• 141
    Ace of Cakes

    Ace of Cakes

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    Food Network (ended 2011)
    Ace of Cakes is a reality series that follows a group of eclectic cake decorators in Baltimore, led by Food Network Challenge star Duff Goldman. With an attitude and personality more suited for rock stardom than running a specialty cakes business, Duff shuns the traditional approach to cake making and decorating. Using power tools and with the help of his artistic staff, Duff creates some of the most amazing cakes ever seen. From abstract wedding cakes to a cake shaped as a Jeep so detailed it looks like it could actually run, these cakes are more than delicious – they're works of art.moreless
  • 142
    Pointless

    Pointless

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    BBC
    Alexander Armstrong presents Pointless, a game show where, unlike the others, it is the lowest scoring teams who proceed into the subsequent rounds. Before an episodes is recorded 100 people are given questions which can have multiple answers (e.g: Name countries beginning with D), then the contestants answer and the points they receive is equal to how many of the 100 said it. So they need an aswer that few of the 100 gave, if none of the 100 said it the contestant gets 0 points (aka 'Pointless'). It was played by five teams of two in the first season and then four teams of two from the second season onwards. It originally aired on BBC-2 up to episode 135 and then BBC-1 from episode 136.

    Merchandise
    • Pointless: The Board Game
    • Pointless: The Travel Game
    • The 100 Most Pointless Things in the World (book)
    • The 100 Most Pointless Arguments in the World (book)moreless
  • 143
    Love & Hip Hop

    Love & Hip Hop

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    VH1
    VH1's Love & Hip Hop follows the lives of six women connected to the world of hip hop. From being girlfriends to famous rappers to aspiring to make it big in the industry, these women all have a story to tell.moreless
  • 144
    The Pick Up Artist

    The Pick Up Artist

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    VH1
    Eight socially challenged men move in together to compete for the title of Master Pick-Up Artist using skills learned from best-selling author Mystery, a social misfit turned seducer extraordinaire. Along with wingmen Matador and J Dog, Mystery will teach contestants the Mystery Method of turning on the charm to make any dream woman into a reality.moreless
  • 145
    A Shot at Love With Tila Tequila

    A Shot at Love With Tila Tequila

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    MTV - Music Television
    A Shot at Love With Tila Tequila features 16 straight men and 16 lesbians vying for the affections of My Space celeb Tila Tequila. Tequila and the contestants will live together in a mansion and each episode will feature a dramatic ceremony where the contestants are dismissed from the show.moreless
  • 146
    The Hollywood Squares (1966)

    The Hollywood Squares (1966)

