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    Judge Judy

    Judge Judy

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    The people are real. The cases are real. The rulings are final. This is Judge Judy. Judge Judith Sheindlin tackles real-life small claims in her courtroom with her no nonsense attitude. Having made a name for herself as a tough but fair judge in New York's Family Court, Judge Judith Sheindlin retired from the bench in 1996 and segued to television to host this syndicated series. Judge Judith Sheindlin brings her trademark wit and wisdom to the widely successful half-hour series that takes viewers inside a television courtroom where justice is dispensed at lightning speed.moreless
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    The Real Housewives of Atlanta

    The Real Housewives of Atlanta

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    Bravo
    Bravo's cameras turn to the Southern states as the network presents this inside look at The Real Housewives of Atlanta. These women handle the personal dramas that affect their affluent lifestyles with a signature Southern brand of style and grace. Broadcast History: The first two seasons of The Real Housewives of Atlanta aired Thursdays at 10:00pm (ET). The third season premiered on October 4, 2010 at a new time of Mondays at 9:00pm (ET). After the fifth episode of the third season, the series moved to its new time of Sundays at 10:00pm (ET). Season four premiered on Sunday, November, 6, 2011 at the series' new time of 9:00pm (ET).moreless
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    Bar Rescue

    Bar Rescue

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    Spike TV
    Jon Taffer, a well-known restaurant and bar consultant, shares his tips for running a successful business.
  • 24
    Wheeler Dealers

    Wheeler Dealers

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    Discovery Channel
    This show follows Mike Brewer, an ex-car salesman and Ed China, a mechanic and engineer as they find the perfect cars to restore to sell on.
  • 25
    Cake Boss

    Cake Boss

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    TLC
    Baker Buddy Valastro will host this TLC docu-soap about a baker to the stars. Valastro's credits boast confections for Britney Spears and have been featured on The Sopranos. The New Jersey based Italian family runs a bakery in Hoboken, NJ.moreless
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    Soul Train

    Soul Train

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    (ended 2006)
    It's the SOOOOOOOOOOOOUUUUL TRAIN!

    Pop music has always had shows like American Bandstand to sing its praises, but R&B music had to wait a while for its own major weekly showcase. Just the same, Soul Train proved to be well worth the wait when it hit the airwaves in the 1970s. This weekly extravaganza, which showed off the latest and greatest in soul music and dance moves, became a national sensation in the mid-1970s and became a pop culture juggernaut that broke new ground for African-American entertainment.

    Soul Train was the brainchild of radio announcer Don Cornelius. After studying broadcasting in college, Cornelius got a job at WVON, one of Chicago's most popular urban radio stations. During this time, he pondered breaking into television with a dance and music show from an African-American perspective. In 1969, he produced a pilot episode and dubbed it "Soul Train" after a local radio promotion he had done in Chicago. The pilot impressed the Sears Roebuck Company, which gave Cornelius some funding in exchange for the rights to use Soul Train to promote a line of record players. With this help, Cornelius launched Soul Train on WCIU-TV, a Chicago UHF station. It premiered on August 17, 1970 as a weekday series airing from 4:30-5:30pm. Cornelius himself hosted the dance-stravaganza, which took place on a club-set. The show featured performances by soul music acts, appearances by guest hosts, and scorching dance numbers from the Soul Train Gang. Local word-of-mouth made Soul Train a big hit in Chicago, which won it another sponsor in The Johnson Products Company, makers of Afro-Sheen.

    Soul Train's relationship with The Johnson Products Company also helped it make the move from local television to syndication. With this company's financial backing, Cornelius moved the show to Hollywood and got it into television syndication in the fall of 1971. Only seven cities were on the initial lineup, but the Soul Train quickly picked up steam and began playing in new cities as its reputation spread. Pretty soon, people all over the country were enjoying the funky thrills that only Soul Train could provide. By the mid-1970s, Soul Train was a force to be reckoned with. Each week, the latest hits and coolest dances were served up in a slick package that had kids of all ages and races dancing around the TV-room floor. Cornelius cut a stylish, unflappably cool figure as the host, making him an often-imitated icon in the entertainment community. Music groups clamored for an appearance on Soul Train, since it was practically a free ticket to r&b (and often pop) chart success. Today, many critics fondly remember Soul Train as the television show that did the most to bring African-American popular culture into American households.

