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    State Trooper

    State Trooper

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    NBC (ended 1959)
    Investigator Rod Blake of the Nevada State police works with the county sheriffs to catch the bad guys.
  • 2
    Keep Talking

    Keep Talking

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    CBS (ended 1960)
    Keep Talking was a quiz show where celebrity panelists were divided into two teams of three players. The host would give each player a secret word and that player had to make up and tell a story using that word. The opposite team then had to guess what the secret word was.
    Panelists on Keep Talking included Paul Winchell, Morey Amsterdam, Peggy Cass, Orson Bean, Audrey Meadows, and Joey Bishop.
    Hosts of the show included Monty Hall, Carl Reiner, and Merv Griffin.moreless
  • 3
    Tic Tac Dough

    Tic Tac Dough

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    (ended 1991)
    Tic Tac Dough is a classic game show that married a straight Q&A quiz with the game of tic-tac-toe. Each version—from the 1950s scandal-plagued version, the successful 1978-86 version and the 1990 ill-advised remake—is covered here. While each version of this Jack Barry and Dan Enright creation had unique elements about them, the gameplay of each version of Tic Tac Dough was essentially identical. Two contestants, including a returning champion (who was "X"), competed. Rules — all versions The host introduced nine categories, and each player alternated selecting boxes on the board. The host read a question, and if the player answered correctly, he/she got to place their symbol in the box and the cash value of the box (which changed depending on the version) was added to a pot. If incorrect, the box was left empty and their opponent could earn their mark there with a correct question. The categories rotated to different boxes after each player is asked a question. The center box always featured a two-part question (or sometimes, a question with two answers); it was worth more than the outside boxes and thus considered "more difficult." The player selecting that box had to answer both parts correctly to earn the box. If there was a tie game, nine new categories were introduced, and the cash pot kept accumulating. Even in the original 1950s version, the pot sometimes reached $10,000 and higher through repeated tie games. The first player to earn three of his mark in a row won the cash value of the pot and became champion. 1956-1959 version In the 1956-1959 version (whose eight outside boxes were worth $100 and the center box $200), there was no bonus game; he/she simply faced another challenger until defeated. The original version (which, at its peak also had a prime-time version) was cancelled in the fall of 1959, a casualty of the Quiz Show Scandals. 1978-1986 version Tic Tac Dough returned in the summer of 1978 as a daytime entry on CBS. Wink Martindale was the host, and the boxes were worth $200 (for the outside) and $300 (for the center). The categories did not "shuffle," and there was no tie games; instead, if both players had four of their mark after eight questions, one final "tie-breaking" question was asked, and the first to answer correctly won the game. The champion then played a bonus game. Here, he/she faced the board of nine squares, which concealed four X's and four O's (arranged to make just one "Tic Tac Dough"), plus the dragon. The player won $150 for each symbol uncovered; he/she could stop at any time, while finding the "Tic Tac Dough" awarded any cash found (amended to $1,000 if they didn't have that much) plus a prize package. Finding the dragon, however, ended the game and forfeited both the cash and prizes. Tic Tac Dough was a much bigger success, as a five-a-week syndicated series. Once again, the questions rotated after each player has been asked one question (later, they shuffled after each question), and the cash values of the box remained $200 and $300, as appropriate. The bonus game was revamped wherein the board hid six cash amounts, a "TIC" and a "TAC" and (of course) that evil dragon (and his earth-shattering roar!). The contestant picked numbers, one at a time, and earned whatever cash amount s/he found ($100, $150, $250, $300, $400 and $500) and added it to the pot. If the player reached $1,000 or more, or uncovered both "TIC" and "TAC," s/he won the cash and a prize package. Once again, uncovering Mr. Dragon ended the bonus round with nothing. Five-time champions won a new car, as thus: • 1978 – Buick Skylark. • 1979-1981 – Buick Century. • 1981-1984 – Chevrolet Chevette. • 1984-1985 – AMC Eagle. • 1985-1986 – Madza GLC. In addition to the regular categories, special red boxed categories were added to the game during the show's run; at first one per game, there were three by the 1982-1983 season. These boxes each had special rules, many of them which involved both players and could affect the game's outcome at that moment. Often, a player could earn two boxes in a single turn (or sometimes, even get a "Tic Tac Dough" without his/her opponent getting a chance). The red box categories, plus long-running champions (who all competed until their defeat) made this version a big success. The best-known long-running champion was Thom McKee, who won $312,700 in his 43-game run in 1980. In the ranks of game shows, only Ken Jennings, the Jeopardy! mega-champion of 2004, has won more games. Also, through multiple games, the cash pot often climbed above $10,000 (the record single-game jackpot was $36,900, reportedly during McKee's championship reign, courtesy of the Secret Category; a red box where a correct answer doubled the pot). Martindale hosted the show until 1985. He was replaced by Jim Caldwell for the 1985-1986 season (which featured a redesigned set). The show's final episode, which aired in May 1986, featured a tribute to McKee. 1990 revival Not even McKee could have saved Tic Tac Dough's 1990 syndicated revival, in many critics' opinions. Game play was similar to the 1978 syndicated version, except the player in control used a plunger to stop the categories from shuffling. The boxes were worth $500 (outside) and $1,000 (center), but the jackpot reset after a tie game and the box values increased ($1,000 and $2,000, and so on…). The bonus game was similar to the 1978 CBS version, except the player chose one mark at the outset to try to get a "Tic Tac Dough" (there were four of the selected mark, the only one that could provide a three-in-a-row; and three of the other mark). The first "X" or "O" found was worth $500 & the next "X" or "O" doubled the pot, so the best possible score would be $8,000 (4 symbols + Dragon Slayer. Finding the "Tic-Tac-Dough" or a Dragon Slayer (an automatic win space & doubled the winnings) won a prize package, while finding the dragon ended the game with nothing. No cars were awarded this time, and champions stayed on for up to 15 shows. The 1990 version (whose only saving grace was music composed by the great Henry Mancini; his final television theme song) was harshly criticized largely for emcee Patrick Wayne's hosting style and the hampered game play because of other rules revisions (not worth mentioning here). And you had a "rapping Dragon" & "rapping dragon slayer" as well. It didn't help to have special theme weeks, such as the much ballyhooed "Divorced Couples Week." Viewers apparently agreed, and this version died a quick death. There is no editor for this show. If you would like to be the editor look here for details.moreless
  • 4
    $64,000 Question

