• 101
    Big Rich Texas

    Big Rich Texas

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    Style Network
    Get to know the inside of the elite Dallas social scene following five rich and competitive mothers and their spoiled daughters.
  • 102
    RuPaul's Drag Race

    RuPaul's Drag Race

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    LOGO
    Offering a new twist on reality programming, Drag Race provides a platform for America's finest drag queens both new and established, to show off their talent to the world and find America's next top Drag Queen! Hosted by RuPaul, the drag queen contestants compete in weekly challenges such as photo shoots, comedy performances and stomping the runway in the hopes of avoiding the bottom two; where they will have to Lip-sync. For. Their. LIFE!moreless
  • 103
    Little People, Big World

    Little People, Big World

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    TLC
    Little People, Big World is a reality television series which follows the six-member Roloff family farm near Portland, Oregon. Many of the episodes focus on the parents, Matt and Amy, and one of their sons, Zach, who are Little People. The family was introduced in an hour-long TLC special in 2005.
    ("The original vision for TLC's 'Little People Big World' was to promote diversity and inspire individuals with disabilities to face life's challenges with courage – all through the story of the Roloff family. They continue to strive toward this original vision to date...After 200 plus episodes and currently filming 'Specials,' the show has become to mean more to its millions of fans worldwide.'Little People Big World' chronicles the journey of the Roloff family. Aside from sharing the day to day experiences of a family with four children and a business to run, it has been a tale of personal growth, celebrations and tragedies, adventures and the many milestones encountered by this unique and amazing family. As Matt says, 'It has been an honor to open our doors and hearts to share our lives with the world knowing that we've shown the power of a loving family and the fact that we all are more alike than different.'" --The Roloff Family)

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  • 104
    Ace of Cakes

    Ace of Cakes

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    Food Network (ended 2011)
    Ace of Cakes is a reality series that follows a group of eclectic cake decorators in Baltimore, led by Food Network Challenge star Duff Goldman. With an attitude and personality more suited for rock stardom than running a specialty cakes business, Duff shuns the traditional approach to cake making and decorating. Using power tools and with the help of his artistic staff, Duff creates some of the most amazing cakes ever seen. From abstract wedding cakes to a cake shaped as a Jeep so detailed it looks like it could actually run, these cakes are more than delicious – they're works of art.moreless
  • 105
    Bully Beatdown

    Bully Beatdown

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    MTV - Music Television
    Typical "bullies" will fight for a chance to win $10,000. The catch - they have to fight professional Mixed Martial Artists.
  • 106
    Solitary

    Solitary

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    FOX Reality Channel
    This new reality competition by FOX pits nine people against each other in the ultimate battle of endurance. Nine contestants are isolated from the rest of the world -- and also from each other. The players then become subjects in a series of strange and taxing experiments. They must endure challenges involving hunger, pain, sleep deprivation, mind control, and more! All for the coveted $50,000 prize. Though there are nine players in this game, the real battle lies between each contestant and his or her own self.moreless
  • 107
    Ladette to Lady

    Ladette to Lady

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    ITV
    If you or someone you know can throw a kegger but can't throw a tea party, send them to Eggleston Hall Finishing School for a five week crash course in etiquette. ITV airs this series which inspired Donald Trump's Lady or a Tramp.moreless
  • 108
    My Bare Lady

    My Bare Lady

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    FOX Reality Channel (ended 2006)
    Four American adult film stars are given the chance to do some 'real' acting. After an extensive LA casting call, four porn stars are selected by a British casting director to attend a professional acting school in the Garrick Theatre in London. Many adult film stars feel that they can act as well as any other actor, if they were given a chance. But will these wanna-be thespians be able to cut it in a refined, swanky English acting program?moreless
  • 109
    Top Chef Duels

    Top Chef Duels

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    Bravo
    Bravo brings together former Top Chef and Top Chef Masters' winners and favorites for one-on-one competitions that include an amazing roster of guest judges from the culinary arts to Hollywood artists. Each episode includes three rounds that determines the winner who advances to the finale. An online redemption game, The Knockout, offers the chance for an eliminated chef to return to the finale.

