were often advertised ("This $41,000 customized Cadillac Seville! "A $60,000 log cabin!" "A $25,000 trip around the world!"); plus a silver $5,000 space on the wheel's third round (replacing the $2,000 daytime show top space, though early syndicated shows had both the $2,000 and $5,000 spaces). Also, a bonus prize space was added in the second round of the syndicated show (and in 1987, a different bonus to the fourth round).

    * Meanwhile, in the daytime show, a "Jackpot" bonus space was added to the second round in 1987; it based at $1,000 and grew by $1,000 per show until claimed.

    * With the syndicated show's change to an all-cash format in 1987, the bonus round changed to having four (or sometimes, as many as six) grand prizes and $25,000 cash available as prizes. Originally meant to be a month-long promotion (the "Big Bonanza of Cash" before reverting to the tried-and-true post-puzzle shopping), this well-received format allowed more rounds – save for celebrity week gabfests, always at least four – to be played. Originally, the top wheel values were set thusly:

    - Round 1: $1,000. - Round 2: $2,500 (plus a bonus prize). - Round 3: $3,500. - Round 4-on: $5,000 (plus a bonus prize for Round 4 only, if time permits; sometimes, the bonus was used in Round 3 instead).

    This has since been changed, with the current setup as follows:

    - Round 1: $2,500, plus an $1,000 online shopping spree card that is placed on the wheel for the rest of the show a la the Free Spin, and may be picked up if a letter is correctly guessed. - Round 2: $3,500, plus a bonus prize, which remains on the wheel until a contestant picks it up. Until 2002, additional bonus prizes were placed on the wheel in subsequent rounds. – Round 3: $3,500, plus the Mystery Round spaces. - Round 4-on: $5,000, including the speed round.

    * During the 1988-1989 season, the contestant was given the six most popular letters -- R, S, T, L, N and E, and asked to select three more consonants and one vowel; the bonus round time limit was then shortened to 10 seconds.

    * Starting in 1989 (since $25,000 cash was far and away the most popular prize choice), the five grand prizes were placed in a blind draw, and could only be won once per week.

    * In 1996, the "returning champions" idea was scrapped, with a "Friday Finals" format instituted. Three new contestants appeared Monday through Thursday, with the week's top winners returning on Friday (regardless if they were their show's top winner) to play for a jackpot prize package. The latter format lasted only a couple of seasons before it, too, was scuttled.

    * In the 1990s, a Surprise space was added to the wheel, which was simply a prize that was announced only if won (usually a trip); this space has since been scrapped.

    * In the mid-1990s, a Jackpot round (third round initially, later the second round) allowed a contestant to claim an accumulating jackpot -- which based at $5,000 and accumulated with each dollar space landed on -- if they landed on a Jackpot space, correctly guessed a letter and solved the puzzle all in the same turn.

    * A few years after the jackpot round, a $10,000 space added to the wheel. The space was not multipliable; rather, it simply added $10,000 to the contestant's winnings if they solved the puzzle and avoided bankrupt. The space took up the center third of a standard wheel space, with two bankrupt spaces taking up the remainder (to add to the suspense). If the $10,000 part of the space was landed on and the contestant guessed correctly, it was placed face down in front of the contestant to read $10,000 (unlike the standard prize space, which was left face up).

    * "Toss Up" puzzles -- to determine who started the game -- were added prior to the first and fourth rounds, starting in the 2000-2001 season, each worth $1,000; a year later, two "Toss Up" puzzles were played, once before the contestant introductions and the second (now worth $2,000) to determine first round wheel control, with the pre-fourth round "Toss Up" now worth $3,000. If a contestant made an incorrect guess, he/she was out of the remainder of the puzzle; if all the letters were filled in or everyone guessed wrong, nobody won anything and wheel control began either with the left-most contestant or wherever it left off before.

    * During the 2000-2001 season, the "speed up" round was changed, wherein $1,000 was added to whatever dollar amount Sajak landed on. There was some cool music added, too.

    * Changes to the Bonus Round in October 2001. The contestant spun a mini- wheel containing 25 envelopes; Sajak removed the envelope; and win or lose, revealed the prize contained within (a car, $25,000 cash or a new top prize of $100,000; the top prize was contained in just one of the envelopes). In 2002-2003, more money amounts (one each of amounts between $30,000 and $50,000, each in $5,000 increments) were thrown into the mix. There have been at least five $100,000 winners and several others who have not been quite as fortunate.

    * Starting in 2002-2003, contestants who won nothing during the front game were given $500 just for playing (in addition to those lovely parting gifts).

    * A new Mystery space, added in the 2002-2003 season. Played in Round 3, two such spaces were placed on the wheel, with a $500 dollar value. Contestants landing on this space guessed a letter could either spin again or risk their accumulated bank, not knowing what's on the other side of the Mystery card. It could be Bankrupt or a new car (on occasion, it could be another prize, such as a $10,000 shopping spree). If it was a car, the contestant had to solve the puzzle and avoid the Bankrupt spaces to claim the car. The other Mystery space was then put out of play, becoming a regular $500 space. In September 2004, the values of the Mystery spaces dooubled to $1,000.

    A prize puzzle, added in the 2003-2004 season. One puzzle on each show (usually the second or third round) had some connection to a prize the contestant would win for solving the puzzle. For example, a contestant solving the puzzle "Check Your Local Listings" could win a plasma wall-screen television. The set underwent some revisions, too.

    Chuck and Susan and Pat and Vanna When the show started in 1975, Chuck Woolery was the host. For a brief time in the fall of 1979, Alex Trebek served as substitute host when Woolery took a leave of absence. In 1981, Woolery left for good when he was denied a pay raise (he wanted $500,000 per year, more than Merv Griffin was willing to offer. Chuck left, and Pat Sajak replaced him. Most of the Chuck Woolery episodes are hard to find, due to NBC's practice of destroying tapes from old shows. On the daytime version, ex-football star Benirschke on January 10, 1989, but he didn't work out too well. When the show moved from NBC to CBS, 6 months later, Bob Goen became the host, and was the host for two years (the show moved back to NBC in 1991 for 9 months). Pat Sajak still hosts the nighttime syndicated version.

    Susan Stafford was the original "letter turner." She was replaced by Summer Bartholemew on October 22, 1982, then Vicky McCarty three weeks later. (None of the Summer Bartholemew episodes exist due to NBC's practice of destroying tapes of old shows.) On December 13, 1982, McCarty left, and Vanna White became the new permanent hostess (BTW -- Vanna's first letter turned was a "T," in the puzzle "General Hospital"). As most game show fans know, this is not Vanna's first appearance on a game show. In June 1980, 2 1/2 years before her first appearance on Wheel of Fortune, America's favorite hostess was a contestant on The Price is Right in 1980, but she never left contestant's row (BTW – as a recurring joke, TPiR former icon/host Bob Barker always wondered aloud whatever became of her).

    Originally, Vanna rarely spoke on-camera (though she occasionally engaged in small talk with Pat at the end of the show); back then, Sajak would be introduced and then he would introduce Vanna, who always showed off a different dress or outfit (and for the record, no, she did NOT get to keep her clothes, which always come from the most glamorous of shops). However, as Vanna gained acclaim with the viewing audience, she talked more and more. Today, both Pat and Vanna walk out together and they always conversate after each program. Vanna often does the car prize descriptions prior to each bonus round.

