• 261
    Blush: The Search for the Next Great Makeup Artist

    Blush: The Search for the Next Great Makeup Artist

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    Lifetime
    Eight aspiring makeup artists try to outdo one another for a one-year contract as a professional with Max Factor, $100,000 in cash, and a chance to show off their skills in a major glossy magazine cover shoot in this Lifetime reality competition series.moreless
  • 262
    King of the Crown

    King of the Crown

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    TLC
    This show follows Cyrus Frakes and his staff at "Gowns and Crowns" as they help new pageant contestants work to refine their winning techniques.
  • 263
    Private Chefs of Beverly Hills

    Private Chefs of Beverly Hills

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    Food Network
    Private Chefs of Beverly Hills is the Food Network docu-soap that follows the chefs at Beverly Hills private chef agency Big City Chefs. Viewers get a peek into the world of glamorous private chefs, who are on call 24/7 to cater to the whims and appetite of their prestigious clientele in the posh LA neighborhood. The company is owned by Tom Stieber, who is in charge of dishing out all of the outrageous requests. From cooking for canines in a pet spa to serving food at a Botox party to a medieval murder mystery party, the chefs handle clients of all types. Jesse Brune is a former star of Bravo's Workout, a Le Cordon Bleu trained chef and trainer who cooks healthy and organic cuisine. Manouschka Guerrier is a model who learned how to cook from her mother and grandmother, and now celebrates the single life with her brand Single Serving. Brian Hill started in catering, and ended up with his own gourmet street food truck and clients like Eddie Murphy and Mary J. Blige. Stuart O'Keeffe studied in Dublin and is now Tupperware's North American chef. Sasha Perl-Raver is self taught and publishes her own books and writes for NBC.com. Brooke Peterson learned how to cook for big groups on small budgets, and has hosted her own web series. The team comes together to try to knock out the crazy jobs of upper-class clients on Food Network's Private Chefs of Beverly Hills.moreless
  • 264
    Bachelor Pad

    Bachelor Pad

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    ABC (ended 2012)
    Twenty of the most unforgettable contestants from The Bachelor will reunite under one roof.Bachelor Pad will feature the participants living together in a house in hopes of getting a second chance at finding love. Each week the reunited contestants will compete in challenges, some of which are inspired by incidents from prior seasons. At the end of the six-episode run, one contestant will emerge victorious and will take home a cash prize, and maybe even true love.moreless
  • 265
    Cowboy U

    Cowboy U

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    CMT - Country Music Television
    Eight city slickers - from a software salesman, to a nurse and a children’s author -- say goodbye to modern conveniences for life on a real working ranch. Under the supervision of a tough ranch foreman and his two wranglers, the city slickers struggle to master cowboy life at this rugged cowboy "boot camp" where they must learn to ride, rope and wrangle before embarking on a grueling weeklong horse trek to the final cowboy challenge. New-found cowboy skills are put to the test when they must rope a steer, barrel race and ride a 1,200-pound live bull. The reward for their efforts - a cash prize, a custom-made saddle, and the coveted title of "All Around Cowboy."moreless
  • 266
    The Dating Game