    Hosted by Curtis Stone, who will also judge, he is joined by Gail Simmons along with rotating judges Wolfgang Puck and Hugh Acheson. They are assisted by a guest judges that represent master chefs; and film, TV, and music stars.

    Top Chef Duels is a production of Magical Elves, and executive produced by Dan Cutforth and Jane Lipsitz.moreless
  • 110
    Dog Whisperer

    Dog Whisperer

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    National Geographic Wild (ended 2012)
    Dog Whisperer follows well-respected animal behaviorist Cesar Millan as he works to help dogs with behavior problems, and their human families. These problems range from excessive barking to behavior, that if not corrected, could leave the owners little choice but to euthanize the dog. Mr. Millan describes his work as "rehabilitating dogs", and training people." Dog owners can learn from him ways to establish a balanced relationship with their dogs that will help to prevent these problems.moreless
  • 111
    Storage Wars

    Storage Wars

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    A&E
    Professional buyers and their aides/helpers search through repossessed storage units they win at auction in the hopes of finding hidden treasure.
  • 112
    The Celebrity Apprentice

    The Celebrity Apprentice

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    NBC
    The Apprentice is the ultimate job interview, where sixteen Americans (eighteen in seasons two through six, fourteen in seasons seven and nine) compete in a series of rigorous business tasks, many of which include prominent Fortune 500 companies and require street smarts and intelligence to conquer, in order to show Donald Trump, the boss, that they are the best candidate for his companies. In each episode, the losing team is sent to the boardroom, where Trump and his associates, Carolyn Kepcher and George Ross, and later, his children, Donald Trump, Jr., and Ivanka Trump, judge the job applicants on their performance in the task. One person is fired and sent home. Who will succeed? Who will fail? And who will be The Apprentice? The eleventh season of The Apprentice will be the fourth celebrity candidate format, with the cast set to be announced by January. The tenth season of The Apprentice returned to having real people compete to become the Apprentice. The theme of this season was candidates who'd been badly affected by the country's recent economic recession, and all sixteen candidates competed to try and get a second chance and ultimately change their lives. The teams were divided into men vs. women once more, and again, the drama between team members was plentiful, and the boardroom battles were epic. The tasks were a bit predictable, as most were simple marketing tasks or fundraising tasks, but at least Trump returned to making understandable, actually fairly rational firing decisions in the boardroom. The season also contained the first-ever firing by disqualification when a candidate illegally sent text messages to friends outside of the game and was caught for it. In the end, Brandy Kuentzel faced off with Clint Robertson in the first-ever pre-taped final boardroom, with Kuentzel walking away as the seventh (regular) Apprentice (and the third female Apprentice). The ninth season of The Apprentice was the third celebrity edition. Fourteen celebrities competed for the title of the third Celebrity Apprentice and the grand prize of $250,000 for the charity of the choice. The season was already rife with big personalities and lots of drama, and many tough competitors emerged early on. However, like the prior season, Trump made firings that weren't very credible, and the drama was almost nonexistent. In the end, rock star Bret Michaels faced off with actress and author Holly Robinson Peete in the final two, and quite possibly due to a sympathy factor from him getting sick weeks before the live finale, Trump crowned Michaels as the third Celebrity Apprentice, though Robinson Peete got a large cash donation to her charity, anyway. The eighth season of The Apprentice was yet another celebrity edition. Sixteen celebrities competed for the title of the second Celebrity Apprentice and the grand prize of $250,000 for the charity of their choice. The cast was more interesting than