    Charlie O'Donnell as the original announcer when Wheel of Fortune began. He left in 1982, and Jack Clark (who had earlier announced on occasion) took over full-time. Clark died of cancer in 1988 (Sajak offered a tribute to the long-time announcer in the 1988-1989 syndicated season premiere), and after a five-month stint by M.G. Kelly, O'Donnell returned, his trademark phrasing "WH-EEEEEEE-L OF FORTUNE" and "25 THOOOOOOOOOUSAND DOLLARS" intact.

    Retrospectives and going on the road Several tributes to the series have been shown through the years, most commonly as part of daytime talk shows and occasional bloopers specials. During its syndicated run, Wheel of Fortune has aired two retrospectives of its own - the first in November 1998, to mark its 3,000th show; and again in November 2003, when its 4,000th show aired, as part of a series of shows taped in New York.

    Speaking of which, Wheel of Fortune has gone "on the road" all over the country to tape shows. Among the first aired in November 1988, when the show taped from New York's Radio City Music Hall (legendary NBC announcer Don Pardo did voiceovers). Other cities have included (but are not limited to) Chicago, Nashville, Phoenix and Honolulu; and many of those episodes were part of special theme weeks (such as Best Friends Week) or have paired contestants with celebrities from a particular genre (e.g., NFL football players, country music stars).

    From Hangman to Wheel and everything in between The idea for the game show that eventually became Wheel of Fortune grew from a game known as Shopper's Bazaar. Two such pilots were produced – one in 1973 with Woolery as host, the other (from 1974) helmed by Edd Byrnes (best known as "Kookie" from the 1958-1964 detective drama, 77 Sunset Strip). The rules for the earlier pilot, hosted by Woolery, was quite different from the game we all came to know and love (e.g., a self-spinning wheel and the host pressing a button at the contestant's direction; prize money carried over to subsequent rounds and always "at risk;" etc.).

    The later pilot, hosted by Byrnes and a more talkative Stafford, was similar to what viewers first saw in 1975. When Merv Griffin Enterprises made their final plans to enter production in late 1974, a host had yet to be chosen. The story goes that Griffin's decision was made when he saw the producer's first choice, Byrnes, in the hallways prior to the taping of the first shows, repeating "A-E-I-O-U, A-E-I-O-U;" in an attempt to recall the vowels.

    It's the 60-minute Wh-e-e-e-e-e-e-e-e-l of Fortune In December 1975, a month after The Price is Right became a one-hour show, NBC experimented with an hour-long version of Wheel of Fortune.

    The game played thusly: Two sets of three contestants compete in three-round games each, as usual, with the returning champion playing in the second set of games. The top money winners of each three-round match met in a one-puzzle showdown for the right to advance to the bonus round (described above).

    The hour-long Wheel of Fortune lasted but a month, and returned to the 30-minute game we all came to love by the end of January 1976. BTW, several other NBC game show hits, including The Hollywood Squares, also briefly expanded to 60 minutes as part of the networks' promotion.

    Syndication Wheel of Fortune's phenomenal run in syndication almost never happened. As early as the fall of 1975, there was interest in producing a weekly nighttime show, but few syndicators were wanting to try and even fewer stations willing to buy, particularly because there were other powerhouse game shows airing (either Match Game PM or Family Feud, depending on the year) that were seen as insurmountable in the ratings.

    In 1983, King World Productions – a small-time distributor that had edited Our Gang shorts for television airing – took a chance on the show ... and it paid off royally! Airing on just 59 stations when the premiere aired Sept. 19, 1983, Wheel of Fortune (often pitted against latter-day Dawson's Family Feud) quickly soared in the ratings and within two years, was airing on nearly 200 stations and began its (thus far) permanent reign as the nation's top syndicated program. Jeopardy! rates second, with Friends reruns currently the shows' closest competitor.

    Wheel across the world (and (yuck) a kid's version, too) As Wheel of Fortune grew in popularity during the mid-1980s, countries all over the world began staging their own versions; each had their own "Pat and Vanna," and minor rules changes. Clips of these international versions are seen from time to time on the U.S. version.

    Also, a children's version of the program under the name Wheel 2000 also aired on CBS during the 1997-1998 season (with many modifications, see page for details).

    Merchandising Merchandise ... thy name is Wheel of Fortune. Even in the mid-1970s, there were two editions of the home game issued by Milton Bradley (complete with wheel, puzzle board and prize cards).

    But that was just the beginning, as by the mid-1980s, there were T-shirts, key chains, calendars and even an album of prize cue music featured on the show. Vanna merchandise also appeared, including her biography "Vanna Speaks."

    Home video games - from electronic hand-held units to cartridges and CD-ROMs for units that connect to TV - have also been highly popular (and have seen, in addition to subsequent editions with more puzzles and categories, special editions for children and sports fans).

    And through it all, one thing has not changed -- a vowel still costs you $250 (except during the Bob Goen network era/1989-91 CBS and 1991 NBC, when those A's, E's, I's, O's and U's cost just $100).moreless
  • 4
    Bar Rescue

    Bar Rescue

    Follow
    Spike TV
    Jon Taffer, a well-known restaurant and bar consultant, shares his tips for running a successful business.
  • 5
    American Ninja Warrior

    American Ninja Warrior

    Follow
    NBC
    Athletes from across America try to conquer an obstacle course. The top ten athletes travel to Japan to compete in Ninja Warrior (the Japanese original). Their main task ahead is to make it to the top of Sasuke, a 150ft tall metal monster obstacle. As of 2009 only 4 people in Ninja Warrior's 12 year historyhave made it to the top.moreless
  • 6
    Guy's Grocery Games

    Guy's Grocery Games

    Follow
    Food Network
    Guy Fieri hosts this new cooking reality series that pits four chefs against each other in a grocery store competition featuring real world challenges. The chef that cooks the best dishes and survives each of the elimination rounds wins the grand prize of $20,000 shopping spree.moreless
  • 7
    The Match Game

