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    Jeopardy!

    Jeopardy!

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    Sony Pictures Television
    "This... is... Jeopardy!"America's top-rated syndicated quiz show entered into its 29th season on September 17, 2012. Many subscribing stations have renewed the show through Season 32 (2015-2016). The show was originally created in the 1960s by Merv Griffin, a famed television host, musician, and actor. Irritated by the impossibility of trying to create a quiz show because of scandals that had taken place involving that genre, Griffin was inspired by a suggestion from his wife Julann to create a show wherein contestants were presented with clues in the form of answers, and had to phrase their responses in the form of a question. He originally was going to title the program What's the Question?, but ended up discarding that original title when a skeptical NBC network producer rejected his original concept, claiming, "It doesn't have enough jeopardies." The original Jeopardy!series premiered on March 30, 1964, as a daytime program on NBC. With Art Fleming as host and Don Pardo as announcer, that series continued to air until January 3, 1975, and also spawned a weekly syndicated version that aired within the 1974-1975 season. Later came a revival, The All-New Jeopardy!, which ran from October 2, 1978 through March 2, 1979; for this version, Fleming was joined by announcer John Harlan. The most successful incarnation of Jeopardy! is the current syndicated version, which has aired continuously since September 10, 1984, featuring the Canadian-born Alex Trebek as its host, joined by announcer Johnny Gilbert. This particular version of the program has lived up to its slogan as "America's Favorite Quiz Show," with over 6,000 episodes aired, and currently averages 25 million viewers per week. The show has featured over 10,000 different contestants over the course of its 29-year run, and a host of prominent personalities - including royalty, Presidents, film stars, television personalities, famous athletes, and Nobel laureates - have either presented special clues or appeared as contestants on the show. Since its premiere, the syndicated version ofJeopardy! has outlived 300 other game shows, won a record 30 Daytime Emmy Awards and a Peabody Award, and gained a worldwide following with a multitude of international adaptations. In addition, both TV Guideand the Game Show Network (GSN) have ranked it #2 on their respective lists of the 50 greatest game shows of all time. The longevity of Jeopardy!'s popularity has led it to being referenced and parodied in many television shows, films, and works of literature over the years, including such popular programs asSaturday Night Live, The Simpsons, Cheers, and The Golden Girls. Educators throughout the United States have created their own versions of the quiz show's game to encourage student participation in class, and even IBM has used the show to exhibit its artificial intelligence system "Watson" and have it compete against two of the show's finest champions in a "man versus machine" competition.moreless
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    The Hollywood Squares (1966)

    The Hollywood Squares (1966)

