• 101
    BBQ Pitmasters

    BBQ Pitmasters

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    TLC
    This show features the world behind nationwide BBQ competitions.
  • 102
    Poker After Dark

    Poker After Dark

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    NBC
    Professional poker players such as Phil Hellmuth, Mike Matusow and Annie Duke compete against others in a game of No Limit Texas hold 'em on a nightly basis in this heated show until only one player is left holding the cards and the winner take the prize of $120,000. Shana Haitt hosts the series for seasons 1 & 2. Marianela Pereyra hosts the series for season 3. Leeann Tweeden currently hosts the series.moreless
  • 103
    Food Network Challenge

    Food Network Challenge

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    Food Network
    Food Network Challenge is a series comprised of various challenges placed upon real chefs who are working in the culinary world, whether their specialities be pastry, sugar, ice, or otherwise. Who can make the best cupcakes? The best BBQ? Who's the fastest bartender in the country or even the world? Join the judges as they find the answers to those very questions on the Food Network Challenge.moreless
  • 104
    Taxicab Confessions

    Taxicab Confessions

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    HBO
    This show is about some taxi drivers with cameras installed in their cabs, so they pick up their passengers and then they ask them about their, and then the passengers open up themselves...sometimes they open up too much.moreless
  • 105
    American Inventor

    American Inventor

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    ABC (ended 2007)
    American Inventor is a show about the biggest search ever for America's best new invention. The show sets out to uncover the hottest new product each season and make one struggling inventor's dream come true. With one million dollars at stake, American Inventor celebrates the best in homespun American ingenuity.

    National casting calls were held in six major cities across the country. Thousands of inventors, tinkerers and entrepreneurs of all ages were drawn to Los Angeles, San Francisco, Chicago, New York, Houston, and Tampa for a shot at turning their dreams into realities. Inventors of all ages presented their most prized inventions, featuring everything from the wacky to the heart warming.

    A panel of expert judges narrows down the initial entries to a group of finalists, who are given $50,000 each to develop their product, refine it and take it to the next level. This is a show that makes the American dream come true for one person -- taking his/her idea, vision and creativity and helping to turn it into a mass produced product that will be in every American home -- but in the end it is up to America to call in and vote on which invention is worthy of the one million dollar prize.

    American Inventor is produced by FremantleMedia North America, Simon Cowell's Syco Television and Peter Jones TV Ltd. Simon Cowell, Cecile Frot-Coutaz, Siobhan Greene, Peter Jones and Clay Newbill are executive producers. Dug James and Tabitha Hansen are co-executive producers.moreless
  • 106
    Two-A-Days

    Two-A-Days

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    MTV - Music Television (ended 2007)
    The Hoover High School Buccaneers are ranked 2nd in the nation in football. Two-A-Days looks at the members of the team as they try to cope with academics, parents, girlfriends, the social scene and their drive to win a fourth state championship title. Each episode ends with a game. And at Hoover, every game is a big game. This show ended after the second season. Coach Propst was caught changing the grades of the players, using several ineligible players, and having numerous affairs.moreless
  • 107
    SlamBall

    SlamBall

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    SlamBall.net (ended 2004)
    When SlamBall made its groundbreaking debut last summer on The New TNN, the sports world got its first glimpse of the future; a non-stop, live-action human video game that broke all the rules of traditional sport and defined a new generation.

    But for the game's creator, 28 year old Mason Gordon, it was much more. For Gordon, SlamBall's debut was the transfiguration of a vision that had been embedded in his imagination for years, to a physical reality that the rest of the world could finally see and understand.

    In his youth, he could visualize it perfectly. In a recurring dream, it would happen over and over again. A guy goes up in the air. Another guy comes up after him. CRASH. There is a huge collision in the air. One guy takes control and pushes his opponent out of the way. Dream over. Every time he had the dream, it was the same thing. There was always a mid-air collision, but it was a different guy, a different uniform and a different move.

    Despite the familiar dreams, Gordon didn't think about acting on this imagery until many years later. Like a growing number of sports fans, his interest in traditional sports was increasingly influenced by the creativity and intensity of action sports like skateboarding, bmx and motocross.