the previous batch of celebrities, and the drama was a lot more intense. However, Trump started making less credible decisions in his firings, and the episodes were soon more about the drama among the celebrities than it was about the actual tasks. In the end, comedienne Joan Rivers faced off against professional poker player Annie Duke in the show's second all-female final two, and despite the majority opinion that Duke's performance throughout the season had been better overall, Trump ended the season on a sour note with the controversial decision to name Rivers as the second Celebrity Apprentice. The seventh season of The Apprentice saw the show returning to New York City. And this time, instead of real people being the candidates, celebrities were. Fourteen celebrities vied for the title of the first-ever Celebrity Apprentice, including a returning Omarosa Manigault-Stallworth from the first season. Among the changes were both teams facing the boardroom following the task to hear what each team did right and wrong, in case that team ended up in the boardroom. The season certainly wasn't without its share of drama, and it showed some pretty smart celebrity candidates. In the end, America's Got Talent judge Piers Morgan and country singer Trace Adkins faced off in the final two, and Morgan took the title of first-ever Celebrity Apprentice, taking $250,000 for the charity of his choice along with him. The sixth season of The Apprentice saw the show leave New York City and move to an all-new location: Los Angeles, California! Here, Carolyn Kepcher and George Ross were gone and replaced as viceroys by Donald Trump's children, Donald, Jr., and Ivanka. While the candidates, among whom were the show's first Asian-American man, the first Jamaican woman, a cervical cancer survivor, and not one, but two openly gay men, were interesting, the season pulled the show's lowest ratings ever, with too much focus on Trump and his brands, as well as Los Angeles pop culture, and not enough on the candidates and the tasks. Also, Trump's logic behind his firing decisions made less and less sense. In the end, Stefani Schaeffer, James Sun, Nicole D'Ambrosio, and Frank Lombardi all faced off in the show's first-ever final four finale that saw Stefani and James ending up as the final two, and Stefani walking away as the sixth Apprentice (and the second female Apprentice, to boot). The fifth season of The Apprentice started with something new: the first Project Managers were chosen by Trump, and they got to pick their own teams. Also, exemptions were wiped clean from the rules. The season started out with promise, with four international candidates from Canada, Cuba, Great Britain, and Russia, but lost steam as the more interesting, colorful candidates, including three of the four international ones, quickly bit the dust and were fired earlier than the blander, less interesting ones. The show ended up with what's been considered to be its worst final two ever, and in the end, the final international candidate, Sean Yazbeck, claimed victory over Lee Bienstock, the youngest candidate to ever make it to the final two, and won the title of the fifth Apprentice, as well as the honor of being the first winner to not be a native-born American. The fourth season of The Apprentice returned to the basics -- the same men vs. women format and winning Project Managers winning exemption -- but this time, with a twist. The winning Project Managers would only receive exemption from Trump if the team cast a majority vote to okay it. The season, which featured the first-ever openly gay contestant and first-ever Russian immigrant, easily shaped up to be one of the best seasons of the show, with an interesting cast, exciting tasks, and even the show's first-ever quadruple-firing! In the end, Dr. Randal Pinkett faced off with Rebecca Jarvis in the final two and won his rightful title as the fourth Apprentice and the first African-American winner. However, the finale was marred by his refusing Trump's offer to hire Rebecca, as well, in what would've been the show's first double-hiring. The third season of The Apprentice included a new twist: there are already two preset teams, "Book Smarts" and "Street Smarts" (Magna Corporation and Net Worth Corporation, respectively). They went head-to-head