    The Dating Game

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    ABC (ended 2000)
    THE DATING GAME was and still is by all accounts, the premiere game show for singles. It was the forerunner for many imitators such as "Love Connection", MTV's "Singled Out" and numerous others. But they all have the same influence: Chuck Barris, the creator of the one that started it all! "THE DATING GAME" first premiered on December 20-24, 1965 on abc-TV and remained a fixture on the network in both daytime and nighttime incarnations through the rest of the 1960s and well into the 1970s. Jim Lange, fresh from his announcing duties with Tennessee Ernie Ford stepped through the flower-speckled rotating partitions for the first of many, many times shortly before Christmas 1965. The game play was simple. On one side you had 3 bachelors answering questions from a girl on the other side of the partition (each not being able to see the other). The girl was given a certain amount of time to ask as many questions as she could to the 3 bachelors. More often than not the questions would be of a quirky nature. (E.G.: "If we were marooned on a desert island, what would be the first thing you'd do and why?"). During a commercial break, the girl would think about which bachelor she'd select. When the show returned, Jim would have her announce her choice. After meeting the 2 boys she didn't select, she's meet her date at which point Jim would tell them where they were going for their dream date. On less frequent occasions, the roles were reversed. To wit, the game would feature a boy selecting 1 from the 3 Bachelorettes. The show became an enormous hit with young viewers. (In fact, in light of its success, Baskin-Robbins named an ice cream flavor in honor of the show.) And over the years, the show featured many stars of the day (Burt Reynolds, Paul Petersen and even Dick Clark showed up) as well as newcomers who would in later years become big stars in their own right (John Ritter, Teri Garr, Tom Selleck and Farrah Fawcett were among these.) The show left abc-TV on July 2-6, 1973, but stayed in syndication for another year (1973-1974) before leaving the airwaves altogether. Creator Chuck Barris brought the show back again 4 years later with Lange as host from 1978 to 1980. Along with an updated version of "The Newlywed Game" and 2 new shows, ("The Gong Show" and "The $1.98 Beauty Show") "The Dating Game" returned to syndicated in 1978, only this time with a more adult-oriented borderline dialogue format--perhaps in an effort to recapture the same audience that had grown up watching THE DATING GAME in the 1960s. The newer version- along with Jim Lange's gaudy red tuxedo- lasted for 2 years until local stations finally got tired of the protesting phone calls. Once again, the show featured both present-day and future stars such as Jaye P. Morgan, Bob Saget and Murray "The Unknown Comic" Langston. THE DATING GAME was all but forgotten until the mid-80s, when Barris decided to do it yet again. An all new 80s update of "The Dating Game (The All-New DATING GAME)" premiered on syndicated on September 8-12, 1986, but this time the hosting duties were handled by Elaine Joyce (Lange was busy at the time hosting "The $1,000,000 Chance Of A Lifetime"). This version lasted for three years with Joyce hosting the 1st season and Jeff McGregor hosting the last 2 Seasons and again as in the previous 2 incarnations, the show featured present and future stars. (Among the future stars was Oscar-winning actor Cuba Gooding, Jr.!) The Program Demised on September 8, 1989. Now... as for the NINETIES update? Well... I don't know terribly much about it except for the following: By the time the 90s rolled around, Chuck Barris sold the rights to all his shows to Columbia-Tristar Television. A newer, corporate-whitewashed version of the DATING GAME was released on September 9-13, 1996 and packaged with another updated version of "The Newlywed Game", this time with Chuck ("Love Connection") Woolery (1st Host is Whose Line is it Anyway (US) Brad Sherwood for the 1st Season for the difference) and outside of the quizzer and the respective suitors & suitorettes not being able to see one another, the rules were almost completely overhauled and all ended the show on September 15, 2000. But if you're a game show retrophile like me, you would have to agree that there's just no Dating Game without Jim Lange with or without the awful tux. And now you don't have to suffer from Lange withdrawal because Game Show Network has some episodes to show you... And HEEEEEEEE-RE THEY ARRRRRRRR-RE! Now you can see the classic Jim Lange episodes of the original DATING GAME on The Game Show Network- in particular, the ones that featured present-day and future superstars. You can see them Saturday and Sunday nights at 11:30pm on GSN. Enjoy them if you can... and if you can't stay up that late, TAPE THEM... LIKE ME!! (Dates with celebrities are always subject to their availability.) THE BROADCAST HISTORY of THE DATING GAME: December 20, 1965-March 31, 1967 at 11:30am-12Noon on ABC-TV April 3, 1967-July 12, 1968 at 4:00-4:30pm on ABC-TV July 15, 1968-July 6, 1973 at 2:30-3:00pm on ABC-TV. On 1st Run Syndicated from September 10, 1973-September 15, 2000.moreless
  • 267
    Models of the Runway

    Models of the Runway

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    Lifetime (ended 2010)
    This companion series to Project Runway takes a look at life backstage and behind the scenes of the catwalk from the model's perspective.
  • 268
    The A-List: New York

    The A-List: New York

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    LOGO
    Get to know what it takes to be on the A-List in New York. See firsthand what it's like to be a gay man on the A-List working towards success and fame.moreless
  • 269
    Let's Make A Deal

    Let's Make A Deal

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    CBS
    This show is a new take on the classic where audience members dress in crazy costumes to win big prizes and cash by making deals with the host, Wayne Brady.
  • 270
    Call To Greatness