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    NBC (ended 1982)
    Welcome to The Hollywood Squares guide at TV.com. After 2 failed multi-star games (People Will Talk and The Celebrity Game), Game show executive producers Merrill Heatter-Bob Quigley finally hit pay dirt with THE HOLLYWOOD SQUARES. The centerpiece of this classic game show was essentially a huge tic-tac-toe board. In each of the nine squares that sat a star (or often, more than one), armed with bluffs and quips aplenty. The show made its debut on NBC's daytime schedule on October 17-21, 1966. Actor-Comedian Peter Marshall served as "The Master of The Hollywood Squares" acting both as straight man and an abettor in the fun. 2 contestants, including a returning champion competed in a best 2-out-of-3 match of Tic-Tac-Toe. The male contestant was "Mr. X" while the female was "Miss Circle" (the "O"). In turn, each contestant chooses a star to which host Marshall read a question. Many of the stars gave zany bluffs (joke answers aka "Zingers") before coming up with their own answer; sometimes they also gave a funny explanation. It was up to the contestant to decide whether they would agree or disagree with the star. A correct judgment earned the player their mark in the square, but an wrong reply meant their opponent got the square. That's unless it led to tic-tac-toe for which the contestant had to earn himself/herself. The 1st player to complete a tic-tac-toe (up-and-down, across or diagonally) won the game and cash, which varied depending on the version: • NBC daytime: $100 per game+($300+100=$400 Bonus)=$500 per match up to $2500 (October 17, 1966-February 10, 1967). $200 per game, $400 per match up to $2000 from February 13, 1967 to June 20, 1980. • NBC nighttime (1968): $300 per game. • Syndicated (1971-1982): $250 per game. Certain games were designated as the Secret Square games (see below), which was a bonus prize (or prize package) for the contestant who won it. To earn the Secret Square prize package, the contestant had to choose that celebrity (up to that point, known only to the home audience) for which Marshall read a special Hollywood multiple choice question. If the contestant was correct in agreeing or disagreeing, he or she won the Secret Square prize package. The prize won with the Secret Square and the frequency played was as thus: • NBC daytime: The 1st or 2nd game of each match. A new prize package was worth started about $1000 and so on (especially if a trip, fur coat or boat were included) and depending on what was added grew in value until claimed. • NBC nighttime (Friday Night): The 1st 2 games of the show. The 1st prize was generally a trip (either around the world to Europe or South America), while the 2nd Secret Square was a new car (most frequently the 1968 Pontiac Firebird, though the Oldsmobile Cutlass and AMC AMX were also offered). • Syndicated: During the early years (1971-1973), the 1st 2 games of each show, later the 1st 3 games (1973-1978). At 1st, unclaimed Secret Square stashes carried over to the next playing, but later went lost if the contestant didn't win it. At first, each Secret Square was worth about $2000 but later, individual prize packages were worth as much as $7000! Later in the nighttime syndicated run (1978-1980) that went back to be having the 1st 2 Games when "The Bonus Prize Squares" added to the nighttime syndicated run. The rules for becoming champion and reward also depended on the version you watched: • NBC daytime: Winning the best 2-of-3 match (which netted $400). At 1st, there was no bonus game; returning champions simply faced a new challenger after the commercial break and finally on September 6-10, 1976, a new "Bonus Prize Squares" game was added wherein the champion selected a star and won an merchandise item or additional cash prize ($500 to $5000) and in the 1978-1979 Season of the show, The Same merchandise items or the cash prizes are doubled ($1000 to $10,000 in 1978-1979). Originally, a 5-Match Champion retired undefeated also winning $2000 (Earlier $2500) and a new car. The bonus was upped handsomely on January 5-9, 1976 to include 2 cars (always at least one very nice car, such as the Chevrolet Caprice Classic or Pontiac Grand Prix), 1 Cruise Ship, $5000 cash for early of it's period (On January 3-7, 1977, the winners win 1 Car, 1 Cruise Ship & $10,000 Cash) are totaled $25,000 (Earlier it's all totaled $20,000). • NBC nighttime: The contestant in the lead won a bonus prize – usually a TV/stereo console or a new kitchen. Average value was about $1500. • Syndicated: The contestant in the lead won a new car – always an economy car (such as the Chevrolet Vega or Datsun B210). Also, in the NBC primetime and syndicated versions, when time expired in the middle of the game (with the sound of the horn aka "Tacky Buzzer"), each contestant was given $50 for each square they had after the final question was played (unless a contestant got a tic-tac-toe); even contestants who