    For Gordon, action sports had so much to offer the traditional sports world: non-stop action, riveting highlights, and most of all, fearless athletes. Yet, as a traditional athlete himself, he started to wonder about combining the best of both worlds. What would you get if you took the athletic components of football, basketball, hockey and gymnastics, and mixed them together with the insanity of action sports?

    He went back to the dreams. Once he made the connection between his new idea and the imagery of the mid-air confrontations he had seen thousands of times in his sleep, his confidence was unshakable. He knew it could be done. The question was, who else would ever believe it?

    Gordon took it to the one person who might, a visionary producer/director, Mike Tollin, principal of Tollin/Robbins Productions where Gordon had once worked as an intern. Says Gordon, "I approached Mike and told him I'd never bother him again, but that I just had this one idea that I wanted him to look at."

    Gordon spent the next six months trying to convince Tollin to help him make SlamBall a reality. Tollin recognized the potential of the idea, and after much thought, had the brainstorm that would be the project's jump off.

    Tollin did not see SlamBall as fitting into the traditional professional sports model. He didn't think it needed to develop in obscurity for several years at the grassroots level, build up a gradual fan base, and then hopefully find its way to television, as other, more established sports were struggling to at the time. If SlamBall was to be the future of pro sports, as Gordon intended, it would create it's own model: first put the games on TV, generate a mass audience, create a demand, and then back it into a more traditional league model.

    In what Gordon describes as the pairing of his extreme sports mentality and Tollin's brilliant understanding of traditional sports dynamics, a working relationship was solidified. Together, they set out to build the first SlamBall half-court.

    Constructed from spare parts: rusty gymnastics springs, second hand plywood and one trampoline, it wasn't pretty, but it would work. Next Gordon needed players. Combing the inner city parks, gyms, and rec. centers, he looked for what he calls prototype SlamBall players, vastly superior athletes who were creative, tough, and would play through pain.

    "You have to be tough as aluminium siding to play this game," says Gordon, "and your heart has to be bigger than your entire chest. You have to possess boundless belief in yourself and your ability. If you don't have that, you can't come close to playing SlamBall at this level."

    After looking at hundreds of players, he found his army, the five guys who would join with Gordon to make up SlamBall's Original Six: Jeff Sheridan, Sean Jackson, Michael Goldman, Dave Redmond and James Willis. Gordon chose to play and develop the game from the inside as a player. Gordon remembers, "We could only afford five players, so I had to be this sixth." In no time, all of them were seriously hooked. For three weeks straight they played 15 hours a day, going home completely beat down, and then coming back for more the next day.

    "It was the most fun I'd ever had in my life. It was crazy," remembers Gordon. "Here were these five guys who initially thought I was a lunatic, who were giving up their bodies and playing a really rough game and loving every minute of it."

    After testing the half court game, the group relocated to a downtown Los Angeles youth center where the first full court was built. With the addition of more players (including current SlamBall sensations Dion Mays, Stan "Shakes" Fletcher and Rob Wilson), the game soared to incredible new heights, literally. On the new court, Gordon added another trampoline at each basket. Gordon's recurring dreams would now be realized in flesh and blood, with spectacular mid-air collisions becoming one of the sport's main staples.

    As word of mouth traveled and local crowds started to get bigger, Gordon and Tollin brought in TRP's production partner Telepictures/Warner Bros to show them the local phenomenon that was building. What they saw was a fully developed underground sport that captured the core attributes of the videogame generation, a new combination of wild athleticism and amazing creativity, never seen before. "Simply put," says Gordon, "they went bananas."

    A 90-second highlight tape went to Albie Hecht, The New TNN's President. After one meeting with Tollin and Gordon, Hecht was sold. SlamBall would debut in the summer of 2002 as part of the network's "Slammin' Saturday Night" line up.

    "From that point on, it was like skiing downhill atone hundred miles an hour," says Gordon. "We had six months to find enough athletes for six teams, hire quality coaches and teach them all the game from scratch."

    Immediately, the group launched a series of radio campaigns to get the word out to potential athletes, and began reaching out to qualified coaches from around the country. Out of 400 coaching applications, the pool was narrowed down to 40 who were evaluated over a four-day clinic based on their understanding of the game and ability to formulate basic strategies.