    Call To Greatness

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    MTV - Music Television
    This new MTV series follows five guys as they cross the country in search of record holders to challenge and steal away their titles.
  • 271
    Tales from River Cottage

    Tales from River Cottage

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    Sky1
    Hugh looks back at what he learnt in his 3 years at River Cottage, and shares gardening tips and stories from his growing competitions as well as numerous recipes, all made from vegetables grown on site in his garden. Viewers also meet many of the people--experts---that appeared in the other River Cottage programmes.moreless
  • 272
    Hair Battle Spectacular

    Hair Battle Spectacular

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    Oxygen
    This show will feature ten hair designers as they live together and compete each week in challenges. One stylist is voted off each week and the winner will receive $100,000.
  • 273
    Oprah's Big Give

    Oprah's Big Give

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    ABC (ended 2008)
    Millions of dollars will be spent as the contestants thrive to find the best way to give back to people while facing twists each week to test their will power and wits. The stakes will raise as the show goes on until finally one person is crowned "The Biggest Giver," in this new heartwarming reality series from Oprah's Harpo Productions.moreless
  • 274
    Starcade

    Starcade

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    Starcade (ended 1984)
    For those who loved arcade video games, which of course were all the rage in the early 1980's, boy, wasStarcade the game for you. Man, this lost classic was the ultimate paradise for those who loved to while away the hours avoiding Inky, Blinky, Pinky and Clyde; saving the damsel from the fearsome gorilla; or shooting down terrorist aliens as they tried to invade the Earth. Two teams of two players each – usually but not always a father and son – competed. The first two rounds began with the host asking a series of toss-up questions about (what else?) video games. The winner after two correct answers earned that team the right to play a video game. The team could select from a choice of five games featured on that week's show. One of them was the "Mystery Game," which if selected won a bonus prize. A player from each team chose one member to play the selected game. There's where the fun began. The players each had 50 seconds to play the game, scoring as many points as possible. Game play for that team automatically ended after time elapsed or the player lost a life (at which point the game screen flashed Game Over). The points that the player scored on that game were added to his team's score. The leading team after two rounds played the Name the Game Board. Here, the team was shown a screenshot from a video game, and given two possible answers. Getting at least three correct answers won a prize. The third round saw representatives of both teams playing the same game (selected by the trailing team), head-to-head, for 40 seconds, with his/her score added to their team's tally. The high-scoring team at this point advanced to the bonus round ... ... which, appropriately enough, saw the champions play a video game (choosing from one of the two remaining). Here, though, the idea was play the game for 30 seconds, attempting to match or beat the average score set by 20 others who had also played the game for half a minute. Guess what the player won if he bested the scoring average? That's right ... A VIDEO GAME!!! (plus a cache of other prizes, too). Aside from The Price is Right (which, to this day, occassionally has video games as prizes) or Wheel of Fortune (which was in the latter years of the shopping-era), Starcade was unique in offering video games as a prize. Mark Richards hosted epiodes 1-23, and Geoff Edwards took over the remainder of the program. The pilot was hoted by Mike Eurozione. (Note from editor: I am currently unsure of the exact airing dates of any of the episodes. Not even the folks at the official Starcade website could help me out with that. According to them the show ran for over three years but they may have been referring to reruns. I apologize for the lack of airing dates in this guide. I had to put something aproximate just to get the guide functional. Again, these are not the correct times or dates.)moreless
  • 275
    Big Sexy

    Big Sexy

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    TLC
    New Yorkers Leslie, Tiffany, Audrey, Nikki and Heather are trying to show viewers that there is more to being beautiful than being skinny. They bring viewers into their daily lives as confident, plus-size women who are excelling at their careers and enjoying city life.moreless
  • 276
    Disaster Date

    Disaster Date

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    MTV - Music Television
    MTV's hidden camera series rewards one unsuspecting dater cash for every minute he or she can hang in there during an awful date.
  • 277
    Return to River Cottage

    Return to River Cottage

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    Channel 4 (ended 2000)
    Following on from Escape to River Cottage, Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall begins his second year as a smallholder in west Dorset. With a year of experience as a small holder behind him, Hugh adds cattle to the River Cottage livestock and launches the commercial venture: The River Cottage Glutton.moreless
  • 278
    Repo Games

    Repo Games

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    Spike TV (ended 2012)
    Real-life repo men, Josh Lewis and Tom Detone, give debtors one more chance to keep their cars, but only if they are willing to pay up front for them.
  • 279
    SlamBall

    SlamBall

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    SlamBall.net (ended 2004)
    When SlamBall made its groundbreaking debut last summer on The New TNN, the sports world got its first glimpse of the future; a non-stop, live-action human video game that broke all the rules of traditional sport and defined a new generation.