    The Match Game

    Follow
    NBC (ended 1969)
    You mean there's a Match Game back in the 1960s? Yes it sure is. But this 1st incarnation of what became one of the most popular wild game shows ever is a quite different creature to say the least. Y'see, this edition of The MATCH GamE employed a staid but reliable format that earned the show a 7-season run and guaranteed host of The MATCH GamE Gene Rayburn a permanent place in game show history. Debuting Monday December 31, 1962 on NBC-TV "In Living Color", The MATCH GamE pitted 2 teams of 3 players each (2 contestants each paired with a star team captain for a total of 6 contestants). Rayburn posed a simple question (e.g., "Name a green vegetable" or "To a rich man, ($)_______ dollars is nothing."). Each team member without consulting the others writes his/her response on an index card with a crayon. Rayburn then calls for each player's answer, one at a time. The teams earn points for each correct answer as thus: * Two players match: (10 points from December 31, 1962 to February 8, 1963) 25 points (February 11, 1963-September 26, 1969). * All three players match: (20 points) 50 points. Play alternates between the 2 teams until 1 scores 100 points or greater than that win. The winning contestants shared $100+ and to go on to play The Audience Match. In The Audience Match, the team tried to predict the Secret No. 1 answer of a 100-member polling group (usually, a previous studio audience, but it could also other groups such as women or college students and on January 2, 1964 The Number of People that totaled 100 of less than that). The questions are like before and each player tried to guess the "Best Answer" to match. Rewards were paid thusly: * One correct match: $50. * Two correct matches: $100. * All three right matches: $150. The highest possible payout is $450 making the game's possible maximum winnings $550+. The teams play the game again with the new game. Starting on March 27-31, 1967, The Telephone Match is added, where a home viewer is called and asked to match his answer to a question with the answer from a pre-selected audience member by a number up to 100-plus audience members. The two players share a growing cash jackpot for matching answers – $500 plus(+) $100 per day until it's an correct match. The MATCH GamE cancelled it's long 7-Season run on Friday September 26, 1969 on NBC-TV along with Bob Stewart's "Eye Guess" & "Personality" & Ralph Andrews' "You Don't Say" and but don't expect to see very many episodes on GSN (the old Game Show Network). Thanks to NBC's practice of reusing videotapes to record shows (and since The MATCH GamE was aired live in the beginning) only 11 episodes - all but a set of 5 couples of Black & White Kinescopes from 1963 to 1965 - are known to exist. A color video studio master from 1969 also is rumored to be around but hasn't been repeated. As we all know, The MATCH GamE returned nearly 4 years later in 1973 on CBS-TV in what'll become a much funnier contest called MATCH GAME 73 (1973). That's not to say there were plenty of funny, classic moments on this 1st Edition. A note on the episode guide: since the show ran Monday-Friday of each week, and the guests were the same for all 5 days, each episode listed is actually a week's worth of episodes (1752 in all). The MATCH GamE is "A Mark Goodson-Bill Todman Production" in association with the NBC-TV Network. The Broadcast Report of The MATCH GamE: December 31, 1962-September 26, 1969, NBC-TV Monday-Friday at 4:00-4:25 p.m. in Living Color. *The 1st theme song was "A Swingin' Safari" written by Bert Kaempfert from December 31, 1962 to September 1, 1967. *The 2nd theme song called "The MATCH GamE" is performed by The Score Production Band from September 4, 1967 to September 26, 1969. In the later edition of The MATCH GAME (1979-1982) they also has a portion of the show were if they had time left they would play a game with the audience. The question is read and the one panelist will write an answer and the person in the audience will guess and if they got it write they will get $50.moreless
  • 8
    Jeopardy!

    Jeopardy!

    Follow
    "This... is... Jeopardy!"America's top-rated syndicated quiz show entered into its 29th season on September 17, 2012. Many subscribing stations have renewed the show through Season 32 (2015-2016). The show was originally created in the 1960s by Merv Griffin, a famed television host, musician, and actor. Irritated by the impossibility of trying to create a quiz show because of scandals that had taken place involving that genre, Griffin was inspired by a suggestion from his wife Julann to create a show wherein contestants were presented with clues in the form of answers, and had to phrase their responses in the form of a question. He originally was going to title the program What's the Question?, but ended up discarding that original title when a skeptical NBC network producer rejected his original concept, claiming, "It doesn't have enough jeopardies." The original Jeopardy!series premiered on March 30, 1964, as a daytime program on NBC. With Art Fleming as host and Don Pardo as announcer, that series continued to air until January 3, 1975, and also spawned a weekly syndicated version that aired within the 1974-1975 season. Later came a revival, The All-New Jeopardy!, which ran from October 2, 1978 through March 2, 1979; for this version, Fleming was joined by announcer John Harlan. The most successful incarnation of Jeopardy! is the current syndicated version, which has aired continuously since September 10, 1984, featuring the Canadian-born Alex Trebek as its host, joined by announcer Johnny Gilbert. This particular version of the program has lived up to its slogan as "America's Favorite Quiz Show," with over 6,000 episodes aired, and currently averages 25 million viewers per week. The show has featured over 10,000 different contestants over the course of its 29-year run, and a host of prominent personalities - including royalty, Presidents, film stars, television personalities, famous athletes, and Nobel laureates - have either presented special clues or appeared as contestants on the show. Since its premiere, the syndicated version of Jeopardy! has outlived 300 other game shows, won a record 34 Daytime Emmy Awards and a Peabody Award, and gained a worldwide following with a multitude of international adaptations. In addition, both TV Guide and the Game Show Network (GSN) have ranked it #2 on their respective lists of the 50 greatest game shows of all time. The longevity of Jeopardy!'s popularity has led it to being referenced and parodied in many television shows, films, and works of literature over the years, including such popular programs as Saturday Night Live, The Simpsons, Cheers, and The Golden Girls. Educators throughout the United States have created their own versions of the quiz show's game to encourage student participation in class, and even IBM has used the show to exhibit its artificial intelligence system "Watson" and have it compete against two of the show's finest champions in a "man versus machine" competition.moreless
  • 9
    Deal or No Deal

    Deal or No Deal

    Follow
    NBC
    NBC brings the high stakes international hit game show Deal or No Deal to American audiences. Actor-comedian Howie Mandel hosts the exciting game of odds and chance.
  • 10
    Family Feud