to see which team was smarter. In the end, the question was answered in the showdown of the century -- Kendra Todd, a college graduate, faced off against Tana Goertz, a high school graduate, in the show's first all-female final two. While in the end, the Book Smarts won the battle, as Kendra was given the grand prize and the title of the third Apprentice (and the first female Apprentice, to boot), the experiment of season three showed that both groups of people can be very successful. The second season of The Apprentice pitted men and women against each other again, but with several changes. The winning Project Manager, or team leader, received an exemption the next week should his or her team lose the task. The tasks became tougher, the judging became harder, and the contestants became fiercer. By the end of the season, Kelly Perdew, though met with tough competition by Jennifer Massey, took his place with Trump on the other side of the boardroom table as the second Apprentice. The first, and now classic, season of The Apprentice asked the age-old question: which gender is smarter? Packed with memorable contestants and mesmerizing moments, the first season was an enormous hit, garnering some of NBC's best ratings in years. By season's end, Bill Rancic was told, "You're hired!" and named the first and original Apprentice over Kwame Jackson, and all of the cast members became instant celebrities, with Donald Trump, as always, at the head of the pack. NBC Broadcast History January 8 & 15, 2004-- Thursday 8:30pm January 14 & 28, 2004 through April 14, 2004 -- Wednesday 8:00pm (Repeats) January 21, 2004 -- Wednesday 8:00pm (First Run Episode) January 29, 2004 - Present Day -- Thursday 9:00pm September 11, 2004 - September 25, 2004 -- Saturday 8:00pm October 2, 2004 - October 23, 2004 -- Saturday 9:00pm (Repeats) Special Presentations February 5 & 12, 2004 -- Thursday 8:42pm (Special Supersized Episodes) April 17, 2004 -- Saturday 9:00pm (2 Hour Rebroadcast Season 1 Finale) September 9, 2004; January 20, 2005 -- Thursday 8:30pm (1 1/2 Hour Season Premieres) September 16, 2004 -- Thursday 9:20pm (Special Supersized Episode 1 Hour & 40 Minutes) September 29, 2004 -- Wednesday 9:00pm (Day Early) December 1, 2004 -- Wednesday 8:00pm (Recap Special, Day Early) January 27, 2005 -- Thursday 8:30pm (Special Supersized Episode) March 24, 2005 -- Thursday 8:30pm (Special Time) CNBC also airs episodes of The Apprentice on a rotating schedule (when the season is current) Global Broadcast History (Canada) January 8 & 15, 2004 -- Thursday 8:30pm January 14 & 28, 2004 -- Wednesday 8:00pm (Repeats) January 21, 2004 -- Wednesday 8:00pm (First Run Episode) January 29, 2004 - Present Day -- Thursday 9:00pm October 2, 2004 - October 23, 2004 -- Saturday 9:00pm (Repeats Special Presentations in Canada April 18, 2004 -- Sunday 1:06am (2 Hour Rebroadcast Season 1 Finale) September 9, 2004 -- Thursday 8:30pm (1 1/2 Hour Season 2 Premiere) September 16, 2004 -- Thursday 9:20pm (Special Supersized Episode 1 Hour & 40 Minutes) September 29, 2004 -- Wednesday 9:00pm (Day Early) December 1, 2004 -- Wednesday 8:00pm (Recap Special, Day Early) January 20, 2005 -- Thursday 8:30pm (1 1/2 Hour Season 3 Premiere) January 27, 2005 -- Thursday 8:30pm (Special Supersized Episode) March 24, 2005 -- Thursday 8:30pm (Special Time) The Apprentice (US Version)in Other Countries: New Zealand: 8:35 PM on TV2 Hong Kong: 8.35 PM Saturdays on TVB Pearl Latin America:9PM Wednesdays on People+Arts (a BBC-Discovery Channel) Turkey: 9PM Thursdays on CNN Turk Sweden: 10:30 PM Sundays on Kanal 5 United Kingdom: 6 PM Weekdays on BBC-2 Brazil: 9PM Wednesdays on People+Arts (a BBC-Discovery Channel). A Brazilian version, O Aprendiz airs Tuesdays and Thursdays at 8 PM on People+Arts and at 10:15 PM on Rede Record The Apprentice Theme Song is "For the Love of Money" by The O'Jays. The Apprentice is created by Mark Burnett, the mind behind series like Survivor, The Contender, and The Restaurant. The Apprentice has been instantly successful, garning Emmy ratings, spinoffs (the upcoming The Apprentice: Martha Stewart), copycat series, spoofs, DVD sets, and books. While only premeiring a year ago, it is regarded as a shining classic in a genre filled with junk.moreless
  • 113
    The People's Court