    As the 1980's began, Soul Train was as popular as ever. Tribune Entertainment, a Chicago-based company, became the exclusive distributor of the show and helped launch The Soul Train Music Awards. This yearly awards gala has become one of the most popular and respected awards ceremonies for r&b musicians and now enjoys "institution" status in the music world. The success of this awards show has also led to other popular Soul Train spin-off specials like The Soul Train Lady Of Soul Annual Awards Special and The Soul Train Christmas Starfest.

    In the 1990s, Don Cornelius stepped down as Soul Train host and passed the role to others. Guest hosts were used from 1993-97 (seasons 23 through 26). Mystro Clark became host in 1997. Following him, was Shemar Moore who hosted seasons 29 through 32. Dorian Gregory is the current Soul Train host. Cornelius remains active as an executive producer for the show, which shows no signs of slowing down. With r&b music more popular than ever in the mainstream, viewers everywhere continue to shake their groove thing to the churning wheels of the Soul Train.

    Soul Train continued with new episodes through the 2005-06 season. The final, first-run episode aired on March 25, 2006. The 2006-07 season began with repeats from 2005-06. As of December 9, 2006, the series has been retitled The Best of Soul Train and features c episodes from the 1970s and 1980s. 1970's & early 1980's Soul Train airdates On this guide, we've listed the earliest known airdates for episodes 1 - 163. The original Los Angeles airdates are listed for episodes 164 - 366 (Dec. 27, 1975 - June 20, 1981). In the 1970s through the early '80s, the episode airdates varied from city to city. Instead of using communications satellites, tapes of the episodes were mailed directly to individual TV stations. And once a station aired an episode, the tape would then be forwarded to a station in another city. (This practice, called "bicycling," was common with most 1970s first-run syndicated shows.) Sometime in the early 1980s, Tribune Entertainment began using satellites to distribute Soul Train resulting in standard airdates across the country.

    Find at what television station and time the train pulls up to your TV: http://tv.tribune.com/showfinder/search/1,1001,soultrain,FF.html

    Contributors to this guide include: --Nick Puzo (Nickfresh) - editor of the Soul Train Yahoo Group --Jabar Robbins (Calatine9) --Robert Spiegel --Edward Loney ("ehloney")moreless
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    Impractical Jokers

    Impractical Jokers

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    truTV
    Four lifelong friends are constantly striving to embarrass each other in public by using hidden cameras.
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    Restaurant: Impossible

    Restaurant: Impossible

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    Food Network
    Chef Robert Irvine has decided to face a new challenge to save America's worst restaurants from failure in only 2 days and $10,000 to spend. Robert will use everything he has to help the owners and employees of the business get hope back and start to regain their success.moreless
  • 29
    Porno Valley

    Porno Valley

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    Sky1 (ended 2004)
    This 13 part series fallows the Vivid girls for 6 months. They present their work, their dreams and the daily life. They face the trouble in their relationships resulting out of their work, as well as the glamorous moments in their careers.

    Everyone that has a name in the industry makes its appearance in this series along with some of the most popular girls at the time of production.

    This show is also know under the title Vivid Valley in the UK, where it aired on Sky Television. In the US the series aired on Playboy TV and the Independent Film Channel (IFC).

    ATTENTION: This series contains adult content!moreless
  • 30
    Untold Stories Of The E.R.

    Untold Stories Of The E.R.