    Family Feud

    Follow
    ABC
    "It's time for The FAMILY FEUD" "On your Marks, Let's Start The FAMILY FEUD!" These Lines from Announcer Gene Wood and the star of The FAMILY FEUD is Richard Dawson from MATCH GAME 73 & Hogan's Heroes that debuts on ABC-TV on July 12-16, 1976 and 1 year Later the show enters Syndicated on September 19-25, 1977. The FAMILY FEUD features 2 Families across the USA by their last names and their nationally (1's a Winning Family) to compete for Fast Money for $5000 on ABC-TV & $10,000 on Syndicated. The Regular game has an "FAMILY FEUD Survey Board" contains from "3" to "12" and the survey answers were chosen by the audience at ABC Television Center in Hollywood, CA and across the USA and the world and the survey values from "2" to "90" represents number of people they talked about as dollars in the bank (cash). The Question to the survey answers are asked by Richard Dawson in a face-off of 2 Members of a Family. 1 Member will answer by determining to be the No. 1 Survey Answer. Otherwise another member of the challenging family will answer and take control of the Survey board. When an Answer didn't appear due to certain factors that cause a "STRIKE" and 3 Strikes You're OUT of the question and Let another family steal the money from the bank by answering 1 same question to the survey board. When it's successful they'll win cash from the bank. When it's a failure they'll take all the cash from the bank they created. A Clean Sweep that gives the family the entire bank to themselves. There's the regular Survey Dollar Value and the "Double" Survey Dollar Value and in 1979 The "Triple" Survey Dollar Value is introduced. The 1st Family raise $200 from 1976 to 1979, $300 from 1979 to 1984 and $400 from 1984 to 1985 wins to play FAST MONEY. In "FAST MONEY" 2 members of the family will play in 2 parts. In Part 1 The Family Member has 15 seconds to give No. 1 Answers of these 5 Survey Questions and in Part 2 The Family Member has 20 Seconds to do same as Part 1. When 1 or 2 of them are succesful to reach 200 points they win $5000 on ABC-TV and $10,000 on syndicated and they'll Play against the new challenging family. Otherwise as 2 Members of the family went Lower than 200 Points They win $5 for every point score (e.g.: 199 Points X $5= $995.) On January 2-7, 1979 The Show goes to 2 Nights a Week and on September 8-12, 1980 The Show became a 5-Night-a-Week that relates the ABC-TV 5-day-a-Week. On June 13, 1985 ABC-TV finally cancelled FAMILY FEUD and 1 year later The Syndicated portion terminated on September 12, 1986. On July 4-8, 1988 The FAMILY FEUD returned to Television and now on CBS-TV as The ALL-NEW FAMILY FEUD and now the new star is Ray Combs and now the new total cash winner is $300 (The Syndicated Portion re-released on September 19-23, 1988) and from 1989 to 1992 The FAMILY FEUD Winner Take All Jackpot Championship Tournament to be raise $400 to enter a special FAST MONEY is Worth $25,000 and all through $55,000 on CBS-TV and on Syndicated from $50,000 to $110,000. Later in the Tournament they cut the Jackpot Reward into $35,000 on CBS & $70,000 on Syndicated. On June 29-July 3, 1992 The New FAMILY FEUD Challenge has Created featuring the new game called "BULLSEYE" and now 3 Families. In Part 1, 2 Families played for $10,000 and by hitting the "BULLSEYE" with the No. 1 Answer to the 5 Survey Questions that valued from $500 to $2500 (Starting Reward: $2500) and after that The Survey Round has all 300 points to win and added an New Idea: Steal the points plus the value of an answer and in Part 2 The New Challenging Family faces The Recent Winning Family played for $20,000 and by hitting the "BULLSEYE" with No. 1 Answer to the 5 Survey Questions that valued from $1000 to $5000 (Starting Reward: $5000) and after that Which to be determined to become the new Winning Family and on September 10, 1993 CBS-TV cancelled "THE NEW FAMILY FEUD CHALLENGE" and Letting CBS-TV to air Local Shows to CBS-TV Stations. From 1992 to 1994 The New Game "BULLSEYE" is added and for the Last Season (1994-1995) and bring back Richard Dawson as the returning star of the show. The New Game replaces "BULLSEYE" with "BANKROLL". In Part 1 They give out $2500 and 3 Survey Questions are Valued from $500 to $2500 for "FAST MONEY" and now changed to 20 Seconds and in Part 2 They give out $5000 and 3 Survey Questions are Valued from $1000 to $5000 for "FAST MONEY" and now changed to 25 seconds and on September 8, 1995 The Syndicated Portion is terminated. On September 20-24, 1999 "FAMILY FEUD" return to Television for the syndicated process. The 1st Host is Louie Anderson and it's worth $10,000 in "FAST MONEY" and in 2002 The "FAST MONEY" Reward doubled to $20,000 and in 2002-2003 They'd Made Changes... Stealing the Bank Plus the Value of the Answer is Removed and the New Host is Richard Karn whom been Al Borden on ABC-TV's Home Improvement. Burton Richardson of "The Arsenio Hall Show" became announcer replaces Gene Wood and in 2006-2007 The Show Reassembled the Old Family Feud Survey Board and the new & present star John O'Hurley (J. Peterman on "Seinfeld" & The Brand-New "TO TELL THE TRUTH"). From May 25 to August 3, 2008..."The New Celebrity FAMILY FEUD" starring Al Roker of "NBC News TODAY" on NBC-TV. The Return of "THE FAMILY FEUD" will air into the 2008-2009 TV Season. The 2009-2010 Season "The Return of THE FAMILY FEUD" brought back "BULLSEYE" for $30,000 with the same question values from $1000 to $5000 (Starting Reward: $15,000) and with 5 wins gets a new car. In 2010-2011, Comedian Steve Harvey of "The Original Black Kings of Comedy" is now the new host and The 1st New Announcer of Ex-Member of N*SYNC named Mr. Joey Fatone and now this season 2015-2016 "The Return of THE FAMILY FEUD" is Mr. Rubin Ervin, The New Announcer.-----THE BROADCAST HISTORY of THE FAMILY FEUD: July 12, 1976-April 22, 1977 Monday-Friday at 1:30-2:00PM on ABC-TV Eastern April 25, 1977-June 27, 1980 Monday-Friday at 11:30AM-12NOON on ABC-TV June 30, 1980-July 23, 1984 Monday-Friday at 12NOON-12:30PM on ABC-TV August 13-October 5, 1984 Monday-Friday at 11:00-11:30AM & 12NOON-12:30PM on ABC-TV October 8, 1984-June 13, 1985 Monday-Friday at 11:30AM-12NOON on ABC-TV July 4, 1988-January 11, 1991 Monday-Friday at 10:00-10:30AM on CBS-TV January 14-April 26, 1991 Monday-Friday at 10:30-11:00AM on CBS-TV April 29-May 24, 1991 Monday-Friday at 10:00-11:00AM on CBS-TV May 27, 1991-June 26, 1992 Monday-Friday at 10:30-11:00AM on CBS-TV June 29, 1992-September 10, 1993 Monday-Friday at 10:00-11:00AM on CBS-TV. On Syndicated from September 19, 1977 to the Present. May 25 to August 3, 2008 Sunday at 8:00-9:00PM on NBC-TV & Returned to ABC-TV for 30 Seasons after it's been cancelled by the same network's daytime area in 2015 and now Steve Harvey.moreless
  • 11
    MasterChef

    MasterChef

    Follow
    FOX
    FOX serves up a food competition series with Gordon Ramsay at the helm. Think American Idol in the kitchen.
  • 12
    Fear Factor

    Fear Factor

    Follow
    NBC (ended 2012)
    "Imagine a world where your greatest fears become reality." In each pulse-racing "Fear Factor" episode, contestants recruited across the country battle in extreme stunts. These stunts are designed to challenge the contestants both physically and mentally. If contestants are too afraid to complete or fail a stunt, they are eliminated. If they succeed, they are one step closer to the grand prize: $50,000.moreless
  • 13
    The Hollywood Squares (1966)

    The Hollywood Squares (1966)