    The People's Court

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    The People's Court - a throwback to 1950s syndicated courtroom fare such as Traffic Court and The Stand Accused - was set in a small-claims court. The litigants had both agreed to bring their grievances to a California small-claims court, where retired Superior Court Judge Joseph A. Wapner heard the cases. The plaintiffs could file a claim for up to $1,500, while the defendants sometimes filed a countersuit if they felt they were due compensation. While most cases were run-of-the-mill complaints over poor service, broken contracts, ownership rights and malfunctioning merchandise, others had odd twists. For instance: * The overweight stripper who was not paid because the bachelor party-goers thought she was unattractive. During the arguments, she reveals she had gone at the request of her friend, the bride-to-be who found out about the party. * The mother who refused to pay a clown after he came to a birthday party dressed as a towering purple monster (he was supposed to play a Smurf); the clown ended up terrifying the party-goers. * The woman who requested a male friend make good on a verbal contract to pay half of the cost of her daughter's abortion, when she thought he was the father. He had backed out when he was sterile. * A woman who sued the owner of a pitbull after he jumped on the hood of his car. The pitbull's owner claimed she struck the dog and requested payment for the dog's injuries; and even suspected the resulting damage to the car was from a prior accident. And the list of odd cases went on. Each litigant (who, as the announcer reminded viewers each day, were not actors) stated his case before Joseph A. Wapner . After he was through asking questions, he retreated to his chambers before rendering his decision. More than once, he refused to support either side. Each litigant was then interviewed by the courtroom reporter (originally Doug Llewelyn from 1981-1993); sometimes, he gave the results of how courtroom spectators would have decided the case. Usually two cases were heard per show, though some longer cases took up the entire 30 minutes. If time permitted, Wapner fielded questions from the gallery; or legal expert Harvey Levin gave advice on handling that episode's legal scenario (i.e., confronting a car dealer about a car suspected to be a lemon). Each episode ended with Llewelyn admonishing viewers with some variation of the age old advice: "When you get mad, don't take the law into your own hands ... take 'em to court!" The original version of The People's Court ran for 12 years. When The People's Court returned to syndicated TV in 1997, the show expanded to 60 minutes, with Judge Ed Koch (the former New York City mayor) now presiding. Koch lasted until 1999, when Judge Jerry Scheindlin took over in 1999. Judge Marilyn Milian has presided since 2001. The format of the revised The People's Court was essentially similar, except the small claim's court limit was upped to $5,000. Sometimes, the interviewers also asked spectators on-camera their thoughts of a case before the judge's verdict was announced. Related Shows The People's Court UK Carol Smillie is set to present a new UK version of the People's Court for ITV1's new daytime line-up titled itv DAY.moreless
  • 114
    Big Brother (Africa)

    Big Brother (Africa)

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    One Continent, One Winner Following on from many other countries around the world, Africa takes a contestant from each of it's twelve main country's to be a contestant in its Big Brother house. The house itself is in Johannesburg in the Sasani Studios in Lyndhurst. All airdates contained in the guide are based on listings on the shows official website and are based on Central African time. For the first series 7 women and 5 men competed for the $50,000 prize. The show ran over 106 days, from May 25th through to September 7th, 2003. With twists which included a housemate swap with the UK - were African housemate Gaetano Kagwa swapped places with the UK's Cameron Stout. The show was revived for a second series in 2007, starting on August the 5th and ending on November the 11th, with 6 men and 6 women competing. This series brought in a Head of House role, as used in other Big Brother's around the world. It also fell under heavy criticism due to alleged bans being lifted throughout the series, continuous advertisements interrupting live broadcasts, alleged sexual assaults in the house and housemates using the Head of House role to abuse other housemates. The show returned for it's third series on Sunday August the 24th, the prize money remaining at $100,000, with a return to the nomination system used in the first series, six men and six women entered the house. It is currently meant to end on November 23rd. Nominations are made by the housemates on Mondays. Each housemate must nominate two fellow housemates, giving clear and justified reasons as to why they should be evicted. The Head of House can be nominated, however once the nominations are made, the Head of House is allowed to save a nominee (including themselves) and nominate a new housemate for eviction. The housemates don't find out who's being up for eviction until the Sunday, when they are evicted. Due to the show being multi-regional, the voting system takes place in 13 parts. Each of the twelve countries within Africa vote for the housemate they want out. The majority of the vote for each country will be counted as a vote. The thirteenth part of the vote comes from viewers watching from outside of Africa, as the housemates and Big Brother all talk English and episodes are available to watch over the internet.moreless
  • 115
    Jerseylicious