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    NBC (ended 1981)
    Welcome to The Hollywood Squares guide at TV.com. After 2 failed multi-star games (People Will Talk and The Celebrity Game), Game show executive producers Merrill Heatter-Bob Quigley finally hit pay dirt with THE HOLLYWOOD SQUARES. The centerpiece of this classic game show was essentially a huge tic-tac-toe board. In each of the nine squares that sat a star (or often, more than one), armed with bluffs and quips aplenty. The show made its debut on NBC's daytime schedule on October 17-21, 1966. Actor-Comedian Peter Marshall served as "The Master of The Hollywood Squares" acting both as straight man and an abettor in the fun. 2 contestants, including a returning champion competed in a best 2-out-of-3 match of Tic-Tac-Toe. The male contestant was "Mr. X" while the female was "Miss Circle" (the "O"). In turn, each contestant chooses a star to which host Marshall read a question. Many of the stars gave zany bluffs (joke answers aka "Zingers") before coming up with their own answer; sometimes they also gave a funny explanation. It was up to the contestant to decide whether they would agree or disagree with the star. A correct judgment earned the player their mark in the square, but an wrong reply meant their opponent got the square. That's unless it led to tic-tac-toe for which the contestant had to earn himself/herself. The 1st player to complete a tic-tac-toe (up-and-down, across or diagonally) won the game and cash, which varied depending on the version: • NBC daytime: $100 per game+($300+100=$400 Bonus)=$500 per match up to $2500 (October 17, 1966-February 10, 1967). $200 per game, $400 per match up to $2000 from February 13, 1967 to June 20, 1980. • NBC nighttime (1968): $300 per game. • Syndicated (1971-1982): $250 per game. Certain games were designated as the Secret Square games (see below), which was a bonus prize (or prize package) for the contestant who won it. To earn the Secret Square prize package, the contestant had to choose that celebrity (up to that point, known only to the home audience) for which Marshall read a special Hollywood multiple choice question. If the contestant was correct in agreeing or disagreeing, he or she won the Secret Square prize package. The prize won with the Secret Square and the frequency played was as thus: • NBC daytime: The 1st or 2nd game of each match. A new prize package was worth started about $1000 and so on (especially if a trip, fur coat or boat were included) and depending on what was added grew in value until claimed. • NBC nighttime (Friday Night): The 1st 2 games of the show. The 1st prize was generally a trip (either around the world to Europe or South America), while the 2nd Secret Square was a new car (most frequently the 1968 Pontiac Firebird, though the Oldsmobile Cutlass and AMC AMX were also offered). • Syndicated: During the early years (1971-1973), the 1st 2 games of each show, later the 1st 3 games (1973-1978). At 1st, unclaimed Secret Square stashes carried over to the next playing, but later went lost if the contestant didn't win it. At first, each Secret Square was worth about $2000 but later, individual prize packages were worth as much as $7000! Later in the nighttime syndicated run (1978-1980) that went back to be having the 2 Games when "The Bonus Prize Squares" added to the nighttime syndicated run. The rules for becoming champion and reward also depended on the version you watched: • NBC daytime: Winning the best 2-of-3 match (which netted $400). At 1st, there was no bonus game; returning champions simply faced a new challenger before the commercial break and finally on September 6-10, 1976, a new "Bonus Prize Squares" game was added wherein the champion selected a star and won an merchandise item or additional cash prize ($500 to $5000) and in the 1978-1979 Season of the show, The Same merchandise items or the cash prizes are doubled ($1000 to $10,000 in 1979-1980). Originally, a 5-Match Champion retired undefeated also winning $2000 (Earlier $2500) and a new car. The bonus was upped handsomely on January 5-9, 1976 to include 2 cars (always at least one very nice car, such as the Chevrolet Caprice Classic or Pontiac Grand Prix), 1 Cruise Ship & $5000 cash for early of it's period (On January 3-7, 1977, the winners win 1 Car, 1 Cruise Ship & $10,000 Cash) are totaled $25,000 (Earlier it's all totaled $20,000). • NBC nighttime: The contestant in the lead won a bonus prize – usually a TV/stereo console or a new kitchen. Average value was about $1500. • Syndicated: The contestant in the lead won a new car – always an economy car (such as the Chevrolet Vega or Datsun B210). Also, in the NBC primetime and syndicated versions, when time expired in the middle of the game (with the sound of the horn aka "Tacky Buzzer"), each contestant was given $50 for each square they had after the final question was played (unless a contestant got a tic-tac-toe); even contestants who didn't win any cash were given $100 just for competing. Virtually every major star from every genre – television, movies, music, sports, experts & the stage of Broadway and other locales– of the 1960s through early 1980s are stopped by with their star quips and bluffs. Hollywood legends also appeared as cameos either as the star's squares or walk-ons. The most popular regulars were Rose Marie, Charley Weaver, Wally Cox, Morey Amsterdam, Abby Dalton, George Gobel and ... of course, longtime center square Paul Lynde. Paul Lynde – by the way – wasn't always the center square as he didn't become the permanent occupant of that space up to the weekday broadcast of October 14-18, 1968. Before Lynde the permanent center square, comedian Buddy Hackett was the most common star to sit in the center square (on the nighttime edition in 1968). Lynde was the center square on nearly every broadcast until he left on August 20-24, 1979; he returned to the center square for a part of the 1980-1981 Las Vegas syndicated season and was a special guest for not sitting the same center square, but sitting the different square for the final syndicated episode on September 11, 1981. Ernest Borgnine was the center square during the debut weekday broadcast of October 17-21, 1966, while Wayland Flowers & Madame was the NBC daytime show's last center square on the last weekday broadcast of June 16-20, 1980 and George Gobel was the last syndicated-version center square on September 7-11, 1981. On November 1-7 1971, a syndicated nighttime portion of The Hollywood Squares released. At first, the show was once-a-week, but once the show proved popular, it quickly expanded to a twice-a-week show starting on September 11-17 1972. 3 Months after the last NBC daytime show aired on June 20, 1980, the production of The Hollywood Squares moved to Las Vegas and the show expanded to five-day-a-week. The expanded syndicated format lasted one year (September 8, 1980-September 11, 1981) with a repeat of the last NBC-TV & Syndicated 1979-1980 Season for the 1981-1982 Season and being Distributed by RHODES PRODUCTIONS-A Filmways Company. 3 Theme songs of The Hollywood Squares were used. The 1st theme (1966-1969) called "The Silly Song" was composed by Jimmie Haskell. Beginning in the 1969-1970 season and it was replaced by a piece composed by William Loose for known to game show aficionados as "Merrill and Bob's Theme," it's the 2nd theme of The Hollywood Squares is mostly identified and ended before & after the 1978-1979 season. The disco-flavored theme called "The Hollywood Bowl" was composed by Stan Worth (who wrote many TV theme songs) became the 3rd and last theme song starting on September 3-7, 1979 and finishing on September 11, 1981. The Hollywood Squares ran on NBC daytime up to June 20, 1980, when it was replaced by David Letterman's ultimately unsuccessful daytime show. 3 revivals all had varying levels of success including a brief marriage to Match Game in 1983-1984 (as The Match Game/Hollywood Squares Hour); A 1986-1989 syndicated entry hosted by frequent original The Hollywood Squares square placer John Davidson (as The New HOLLYWOOD SQUARES) and the 1998-2004 edition (as HOLLYWOOD SQUARES "H2") hosted by talk show personality Tom Bergeron (Fresh out of WBZ-TV NBC "Now CBS 4" Boston's "PEOPLE ARE TALKING"). From April 2002 to October 2003, reruns of the Peter Marshall-hosted Hollywood Squares ran on Game Show Network; the package included 14 NBC-TV primetime and 116 syndicated episodes (130 total). Originally having aired in several weekday timeslots, the show was eventually downgraded to weekend-only airings (at 10:30 a.m. EST). Despite a promising start and wide promotion, the reruns never drew high ratings or young audiences (in part because many of the stars have died or are unfamiliar to younger audiences) and were eventually replaced with reruns of the Tom Bergeron Hollywood Squares edition right through August 31, 2007. On March 30-April 3, 2009 "(The All-New) HOLLYWOOD SQUARES" has came back to GSN-play everyday to the lineup for GSN LIVE. In 2010 The Show now seen on weekends featuring the 1st 2 Seasons of "HOLLYWOOD Squares" from 1998 to 2000. The Broadcast History of THE HOLLYWOOD SQUARES {NBC Daytime} October 17, 1966-October 1, 1976 Monday-Friday at 11:30 AM-12NOON Eastern October 4, 1976-September 29, 1978 Monday-Friday at 10:30-11:00 AM October 2, 1978-March 2, 1979 Monday–Friday at 1:00-1:30 PM (or 4:00-4:30 PM) March 5-August 10, 1979 Monday-Friday at 12:30-1:00 PM August 13, 1979-June 20, 1980 Monday–Friday at 10:30-11:00 AM. {NBC Nighttime} January 12-September 13, 1968 – 9:30-10:00 PM Friday. {Syndicated} November 1, 1971-September 11, 1981 – Various nights at 7:30-8:00 PM Eastern (Monday-Saturday) & 5:30-6:00 PM Eastern (Sunday) and for the last 2 seasons for Weekdays/Weeknights at various times which depending on market and Distributed by RHODES PRODUCTIONS-A Filmways Company. "THE HOLLYWOOD SQUARES (1966)" is A MERRILL HEATTER (hQ) BOB QUIGLEY PRODUCTION-A Filmways Company. Now This Show Owned by Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Television.moreless
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    Supermarket Sweep