    Surprisingly to Tollin and Gordon, many of the top tier basketball coaches could not get their heads around SlamBall. It was the younger candidates who better understood SlamBall's youthful energy, and had the kind of passion needed to guide it. Some candidates in their early twenties, like Hernando Planells, Jr. and Brendan Kirsch were awarded head coaching positions and encouraged to innovate.

    The search for players was equally as challenging. Three months and hundreds of athletes later, the first-ever SlamBall draft took place, producing six teams of eight players each. With players and personnel in place, Gordon and his team faced their biggest challenge of the sport's first season.

    "In six weeks," he says, "we had to teach a group of players a brand new skill set and get them to where they could put a professional quality sports product on the floor. With our original players already at a certain level, we had to get the rest of the guys caught up. By this time, the addition of two more trampolines on each side made the SlamBall court complete.

    Knowing the critical role credibility would play in establishing SlamBall's legitimacy, Tollin, a Philadelphia native, reached out to hometown businessman, Pat Croce, former President of the Philadelphia 76ers and one of the most successful sports entrepreneurs ever.

    Three days after seeing the game live and up-close, Croce signed on as a SlamBall partner and became the game's premier spokesperson, generating a PR frenzy no fledgling sport could even hope to achieve. With little marketing and promotion behind the initial campaign , Croce's involvement came at a critical time and soon the mainstream media; including ESPN, Sports Illustrated, Time Magazine and The Jay Leno Show were all chasing the SlamBall story.

    SlamBall made its national television debut on August 3, 2002, as a six-episode summer series and delivered the young and diverse audience TNN was looking for. Ratings were consistent throughout five consecutive re-run cycles as tremendous word of mouth brought new viewers to the game each week.

    "The greatest thing in the world for me," says Gordon, "was seeing glimpses of the sport I wanted SlamBall to be. When players would work out some kind of intricate pass or misdirection of the stopper, I saw a new type of instinctive strategy. To me, that's what was so cool about the first season."

    By December of 2002, SlamBall got the green light for Season Two. Seeing the potential for big ratings, the network more than doubled the number of SlamBall episodes, scheduling a 13-week series for the new season.

    With increased exposure, Gordon knows the game will be scrutinized more closely as critics try to decide whether SlamBall is, in fact, a "real" sport. "I want people to look at us," he says, "because the closer they look, the more they'll realize that these players are tremendous athletes who are playing their hearts out in a game that's so exciting, creative and dynamic."

    This year, the league added two new teams, the Riders and Bandits, and took tryouts national, something Gordon believes will raise the level of play exponentially, "What people don't understand is that we're just scratching the surface of the level of creativity and athleticism you're going to see in this game for years to come"

    "One day, there is going to be a guy out there who will have an interdisciplinary skill set so far beyond anything we've ever seen before, that no one will be able to discount his ability."

    As for SlamBall's future and the possibility of growing the sport, Gordon says it all depends on the fans. "If the fans want to see it, it's going to happen," he says, "but people can trust that everyone involved in SlamBall is going 24-7 on the accelerator to get it there."moreless
  • 108
    The Nate Berkus Show

    The Nate Berkus Show

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    W.
    Design expert, best-selling author and contributor to The Oprah Winfrey Show, Nate Berkus takes on design challenges, showcases home improvement and personal makeover stories, and offers tips and tricks on The Nate Berkus Show.moreless
  • 109
    Treehouse Masters

    Treehouse Masters

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    (Returning January 10th, 2014)
  • 110
    Rock the Cradle

    Rock the Cradle

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    MTV - Music Television
    Rock the Cradle is a new reality singing competition series that pits the children of famous singers against each other.
  • 111
    Made

    Made

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    MTV - Music Television
    On every new episode of Made, one willing candidate embarks on a mission to transform his or her life. Whether it's to become a varsity football player, a BMX biker, or a surfer, each teenager has a dream to break out of their shell and find out who they really are. Sometimes they make it, sometimes not, and sometimes they realize they had what they wanted all along. It's a brand new season of subjects, so tune in to see if their dreams get Made.moreless
  • 112
    Parental Control