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    TLC
    Untold Stories of the E.R. follows real life stories of incidents occurring to doctors at real hospital emergency rooms and the troubles they face trying to help the various people that they encounter.moreless
  • 31
    Jerseylicious

    Jerseylicious

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    Style Network
    Six stylists from New Jersey fight for the spotlight in this new comedy docusoap on The Style Network. Get ready for big drama, big families, and very big hair!
  • 32
    The X Factor (UK)

    The X Factor (UK)

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    ITV
    A UK based music reality show with a difference: "anyone and everyone can audition". The contest is open to 4 different categories: under 28 Girls, under 28 Boys, over 28, and groups. The current judges are Gary Barlow, Louis Walsh, Kelly Rowland and Tulisa Contostavlos. The Judges: Gary Barlow: -The lead member of the band, Take That.The band have won multiple BRIT Awards and have received 11 numberonesingles. Tulisa Contostavlos: -At just 23 years of age, Tulisa has been with N-Dubz , a hip hop group from London for 5 years. She rose to fame whenN-Dubz releaseda song entitled Ouch and got over 4 million viewers on Youtube. Louis Walsh: - he's the man behind such pop acts as Boyzone, Westlife, Samantha Mumba and Girls Aloud - has had 21 number 1 singles - is best known as the judge on Popstars: Ireland and Popstars: The Rivals Kelly Rowland: -Kellystarted off working with Destiny's Child but then went solo and has now been fornearly 10years. Her first solo single was Stole which got to #1 in the UK. ROUND 1: The Auditions In the first round, each of the contestants must audition for the judges. They either go through to the next round or go home . ROUND 2: Boot Camp In the second round of the contest the judges are each assigned a category to mentor. Each judge will then get to assemble a team of people to help turn their wannabes into stars! The contestants will then be put through a boot camp and afterwards only 8 will remain in each category. ROUND 3: Judges' Home Visits Next, the remaining contestants will get to live the life of luxury with their mentors! But it won't be all fun and games as the mentors must whittle their teams down to just 3 each . ROUND 4: Live Shows The 12 remaining contestants/groups will now get the chance to showdown live on ITV1 along with a wildcard pick by each judge. Week by week more contestants will be voted off the show and we will eventually find out who Britain thinks has got The X Factor!moreless
  • 33
    What Not To Wear

    What Not To Wear

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    TLC
    TLC's What Not To Wear is a spin off of What Not To Wear airing on BBC America. The reality show premise is simple: friends and family members nominate a candidate that they consider poorly dressed and ask the show to make over the "fashion victim." Fashion Police Stacy London and her partner, Clinton Kelly (or Wayne Scott Lukas in the first season) ambush the candidate and make them an offer-- they are given a $5000.00 budget for a new wardrobe, which they must purchase in New York City boutiques over the course of two days, but only on the condition that they allow Stacy & Clinton/ Wayne to critique, and in most cases throw out, their existing wardrobe. For grooming tips, hairdresser Nick Arrojio and makeup artist Carmindy help refine the candidate's look.moreless
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    Flipping Vegas

    Flipping Vegas

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    A&E
    Flipping Vegas follows Scott and his team – wife and interior designer Amie, and a host of wild project managers and beautiful real estate agents – as they work to breathe new life into run down properties. Despite the roadblocks, the conflict, and the drama, Scott always finishes what he starts – leaving behind a beautiful new home, excited new homeowners and most importantly, a profit in his pocket.moreless
  • 35
    Jim Henson's Creature Shop Challenge

    Jim Henson's Creature Shop Challenge

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    Syfy
    Jim Henson’s Creature Shop Challenge is a Face/Off style competition show featuring wanna-be "Creature Creators" competing for a prize of $100,000 and the opportunity for a job working at the Jim Henson’s Creature Shop. The show is an elimination based series, where one person will be sent home each week. The contestants will be putting their imaginations to the test, as they build mechanical characters and whimsical beasts.moreless
  • 36
    Jeopardy!

    Jeopardy!