    Supermarket Sweep

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    ABC (ended 2003)
    "Hey, the next time you're at the checkout counter and you hear the beep, think of all the fun you can have on, Supermarket Sweep! Following many years of waiting in the check out lines at local supermarkets Al Howard, with his wife, Alice, wondered what it would be like if just once the manager came to him and asked, "How would you like to run wild through the market and grab everything you can get your hands on and it won't cost you a cent!?" The idea of Supermarket Sweep was born. But, Al realized that he needed more than just 'running through a market' to make a successful game show, so he came up with other features, all relating to products we typically find in a market. Than he took his new show to ABC-TV and soon the show was viewed all across America, five days-a-week at 11 a.m. Eventually, Sweep went off ABC-TV but over the years, the TV audience never forgot the show that looked entirely different from any other game show. After all, what other show allows you to grab a supermarket shopping cart and act out your fantasy! Lifetime TV put the show back on in 1990. This time, Al created an exciting new element: the "Bonus Round." $5000 in cash was hidden somewhere in the market and a contestant team was given 60 seconds to find it. They had to solve 3 clues in that amount of time and if they did, their reward was the $5000 in cash! Have contestants been successful in finding the big money? Well, the record shows that up to this point in time, Supermarket Sweep has given away close to two million dollars in cash! (Yes, that's $2,000,000.00) The program used to be seen on PAX TV, but the show is no longer seen as of right now. But since PAX is famous for being America's "Family Network," the show is a perfect fit for them. After all, going to the supermarket is a family experience!moreless
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    The Newlywed Game