didn't win any cash were given $100 just for competing. Virtually every major star from every genre – television, movies, music, sports, experts & the stage of Broadway and other locales– of the 1960s through early 1980s are stopped by with their star quips and bluffs. Hollywood legends also appeared as cameos either as the star's squares or walk-ons. The most popular regulars were Rose Marie, Charley Weaver, Wally Cox, Morey Amsterdam, Abby Dalton, George Gobel and ... of course, longtime center square Paul Lynde. Paul Lynde – by the way – wasn't always the center square as he didn't become the permanent occupant of that space up to October 14-18, 1968. Before Lynde the permanent center square, comedian Buddy Hackett was the most common star to sit in the center square (on the nighttime edition in 1968). Lynde was the center square on nearly every broadcast until he left on August 20-24, 1979; he returned to the center square for a part of the 1980-1981 Las Vegas syndicated season and was a special guest for the final syndicated episode on September 11, 1981. Ernest Borgnine was the center square during the debut weekday broadcast of October 17-21, 1966, while Wayland Flowers & Madame was the NBC daytime show's last center square on the last weekday broadcast of June 16-20, 1980 and George Gobel was the last syndicated-version center square on September 7-11, 1981. On November 1-7 1971, a syndicated nighttime version of The Hollywood Squares premiered. At first, the show was once-a-week, but once the show proved popular, it quickly expanded to a twice-a-week show starting on September 11-17 1972. Three months after the last NBC daytime show aired on June 20, 1980, the production of The Hollywood Squares moved to Las Vegas and the show expanded to five-day-a-week. The expanded syndicated format lasted one year (September 8, 1980-September 11, 1981) with a repeat of the last NBC-TV & Syndicated 1979-1980 Season for the 1981-1982 Season and being Distributed by RHODES PRODUCTIONS-A Filmways Company. 3 versions of the theme music of The Hollywood Squares were used. The 1st theme (1966-1969) called "The Silly Song" was composed by Jimmie Haskell. Beginning in the 1969-1970 season and it was replaced by a piece composed by William Loose; known to game show aficionados as "Merrill and Bob's Theme," it's the 2nd theme of The Hollywood Squares is mostly identified and ended before & after the 1978-1979 season. The disco-flavored theme called "The Hollywood Bowl" was composed by Stan Worth (who wrote many TV theme songs) became the 3rd and last version of the song starting on December 3-7, 1979 and finishing on September 11, 1981. The Hollywood Squares ran on NBC daytime up to June 20, 1980, when it was replaced by David Letterman's ultimately unsuccessful daytime show. 3 revivals all had varying levels of success including a brief marriage to Match Game in 1983-1984 (as The Match Game/Hollywood Squares Hour); A 1986-1989 syndicated entry hosted by frequent original The Hollywood Squares square placer John Davidson (as The New HOLLYWOOD SQUARES) and the 1998-2004 edition (as HOLLYWOOD SQUARES "H2") hosted by talk show personality Tom Bergeron (Fresh out of WBZ-TV NBC "Now CBS 4" Boston's "PEOPLE ARE TALKING"). From April 2002 to October 2003, reruns of the Peter Marshall-hosted Hollywood Squares ran on Game Show Network; the package included 14 NBC-TV primetime and 116 syndicated episodes. Originally having aired in several weekday timeslots, the show was eventually downgraded to weekend-only airings (at 10:30 a.m. EST). Despite a promising start and wide promotion, the reruns never drew high ratings or young audiences (in part because many of the stars have died or are unfamiliar to younger audiences) and were eventually replaced with reruns of the Tom Bergeron Hollywood Squares edition right through August 31, 2007. On March 30-April 3, 2009 "(The All-New) HOLLYWOOD SQUARES" has came back to GSN-play everyday to the lineup for GSN LIVE. In 2010 The Show now seen on weekends featuring the 1st 2 Seasons of "HOLLYWOOD Squares" from 1998 to 2000. The Broadcast History of THE HOLLYWOOD SQUARES {NBC Daytime} October 17, 1966-October 1, 1976 Monday-Friday at 11:30 AM-12NOON Eastern October 4, 1976-September 29, 1978 Monday-Friday at 10:30-11:00 AM October 2, 1978-March 2, 1979 Monday–Friday at 1:00-1:30 PM (or 4:00-4:30 PM) March 5-August 10, 1979 Monday-Friday at 12:30-1:00 PM August 13, 1979-June 20, 1980 Monday–Friday at 10:30-11:00 AM. {NBC Nighttime} January 12-September 13, 1968 – 9:30-10:00 PM Friday. {Syndicated} November 1, 1971-September 10, 1982 – Various nights at 7:30-8:00 PM Eastern (Monday-Saturday) & 5:30-6:00 PM Eastern (Sunday) and for the last 2 seasons for Weekdays/Weeknights at various times which depending on market and Distributed by RHODES PRODUCTIONS-A Filmways Company. "THE HOLLYWOOD SQUARES (1966)" is A MERRILL HEATTER (hQ) BOB QUIGLEY PRODUCTION-A Filmways Company.moreless
  • 147
    Flip This House