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    Sony Pictures Television
    "This... is... Jeopardy!"America's top-rated syndicated quiz show entered into its 29th season on September 17, 2012. Many subscribing stations have renewed the show through Season 32 (2015-2016). The show was originally created in the 1960s by Merv Griffin, a famed television host, musician, and actor. Irritated by the impossibility of trying to create a quiz show because of scandals that had taken place involving that genre, Griffin was inspired by a suggestion from his wife Julann to create a show wherein contestants were presented with clues in the form of answers, and had to phrase their responses in the form of a question. He originally was going to title the program What's the Question?, but ended up discarding that original title when a skeptical NBC network producer rejected his original concept, claiming, "It doesn't have enough jeopardies." The original Jeopardy!series premiered on March 30, 1964, as a daytime program on NBC. With Art Fleming as host and Don Pardo as announcer, that series continued to air until January 3, 1975, and also spawned a weekly syndicated version that aired within the 1974-1975 season. Later came a revival, The All-New Jeopardy!, which ran from October 2, 1978 through March 2, 1979; for this version, Fleming was joined by announcer John Harlan. The most successful incarnation of Jeopardy! is the current syndicated version, which has aired continuously since September 10, 1984, featuring the Canadian-born Alex Trebek as its host, joined by announcer Johnny Gilbert. This particular version of the program has lived up to its slogan as "America's Favorite Quiz Show," with over 6,000 episodes aired, and currently averages 25 million viewers per week. The show has featured over 10,000 different contestants over the course of its 29-year run, and a host of prominent personalities - including royalty, Presidents, film stars, television personalities, famous athletes, and Nobel laureates - have either presented special clues or appeared as contestants on the show. Since its premiere, the syndicated version ofJeopardy! has outlived 300 other game shows, won a record 30 Daytime Emmy Awards and a Peabody Award, and gained a worldwide following with a multitude of international adaptations. In addition, both TV Guideand the Game Show Network (GSN) have ranked it #2 on their respective lists of the 50 greatest game shows of all time. The longevity of Jeopardy!'s popularity has led it to being referenced and parodied in many television shows, films, and works of literature over the years, including such popular programs asSaturday Night Live, The Simpsons, Cheers, and The Golden Girls. Educators throughout the United States have created their own versions of the quiz show's game to encourage student participation in class, and even IBM has used the show to exhibit its artificial intelligence system "Watson" and have it compete against two of the show's finest champions in a "man versus machine" competition.moreless
  • 37
    The Price is Right