    But for the game's creator, 28 year old Mason Gordon, it was much more. For Gordon, SlamBall's debut was the transfiguration of a vision that had been embedded in his imagination for years, to a physical reality that the rest of the world could finally see and understand.

    In his youth, he could visualize it perfectly. In a recurring dream, it would happen over and over again. A guy goes up in the air. Another guy comes up after him. CRASH. There is a huge collision in the air. One guy takes control and pushes his opponent out of the way. Dream over. Every time he had the dream, it was the same thing. There was always a mid-air collision, but it was a different guy, a different uniform and a different move.

    Despite the familiar dreams, Gordon didn't think about acting on this imagery until many years later. Like a growing number of sports fans, his interest in traditional sports was increasingly influenced by the creativity and intensity of action sports like skateboarding, bmx and motocross.

    For Gordon, action sports had so much to offer the traditional sports world: non-stop action, riveting highlights, and most of all, fearless athletes. Yet, as a traditional athlete himself, he started to wonder about combining the best of both worlds. What would you get if you took the athletic components of football, basketball, hockey and gymnastics, and mixed them together with the insanity of action sports?

    He went back to the dreams. Once he made the connection between his new idea and the imagery of the mid-air confrontations he had seen thousands of times in his sleep, his confidence was unshakable. He knew it could be done. The question was, who else would ever believe it?

    Gordon took it to the one person who might, a visionary producer/director, Mike Tollin, principal of Tollin/Robbins Productions where Gordon had once worked as an intern. Says Gordon, "I approached Mike and told him I'd never bother him again, but that I just had this one idea that I wanted him to look at."

    Gordon spent the next six months trying to convince Tollin to help him make SlamBall a reality. Tollin recognized the potential of the idea, and after much thought, had the brainstorm that would be the project's jump off.

    Tollin did not see SlamBall as fitting into the traditional professional sports model. He didn't think it needed to develop in obscurity for several years at the grassroots level, build up a gradual fan base, and then hopefully find its way to television, as other, more established sports were struggling to at the time. If SlamBall was to be the future of pro sports, as Gordon intended, it would create it's own model: first put the games on TV, generate a mass audience, create a demand, and then back it into a more traditional league model.

    In what Gordon describes as the pairing of his extreme sports mentality and Tollin's brilliant understanding of traditional sports dynamics, a working relationship was solidified. Together, they set out to build the first SlamBall half-court.

    Constructed from spare parts: rusty gymnastics springs, second hand plywood and one trampoline, it wasn't pretty, but it would work. Next Gordon needed players. Combing the inner city parks, gyms, and rec. centers, he looked for what he calls prototype SlamBall players, vastly superior athletes who were creative, tough, and would play through pain.

    "You have to be tough as aluminium siding to play this game," says Gordon, "and your heart has to be bigger than your entire chest. You have to possess boundless belief in yourself and your ability. If you don't have that, you can't come close to playing SlamBall at this level."

    After looking at hundreds of players, he found his army, the five guys who would join with Gordon to make up SlamBall's Original Six: Jeff Sheridan, Sean Jackson, Michael Goldman, Dave Redmond and James Willis. Gordon chose to play and develop the game from the inside as a player. Gordon remembers, "We could only afford five players, so I had to be this sixth." In no time, all of them were seriously hooked. For three weeks straight they played 15 hours a day, going home completely beat down, and then coming back for more the next day.

    "It was the most fun I'd ever had in my life. It was crazy," remembers Gordon. "Here were these five guys who initially thought I was a lunatic, who were giving up their bodies and playing a really rough game and loving every minute of it."

    After testing the half court game, the group relocated to a downtown Los Angeles youth center where the first full court was built. With the addition of more players (including current SlamBall sensations Dion Mays, Stan "Shakes" Fletcher and Rob Wilson), the game soared to incredible new heights, literally. On the new court, Gordon added another trampoline at each basket. Gordon's recurring dreams would now be realized in flesh and blood, with spectacular mid-air collisions becoming one of the sport's main staples.