    Follow
    NBC (ended 1981)
    Welcome to The Hollywood Squares guide at TV.com. After 2 failed multi-star games (People Will Talk and The Celebrity Game), Game show executive producers Merrill Heatter-Bob Quigley finally hit pay dirt with THE HOLLYWOOD SQUARES. The centerpiece of this classic game show was essentially a huge tic-tac-toe board. In each of the nine squares that sat a star (or often, more than one), armed with bluffs and quips aplenty. The show made it's debut on NBC-TV Daytime on Monday-Friday October 17-21, 1966. Actor-Comedian Peter Marshall served as "The Master of THE HOLLYWOOD SQUARES" acting both as the straight man & the abettor to the fun. 2 contestants which is including a returning champion compete in A Best 2-out-of-3 match of Tic-Tac-Toe. The male contestant is "Mr. X" (The "X") & The female is "Miss/Ms. Circle" (The "O"). In turn, each contestant picks a star to which "The Master" Marshall reads a question. Many of the stars gave zany bluffs (joke answers aka "Zingers") before coming up with the actual answer; sometimes they also gave a funny explanation. It's up to the contestant to figure it out when the answer to the question by saying "I Agree" or "I Disagree" with the star. A Correct judgment wins the contestant gets the square otherwise An Wrong Judgment meant the contestant gets the square. That's unless it leads to win Tic-Tac-Toe for which the contestant willing to earn him/herself in order to win the square. The 1st Contestant to complete a tic-tac-toe (3 Stars Across: Left & Right, Up & Down or Diagonally & Sideways or Otherwise 5-6 Squares on NBC-TV) win the game/match & collects the cash, which varied concerning on the show's portion: • NBC-TV Daytime: $100 per game+($300+100=$400 Bonus)=$500 per match up to $2500 (October 17, 1966-February 10, 1967) & The New Car. $200 per game, $400 per match up to $2000 & The New Car from February 13, 1967 to June 20, 1980. • NBC-TV Nighttime (1968 ) : $300 per game. • Syndicated (1971-1981): $250 per game. The Certain Games are designated as the Secret Square games (see below), which is a bonus prize (or prize package & early on with the additional cash) for the contestant who'll wins everything. To Win The Secret Square Prize Package, The contestant will picks the star (up to this/that point, known only to the home audience at the shot of Color Television Camera to Make A Close-Up on 1 of The 9 Stars) for which Marshall reads a special Hollywood multiple choice question. If the contestant's correct by agreeing or disagreeing the right or wrong, he or she wins The Secret Square Prize Package. On NBC-TV Daytime: The prizes (as well as Cash) can win on "The Secret Square" for The 1st, 2nd or The Rubber Game of The Match for the cash & prize package is worth started about & exactly $1000 from October 17 to December 30, 1966 and begins increasing the total within $1000 Greater or Less from January 3, 1967 to June 20, 1980 (especially if a trip, fur coat or boat are included) and before being itself collected. • NBC-TV Nighttime (Friday Night January 12-September 13, 1968 ) : The 1st 2 Secret Square on the show. The 1st Prize is generally a trip (either around the world to Europe or South America) & The 2nd & Last Prize is A New Car (most frequently The 1968 Pontiac Firebird though the Oldsmobile Cutlass and AMC AMX are also offered). • Syndicated (Nighttime & Weekday/Night) : In The 1st 2 Seasons (1971-1973), The 1st 2 Games of each & every week, Season 3 to 7: The 1st 3 Games (1973-1978 ). At 1st, The Losing Secret Square Prize Packages going up to 2-3 Games of the show and losing it when the contestant made the star's answer to the Secret Square Question by Agreeing or Disagreeing Wrong. At first, each Secret Square is worth about $2000 but later, All individual prize packages are worth as much as $7000! Later in the nighttime syndicated run (Seasons 8 & 9: 1978-1980 ) The Secret Square goes to Games 1, 2 (and later 3) are used in separate style in Season 8 when "The Bonus Prize Squares" is added to the nighttime syndicated edition along with NBC-TV Daytime Edition. At 1st, There's No Bonus Game from October 17, 1966 to September 3, 1976; The Returning Champions simply faced The New Challenger before the commercial break & Finally on September 6-10, 1976, The New "Bonus Prize Squares" game is added & where's the champion to picks the star and win an merchandise item or additional cash prize ($500 to $5000) and in the 1978-1979 Season of the show, The Same merchandise items or the cash prizes are doubled ($1000 to $10,000 in 1979-1980). Originally, A 5-Match Champion Undefeated also winning $2000 (Earlier $2500) & A New Car to Leaves the show from October 17, 1966 to January 2, 1976. The Bonus Award are upped handsomely on January 5-9, 1976 as called "THE WHOLE THING" and this/that include 2 cars (always at least one very nice car, such as the Chevrolet Caprice Classic or Pontiac Grand Prix), 1 Cruise Ship & $5000 cash for early of it's own period (On January 3-7, 1977, the winners win 1 Car, 1 Cruise Ship & $10,000 Cash) are totaled $25,000 (Earlier it's all totaled $20,000). • NBC nighttime: The contestant in the leads to win A Bonus Prize – usually a TV/stereo console or a new kitchen. Average value is about $1500. • Syndicated: The contestant in the leads to win a new car – always an economy car (such as the Chevrolet Vega, Pontiac Astre or Datsun B210). Also, in The NBC Nighttime & Syndicated Portions, when time expired in the middle of the game (with the sound of the horn aka "The Tacky Buzzer"), each contestant is given $50 for each square they've got after the last question is answered & played (unless a contestant got a tic-tac-toe); even contestants who didn't win any cash were given $100 just for competing. Virtually every major star from every genre – Television, Movies, Music, Sports, Fashion, Regular Experts, New York's Broadway & Other Local Shows in The U.S. of the 1960s through early 1980s are stopped by with their star quips (zingers) & bluffs. Hollywood legends also appeared as cameos either as the star's squares or sit-ins. The Most Popular Regulars (SQUARE OWNERS) are Rose Marie, Charley Weaver (1966-1974), Wally Cox (1967-1973), Morey Amsterdam (1967-1969), Abby Dalton (1967-1970), George Gobel (1974-1981) and ... of course, the all-time center square Paul Lynde (1968-1981). Paul Lynde – by the way – He's not always the center square as he didn't become the permanent occupant of that space up to the weekday broadcast of October 14-18, 1968. Before Lynde the permanent center square, comedian Buddy Hackett was the most common star to sit in the center square (on the nighttime edition in 1968). Lynde was the center square on nearly every broadcast until he left on August 20-24, 1979; he returned to the center square for a part of the 1980-1981 Las Vegas syndicated season and was a special guest for not sitting the same center square, but sitting the different square for the final syndicated episode on September 11, 1981. Ernest Borgnine was the center square during the debut weekday broadcast of October 17-21, 1966, while Wayland Flowers & Madame was the NBC daytime show's last center square on the last weekday broadcast of June 16-20, 1980 and George Gobel was the last syndicated-version center square on September 7-11, 1981. On November 1-7 1971, a syndicated nighttime portion of The Hollywood Squares released. At first, the show was once-a-week, but once the show proved popular, it quickly expanded to a twice-a-week show starting on September 11-17 1972. 3 Months after the last NBC daytime show aired on June 20, 1980, the production of The Hollywood Squares moved to Las Vegas and the show expanded to five-day-a-week. The expanded syndicated format lasted one season (September 8, 1980-September 11, 1981) with a repeat of the last NBC-TV 1979-1980 Daytime Season for the 1981-1982 Season and being Distributed by RHODES PRODUCTIONS-A Filmways Company. 3 Theme songs of The Hollywood Squares are all used. The 1st Theme (1966-1969) called "The Silly Song" is composed by (The Late) Jimmie Haskell. Beginning in the 1969-1970 season (Season 4) and it's replaced by a musical piece is composed by (The Late) William Loose for known to game show aficionados as "Merrill and Bob's Theme," It's The 2nd Theme of The Hollywood Squares is mostly identified and it ended before & after the 1978-1979 season (Season 13.) The Disco-Flavored Theme called "The Hollywood Bowl" is composed by (The Late) Stan Worth (who wrote many TV theme songs) became The 3rd & Last Theme Song Starting on September 10-14, 1979 & Finishing it on September 11, 1981. "THE HOLLYWOOD SQUARES" broadcasted on NBC-TV Daytime and cancelled severely on June 16-20, 1980, when it's replaced by David Letterman's ultimately unsuccessful daytime talk-variety show on June 23-27, 1980. 3 Remarks are all having tries for success including a brief marriage to Match Game in 1983-1984 (as THE MATCH GAME/HOLLYWOOD SQUARES HOUR); A 1986-1989 Syndicated entry hosted by frequent original The Hollywood Squares Square Placer John Davidson (as The New HOLLYWOOD SQUARES) & The 1998-2004 Edition (as HOLLYWOOD SQUARES "H2") hosted by talk show personality Tom Bergeron (Fresh out of WBZ-TV NBC "Now CBS 4" Boston's "PEOPLE ARE TALKING"). From April 2002 to October 2003, reruns of the Peter Marshall-hosted Hollywood Squares ran on Game Show Network (and now GSN); the package included 14 NBC-TV primetime and 116 syndicated episodes (130 total). Originally having aired in several weekday/night timeslots, the show is eventually downgraded to weekend-only airings (at 10:30-11:00 AM EDT). Despite a promising start and wide promotion, the reruns never drew high ratings or young audiences (in part because many to most of the stars have died in the same & different years or are really too unfamiliar to younger viewers) and are all eventually replaced with reruns of the Tom Bergeron Hollywood Squares edition right through August 31, 2007. On March 30-April 3, 2009 "(The All-New) HOLLYWOOD SQUARES" has came back to GSN-play everyday to the lineup for GSN LIVE. In 2010 The Show now seen on weekends featuring the 1st 2 Seasons of "HOLLYWOOD Squares" from 1998 to 2000 and soon after it's gone for good. The Broadcast History of THE HOLLYWOOD SQUARES: {NBC Daytime} October 17, 1966-October 1, 1976 Monday-Friday at 11:30 AM-12NOON Eastern October 4, 1976-September 29, 1978 Monday-Friday at 10:30-11:00 AM October 2, 1978-March 2, 1979 Monday–Friday at 1:00-1:30 PM (or 4:00-4:30 PM) March 5-August 10, 1979 Monday-Friday at 12:30-1:00 PM August 13, 1979-June 20, 1980 Monday–Friday at 10:30-11:00 AM. {NBC Nighttime} January 12-September 13, 1968 – 9:30-10:00 PM Friday. {Syndicated} November 1, 1971-September 11, 1981 – Various nights at 7:30-8:00 PM Eastern (Monday-Saturday) & 5:30-6:00 PM Eastern (Sunday) and for the last 2 seasons for Weekdays/Weeknights at various times which depending on market and Distributed by RHODES PRODUCTIONS-A Filmways Company. "THE HOLLYWOOD SQUARES (1966)" is A MERRILL HEATTER (hQ) BOB QUIGLEY PRODUCTION-A Filmways Company. Now This Show Owned by Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Television.moreless
  • 14
    The Price is Right