    Flip This House

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    A&E
    Flip This House focuses on Real Estate investors who take the most rundown houses and over the course of a few weeks transforms them into gorgeous profitable properties.
  • 148
    The Princes of Malibu

    The Princes of Malibu

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    FOX (ended 2005)
    The Princes of Malibu is the story of two lazy brothers, Brandon and Brody Jenner - the sons of Olympian Bruce Jenner and songwriter Linda Thompson - who are on permanent vacation in music legend David Foster's house. Now living with their their stepfather (Foster) and their mother, the boys use David's property whenever they feel like it, and do many things - some unintential, most otherwise - to annoy David. Although their mother, Linda, thinks her sons can do no wrong, David forces the freeloaders pay rent in order to continue living in his 22-acre mansion, Casablanca. To get the money, Brandon and Brody do all sorts of things, including washing cars, creating a drive-in movie theater on David's front lawn, and working at Target. Oh, the life of luxury is gone for the brothers - and a life of sanity is slowly going away for David Foster. The Princes of Malibu debuted in July on the Fox network, but was later yanked off of the schedule due to low ratings before the third episode aired. The remaining four episodes will be aired on The Fox Reality Network starting the weekend of July 31st. The series is executive produced by Gary R. Benz, Brant Pinvidic, and Spencer Pratt, and comes from GRB Entertainment.moreless
  • 149
    Dragons' Den

    Dragons' Den

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    BBC Two
    The 'dragons', a panel of tough business minds, decide whether or not to green light a fund-lacking entrepeneur's idea in this BBC2 series. Contestants pitch their ideas offering up a percentage of ownership in the imagined company in the hopes of winning the investment dollars of five critical venture capitalists.moreless
  • 150
    Endurance

    Endurance

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    Discovery Channel Kids (ended 2008)
    The premise of Endurance is simple: 20 teens will be dropped off in an exotic location, and will compete against eachother in both physical and mental challenges, with hopes of staying in the game. In the end, only one teen team will be left standing, and will take home the grand prize. In the first season, 20 teens competed in the Pacific Islands. During season 2, 20 new teens (and 2 returning competitors from season 1) faced off in Baja, Mexico. Season 3 brought the competition to Hawaii, and Season 4 went inland to the Tehachapi mountains. Season 5 soared to new heights in "High Sierras". Season 6 "Fiji" is now airing on the Discovery Kids network. ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ Broadcast History: October 5, 2002 - April 8, 2006: Saturday morning NBC (time varied regionally) October 14, 2006 - Present: Saturday, 8:30 (EST) Discovery Kids ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ The Episode List uses the first time the particular episode was aired on any network. For episodes 1-1 through 4-13 this premiere was on NBC on Saturday mornings. Episodes 4-14 and 4-15 premiered on Saturday night on Discovery Kids and were aired later on NBC. Starting with episode 5-1, the shows premiere Saturday night on Discovery Kids and do not air on NBC at all. ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ "Endurance" At a Glance "Endurance": Blue Team (Jonna and Aaron) Win "Endurance II": Brown Team (Jenna and Max) Win "Endurance III: Hawaii": Gray Team (Lindi and Chris) Win "Endurance IV: Tehachapi": Red Team (Franke and Erika) Win "Endurance V: High Sierras": Green Team (Alex and Cealy) Win "Endurance VI: Fiji": Blue Team (Ben and Jordyn) Winmoreless
  • 151
    Lingo