    As word of mouth traveled and local crowds started to get bigger, Gordon and Tollin brought in TRP's production partner Telepictures/Warner Bros to show them the local phenomenon that was building. What they saw was a fully developed underground sport that captured the core attributes of the videogame generation, a new combination of wild athleticism and amazing creativity, never seen before. "Simply put," says Gordon, "they went bananas."

    A 90-second highlight tape went to Albie Hecht, The New TNN's President. After one meeting with Tollin and Gordon, Hecht was sold. SlamBall would debut in the summer of 2002 as part of the network's "Slammin' Saturday Night" line up.

    "From that point on, it was like skiing downhill atone hundred miles an hour," says Gordon. "We had six months to find enough athletes for six teams, hire quality coaches and teach them all the game from scratch."

    Immediately, the group launched a series of radio campaigns to get the word out to potential athletes, and began reaching out to qualified coaches from around the country. Out of 400 coaching applications, the pool was narrowed down to 40 who were evaluated over a four-day clinic based on their understanding of the game and ability to formulate basic strategies.

    Surprisingly to Tollin and Gordon, many of the top tier basketball coaches could not get their heads around SlamBall. It was the younger candidates who better understood SlamBall's youthful energy, and had the kind of passion needed to guide it. Some candidates in their early twenties, like Hernando Planells, Jr. and Brendan Kirsch were awarded head coaching positions and encouraged to innovate.

    The search for players was equally as challenging. Three months and hundreds of athletes later, the first-ever SlamBall draft took place, producing six teams of eight players each. With players and personnel in place, Gordon and his team faced their biggest challenge of the sport's first season.

    "In six weeks," he says, "we had to teach a group of players a brand new skill set and get them to where they could put a professional quality sports product on the floor. With our original players already at a certain level, we had to get the rest of the guys caught up. By this time, the addition of two more trampolines on each side made the SlamBall court complete.

    Knowing the critical role credibility would play in establishing SlamBall's legitimacy, Tollin, a Philadelphia native, reached out to hometown businessman, Pat Croce, former President of the Philadelphia 76ers and one of the most successful sports entrepreneurs ever.

    Three days after seeing the game live and up-close, Croce signed on as a SlamBall partner and became the game's premier spokesperson, generating a PR frenzy no fledgling sport could even hope to achieve. With little marketing and promotion behind the initial campaign , Croce's involvement came at a critical time and soon the mainstream media; including ESPN, Sports Illustrated, Time Magazine and The Jay Leno Show were all chasing the SlamBall story.

    SlamBall made its national television debut on August 3, 2002, as a six-episode summer series and delivered the young and diverse audience TNN was looking for. Ratings were consistent throughout five consecutive re-run cycles as tremendous word of mouth brought new viewers to the game each week.

    "The greatest thing in the world for me," says Gordon, "was seeing glimpses of the sport I wanted SlamBall to be. When players would work out some kind of intricate pass or misdirection of the stopper, I saw a new type of instinctive strategy. To me, that's what was so cool about the first season."

    By December of 2002, SlamBall got the green light for Season Two. Seeing the potential for big ratings, the network more than doubled the number of SlamBall episodes, scheduling a 13-week series for the new season.

    With increased exposure, Gordon knows the game will be scrutinized more closely as critics try to decide whether SlamBall is, in fact, a "real" sport. "I want people to look at us," he says, "because the closer they look, the more they'll realize that these players are tremendous athletes who are playing their hearts out in a game that's so exciting, creative and dynamic."

    This year, the league added two new teams, the Riders and Bandits, and took tryouts national, something Gordon believes will raise the level of play exponentially, "What people don't understand is that we're just scratching the surface of the level of creativity and athleticism you're going to see in this game for years to come"

    "One day, there is going to be a guy out there who will have an interdisciplinary skill set so far beyond anything we've ever seen before, that no one will be able to discount his ability."