    The Newlywed Game

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    ABC (ended 1974)
    "Once upon a time, there was this nice, family TV game show on CBS called Password, wherein teams of two tried to guess words using just one word. It did very well in the ratings, and was quite educational, too. "Then, one day – July 11, 1966, to be exact – a CBS News special report about Robert McNamara reporting on the Vietnam War pre-empted Password. That didn't make people very happy. So, they turned the station to see what else was on. "Some people saw a game unlike what they had ever seen before. There was this handsome young man asking four newlywed couples questions about their marriages. Sometimes, you saw just the beautiful young ladies; and other times, the good-looking men were on, but they always got back together to talk about their marriages. "Sometimes, the couples kissed each other. Other times, they pouted and made a scene. And sometimes, they shared information that was quite intimate (can you say "intimate," kiddies). "The audience on TV laughed and laughed, and the handsome young host did everything to help make the audience laugh. The people couldn't believe what they were seeing on the TV. But they became curious and decided to watch this new show when it came on the next day ... and the next day ... and the next day ... forgetting all about Password wondering if the newlywed couples would or could live happily ever after." That, in a nutshell, tells the story of the classic game show The Newlywed Game, the tell-all game show where four couples – all married less than two years – answered questions about their relationship to win a prize. The game was played in two rounds, each with two parts (though never referred to as such). In the first part, the wives were secluded off-stage (when the show first aired, the husbands were secluded off-stage) while host Eubanks posed a series of three questions to the husbands – usually multiple choice or fill-in-the blank, sometimes with more than one answer required. After the questions were asked, the wives were brought back onstage to answer the same questions. A correct match earned the newlywed couple 5 points, but the real fun came when there was not a match. Usually, not matching meant an argument, with the spouses each (shall we say) strongly defending their answer. And yes, Eubanks did everything to make the situation worse (often using one spouses words against him/her, or even relaying what the spouse said while the other was off-stage); and of course the audience played right along, loving every moment. In the second round, the husbands were taken to the sound-proof room (when the show first aired, the wives were secluded off stage) while the wives were posed the questions, the fourth being a special 25-point bonus question. Correct matches at this point were worth 10 points (for the first 3 questions). The special 25-point bonus question – usually general enough so as not to cause an argument, unless that too was incorrect – often determined the day's winner. The winner after all the questions were asked (or a tie-breaker was played, if necessary, by the couple predicting their point total) "won a special bonus prize, chosen especially for" them. Usually, this prize was kitchen appliances; rooms of furniture; stereo/TV equipment; things for the game room (such as a pinball machine or a pool table) a boat, motorcycle or trailer; a piano; or a trip (with the requisite luggage and camera thrown in). And yes, couples who wanted a specific prize competed for it on that day's show. Special episodes were frequently dedicated toward expectant couples ("maternity day") and couples who had previously appeared on the show but, even though they didn't win, they had won the audience over (refered to as "Alumni Day"). During the ABC run, during the Christmas season, couples donated their gifts to charity. Thousands of couples let all of their secrets out of the bag during The Newlywed Game's four lives. In addition to the 1966-1974 ABC and 1996-2000 syndicated versions, the most often remembered versions (and most-reran on Game Show Network [GSN]) came with the 1977-1980 (1 Night a week) and 1985-1989 5-Day-a-week syndicated incarnations. The rules for The Newlywed Game were modified for the 1988-1989 season, with host Paul Rodriguez; and again when the series resurfaced as a new entry in the 1996-1997 season, with Gary Kroeger as host. Neither of the "modified" versions sat well with fans (like any version did with some), but the alterations basically involved converting the scoring into dollars and rules to how the questions were asked and how the awards were paid out. Bob Eubanks would return to helm the 1996 version during its second and third seasons (1997-1999), and that along with reverting to the original rules made for a welcome reception from long-time (and new) fans. The only difference was that the grand prize each time was a "second honeymoon" (remember, before, it could also be furniture, electronics or transportation). The 4th and Last Season (1999-2000) is a repeat of the previous season. As one might expect on a show like this, there were countless classic moments during the history of The Newlywed Game. None was more infamous than one such moment that occurred early in the 1977-1980 syndicated run. During a maternity week episode, Eubanks had asked the question, "Where, specifically, is the weeeeeiirdest place that you have ever gotten the urge the make whoopee?" The husband gave a pedestrian reply: "The freeway." His wife's answer was, to put it mildly, not: "Is it (bleep)?" (you fill in the blank, but it made for uproarious laughter). Needless to say, the young woman clearly misunderstood the question.moreless
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    The Dating Game