    $64,000 Question

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    CBS (ended 1958)
    Welcome to the $64,000 Question guide at TV.com. There is no editor for this show. If you would like to be the editor look here for details. This quiz show was based on a radio game show "Take It or Leave It" where the top prize is $64. The television version added 3 zeroes to make it $64,000. A contestant started by choosing a category of his/her choice. The first 10 questions were valued starting @ $1 & doubled up to $512. At any time, the contestant could walk away with the money earned (Jack Benny stopped @ $1!) or risk missing & going home with nothing. The next three questions ($1,000/$2,000/$4,000) came from a secured safe. Then it came time for the Isolation Booth. There, questions were divided into many parts (IE: a 6-part question for $8,000), & think music was provided before the contestant could answer. Each successful win paid $8,000/$16,000/$32,000/$64,000. Missing a question in this stage of the game resulted in a consolation prize, a new Cadillac. Many famous contestants appeared on the show including Barbara Feldon (Get Smart) who had Shakespeare for her caegory, Dr. Joyce Brothers for boxing. There were sometimes guest hosts who filled in for Hal March, Ed Sullivan was game show host for a day. The demise of The $64,000 Question was because of the Quiz Show Scandal. Producers fed contestants information beforehand. Along with Twenty-One & Dotto (the show that started the scandals), big money quizzes were gone by 1958. In 1976, it came back as The $128,000 Question. Mike Darow hosted the first season from New York while Alex Trebek did the second season from Toronto.moreless
  • 5
    Earn Your Vacation

    Earn Your Vacation

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    CBS (ended 1954)
    Host Johnny Carson asked audience members where they wanted to go on their vacations, then they would play for their prizes.
  • 6
    We Take Your Word

    We Take Your Word

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    CBS (ended 1951)
    We Take Your Word was a game show where television viewers mailed in word suggestions and the show's panelists would attempt to provide the definitions, derivations and histories of the word.moreless
  • 7
    The $64,000 Challenge!

    The $64,000 Challenge!