    Lingo

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    GSN - Game Show Network
    TV Rating:
    Canada: (Varies by episode from G to 14+)
    USA: (Varies by episode from TV-G to TV-14) Lingo is the word game that's taken the Game Show Network by storm. Hosted by Chuck Woolery (Greed/Love Connection/Scrabble), with assistance by 2004 Miss America, Shandi Finnessey, who directs the play and acts as word judge. The team in control has up to 5 chances to guess the mystery word. The first letter is provided to start. Each guess must be spelt out, and must begin with the given letter. It doesn't really matter what word is said, as long as they spell a five-letter word. The board will then indicate whether each letter is in the word and if it is in the right place. The team that gets the word will then draw two Lingo balls that correspond to their own board. To get a Lingo you need 5 across, up and down, or diagonally. The team will lose control if they fail to spell a five letter word, if they run out of time, if they draw a red ball, or if they haven't correctly answered after five attempts. The point values are 25 for a word and 50 for a LINGO. In round 2 the points are doubled and 3 "?" balls are added, which act as wild cards. This means that they can be used anywhere on the Lingo board. Bonus Lingo: The team that wins then goes on to play bonus Lingo. They get two minutes to try to guess as many words as they possibly can - this time instead of 1 letter they get 2 letters to start each word, with an option to enter bonus letters which help them. They get 1 bonus letter for winning the game and 1 for every Lingo they get during the game. In this round, the team gets $100 and one LINGO ball for each word they get right. A new board is presented with 12 spaces already filled. They then draw those balls for the chance to win $5,000. If a team gets a LINGO on the first pull, prizes are as follows: Season 2: Trip to Jamaica and the $5000. Season 3: Trip to Lake Tahoe and the $5,000. Season 4: $10,000 cash. Season 5 forward: Progressive, starting at $10,000 and rising by $1,000 each game until won. Lingo became GSN's top rated original series of all time upon its debut, almost singlehandedly rescuing the network from ratings failure, and has retained that title through season 6. At the start of season 5, a new interactive Lingo tournament was added for viewers, who can compete for cash prizes, and a chance to play on future episodes. Some of the best contests have been between teams of online winners and former champions. There have been some celebrity and 'themed' episodes where the prizes were higher, and a tournament of champions at the end of season 3.moreless
  • 152
    The Swan

    The Swan

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    FOX (ended 2004)
    The Swan offers ugly ducklings to transforms themselves into a beautiful swan. It offers women the incredible opportunity to undergo physical, mental and emotional transformations and follows them through the process. This groundbreaking idea culminates in a pageant in which one woman will be crowned "The Ultimate Swan." Each of the contestants will be assigned a team of specialists -- a coach, therapist, trainer, cosmetic surgeon, dentist and stylist -- that will work together to design the perfect individually-tailored program. The final reveal will be especially dramatic because the contestants will not be permitted to see themselves in a mirror during the three-month transformation process. FOX Broadcast History April 2004 - May 2004 .... Monday, 9:00pm October 2004--December 2004 Mondays, 9pm/8c Special Presentations April 7, 2004 .... Wednesday, 9/8c December 20, 2004....Monday , 8/7cmoreless
  • 153
    Tia & Tamera

    Tia & Tamera

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    E! (ended 2013)
    This docu-series goes inside the lives of celebrity identical twins Tia Mowry Hardrict and Tamera Mowry-Housley as they learn how to balance their successful acting careers with major life transformations of marriage and motherhood.moreless
  • 154
    Newport Harbor: The Real Orange County