    The Price is Right

    Follow
    CBS
    The Price Is Right has long been a staple of daytime and nighttime television. It has seen five incarnations: the 1956-1965 daytime version hosted by Bill Cullen on NBC and ABC, the 1972-1980 nighttime version hosted by Dennis James and Bob Barker, the 1985 nighttime version hosted by Tom Kennedy, the 1994-1995 nighttime version hosted by Doug Davidson, and the current daytime version hosted by Barker and Drew Carey. This guide covers the current daytime version. The object of The Price Is Right is to correctly guess the retail prices of items, without going over, to either win the items themselves or other prizes. At the beginning of each show, the announcer calls out the names of four contestants, imploring each to "come on down!" A prize is announced for which each contestant (one at a time) makes a bid (called the One Bid). After the host announces the actual retail price, the contestant who bid closest without going over is invited on stage to play a pricing game for a larger prize. If a contestant's bid is exactly correct, he/she wins a $500 bonus (on the Armed Forces and $1,000,000 Spectacular Specials, the bonus for an exact bid is $1000). Frequently, during Barker's tenure as host, an animal would be brought out on stage by one of the models during the One Bid prize plugs. Barker would then comment that the pet was available for adoption at an area animal shelter. He also encouraged viewers to visit their local humane society. Pricing game prizes often include cars, trips, rooms of furniture, cash, and various other items. Furs were also given away during the early years, but this practice was dropped per Barker's wishes due to his involvement with animal-rights issues. The episodes that offer furs as prizes will likely never be seen again as Barker continues to fight against their re-airing. There were over 100 total individual pricing games with 72 in the current rotation. Some games involved pricing grocery or small, everyday items. Others involved chance, deduction, skill and/or patience. Many games quickly became very popular. Contestants chomp at the bit to play such entries as Plinko, Ten Chances, Cliff Hangers, Any Number, Grocery Game, Range Game, Race Game, and many others. While each of the pricing games uses only one player, there was one game (known by fans as Bullseye 2) which used two players. This game, which was retired during the first season, had the players alternating bids on a car or boat, and the first to guess the price exactly won. The second contestant was determined by immediately playing another One Bid. Some pricing games have been retired. The reasons include frequent mechanical malfunctions, complicated rules, low odds of winning, and negative responses from viewers. Pictures, audio files, and videos of most of the retired pricing games can be seen on various fan pages on the World Wide Web. After each pricing game is played (except for the final game of the day), one more contestant is called from the audience to "come on down," and another One Bid item is shown for another chance to play a pricing game. Until the fourth season, the two contestants with the highest winnings after all three pricing games had been played went to the Showcase round. Two showcases (prize packages worth several thousand dollars) are shown, one at a time. After the first showcase is revealed, the top winning contestant has the choice to bid on the showcase or pass it to his/her opponent and force him/her to bid. The contestant coming closest to the actual retail price of his/her own showcase without going over wins their showcase. Originally, the contestant could win only his/her showcase. Early in the show's run, a stipulation was added stating that if a contestant's bid came within $100 of his/her showcase's actual retail price, they'd win everything in both showcases. In 1998, the stipulation was modified, and, now, winning contestants who are $250 or less away from the actual retail price of their showcase win both showcases. For the week of November 3-7, 1975 the show expanded from 30 to 60 minutes, following a successful week of experimental hour-long shows the week of September 8-12. A new round called the Showcase Showdown was added. After three contestants have played their pricing games, each has the chance to spin a large wheel called "The Big Wheel." The order of spinning is determined by each contestant's winnings with the player having won the least going first and the player having won the most going last. The Big Wheel contains 20 spaces with numbers in increments of five cents (not in order). Each contestant gets up to two spins in an attempt to get as close to $1.00 without going over. If he/she does not have $1.00 after the first spin, the contestant can choose to spin again to get closer to $1.00 or stop at their current score with the hope that the other contestants will either score lower or go over $1.00. Getting $1.00 exactly earns the contestant a $1000 bonus. Going over $1.00 automatically disqualifies the contestant from going any further. A one-spin spin-off is held if there is a tie between two or all three contestants. If the first two contestants go over $1.00, the third player automatically advances to the Showcase but is still entitled to one spin. After the first Showcase Showdown of each show, three more pricing games are played, followed by the second Showcase Showdown. When the Showcase Showdown was first introduced, during the experimental hour-long week, the wheel spun sideways, and there was no $1000 bonus. When the hour-long show became permanent on November 3, 1975, the $1000 bonus was added, and the current wheel debuted. Beginning in June, 1978, contestants scoring $1.00 were now allowed to spin again in an attempt to win an additional $5000 for hitting one of the green sections above or below the $1.00 space (five and 15 cents) or $10,000 for hitting the $1.00 space. During the prime time specials that first aired in 2002, contestants that hit $1.00 during the bonus spin win $100,000. During the $1,000,000 Spectacular specials airing in 2003, this bonus was increased to one million dollars. The winners of each Showcase Showdown (two per show) advance to the Showcase round. Numerous other changes have taken place through the years, and several prime time specials have aired. The Price Is Right's 5000th episode aired in March, 1998 at which time the studio at CBS's Television City where the show is shot was renamed the Bob Barker Studio. Also, the set and some of the pricing game boards went through numerous minor changes due to inflation or to give it a modern look. The bloopers that have occurred on The Price is Right are among the most celebrated in television history. In early 1976, a woman called to Contestant's Row was in the ladies' room. Her husband had to leave the studio to tell her she'd been called. At the beginning of an episode early in the sixth season, a woman's tube top slipped down as she was running toward Contestant's Row. Also during that season, a woman fainted when she learned she won her showcase ($11,000 in prizes). Other bloopers include cars with malfunctioning brakes and other prizes which give way at the wrong time. Usually, one of the models is often a victim of these unfortunate mishaps (such as Janice Pennington and Rachel Reynolds hitting the wall with the car they are revealing for the Lucky $even pricing game). Many pricing games have malfunctioned at one time or another. Many contestants spinning the Big Wheel spin it so hard that they fall to the floor. There have been a fair share of contestants who claim to or actually don't understand how to play a given game. The most notable is the Check Game (where the contestant writes in an amount that when added to the actual retail price of a prize must total between $5000 and $6000. In addition, one game was victimized by a cheater on the April 4, 2005 playing of Flip Flop (where a contestant is presented a string of two sets of two numbers, representing an incorrect price, and must correct one or both sets to win a prize). The contestant, after receiving input from the audience, pressed the reveal button without making any changes. Barker awarded the contestant the prize anyway, although many fans believe the player should have been disqualified. Some contestants eventually became celebrities - Vanna White in particular. She was called to "come on down" in June, 1980, but did not get out of Contestant's Row. Other future stars include Rick Schroeder and Linda Cardellini. Main Title Theme Song "The Price Is Right Theme" by Edd Kalehoff CBS Broadcast History September 4, 1972 - March 23, 1973 .... Monday - Friday at 10:30 AM - 11:00 AM March 26, 1973 - August 15, 1975 .... Monday - Friday at 3:00 PM - 3:30 PM August 15, 1975 - November 28, 1975 .... Monday - Friday at 10:30 AM - 11:00 AM November 3, 1975 - March 25, 1977 .... Monday - Friday at 10:00 AM 11:00 AM March 28, 1977 - November 4, 1977 .... Monday - Friday at 10:30AM - 11:30 AM November 7, 1977 - December 16, 1977 .... Monday - Friday at 10:00 AM - 11:00 AM December 19, 1977 - April 20, 1979 .... Monday - Friday at 10:30 AM - 11:30 AM April 23, 1979 -present .... Monday - Friday at 11:00 AM - 12:00 PM Emmy Awards Nominations Outstanding Host in a Game Show or Audience Participation Show 1975 - Bob Barker Outstanding Game Show Host 1979 - Bob Barker 1982 - Bob Barker (winner) 1985 - Bob Barker 1986 - Bob Barker 1987 - Bob Barker (winner) 1990 - Bob Barker (winner) 1991 - Bob Barker (winner) 1992 - Bob Barker (winner) 1993 - Bob Barker 1994 - Bob Barker (winner) 1995 - Bob Barker (winner) 1996 - Bob Barker (winner) 2000 - Bob Barker (winner) 2002 - Bob Barker (winner) 2003 - Bob Barker 2004 - Bob Barker (winner) 2005 - Bob Barker 2007 - Bob Barker (winner) Outstanding Game Show Host/Hostess 1984 - Bob Barker (winner) 1988 - Bob Barker (winner) Outstanding Game Show 1976 1982 1983 1984 1985 1986 1987 1988 (winner) 1989 1990 1992 1993 1994 1995 Outstanding Game/Audience Participation Show 2002 2003 2004 (winner) 2005 2007 (winner) 2008 Outstanding Technical Direction/Camera/Video for a Miniseries or a Special 1997 - The Price Is Right 25th Anniversary Primetime Specialmoreless
  • 15
    Next