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    CBS (ended 1958)
    a spin-off of "The $64,000 Question".
  • 8
    Ad Libbers

    Ad Libbers

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    CBS (ended 1951)
    The Ad Libbers was a short lived improvisational program where a host Peter Donald offered a situation and a group of actors would ad lib dialogue to fit that scene.
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    21

    21

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    NBC (ended 1958)
    The number 21 means a lot of different things to different people. It's the highest winning score in blackjack, legal drinking age, the New England Patriots' NFL record for consecutive victories and the current Century. But for a brief span in the late 1950s, Twenty-One also was synonymous with one of the most-watched, and most infamous, game shows in history. 21 inspired the movie Quiz Show.moreless
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    Front Page Challenge

    Front Page Challenge

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    CBC (ended 1995)
    Canadian panel/quiz show
  • 11
    Tag the Gag

    Tag the Gag

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    NBC (ended 1951)
    Wilbur Stark Productions created this short-lived game show. Hal Block was the Host. This quiz show lasted two weeks. A panel of comedians attempted to guess the punch line based on the actions of a group of performers. This series was aired only on two Mondays: August 13 and 20, 1951 at 8:00 PM on NBC. These two shows are lost to history. No kinescopes exist.moreless
  • 12
    It Could Be You

    It Could Be You

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    NBC (ended 1961)
    Game.Contestants selected from the studio audience compete by performing stunts. Winners receive a prize that they had always wanted (stated before the game begins) ,but could never afford to purchase. Featured: friend and family reunions.moreless
  • 13
    Gamble on Love

    Gamble on Love

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    Dumont (ended 1954)
    coming soon...
  • 14
    Dollar a Second

    Dollar a Second

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    Dumont (ended 1957)
    Contestants earned money for every correct answer. BROADCAST HISTORY DuMont: 9/20/53 - 6/14/54 NBC: 7/4/54 - 8/22/54 ABC: 10/1/54 - 6/24/55; 9/2/55 - 8/31/56 NBC: 6/22/57 - 9/28/57
  • 15
    Double or Nothing

    Double or Nothing

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    CBS (ended 1954)
    early CBS game show
  • 16
    Who's There?

    Who's There?

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    CBS (ended 1952)
    This program was a summer replacement show with three panelists attempting to guess a celebrity's name after viewing articles of clothing or props associated with him or her.
  • 17
    Answer Yes or No

    Answer Yes or No

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    NBC (ended 1950)
    Hosted by Moss Hart, this quiz show featured a panel of celebrity guests who would be asked questions about how they would behave in a variety of hypothetical situations. The contestants would then ask the guests other questions about themselves to try and determine what their hypothetical answer would be.moreless
  • 18
    Battle of the Ages

    Battle of the Ages

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    Dumont (ended 1952)
    Two generations of talent competed against each other in this game show.
  • 19
    Miss Universe

    Miss Universe

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    NBC
    Miss Universe is an annual beauty pageant broadcast by NBC and run by the Miss Universe Organization. In the contest, women from more than 80 countries contest for the crown and the title of Miss Universe, vying for the highest cumulative score in swimsuit, evening gown, and question-and-answer competitions. The overall winner receives a contract with the Miss Universe Organization, a chance to spread awareness of disease control, peace, and AIDS awareness across the globe, and the keys to an apartment in Trump Tower (Donald Trump owns the rights to the competition). The pageant aims to host a competition of women that are beautiful, yet are still intelligent, goal-oriented, and well-mannered. The contestants are usually chosen through national pageants in countries across the world, although some countries refuse to participate due to cost or local customs. Over the history of the Miss Universe pageant, the United States has taken the most titles (7), followed Venezuela (6), Puerto Rico (5), and Sweden (3).moreless
  • 20
    The Westminster Kennel Club Dog Show

    The Westminster Kennel Club Dog Show

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    USA
    The Westminster Kennel Club Dog Show is one of the classiest sporting events in the world. Since the first show in 1877, the Westminster Dog Show has crowned hundreds of dogs as best in show, granting them the highest honor a dog can receive. During the show, dogs are judged based on specific standards for their breeds for two full days in February. After initial group judging, the top dog from each of the seven groups are allowed to move on to the final round and a chance to win best of show. This judging technique provides all dogs with an equal opportunity to win the show. The Westminster Kennel Club Dog Show has grown to be one of the most popular sports specials aired since it was first broadcasted in 1948. The Club also hosts a Junior Showmanship competition, with the finalists receiving scholarships for post-secondary schooling. What could be classier than an upscale competition focused on some of the world's most beloved animals? Well, you would have to be barking mad to miss the next Westminster Kennel Club Dog Show.moreless
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    Thursday Night Football
    CBS