    Newport Harbor: The Real Orange County

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    MTV - Music Television (ended 2008)
    Located in Orange County, just south of Los Angeles on the Pacific Coast, one of the wealthiest communities within the US, even the world, is located: It's name: LAGUNA BEACH! After three seasons and some legal trouble, MTV moves the show to another town for a fourth season. The show moves to the bigger and richer NEWPORT BEACH. MTV now gains unlimited access to the rich kids of Laguna Beach and follows them around all day and all night long. What do rich kids do all day long? They hang out on the beach, fall in love and do everything they can to enjoy their privileged life. But is everyone so happy in this little paradise on Earth? Is everything as shiny as it looks like? In this smarter than it looks series, MTV proves that money might not be everything. The series focuses on a small group of high-school kids, who are filmed four days and nights a week over almost 6 months, a period of time that makes up one season. Every season has its main figure, who also works as narrator. In the first season this is Lauren "L.C." Conrad. In the second season it is L.C.'s big enemy, Kristen who takes over. After these two seasons everyone of the original cast left Laguna Beach for college, but MTV followed L.C. with the spin-off show THE HILLS. The fresh start in season three, with an entire new cast, features Tessa as new center/speaker of the show - and the show starts all over back in high-school, senior year. The group of friends is characterized by constant fights, intrigues and other mean behavior. The ratings were so bad that MTV decided not to go on with this cast, but due the legal trouble with the commune of Laguna, the local high school forced MTV to move out of town. The fourth season of the show moves to Newport Beach and welcomes an entire new cast. The season will feature high school senior Chrissy. Different than in the previous seasons, the show features just a couple of seniors while the others are juniors. Compared to previous seasons, the Newport Harbor cast is much less focused on sex and intrigues. Nonetheless, the high school drama continues. Parents feature much more prominently in this season; parents who actually try to protect their children. The narrator is Chrissy. She's a high-school senior desperately in love with Clay, a high school junior. Even though he returns her affections, both need help to get close to each other. Clay gets his relationship advice from his best friend Grant while Chrissy gets hers from her best friend and neighbor Sasha. The group is completed by Chase, his on and off girlfriend Taylor, and his crush Allie. Since ratings of the third season were bad and the show moved out of town, MTV only ordered 8 episodes for the fourth season. The ratings weren't bad, but also not outstanding. There was a fifth, and last, season, also known as a four-episodes special set called "Home For The Holidays".moreless
  • 155
    The Newlywed Game