    Next

    Follow
    MTV - Music Television
    MTV puts a new twist on the dating show. Each person is set up with five potential dates. If things aren’t going well, just say “NEXT!” to move on to the next prospect. Now there is some incentive for the potential dates to be on their best behavior too. Each date gets cash for every minute they last and if they make it to the end of the designated date time period they can either choose to go on a second date, or take the money and run! Next!moreless
  • 16
    Storage Wars

    Storage Wars

    Follow
    A&E
    Professional buyers and their aides/helpers search through repossessed storage units they win at auction in the hopes of finding hidden treasure.
  • 17
    The Dating Game

    The Dating Game

    Follow
    ABC (ended 2000)
    THE DATING GAME was and still is by all accounts, the premiere game show for singles. It was the forerunner for many imitators such as "Love Connection", MTV's "Singled Out" and numerous others. But they all have the same influence: Chuck Barris, the creator of the one that started it all! "THE DATING GAME" first premiered on December 20-24, 1965 on abc-TV and remained a fixture on the network in both daytime and nighttime incarnations through the rest of the 1960s and well into the 1970s. Jim Lange, fresh from his announcing duties with Tennessee Ernie Ford stepped through the flower-speckled rotating partitions for the first of many, many times shortly before Christmas 1965. The game play was simple. On one side you had 3 bachelors answering questions from a girl on the other side of the partition (each not being able to see the other). The girl was given a certain amount of time to ask as many questions as she could to the 3 bachelors. More often than not the questions would be of a quirky nature. (E.G.: "If we were marooned on a desert island, what would be the first thing you'd do and why?"). During a commercial break, the girl would think about which bachelor she'd select. When the show returned, Jim would have her announce her choice. After meeting the 2 boys she didn't select, she's meet her date at which point Jim would tell them where they were going for their dream date. On less frequent occasions, the roles were reversed. To wit, the game would feature a boy selecting 1 from the 3 Bachelorettes. The show became an enormous hit with young viewers. (In fact, in light of its success, Baskin-Robbins named an ice cream flavor in honor of the show.) And over the years, the show featured many stars of the day (Burt Reynolds, Paul Petersen and even Dick Clark showed up) as well as newcomers who would in later years become big stars in their own right (John Ritter, Teri Garr, Tom Selleck and Farrah Fawcett were among these.) The show left abc-TV on July 2-6, 1973, but stayed in syndication for another year (1973-1974) before leaving the airwaves altogether. Creator Chuck Barris brought the show back again 4 years later with Lange as host from 1978 to 1980. Along with an updated version of "The Newlywed Game" and 2 new shows, ("The Gong Show" and "The $1.98 Beauty Show") "The Dating Game" returned to syndicated in 1978, only this time with a more adult-oriented borderline dialogue format--perhaps in an effort to recapture the same audience that had grown up watching THE DATING GAME in the 1960s. The newer version- along with Jim Lange's gaudy red tuxedo- lasted for 2 years until local stations finally got tired of the protesting phone calls. Once again, the show featured both present-day and future stars such as Jaye P. Morgan, Bob Saget and Murray "The Unknown Comic" Langston. THE DATING GAME was all but forgotten until the mid-80s, when Barris decided to do it yet again. An all new 80s update of "The Dating Game (The All-New DATING GAME)" premiered on syndicated on September 8-12, 1986, but this time the hosting duties were handled by Elaine Joyce (Lange was busy at the time hosting "The $1,000,000 Chance Of A Lifetime"). This version lasted for three years with Joyce hosting the 1st season and Jeff McGregor hosting the last 2 Seasons and again as in the previous 2 incarnations, the show featured present and future stars. (Among the future stars was Oscar-winning actor Cuba Gooding, Jr.!) The Program Demised on September 8, 1989. Now... as for the NINETIES update? Well... I don't know terribly much about it except for the following: By the time the 90s rolled around, Chuck Barris sold the rights to all his shows to Columbia-Tristar Television. A newer, corporate-whitewashed version of the DATING GAME was released on September 9-13, 1996 and packaged with another updated version of "The Newlywed Game", this time with Chuck ("Love Connection") Woolery (1st Host is Whose Line is it Anyway (US) Brad Sherwood for the 1st Season for the difference) and outside of the quizzer and the respective suitors & suitorettes not being able to see one another, the rules were almost completely overhauled and all ended the show on September 15, 2000. But if you're a game show retrophile like me, you would have to agree that there's just no Dating Game without Jim Lange with or without the awful tux. And now you don't have to suffer from Lange withdrawal because Game Show Network has some episodes to show you... And HEEEEEEEE-RE THEY ARRRRRRRR-RE! Now you can see the classic Jim Lange episodes of the original DATING GAME on The Game Show Network- in particular, the ones that featured present-day and future superstars. You can see them Saturday and Sunday nights at 11:30pm on GSN. Enjoy them if you can... and if you can't stay up that late, TAPE THEM... LIKE ME!! (Dates with celebrities are always subject to their availability.) THE BROADCAST HISTORY of THE DATING GAME: December 20, 1965-March 31, 1967 at 11:30am-12Noon on ABC-TV April 3, 1967-July 12, 1968 at 4:00-4:30pm on ABC-TV July 15, 1968-July 6, 1973 at 2:30-3:00pm on ABC-TV. On 1st Run Syndicated from September 10, 1973-September 15, 2000.moreless
  • 18
    Project Runway