    The Price is Right

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    CBS
    The Price Is Right has long been a staple of daytime and nighttime television. It has seen five incarnations: the 1956-1965 daytime version hosted by Bill Cullen on NBC and ABC, the 1972-1980 nighttime version hosted by Dennis James and Bob Barker, the 1985 nighttime version hosted by Tom Kennedy, the 1994-1995 nighttime version hosted by Doug Davidson, and the current daytime version hosted by Barker and Drew Carey. This guide covers the current daytime version. The object of The Price Is Right is to correctly guess the retail prices of items, without going over, to either win the items themselves or other prizes. At the beginning of each show, the announcer calls out the names of four contestants, imploring each to "come on down!" A prize is announced for which each contestant (one at a time) makes a bid (called the One Bid). After the host announces the actual retail price, the contestant who bid closest without going over is invited on stage to play a pricing game for a larger prize. If a contestant's bid is exactly correct, he/she wins a $500 bonus (on the Armed Forces and $1,000,000 Spectacular Specials, the bonus for an exact bid is $1000). Frequently, during Barker's tenure as host, an animal would be brought out on stage by one of the models during the One Bid prize plugs. Barker would then comment that the pet was available for adoption at an area animal shelter. He also encouraged viewers to visit their local humane society. Pricing game prizes often include cars, trips, rooms of furniture, cash, and various other items. Furs were also given away during the early years, but this practice was dropped per Barker's wishes due to his involvement with animal-rights issues. The episodes that offer furs as prizes will likely never be seen again as Barker continues to fight against their re-airing. There were over 100 total individual pricing games with 72 in the current rotation. Some games involved pricing grocery or small, everyday items. Others involved chance, deduction, skill and/or patience. Many games quickly became very popular. Contestants chomp at the bit to play such entries as Plinko, Ten Chances, Cliff Hangers, Any Number, Grocery Game, Range Game, Race Game, and many others. While each of the pricing games uses only one player, there was one game (known by fans as Bullseye 2) which used two players. This game, which was retired during the first season, had the players alternating bids on a car or boat, and the first to guess the price exactly won. The second contestant was determined by immediately playing another One Bid. Some pricing games have been retired. The reasons include frequent mechanical malfunctions, complicated rules, low odds of winning, and negative responses from viewers. Pictures, audio files, and videos of most of the retired pricing games can be seen on various fan pages on the World Wide Web. After each pricing game is played (except for the final game of the day), one more contestant is called from the audience to "come on down," and another One Bid item is shown for another chance to play a pricing game. Until the fourth season, the two contestants with the highest winnings after all three pricing games had been played went to the Showcase round. Two showcases (prize packages worth several thousand dollars) are shown, one at a time. After the first showcase is revealed, the top winning contestant has the choice to bid on the showcase or pass it to his/her opponent and force him/her to bid. The contestant coming closest to the actual retail price of his/her own showcase without going over wins their showcase. Originally, the contestant could win only his/her showcase. Early in the show's run, a stipulation was added stating that if a contestant's bid came within $100 of his/her showcase's actual retail price, they'd win everything in both showcases. In 1998, the stipulation was modified, and, now, winning contestants who are $250 or less away from the actual retail price of their showcase win both showcases. For the week of November 3-7, 1975 the show expanded from 30 to 60 minutes, following a successful week of experimental hour-long shows the week of September 8-12. A new round called the Showcase Showdown was added. After three contestants have played their pricing games, each has the chance to spin a large wheel called "The Big Wheel." The order of spinning is determined by each contestant's winnings with the player having won the least going first and the player having won the most going last. The Big Wheel contains 20 spaces with numbers in increments of five cents (not in order). Each contestant gets up to two spins in an attempt to get as close to $1.00 without going over. If he/she does not have $1.00 after the first spin, the contestant can choose to spin again to get closer to $1.00 or stop at their current score with the hope that the other contestants will either score lower or go over $1.00. Getting $1.00 exactly earns the contestant a $1000 bonus. Going over $1.00 automatically disqualifies the contestant from going any further. A one-spin spin-off is held if there is a tie between two or all three contestants. If the first two contestants go over $1.00, the third player automatically advances to the Showcase but is still entitled to one spin. After the first Showcase Showdown of each show, three more pricing games are played, followed by the second Showcase Showdown. When the Showcase Showdown was first introduced, during the experimental hour-long week, the wheel spun sideways, and there was no $1000 bonus. When the hour-long show became permanent on November 