    Jerseylicious

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    Style Network
    Six stylists from New Jersey fight for the spotlight in this new comedy docusoap on The Style Network. Get ready for big drama, big families, and very big hair!
  • 116
    Bizarre Foods with Andrew Zimmern

    Bizarre Foods with Andrew Zimmern

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    Travel Channel
    Andrew Zimmern wanders the globe searching for strange and unusual delicacies. In each destination, Andrew samples the native culinary delights. However, he doesn't go in for the normal foods that tourists would be drawn to. Instead, he goes after the strangest foods that the location has to offer. He explains the taste, texture and history of all the foods he tastes. Destinations include: U.S. gulf coast, Morocco, Spain, Scotland, and the Philippines.

    Bizarre Foods is a product of Tremendous! Entertainment and the Travel Channel.moreless
  • 117
    Tanked

    Tanked

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    Animal Planet
    Brett King and Wayde Raymer own Acrylic Tank Manufacturing, who cater to fish lovers. Together, these brother in-laws build some of the biggest and most outrageous fish tanks.
  • 118
    Nanny 911

    Nanny 911

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    FOX
    Nanny 911 is a new unscripted series that follows a team of nannies armed with the dos and don'ts of child-rearing. Each nanny has a specific area of expertise, ranging from proper etiquette to controlling temper tantrums, and all are ready to help exhausted parents tackle the issues creating chaos in their home and whip their families into tip-top shape. (FOX's press release)moreless
  • 119
    The Hollywood Squares (1966)

    The Hollywood Squares (1966)