    The Dating Game

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    ABC (ended 2000)
    THE DATING GAME was and still is by all accounts, the premiere game show for singles. It was the forerunner for many imitators such as "Love Connection", MTV's "Singled Out" and numerous others. But they all have the same influence: Chuck Barris, the creator of the one that started it all! "THE DATING GAME" first premiered on December 20-24, 1965 on abc-TV and remained a fixture on the network in both daytime and nighttime incarnations through the rest of the 1960s and well into the 1970s. Jim Lange, fresh from his announcing duties with Tennessee Ernie Ford stepped through the flower-speckled rotating partitions for the first of many, many times shortly before Christmas 1965. The game play was simple. On one side you had 3 bachelors answering questions from a girl on the other side of the partition (each not being able to see the other). The girl was given a certain amount of time to ask as many questions as she could to the 3 bachelors. More often than not the questions would be of a quirky nature. (E.G.: "If we were marooned on a desert island, what would be the first thing you'd do and why?"). During a commercial break, the girl would think about which bachelor she'd select. When the show returned, Jim would have her announce her choice. After meeting the 2 boys she didn't select, she's meet her date at which point Jim would tell them where they were going for their dream date. On less frequent occasions, the roles were reversed. To wit, the game would feature a boy selecting 1 from the 3 Bachelorettes. The show became an enormous hit with young viewers. (In fact, in light of its success, Baskin-Robbins named an ice cream flavor in honor of the show.) And over the years, the show featured many stars of the day (Burt Reynolds, Paul Petersen and even Dick Clark showed up) as well as newcomers who would in later years become big stars in their own right (John Ritter, Teri Garr, Tom Selleck and Farrah Fawcett were among these.) The show left abc-TV on July 2-6, 1973, but stayed in syndication for another year (1973-1974) before leaving the airwaves altogether. Creator Chuck Barris brought the show back again 4 years later with Lange as host from 1978 to 1980. Along with an updated version of "The Newlywed Game" and 2 new shows, ("The Gong Show" and "The $1.98 Beauty Show") "The Dating Game" returned to syndicated in 1978, only this time with a more adult-oriented borderline dialogue format--perhaps in an effort to recapture the same audience that had grown up watching THE DATING GAME in the 1960s. The newer version- along with Jim Lange's gaudy red tuxedo- lasted for 2 years until local stations finally got tired of the protesting phone calls. Once again, the show featured both present-day and future stars such as Jaye P. Morgan, Bob Saget and Murray "The Unknown Comic" Langston. THE DATING GAME was all but forgotten until the mid-80s, when Barris decided to do it yet again. An all new 80s update of "The Dating Game (The All-New DATING GAME)" premiered on syndicated on September 8-12, 1986, but this time the hosting duties were handled by Elaine Joyce (Lange was busy at the time hosting "The $1,000,000 Chance Of A Lifetime"). This version lasted for three years with Joyce hosting the 1st season and Jeff McGregor hosting the last 2 Seasons and again as in the previous 2 incarnations, the show featured present and future stars. (Among the future stars was Oscar-winning actor Cuba Gooding, Jr.!) The Program Demised on September 8, 1989. Now... as for the NINETIES update? Well... I don't know terribly much about it except for the following: By the time the 90s rolled around, Chuck Barris sold the rights to all his shows to Columbia-Tristar Television. A newer, corporate-whitewashed version of the DATING GAME was released on September 9-13, 1996 and packaged with another updated version of "The Newlywed Game", this time with Chuck ("Love Connection") Woolery (1st Host is Whose Line is it Anyway (US) Brad Sherwood for the 1st Season for the difference) and outside of the quizzer and the respective suitors & suitorettes not being able to see one another, the rules were almost completely overhauled and all ended the show on September 15, 2000. But if you're a game show retrophile like me, you would have to agree that there's just no Dating Game without Jim Lange with or without the awful tux. And now you don't have to suffer from Lange withdrawal because Game Show Network has some episodes to show you... And HEEEEEEEE-RE THEY ARRRRRRRR-RE! Now you can see the classic Jim Lange episodes of the original DATING GAME on The Game Show Network- in particular, the ones that featured present-day and future superstars. You can see them Saturday and Sunday nights at 11:30pm on GSN. Enjoy them if you can... and if you can't stay up that late, TAPE THEM... LIKE ME!! (Dates with celebrities are always subject to their availability.) THE BROADCAST HISTORY of THE DATING GAME: December 20, 1965-March 31, 1967 at 11:30am-12Noon on ABC-TV April 3, 1967-July 12, 1968 at 4:00-4:30pm on ABC-TV July 15, 1968-July 6, 1973 at 2:30-3:00pm on ABC-TV. On 1st Run Syndicated from September 10, 1973-September 15, 2000.moreless
  • 6
    Password

    Password

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    CBS (ended 1975)
    Password was a simple word-association game, but became one of the most popular and beloved game shows of all time. It was the first successful show to pair a contestant with a celebrity partner and among the first to return after being cancelled several years. A retooled version of "Password" began in 1979 (as Password+Plus and later in 1984 as Super Password) enjoyed two more highly successful runs. This Password page, however, focuses on the 1961-1967 and 1971-1975 versions. Two contestants competed, each paired with a star partner that played the entire week. Host Allen Ludden gave one member of each team a "password," and using 1-word clues only (proper nouns were accepted), it was the cluegiver's job to get his or her partner to guess the word for 10 points. If the 1st team didn't guess the word, the opposing team (who was allowed to "eavesdrop") could try to successfully communicate the word with a new clue (or sometimes even the same clue) for 9 points. Play alternated until the word was guessed with 1 point deducted for each clue or until all 10 clues were given at Ludden's discretion (if it was obvious the word would never be guessed) or if the cluegiver accidentally uttered part or all of the password. Illegal clues – such as hyphenated words and clues with more than one word – and taking too much time also passed control to the opponents will be sounded by the buzzer from The Word Authority of Dr. Reason A. Goodwin--The Editor of World Book Encyclopedia Dictionary. Usually, the stars (who played the entire weekday) gave the clues on the 1st word of a game with the contestants trying to guess the word; then the contestants gave the clues and the celebrities tried to guess and so on. Play continued until 1 team scored 25 points (or on occassion, a time's up whistle sounded). The contestant won $100 on CBS Daytime and ($250 for the nighttime portion) and his or her team played the Lightning Round (believed to be the 1st endgame in a game show). In the Lightning Round, the celebrity partner was shown a series of 5 new passwords, one at a time. He or she had 60 seconds (1 Minute) to communicate all 5 to the contestant at $50 per correct guess of the word. An illegal clue or a pass meant no money could be earned on that word. Up to $250 was possible in the Lightning Round. Each contestant played 2 games after which they both retired; a contestant could win a maximum of $700. Even contestants who were shut out of any cash winnings were given a consolation gift (usually a camera or a set of World Book encyclopedias or other stuff). The most impressive contestants returned each year for a tournament of champions, but this was little more than asking them back to play two more games for $700 extra. The show debuted on the CBS daytime schedule on October 2, 1961 and continued through September 15, 1967; a nighttime Portion premiered on January 2, 1962 and had 2 runs up to May 22, 1967. Actress Betty White was a frequent guest star(and in June 1963, was a permanent fixture in Ludden's life ... as his wife); she appeared very frequently in all revivals of Password, long after Ludden's death on June 9, 1981; little wonder she was among the best players of this game. Reruns were syndicated to local stations after leaving CBS daytime (in part due to a naughty new game show called The Newlywed Game which was scheduled against Password) before reappearing on April 5, 1971 as a part of the ABC daytime schedule. Play was largely as before with modest cash payouts. That's until November 18, 1974, when the powers-that-be decided to change the game. An all-star edition – as Password All-Stars with 6 stars playing for charity – and a revised format with 4 contestants (2 of which were paired with a celebrity partner) competing for 2 spots in the main game were seen more as screwing up a good thing than changing it. Needless to say, the show would die of a quick death leaving ABC after an 5 season run on June 27, 1975. However, Goodson-Todman did make some changes that DID work, and showcased them in another revival called Password Plus, which debuted on January 8, 1979 on NBC (hosted originally by Ludden and later Bill Cullen and Tom Kennedy). That show remained until March 26, 1982, but it returned on September 24, 1984 as Super Password (hosted by Bert Convy) and it lived on NBC until March 24, 1989. See Password Plus and Super Password for more details. Broadcast History of Password: October 2, 1961-September 15, 1967 CBS-TV: Monday-Friday at 2:00-2:30pm April 5, 1971-September 3, 1971 ABC-TV: Monday-Friday at 4:00-4:30pm September 6, 1971-March 17, 1972 ABC-TV: Monday-Friday at 12:30-1:00pm March 20, 1972-June 27, 1975 ABC-TV Monday-Friday at 12Noon-12:30pm.moreless
  • 7
    Sale of The Century