    Project Runway

    Follow
    Lifetime
    Supermodel Heidi Klum and Marie Claire Magazine present Project Runway, an all-new behind-the-scene documentary series and competition set in the other most glamorous business in the world: the fashion industry. For the thirteenth season, cameras will roll for fourteen episodes as up-and-coming designers compete in weekly challenges and are given all the resources of a top designer to prepare a competitive runway show for the next New York Fashion Week.

    Supermodel Heidi Klum co-developed the series and appears as one of the celebrity judges. Harvey Weinstein, Bob Weinstein and Meryl Poster serve as executive producers.

    In July 2006, the show began airing at 10PM, but by July 2008 and by September 2010, the show returned to it's 9PM timeslot. In 2013 hosts Heidi Klum and and Tim Gunn won an Emmy in the category Outstanding Host For A Reality Or Reality-Competition Program. Another Emmy was won by Jamie Pedroza, Mary DeChambres, Spiro C. Lampros, Richie Edelson, Maris Berzins, Matthew Moul, Steve Lichtenstein for Outstanding Picture Editing For Reality Programming in 2009.moreless
  • 19
    Trading Spaces

    Trading Spaces

    Follow
    TLC
    Many of the original cast return for an all new season/series in 2018, a decade after the final episodes aired! The first and best home decorating show, and certainly the most copied show of it's kind, ended its run in December 2008 after 8 years. Host Paige Davis, 2 talented professional designers and 1 or 2 skilled carpenters were given just 2 days and a thousand dollars each week to help 1 person and their friend or relative improve a room belonging to another person, usually a neighbor, while that same other person and their friend or relative had a go at improving the first persons room in return. The journey was much of the fun as both the viewer and the homeowners learned new ways to remake their rooms in innovative ways, while wondering if the homeowners would love or hate their new rooms! Ever sit in a friend or relative's home and wish you could strip or paint the walls, take up the floor, sew and replace fabric on the couch or chairs? Well this show was for you... Trading Spaces was a design show based on the British series Changing Rooms. For the first 4 seasons, the show took two sets of neighbors, and they switched one room in each other's home. They were given a $1,000 budget and they only had two days to completely redesign their neighbor's room. They were assigned a designer and shared a carpenter. Starting with season 5, the neighbors and the designer got to choose the room and if they get the right room Paige picked, they would get extra money (usually twice the normal $1000) for the room. But they still only had two days to completely redesign their neighbor's room after the prep day. They still were not allowed back in to their own rooms until the two days are up. At the end of each episode, the host would sit down to talk with the designers about the room they just finished. Then, the host took the owners into their rooms, with their eyes closed, and revealed the room to them. Will they like the design? Will they hate them? Will they get rid of the design... The answer could be surprising during the reveal. During season 5 and continuing through season 7, Paige Davis was dropped from the show and a host-less format took over, with the designers and carpenters serving most of the functions Paige had done so well. The show continued, but seemed to loose focus, as the producers tried a number of changes to the format. They added a 2nd carpenter to each show in several seasons, added several of the designers and carpenters from the sister show While You Were Out to the roster, but ratings continued to stay low. So in season 8 the producers replaced everyone except Laura Day and Frank Bialec and one carpenter with a handful of new designers & 2 new male carpenters. The ratings must have nosedived because after less than half a season was shown, the new network bosses at TLC fired the production company and convinced Paige Davis and a 1/2 dozen of the most popular designers and carpenters to return to the show and see if going back to basics could restore the popularity the show had lost when Ms. Davis was let go. With the best talent on the show again, could the magic happen again! Apparently not, as the show was canceled after two more short seasons were shown. Some of the last season episodes were moved to a morning time-slot which probably lost the viewers that still remained. It was apparently a case of fixing the mistakes made to make the show without Paige Davis a little too late to recapture the audience that had moved on to other decorating shows during her absence. Trading Spaces Products - VHS/DVD Releases: The Best of Trading Spaces Trading Spaces - They Hated It! Trading Spaces: Season 1 Viewer's Choice Trading Spaces: Season 2 Viewer's Choice Book Releases: Behind the Scenes Book Make It Yours! Color! Paige by Paige: A Year of Trading Spaces Trading Spaces Ultimate Episode Guide Trading Spaces Trivia: Seasons 1-3 Ty's Tricks $100 to $1000 Makeovers 48-Hour Makeovers Rooms for Living Instant Impact Game Releases: Trading Spaces Design Companion (computer game) Trading Spaces Game (board game) Most of these can be purchased through TLC.com. Just go to the Trading Spaces site at TLC.com and click on 'Buy TS Stuff' -- some items can be found at other sites such as Amazon.com. Awards & Nominations 2002 - Daytime Emmy - Nominated - Outstanding Special Class Series 2002 - Daytime Emmy - Nominated - Single Camera Editing 2002 - Emmy - Nominated - Outstanding Special Class Program 2003 - Emmy - Nominated - Outstanding Nonfiction Program 2005 - People's Choice - Nominated- Favorite Reality Makeover Show Spinoffs! Trading Spaces: Family Trading Spaces: Boys vs. Girls Cast Hosts Paige Davis (seasons 2-5, 9-10) Alex Mcleod (season 1) Designers Frank Bielec Laura Day Genevieve Gorder Christi Proctor Rick Rifle (season 4) Dez Ryan (season 1) Laurie Smith Kia Steve-Dickerson Hildi Santo-Tomas Edward Walker Cat Wei (Trading Spaces: Family season 1) Douglas Wilson Barry Wood Vern Yip (seasons 2-4) Jon Laymon Carpenters Faber Dewar Carter Oosterhouse Amy Wynn Pastor Ty Pennington (seasons 1-4)moreless
  • 20
    Tanked

    Tanked

    Follow
    Animal Planet
    Brett King and Wayde Raymer own Acrylic Tank Manufacturing, who cater to fish lovers. Together, these brother in-laws build some of the biggest and most outrageous fish tanks.
  • < 1 2 3 4 5