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    NBC (ended 1982)
    Welcome to The Hollywood Squares guide at TV.com. After 2 failed multi-star games (People Will Talk and The Celebrity Game), Game show executive producers Merrill Heatter-Bob Quigley finally hit pay dirt with THE HOLLYWOOD SQUARES. The centerpiece of this classic game show was essentially a huge tic-tac-toe board. In each of the nine squares that sat a star (or often, more than one), armed with bluffs and quips aplenty. The show made its debut on NBC's daytime schedule on October 17-21, 1966. Actor-Comedian Peter Marshall served as "The Master of The Hollywood Squares" acting both as straight man and an abettor in the fun. 2 contestants, including a returning champion competed in a best 2-out-of-3 match of Tic-Tac-Toe. The male contestant was "Mr. X" while the female was "Miss Circle" (the "O"). In turn, each contestant chooses a star to which host Marshall read a question. Many of the stars gave zany bluffs (joke answers aka "Zingers") before coming up with their own answer; sometimes they also gave a funny explanation. It was up to the contestant to decide whether they would agree or disagree with the star. A correct judgment earned the player their mark in the square, but an wrong reply meant their opponent got the square. That's unless it led to tic-tac-toe for which the contestant had to earn himself/herself. The 1st player to complete a tic-tac-toe (up-and-down, across or diagonally) won the game and cash, which varied depending on the version: • NBC daytime: $100 per game+($300+100=$400 Bonus)=$500 per match up to $2500 (October 17, 1966-February 10, 1967). $200 per game, $400 per match up to $2000 from February 13, 1967 to June 20, 1980. • NBC nighttime (1968): $300 per game. • Syndicated (1971-1982): $250 per game. Certain games were designated as the Secret Square games (see below), which was a bonus prize (or prize package) for the contestant who won it. To earn the Secret Square prize package, the contestant had to choose that celebrity (up to that point, known only to the home audience) for which Marshall read a special Hollywood multiple choice question. If the contestant was correct in agreeing or disagreeing, he or she won the Secret Square prize package. The prize won with the Secret Square and the frequency played was as thus: • NBC daytime: The 1st or 2nd game of each match. A new prize package was worth started about $1000 and so on (especially if a trip, fur coat or boat were included) and depending on what was added grew in value until claimed. • NBC nighttime (Friday Night): The 1st 2 games of the show. The 1st prize was generally a trip (either around the world to Europe or South America), while the 2nd Secret Square was a new car (most frequently the 1968 Pontiac Firebird, though the Oldsmobile Cutlass and AMC AMX were also offered). • Syndicated: During the early years (1971-1973), the 1st 2 games of each show, later the 1st 3 games (1973-1978). At 1st, unclaimed Secret Square stashes carried over to the next playing, but later went lost if the contestant didn't win it. At first, each Secret Square was worth about $2000 but later, individual prize packages were worth as much as $7000! Later in the nighttime syndicated run (1978-1980) that went back to be having the 1st 2 Games when "The Bonus Prize Squares" added to the nighttime syndicated run. The rules for becoming champion and reward also depended on the version you watched: • NBC daytime: Winning the best 2-of-3 match (which netted $400). At 1st, there was no bonus game; returning champions simply faced a new challenger after the commercial break and finally on September 6-10, 1976, a new "Bonus Prize Squares" game was added wherein the champion selected a star and won an merchandise item or additional cash prize ($500 to $5000) and in the 1978-1979 Season of the show, The Same merchandise items or the cash prizes are doubled ($1000 to $10,000 in 1978-1979). Originally, a 5-Match Champion retired undefeated also winning $2000 (Earlier $2500) and a new car. The bonus was upped handsomely on January 5-9, 1976 to include 2 cars (always at least one very nice car, such as the Chevrolet Caprice Classic or Pontiac Grand Prix), 1 Cruise Ship, $5000 cash for early of it's period (On January 3-7, 1977, the winners win 1 Car, 1 Cruise Ship & $10,000 Cash) are totaled $25,000 (Earlier it's all totaled $20,000). • NBC nighttime: The contestant in the lead won a bonus prize – usually a TV/stereo console or a new kitchen. Average value was about $1500. • Syndicated: The contestant in the lead won a new car – always an economy car (such as the Chevrolet Vega or Datsun B210). Also, in the NBC primetime and syndicated versions, when time expired in the middle of the game (with the sound of the horn aka "Tacky Buzzer"), each contestant was given $50 for each square they had after the final question was played (unless a contestant got a tic-tac-toe); even contestants who didn't win any cash were given $100 just for competing. Virtually every major star from every genre – television, movies, music, sports, experts & the stage of Broadway and other locales– of the 1960s through early 1980s are stopped by with their star