    Sale of The Century

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    GSN - Game Show Network
    Sale of the Century was a long-running quiz show that was modestly successful in its native United States. But when producer Reg Grundy produced a version for Australia's Nine(9) Network, it became a phenomenal success down under. This report, however, covers the U.S. versions of Sale of the Century. 1969-1974 version The original 1969 version was produced by William Jones-Al Howard Productions and hosted by Jack Kelly (1969-1971) and former baseball star/contemporary baseball broadcaster Joe Garagiola (1971-1974). Three contestants, including a returning champion, competed to answer a series of questions, read rapid-fire style. Each contestant was spotted $25; correct answers were worth $5, wrong answers deducted $5 from the score. The game was interrupted at several points for Instant Bargains, which allowed the player in the lead to buy a take-it-or-leave-it prize at a heavily-discounted price (e.g., an $1175 color TV-stereo console for $14); if there was a tie for the lead, both or perhaps all 3 players could vie for the prize first-come, first-serve style. The contestant could buy the prize, knowing s/he might later lose the game; at times, the host offered cash, an additional prize or reduced the asking price as an additional incentive to buy the prize. During the second round, question values were increased to $10, added or subtracted appropriately; and again to $25 toward the end of the game. The contestant with the highest cash score when time expired was the day's champion and earned the right to shop in the "Sale of the Century." The losers received their cash score and any Instant Bargain prizes. In the "Sale of the Century," the contestant could use his/her cash score winnings to buy specially-discounted luxury items (e.g., a $2800 dining room suite for $85), or bank the cash and return on the next show and accumulate more by winning future games and having access to more expensive prizes (including a luxury car and a cash jackpot that started at $25,000 and grew by $1000 per show until claimed). That's where the strategy and excitement came in – does the player want that new room of furniture, or does s/he want to bank more cash for that $8500 Cadillac? A player who earned enough cash was awarded all the prizes in the "Sale of the Century" (which often had a combined value of more than $50,000). Late in the NBC run, the format was altered so that three married couples competed, with late-game questions worth $20 and the winning couple going shopping. The format reverted to the original a 1-season syndicated version that appeared in the fall of 1973. 1983-1989 U.S. run $ale of the Century (which had since become a monster hit in Australia under the watch of Reg Grundy) returned to the U.S. in January 1983, with new host Jim Perry (best known in the U.S. on Card Sharks). Perry's easy-going hosting style plus his ability to talk the contestants into the Instant Bargains, made this show – now a Reg Grundy Production – a respectable hit. Originally, the rules were the same as the 1969 version, with the exception of a new "Fame Game" feature. Played in alternating order with the "Instant Bargain," Perry read a series of 6 to 10 first-person clues that led to a famous person, place, thing, event, etc. There was no scoring penalty, but a wrong guess put that player out of the rest of the question. The player who was correct chose one of nine numbers on the 3-by-3 "Fame Game" board (initially, the board held the faces of celebrities); behind the numbers were prizes, cash prizes of $300-$1000 and score money ($10 on the first playing, and $15 and $25 added in subsequent rounds). Later in the run, the player used his lock-in buzzer to stop a randomized light; also, a "Mystery Money" space was added (with cash amounts of $2 to $1,500 offered in lieu of trying for another number). In 1986, the third "Instant Bargain" was replaced by "Instant Cash," wherein the first-place player could spend the full amount of his/her lead on a 1-in-3 shot (the other two had $100) at a box that concealed a growing jackpot, which started at $1000 and grew by that amount each day until claimed. If there was a tie for the lead, Perry held an auction, reducing the prize to as low as $1 for a chance at thousands. Only if the lead was a few dollars or two or more contestants were tied did someone usually go for the "Instant Cash"; many players with a sizable lead passed, even when the jackpot approached $20,000 or more (as it did on more than one occasion). On special weeks (e.g., College Week, Brides Week, etc.), Instant Cash was a flat $2000. After the third "Fame Game" came the 60-second Speed Round in 1984; implemented about a year into the run, this replaced an often anti-climatic series of three final questions in 1983-1984. The bonus round went through 3 distinct formats, as thus: • Format 1 (1983-1986): The old but very lavish "Sale of the Century" from before. The cash jackpot now started at $50,000 (and grew by $1000 per show until claimed); a contestant who won everything in this round could walk away with well over $100,000 in cash and prizes. • Format 2 (1986-1988): The "Winner's Board" game. The player faced a board of 20 squares, which concealed a car, $3000, $10,000, the names of six other prizes (worth between $2000 and $15,000) and two "WIN" cards that served as wild cards for the next prize chosen. After clearing the board, the player was offered a chance to quit and take everything home or return for one more show. If they returned and lost, they lost everything collected off the "Winner's Board," but a win added a $50,000 cash bonus to their already impressive array of cash and prizes. • Format 3 (1988-1989): The "Winner's Big Money Game." The champion was given a prize (worth about $2000-$3000 on the first day and increasing in value for each win to about $10,000) and played this new "guess-the-answer" game, which was about as far from $ale of the Century's original premise as possible. The player was shown a series of six-word clues to famous people, places, things, etc., with the words revealed one at a time every 3/4-second (or so). Solving four won a cash bonus of $5000 for the 1st day, $6000 for the 2nd day and so on up to $10,000 for day 6. On day 7, the contestant played for a luxury car and on day 8, he/she went for the $50,000 cash jackpot. A 5-day-a-week syndicated edition of $ale of the Century ran from January 1985 to September 1986, with the rules changes made concurrent to the NBC daily version.moreless
  • 8
    Keep Talking