3, 1975, the $1000 bonus was added, and the current wheel debuted. Beginning in June, 1978, contestants scoring $1.00 were now allowed to spin again in an attempt to win an additional $5000 for hitting one of the green sections above or below the $1.00 space (five and 15 cents) or $10,000 for hitting the $1.00 space. During the prime time specials that first aired in 2002, contestants that hit $1.00 during the bonus spin win $100,000. During the $1,000,000 Spectacular specials airing in 2003, this bonus was increased to one million dollars. The winners of each Showcase Showdown (two per show) advance to the Showcase round. Numerous other changes have taken place through the years, and several prime time specials have aired. The Price Is Right's 5000th episode aired in March, 1998 at which time the studio at CBS's Television City where the show is shot was renamed the Bob Barker Studio. Also, the set and some of the pricing game boards went through numerous minor changes due to inflation or to give it a modern look. The bloopers that have occurred on The Price is Right are among the most celebrated in television history. In early 1976, a woman called to Contestant's Row was in the ladies' room. Her husband had to leave the studio to tell her she'd been called. At the beginning of an episode early in the sixth season, a woman's tube top slipped down as she was running toward Contestant's Row. Also during that season, a woman fainted when she learned she won her showcase ($11,000 in prizes). Other bloopers include cars with malfunctioning brakes and other prizes which give way at the wrong time. Usually, one of the models is often a victim of these unfortunate mishaps (such as Janice Pennington and Rachel Reynolds hitting the wall with the car they are revealing for the Lucky $even pricing game). Many pricing games have malfunctioned at one time or another. Many contestants spinning the Big Wheel spin it so hard that they fall to the floor. There have been a fair share of contestants who claim to or actually don't understand how to play a given game. The most notable is the Check Game (where the contestant writes in an amount that when added to the actual retail price of a prize must total between $5000 and $6000. In addition, one game was victimized by a cheater on the April 4, 2005 playing of Flip Flop (where a contestant is presented a string of two sets of two numbers, representing an incorrect price, and must correct one or both sets to win a prize). The contestant, after receiving input from the audience, pressed the reveal button without making any changes. Barker awarded the contestant the prize anyway, although many fans believe the player should have been disqualified. Some contestants eventually became celebrities - Vanna White in particular. She was called to "come on down" in June, 1980, but did not get out of Contestant's Row. Other future stars include Rick Schroeder and Linda Cardellini. Main Title Theme Song "The Price Is Right Theme" by Edd Kalehoff CBS Broadcast History September 4, 1972 - March 23, 1973 .... Monday - Friday at 10:30 AM - 11:00 AM March 26, 1973 - August 15, 1975 .... Monday - Friday at 3:00 PM - 3:30 PM August 15, 1975 - November 28, 1975 .... Monday - Friday at 10:30 AM - 11:00 AM November 3, 1975 - March 25, 1977 .... Monday - Friday at 10:00 AM 11:00 AM March 28, 1977 - November 4, 1977 .... Monday - Friday at 10:30AM - 11:30 AM November 7, 1977 - December 16, 1977 .... Monday - Friday at 10:00 AM - 11:00 AM December 19, 1977 - April 20, 1979 .... Monday - Friday at 10:30 AM - 11:30 AM April 23, 1979 -present .... Monday - Friday at 11:00 AM - 12:00 PM Emmy Awards Nominations Outstanding Host in a Game Show or Audience Participation Show 1975 - Bob Barker Outstanding Game Show Host 1979 - Bob Barker 1982 - Bob Barker (winner) 1985 - Bob Barker 1986 - Bob Barker 1987 - Bob Barker (winner) 1990 - Bob Barker (winner) 1991 - Bob Barker (winner) 1992 - Bob Barker (winner) 1993 - Bob Barker 1994 - Bob Barker (winner) 1995 - Bob Barker (winner) 1996 - Bob Barker (winner) 2000 - Bob Barker (winner) 2002 - Bob Barker (winner) 2003 - Bob Barker 2004 - Bob Barker (winner) 2005 - Bob Barker 2007 - Bob Barker (winner) Outstanding Game Show Host/Hostess 1984 - Bob Barker (winner) 1988 - Bob Barker (winner) Outstanding Game Show 1976 1982 1983 1984 1985 1986 1987 1988 (winner) 1989 1990 1992 1993 1994 1995 Outstanding Game/Audience Participation Show 2002 2003 2004 (winner) 2005 2007 (winner) 2008 Outstanding Technical Direction/Camera/Video for a Miniseries or a Special 1997 - The Price Is Right 25th Anniversary Primetime Specialmoreless
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    Bad Girls Club

    Bad Girls Club

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    Oxygen
    From the producers of 'The Real World,' comes a reality show that follows seven self-described 'bad girls' as they are forced to live together in a house in LA.
  • 39
    Long Island Medium

    Long Island Medium

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    TLC
    Theresa Caputo, a real-life psychic medium, mustbalance her family life along with her full-time job of looking into the past lives of clients.
  • 40
    Crashbox

    Crashbox

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    HBO
    This is an educational show that passes on HBO.HBO is a channel that pass a lot of movies with out an comercial! Just some people have HBO at home.But they don't think of that way, they want to have an audience,That's why they have this lovely show called Crashbox. An animated series for kids featuring brain teasers.moreless
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