    The Newlywed Game

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    ABC (ended 1974)
    "Once upon a time, there was this nice, family TV game show on CBS called Password, wherein teams of two tried to guess words using just one word. It did very well in the ratings, and was quite educational, too. "Then, one day – July 11, 1966, to be exact – a CBS News special report about Robert McNamara reporting on the Vietnam War pre-empted Password. That didn't make people very happy. So, they turned the station to see what else was on. "Some people saw a game unlike what they had ever seen before. There was this handsome young man asking four newlywed couples questions about their marriages. Sometimes, you saw just the beautiful young ladies; and other times, the good-looking men were on, but they always got back together to talk about their marriages. "Sometimes, the couples kissed each other. Other times, they pouted and made a scene. And sometimes, they shared information that was quite intimate (can you say "intimate," kiddies). "The audience on TV laughed and laughed, and the handsome young host did everything to help make the audience laugh. The people couldn't believe what they were seeing on the TV. But they became curious and decided to watch this new show when it came on the next day ... and the next day ... and the next day ... forgetting all about Password wondering if the newlywed couples would or could live happily ever after." That, in a nutshell, tells the story of the classic game show The Newlywed Game, the tell-all game show where four couples – all married less than two years – answered questions about their relationship to win a prize. The game was played in two rounds, each with two parts (though never referred to as such). In the first part, the wives were secluded off-stage (when the show first aired, the husbands were secluded off-stage) while host Eubanks posed a series of three questions to the husbands – usually multiple choice or fill-in-the blank, sometimes with more than one answer required. After the questions were asked, the wives were brought back onstage to answer the same questions. A correct match earned the newlywed couple 5 points, but the real fun came when there was not a match. Usually, not matching meant an argument, with the spouses each (shall we say) strongly defending their answer. And yes, Eubanks did everything to make the situation worse (often using one spouses words against him/her, or even relaying what the spouse said while the other was off-stage); and of course the audience played right along, loving every moment. In the second round, the husbands were taken to the sound-proof room (when the show first aired, the wives were secluded off stage) while the wives were posed the questions, the fourth being a special 25-point bonus question. Correct matches at this point were worth 10 points (for the first 3 questions). The special 25-point bonus question – usually general enough so as not to cause an argument, unless that too was incorrect – often determined the day's winner. The winner after all the questions were asked (or a tie-breaker was played, if necessary, by the couple predicting their point total) "won a special bonus prize, chosen especially for" them. Usually, this prize was kitchen appliances; rooms of furniture; stereo/TV equipment; things for the game room (such as a pinball machine or a pool table) a boat, motorcycle or trailer; a piano; or a trip (with the requisite luggage and camera thrown in). And yes, couples who wanted a specific prize competed for it on that day's show. Special episodes were frequently dedicated toward expectant couples ("maternity day") and couples who had previously appeared on the show but, even though they didn't win, they had won the audience over (refered to as "Alumni Day"). During the ABC run, during the Christmas season, couples donated their gifts to charity. Thousands of couples let all of their secrets out of the bag during The Newlywed Game's four lives. In addition to the 1966-1974 ABC and 1996-2000 syndicated versions, the most often remembered versions (and most-reran on Game Show Network [GSN]) came with the 1977-1980 (1 Night a week) and 1985-1989 5-Day-a-week syndicated incarnations. The rules for The Newlywed Game were modified for the 1988-1989 season, with host Paul Rodriguez; and again when the series resurfaced as a new entry in the 1996-1997 season, with Gary Kroeger as host. Neither of the "modified" versions sat well with fans (like any version did with some), but the alterations basically involved converting the scoring into dollars and rules to how the questions were asked and how the awards were paid out. Bob Eubanks would return to helm the 1996 version during its second and third seasons (1997-1999), and that along with reverting to the original rules made for a welcome reception from long-time (and new) fans. The only difference was that the grand prize each time was a "second honeymoon" (remember, before, it could also be furniture, electronics or transportation). The 4th and Last Season (1999-2000) is a repeat of the previous season. As one might expect on a show like this, there were countless classic moments during the history of The Newlywed Game. None was more infamous than one such moment that occurred early in the 1977-1980 syndicated run. During a maternity week episode, Eubanks had asked the question, "Where, specifically, is the weeeeeiirdest place that you have ever gotten the urge the make whoopee?" The husband gave a pedestrian reply: "The freeway." His wife's answer was, to put it mildly, not: "Is it (bleep)?" (you fill in the blank, but it made for uproarious laughter). Needless to say, the young woman clearly misunderstood the question.moreless
  • 156
    The Rachel Zoe Project

    The Rachel Zoe Project

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    Bravo
    Celebrity fashion stylist Rachel Zoe opens up her life to Bravo's cameras as she works to take her business to the next level. Together with her growing fashion team and her husband, Rachel works to further herself as a stylist-in-demand.moreless
  • 157
    Password