    Keep Talking

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    CBS (ended 1960)
    Keep Talking was a quiz show where celebrity panelists were divided into two teams of three players. The host would give each player a secret word and that player had to make up and tell a story using that word. The opposite team then had to guess what the secret word was.
    Panelists on Keep Talking included Paul Winchell, Morey Amsterdam, Peggy Cass, Orson Bean, Audrey Meadows, and Joey Bishop.
    Hosts of the show included Monty Hall, Carl Reiner, and Merv Griffin.moreless
  • 9
    Hollywood Squares, The (1966)

    Hollywood Squares, The (1966)

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    NBC
    The Hollywood Squares is a classic 1966 game show that mixes trivia with the classic strategy game, tic-tac-toe. Two contestants go head-to-head to try to get three Xs or Os in a row on a giant tic-tac-toe board. But it's not as easy as it sounds. Each space on the giant board contains a celebrity, who answers a trivia question whenever a contestant tries to win their space. The celebrity may know the answer to the trivia question, or they may make something up. The contestant has to decide whether the celebrity is answering truthfully or not, and they only get to occupy that space on the board if they choose correctly. The Hollywood Squares offers a chance to see some of Tinsel Town's biggest stars at their least scripted. This inventive game show became known for the unpredictability of the stars, who used the show to exhibit their real selves, without any media exaggeration. The Hollywood Squares featured many celebrities, including Billy Crystal, Vincent Price, Aretha Franklin, Joan Rivers, Eva Gabor, Don Knotts, and many more.moreless
  • 10
    University Challenge

    University Challenge

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    BBC
    Long-running quiz show based on the US format "College Bowl". Two teams of four students representing institutions of higher education, answer questions of a generally more difficult standard than most quiz shows. The original ITV incarnation started on a winner-stays-on system with teams retiring after three victories and the top-scorers returning for a knock-out phase at the end of the series, later changing to the straight knock-out system carried through to the BBC revival.moreless
  • 11
    It's Your Bet

    It's Your Bet

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    (ended 1973)
    a revised version of the NBC daytime game show "I'll Bet"
  • 12
    The Baby Game

    The Baby Game

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    ABC (ended 1968)
    On this game show, three couples were asked to predict children's behavior in various situations.
  • 13
    100 Grand

    100 Grand

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    ABC (ended 1963)
    Prime-time game show that lasted only three weeks.
  • 14
    Say When

    Say When

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    NBC (ended 1965)
    Debuting on Monday January 2, 1961... Say When! is a knockoff of The Price Is Right and the star of the show is Ex-Announcer of Concentration Art James. 2 contestants competed in this shopping game. First, a pre determined amount was set (two $750 games with the two winners going to the $2000 game) Each contestant took turns picking a category prize from 4 (IE; musical instruments, kitchen, car, boat). Prizes could be cheap or expensive. A contestant has to pick a number to replace the prize their opponent chooses and if he/she gets a Blank Check,the contestant has to choose the quantity from 1-100 of that prize,not choose another prize for that turn. If the player felt that the next prize would put him/her over the amount, they can call "Say When" @ that point & stop. If they go over the amount and the opponent wins. The opponent also wins if their leftover score is lower than the person who stopped. If a player reaches 0 total, the player wins a cash jackpot. 2 out of 3 determined the champ! Finally Say When cancelled on Friday March 26, 1965 on NBC-TV.moreless
  • 15
    Eye Guess