    Parental Control

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    MTV - Music Television
    Parental Control is a dating show with a twist. Mom and Dad get to pick candidates to date their kid in order to replace their kid's current unacceptable love interest. The show begins with mom and dad both picking a candidate of their choice. Both get to plan and carry out a date with their pride and joy and then the kid gets to choose...go with mom's pick, dad's pick or stay with their current beau.moreless
  • 113
    Monster Garage

    Monster Garage

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    Discovery Channel (ended 2006)
    Monster Garage is a game show where a group of people who have a passion for building, modifying, or fabricating cars get the chance to create a vehicle that can transform into a completely different machine. If the build is successful, the build crew gets a tool chest with $3,400 worth of Mac tools. Later add-ons to the prize, Monster Garage soundtrack CD, and occasionally (to some of the builders who go above and beyond) a Monster Garage jacket. If the build is a failure, host Jesse James feeds it to a shredder. James got his Discovery Channel fame by being chronicled in Motorcycle Mania and Motorcycle Mania 2. In Monster Garage, he is practically involved in every build; from design, construction (or destruction), and the Monster Challenge.moreless
  • 114
    Operation Repo

    Operation Repo

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    truTV
    This show follows a highly-trained team in the San Fernando Valley as they give us an inside look at the business behind auto repossession.
  • 115
    American Justice

    American Justice

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    A&E
    Welcome to the American Justice guide at TV.com.

    For over ten years, AMERICAN JUSTICE has been the gold standard of criminal justice programming, tackling today's toughest issues through the cases that challenge and change the law. Told by key players from police to the victims to the perpetrators, it offers a rare, inside view that enables viewers to understand the complex legal principles at stake.

    Hosted by award-winning journalist Bill Kurtis and produced by Towers Productions, AMERICAN JUSTICE has been hailed as 'presenting...an insightful perspective on the most controversial aspects of criminal law in the nation'. --AETV.commoreless
  • 116
    My Cat From Hell

    My Cat From Hell

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    Animal Planet
    From spastic cats that break up relationships to violent felines that put their owners in the hospital, cat behaviorist Jackson Galaxy has seen it all. Follow Jackson as he brings his unique understanding of cats to desperate families on the verge of giving up on their furry companions.moreless
  • 117
    The Real Housewives of New York City

    The Real Housewives of New York City

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    Bravo
    Get ready for domesticity New York-style as Bravo follows around five glamorous Manhattan housewives in this East Coast take onThe Real Housewives of Orange County. Whether they are out for the front row at Fashion Week or heading to the Hamptons, these busy ladies demonstrate the art form that is juggling motherhood, career and a social calendar. In Season 2, Kelly Killoren Bensimon joins the cast and causes more drama than before.moreless
  • 118
    DC Cupcakes

    DC Cupcakes

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    TLC
    Sisters and business partners, Sophie LaMontagne and Katherine Kallinis, run Georgetown Cupcake, a small business that has turned into a wildly successful business.
  • 119
    The Swan

    The Swan

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    FOX (ended 2004)
    The Swan offers ugly ducklings to transforms themselves into a beautiful swan. It offers women the incredible opportunity to undergo physical, mental and emotional transformations and follows them through the process. This groundbreaking idea culminates in a pageant in which one woman will be crowned "The Ultimate Swan." Each of the contestants will be assigned a team of specialists -- a coach, therapist, trainer, cosmetic surgeon, dentist and stylist -- that will work together to design the perfect individually-tailored program. The final reveal will be especially dramatic because the contestants will not be permitted to see themselves in a mirror during the three-month transformation process. FOX Broadcast History April 2004 - May 2004 .... Monday, 9:00pm October 2004--December 2004 Mondays, 9pm/8c Special Presentations April 7, 2004 .... Wednesday, 9/8c December 20, 2004....Monday , 8/7cmoreless
  • 120
    The Newlywed Game