    Password

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    CBS (ended 1975)
    Password was a simple word-association game, but became one of the most popular and beloved game shows of all time. It was the first successful show to pair a contestant with a celebrity partner and among the first to return after being cancelled several years. A retooled version of "Password" began in 1979 (as Password+Plus and later in 1984 as Super Password) enjoyed two more highly successful runs. This Password page, however, focuses on the 1961-1967 and 1971-1975 versions. Two contestants competed, each paired with a star partner that played the entire week. Host Allen Ludden gave one member of each team a "password," and using 1-word clues only (proper nouns were accepted), it was the cluegiver's job to get his or her partner to guess the word for 10 points. If the 1st team didn't guess the word, the opposing team (who was allowed to "eavesdrop") could try to successfully communicate the word with a new clue (or sometimes even the same clue) for 9 points. Play alternated until the word was guessed with 1 point deducted for each clue or until all 10 clues were given at Ludden's discretion (if it was obvious the word would never be guessed) or if the cluegiver accidentally uttered part or all of the password. Illegal clues – such as hyphenated words and clues with more than one word – and taking too much time also passed control to the opponents will be sounded by the buzzer from The Word Authority of Dr. Reason A. Goodwin--The Editor of World Book Encyclopedia Dictionary. Usually, the stars (who played the entire weekday) gave the clues on the 1st word of a game with the contestants trying to guess the word; then the contestants gave the clues and the celebrities tried to guess and so on. Play continued until 1 team scored 25 points (or on occassion, a time's up whistle sounded). The contestant won $100 on CBS Daytime and ($250 for the nighttime portion) and his or her team played the Lightning Round (believed to be the 1st endgame in a game show). In the Lightning Round, the celebrity partner was shown a series of 5 new passwords, one at a time. He or she had 60 seconds (1 Minute) to communicate all 5 to the contestant at $50 per correct guess of the word. An illegal clue or a pass meant no money could be earned on that word. Up to $250 was possible in the Lightning Round. Each contestant played 2 games after which they both retired; a contestant could win a maximum of $700. Even contestants who were shut out of any cash winnings were given a consolation gift (usually a camera or a set of World Book encyclopedias or other stuff). The most impressive contestants returned each year for a tournament of champions, but this was little more than asking them back to play two more games for $700 extra. The show debuted on the CBS daytime schedule on October 2, 1961 and continued through September 15, 1967; a nighttime Portion premiered on January 2, 1962 and had 2 runs up to May 22, 1967. Actress Betty White was a frequent guest star(and in June 1963, was a permanent fixture in Ludden's life ... as his wife); she appeared very frequently in all revivals of Password, long after Ludden's death on June 9, 1981; little wonder she was among the best players of this game. Reruns were syndicated to local stations after leaving CBS daytime (in part due to a naughty new game show called The Newlywed Game which was scheduled against Password) before reappearing on April 5, 1971 as a part of the ABC daytime schedule. Play was largely as before with modest cash payouts. That's until November 18, 1974, when the powers-that-be decided to change the game. An all-star edition – as Password All-Stars with 6 stars playing for charity – and a revised format with 4 contestants (2 of which were paired with a celebrity partner) competing for 2 spots in the main game were seen more as screwing up a good thing than changing it. Needless to say, the show would die of a quick death leaving ABC after an 5 season run on June 27, 1975. However, Goodson-Todman did make some changes that DID work, and showcased them in another revival called Password Plus, which debuted on January 8, 1979 on NBC (hosted originally by Ludden and later Bill Cullen and Tom Kennedy). That show remained until March 26, 1982, but it returned on September 24, 1984 as Super Password (hosted by Bert Convy) and it lived on NBC until March 24, 1989. See Password Plus and Super Password for more details. Broadcast History of Password: October 2, 1961-September 15, 1967 CBS-TV: Monday-Friday at 2:00-2:30pm April 5, 1971-September 3, 1971 ABC-TV: Monday-Friday at 4:00-4:30pm September 6, 1971-March 17, 1972 ABC-TV: Monday-Friday at 12:30-1:00pm March 20, 1972-June 27, 1975 ABC-TV Monday-Friday at 12Noon-12:30pm.moreless
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    Whose Wedding Is It Anyway?

    Whose Wedding Is It Anyway?

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    Style Network
    Find out what kind of superhuman it takes to become a wedding planner in this addictive series from the Style Network.
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    Yo Momma

    Yo Momma

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    MTV - Music Television
    Host Wilmer Valderrama searches Los Angeles,New York,and Atlanta looking for the best trash-talkers. This unscripted comedy competition series pits trash-talkers up against each other in a battle for $1,000 cash and a chance to advance to the final tournament for the chance at another $1,000 in cash and some extra prizes. Yo Momma airs daily.moreless
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    The Sing-Off

    The Sing-Off

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    NBC
    Vocal-only groups get a chance to compete for a recording contract from Sony Music in this NBC take-off on American Idol.
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