    Eye Guess

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    NBC (ended 1969)
    It marked Bob Stewart's first independent game show after studying under the Goodson-Todman school known as Password. Game Show. Answers to 8 numbers are revealed to 2 contestants for 8 seconds and then they try to complete phrases (Example: "When his secretary was late for the 3rd consecutive day, what did her boss do?"). The contestant then picks a number from the Eye Guess board to complete the phrase. Each correct answer was worth 10 points with a 20 point board later. A special answer, not made visible to the contestants, was under the Eye Guess rebus. Each incorrect answer resulted in the turn going over to their opponent. The object of the game was to get 100 points to win the game and get a chance at winning prizes from the Eye Guess board. If a contestant guessed all seven numbers without hitting the stop number, the contestant won a new car! Early in the run Eye Guess has Categories and its items and worth $25 for finding a item to a category and win a New Car. When a "STOP" Sign appears he or she lose everything and 1 other way to "QUIT" the game and keeps the money he or she collected. The theme song for Eye Guess was "Sugar Lips" by Al Hirt. BROADCAST HISTORY of Eye Guess: January 3-December 30, 1966 Monday-Friday at 10:00-10:25am on NBC-TV January 2, 1967-September 26, 1969 Monday-Friday at 12:30-12:55pm on NBC-TV.moreless
  • 16
    PDQ

    PDQ

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    This word game used to teams; two celebrities comprised the Home Team while the Visitors were a celebrity and a civilian. The civilian played for prizes. One member of each team was placed in its teams isolation booth while the other team has access to letters of the alphabet one would see on a theater marquis. The object of the game is guess the long word or short phrase using as fewer letters than the other team. The teammate who would spell out the puzzle began each round with three letters, but not the first three in any order. An audio cue would allow one letter to be added to the phrase every fifteen seconds or so until the puzzle was solved. The player with the letter often used pantomime to help the guessing player. Every round was played for a prize. After two games, the PDQ Special, a best two out of three series,was played for the most expensive prize of the day. When time ran out, the civilian would play a bonus round for up to $500 in trading stamps. The player have to guess a wordbased on seeing only three letters of it. The player had ten seconds to solve each word. NBC revived this show in 1973, under the new name, Baffle (which replaced Concentration).moreless
  • 17
    Stump the Stars

    Stump the Stars

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    CreateSpace (ended 1963)
    Welcome to the Stump the Stars guide at TV.com. another title for Pantomime Quiz BROADCAST HISTORY 9/17/62 - 9/16/63: Mondays at 10:30p on CBS 2/24/64 - 9/4/64: weeknights in syndication 9/8/69 - 9/25/70: weeknights in syndicationmoreless
  • 18
    Seven Keys

    Seven Keys

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    ABC (ended 1964)
    Seven Keys had a single contestant vying for one of seven keys that would open a lock containing valuable prizes.

    To obtain a key, he/she played a general knowledge game facing a board of 70 windows, laid out in seven rows of ten windows. To start, the player presses the button marked "Steps", and the board advances the number of steps (1 to 10) shown on a wheel corresponding to the buttons. He/she must correctly answer or identify the subject shown. To win, he/she must make all 70 squares in fifteen chances.

    If a player answers incorrectly, he/she must go back to the first square in the row. If he she lands on a "Penalty" window, he/she must press the "Penalty" button and go back the number shown. If the player lands on a "Bonus," he/she presses the "Bonus" button and goes ahead the number shown. If a player lands on a "Safety", he/she presses the "Steps" button as usual and loses no chances. Chances are not lost for incorrect answers, Bonus windows or Penalty windows.

    A player completing the board may select a key which will open one of seven lock containing prizes, one of them a grand prize. The contestant may also return the next show to play for more keys, with seven wins automatically winning everything. If a player fails to complete the board at any point, he/she forfeits any keys won and departs with some nice parting gifts.moreless
  • 19
    Personality

    Personality

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    NBC (ended 1969)
    Three celebrity guests make predictions on how others would answer specific questions.
  • 20
    The Object Is

    The Object Is

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    ABC (ended 1964)
    Showing that imitation is truly the sincerest form of television, The Object Is was a hybrid of CBS's Password and NBC's You Don't Say!. It was Dick Clark's first gig as a game show host.

    Two celebrities and two contestants and split into teams, and the object is to convey a famous name using inanimate objects as clues. It can be one or two-word clues, no proper names or hyphenated words. The first clue is worth 10 points, the second 7, the third 5, and the fourth and last clue 3 points.

    First team to 15 points wins the game, and two games wins the match. The winning player here pairs with the celebrity and rattling off as many items relating to an object shown to them in 30 seconds. Each item is worth $5.

    The Object Is was canceled on March 27, 1964 and replaced by Goodson-Todman's Missing Links, which had moved from NBC (to make room for a little show called--you may have heard of it--Jeopardy!). Clark would host Missing Links as its NBC host, Ed McMahon, contractually bound to NBC.moreless
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