    As for SlamBall's future and the possibility of growing the sport, Gordon says it all depends on the fans. "If the fans want to see it, it's going to happen," he says, "but people can trust that everyone involved in SlamBall is going 24-7 on the accelerator to get it there."moreless
  • 280
    Average Joe

    Average Joe

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    NBC (ended 2005)
    The series involves an ex-beauty queen/NFL cheerleader who's lead to believe she'll be on a dating show where she'll get to pick from a group of handsome men, a la "The Bachelorette." The first twist comes when she arrives and discovers the guys are actually "Average Joes." In the first season, the bachlorette is Melana Scantlin. NBC Studios is behind the series which will contain original twists and turns for the current dating/reality genre. Specifics however where not revealed. In the show, each week the beauty learns about her suitors during group and individual dates, as she determines which one might be her soul mate. She faces tough decisions as she must eliminate some guys in order to focus on those she has the most chemistry with. As the host and confindant, Kathy Griffin will offer her take on the behaviors and personalities af the men and is on hand to introduce the many twists and turns the show takes. The Peacock has committed to six episodes of the reality series from Executive Producers Stuart Krasnow ("America's Most Talented Kid") and Andrew Glassman (CNBC). Kathy Griffin ("The Mole") will host the project which, like FOX's "Mr. Personality" will test how important looks are in the dating process. Average Joe 2: Hawaii Hot on the heels of this Fall's hit Average Joe, NBC premieres the second installment of the series, Average Joe: Hawaii, on Monday, January 5 (10-11 p.m. ET). This new series was taped before the first series ever aired, thus protecting the twist. "As soon as we saw the first tapes of the original ‘Average Joe,' we knew there was rich potential for a second helping of this twisted take on the dating show. The fact that we taped both series before either hit the air allows for the surprise twists to hit the new participants with the same impact they had on the original show," said Zucker. In this new series, the crown of "Average Joe's" former beauty queen and NFL cheerleader Melana Scantlin is passed on to another former Miss USA contestant and model - Larissa Meek, who is swept away to a secluded island paradise with the promise of romance to be found among a group of 18 Prince Charmings. With no way of knowing the secret twist to "Average Joe" in advance, our new beauty must decide how to proceed when she meets the unexpected group of guys with big personalities, but admittedly average looks, ranging from a 5-foot-3 engineer to 340 pound sewage contractor. While finding themselves on what one dismayed ‘Average Joe' describes as "nerd island," the guys happily greet their beauty unaware that in a few short weeks a group of eight traditional dating-show-studs will join the competition to vie for her affection. As the series proceeds, new takes on the twists of "Average Joe" are in store for the audience along with brand new dramatic surprises; and tensions between the two groups of men reach new levels in several emotionally charged ‘joe' vs. ‘jock' showdowns. Average Joe 3: Adam Returns NBC will be premiering the third season of the series, Average Joe: Adam Returns, on Monday, March 15 (10:00 PM). The new season will be having new twists, and the biggest one would probably be Adam Mesh's return to the show. After Melana Scantlin's choice to take Jason as a winner on Average Joe's first season finale, instead of Adam, Adam's fans sent a big number of e-mails for bringing Adam back. Finally, after second season finished its airing, Adam Mesh will return to the show as a main bachelor in Average Joe 3: Adam Returns. Now Adam Mesh has the power to choose over some girls... Average Joe 4: The Joes Strike Back The newest and boldest installment of NBC's popular relationship series Average Joe about average-looking guys with big hearts and great personalities hoping to win the love of a beautiful woman returns with more twists, turns and conflicts than ever before. This time, stunning 26-year-old red-headed beauty Anna is the alluring bachelorette. Born in Poland and raised in Las Vegas, Anna has a degree in business administration and is now a model and entrepreneur. Once again, the unsuspecting model thought she was on a traditional dating show only to be surprised by a swarm of average Joes, including a tool salesman, a pest control guy and a computer-science student pursuing his Ph.D. In the six-episode series, the 18 enthusiastic average Joes hope to woo and win her over with their charm and personalities. But first, they'll have to navigate through an all new series of dramatic twists and turns, outrageous surprises ? and their toughest competition yet ? seven strikingly handsome jocks who are cocky and confident that Anna will only have eyes for them. Also included are a romantic getaway to exotic Tahiti, surprise visitors for both the Joes and Anna, and the return of three of the most popular former Average Joes in the premiere. NBC Broadcast History November 2003 - April 2004 -- Mondays 10:00 PM June 2005 - July 2005 -- Tuesdays 8:00 PM NBC Broadcast History - Special Night: Season 4 FINALE - July 27 2005 -- Wednesday 8:00 PMmoreless