    The Newlywed Game

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    ABC (ended 1974)
    "Once upon a time, there was this nice, family TV game show on CBS called Password, wherein teams of two tried to guess words using just one word. It did very well in the ratings, and was quite educational, too. "Then, one day – July 11, 1966, to be exact – a CBS News special report about Robert McNamara reporting on the Vietnam War pre-empted Password. That didn't make people very happy. So, they turned the station to see what else was on. "Some people saw a game unlike what they had ever seen before. There was this handsome young man asking four newlywed couples questions about their marriages. Sometimes, you saw just the beautiful young ladies; and other times, the good-looking men were on, but they always got back together to talk about their marriages. "Sometimes, the couples kissed each other. Other times, they pouted and made a scene. And sometimes, they shared information that was quite intimate (can you say "intimate," kiddies). "The audience on TV laughed and laughed, and the handsome young host did everything to help make the audience laugh. The people couldn't believe what they were seeing on the TV. But they became curious and decided to watch this new show when it came on the next day ... and the next day ... and the next day ... forgetting all about Password wondering if the newlywed couples would or could live happily ever after." That, in a nutshell, tells the story of the classic game show The Newlywed Game, the tell-all game show where four couples – all married less than two years – answered questions about their relationship to win a prize. The game was played in two rounds, each with two parts (though never referred to as such). In the first part, the wives were secluded off-stage (when the show first aired, the husbands were secluded off-stage) while host Eubanks posed a series of three questions to the husbands – usually multiple choice or fill-in-the blank, sometimes with more than one answer required. After the questions were asked, the wives were brought back onstage to answer the same questions. A correct match earned the newlywed couple 5 points, but the real fun came when there was not a match. Usually, not matching meant an argument, with the spouses each (shall we say) strongly defending their answer. And yes, Eubanks did everything to make the situation worse (often using one spouses words against him/her, or even relaying what the spouse said while the other was off-stage); and of course the audience played right along, loving every moment. In the second round, the husbands were taken to the sound-proof room (when the show first aired, the wives were secluded off stage) while the wives were posed the questions, the fourth being a special 25-point bonus question. Correct matches at this point were worth 10 points (for the first 3 questions). The special 25-point bonus question – usually general enough so as not to cause an argument, unless that too was incorrect – often determined the day's winner. The winner after all the questions were asked (or a tie-breaker was played, if necessary, by the couple predicting their point total) "won a special bonus prize, chosen especially for" them. Usually, this prize was kitchen appliances; rooms of furniture; stereo/TV equipment; things for the game room (such as a pinball machine or a pool table) a boat, motorcycle or trailer; a piano; or a trip (with the requisite luggage and camera thrown in). And yes, couples who wanted a specific prize competed for it on that day's show. Special episodes were frequently dedicated toward expectant couples ("maternity day") and couples who had previously appeared on the show but, even though they didn't win, they had won the audience over (refered to as "Alumni Day"). During the ABC run, during the Christmas season, couples donated their gifts to charity. Thousands of couples let all of their secrets out of the bag during The Newlywed Game's four lives. In addition to the 1966-1974 ABC and 1996-2000 syndicated versions, the most often remembered versions (and most-reran on Game Show Network [GSN]) came with the 1977-1980 (1 Night a week) and 1985-1989 5-Day-a-week syndicated incarnations. The rules for The Newlywed Game were modified for the 1988-1989 season, with host Paul Rodriguez; and again when the series resurfaced as a new entry in the 1996-1997 season, with Gary Kroeger as host. Neither of the "modified" versions sat well with fans (like any version did with some), but the alterations basically involved converting the scoring into dollars and rules to how the questions were asked and how the awards were paid out. Bob Eubanks would return to helm the 1996 version during its second and third seasons (1997-1999), and that along with reverting to the original rules made for a welcome reception from long-time (and new) fans. The only difference was that the grand prize each time was a "second honeymoon" (remember, before, it could also be furniture, electronics or transportation). The 4th and Last Season (1999-2000) is a repeat of the previous season. As one might expect on a show like this, there were countless classic moments during the history of The Newlywed Game. None was more infamous than one such moment that occurred early in the 1977-1980 syndicated run. During a maternity week episode, Eubanks had asked the question, "Where, specifically, is the weeeeeiirdest place that you have ever gotten the urge the make whoopee?" The husband gave a pedestrian reply: "The freeway." His wife's answer was, to put it mildly, not: "Is it (bleep)?" (you fill in the blank, but it made for uproarious laughter). Needless to say, the young woman clearly misunderstood the question.moreless
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