quips and bluffs. Hollywood legends also appeared as cameos either as the star's squares or walk-ons. The most popular regulars were Rose Marie, Charley Weaver, Wally Cox, Morey Amsterdam, Abby Dalton, George Gobel and ... of course, longtime center square Paul Lynde. Paul Lynde – by the way – wasn't always the center square as he didn't become the permanent occupant of that space up to October 14-18, 1968. Before Lynde the permanent center square, comedian Buddy Hackett was the most common star to sit in the center square (on the nighttime edition in 1968). Lynde was the center square on nearly every broadcast until he left on August 20-24, 1979; he returned to the center square for a part of the 1980-1981 Las Vegas syndicated season and was a special guest for the final syndicated episode on September 11, 1981. Ernest Borgnine was the center square during the debut weekday broadcast of October 17-21, 1966, while Wayland Flowers & Madame was the NBC daytime show's last center square on the last weekday broadcast of June 16-20, 1980 and George Gobel was the last syndicated-version center square on September 7-11, 1981. On November 1-7 1971, a syndicated nighttime version of The Hollywood Squares premiered. At first, the show was once-a-week, but once the show proved popular, it quickly expanded to a twice-a-week show starting on September 11-17 1972. Three months after the last NBC daytime show aired on June 20, 1980, the production of The Hollywood Squares moved to Las Vegas and the show expanded to five-day-a-week. The expanded syndicated format lasted one year (September 8, 1980-September 11, 1981) with a repeat of the last NBC-TV & Syndicated 1979-1980 Season for the 1981-1982 Season and being Distributed by RHODES PRODUCTIONS-A Filmways Company. 3 versions of the theme music of The Hollywood Squares were used. The 1st theme (1966-1969) called "The Silly Song" was composed by Jimmie Haskell. Beginning in the 1969-1970 season and it was replaced by a piece composed by William Loose; known to game show aficionados as "Merrill and Bob's Theme," it's the 2nd theme of The Hollywood Squares is mostly identified and ended before & after the 1978-1979 season. The disco-flavored theme called "The Hollywood Bowl" was composed by Stan Worth (who wrote many TV theme songs) became the 3rd and last version of the song starting on December 3-7, 1979 and finishing on September 11, 1981. The Hollywood Squares ran on NBC daytime up to June 20, 1980, when it was replaced by David Letterman's ultimately unsuccessful daytime show. 3 revivals all had varying levels of success including a brief marriage to Match Game in 1983-1984 (as The Match Game/Hollywood Squares Hour); A 1986-1989 syndicated entry hosted by frequent original The Hollywood Squares square placer John Davidson (as The New HOLLYWOOD SQUARES) and the 1998-2004 edition (as HOLLYWOOD SQUARES "H2") hosted by talk show personality Tom Bergeron (Fresh out of WBZ-TV NBC "Now CBS 4" Boston's "PEOPLE ARE TALKING"). From April 2002 to October 2003, reruns of the Peter Marshall-hosted Hollywood Squares ran on Game Show Network; the package included 14 NBC-TV primetime and 116 syndicated episodes. Originally having aired in several weekday timeslots, the show was eventually downgraded to weekend-only airings (at 10:30 a.m. EST). Despite a promising start and wide promotion, the reruns never drew high ratings or young audiences (in part because many of the stars have died or are unfamiliar to younger audiences) and were eventually replaced with reruns of the Tom Bergeron Hollywood Squares edition right through August 31, 2007. On March 30-April 3, 2009 "(The All-New) HOLLYWOOD SQUARES" has came back to GSN-play everyday to the lineup for GSN LIVE. In 2010 The Show now seen on weekends featuring the 1st 2 Seasons of "HOLLYWOOD Squares" from 1998 to 2000. The Broadcast History of THE HOLLYWOOD SQUARES {NBC Daytime} October 17, 1966-October 1, 1976 Monday-Friday at 11:30 AM-12NOON Eastern October 4, 1976-September 29, 1978 Monday-Friday at 10:30-11:00 AM October 2, 1978-March 2, 1979 Monday–Friday at 1:00-1:30 PM (or 4:00-4:30 PM) March 5-August 10, 1979 Monday-Friday at 12:30-1:00 PM August 13, 1979-June 20, 1980 Monday–Friday at 10:30-11:00 AM. {NBC Nighttime} January 12-September 13, 1968 – 9:30-10:00 PM Friday. {Syndicated} November 1, 1971-September 10, 1982 – Various nights at 7:30-8:00 PM Eastern (Monday-Saturday) & 5:30-6:00 PM Eastern (Sunday) and for the last 2 seasons for Weekdays/Weeknights at various times which depending on market and Distributed by RHODES PRODUCTIONS-A Filmways Company. "THE HOLLYWOOD SQUARES (1966)" is A MERRILL HEATTER (hQ) BOB QUIGLEY PRODUCTION-A Filmways Company.moreless
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    Khloé & Lamar

    Khloé & Lamar

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    Khloe Kardashian and Lamar Odom tied the knot in 2009, since then they have been piecing their lives together and falling more and more in love. Khloe and Lamar have decided to let cameras into their daily lives and into their home, where Khloe's brother Robert Kardashian has become a semi-permanent house guest.moreless
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