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    The Twilight Zone

    The Twilight Zone

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    CBS (ended 1964)
    The series was a collection of various tales that range from the tragic to the comedic. They may be scary or just thought-provoking. Most episodes have unexpected endings and a moral lesson. But, no matter what, it's "a journey into a wondrous land, whose boundaries are that of the imagination." Rod Serling, creator and host of the series, won two Emmys for outstanding writing (1960 & '61), and the Golden Globe in 1962 for best TV director/producer. Reruns of the original Twilight Zone can be seen on the US Sci Fi channel. This is the Original 1959 series, not the CBS The Twilight Zone (1985) version nor the UPN The Twilight Zone (2002) version. CBS Programming History October 1959-September 1962 ..... Friday 10:00 January 1963-September 1963 ..... Thursday 9:00 September 1961-September 1964 ..... Friday 9:30 May 1965-September 1965 ..... Sunday 9:00 Note: Seasons 1-3 & 5 have a running time of 30 minutes. All of the episodes in Season 4 have a running time of one hour.moreless
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    Dark Shadows

    Dark Shadows

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    ABC (ended 1971)
    Dark Shadows was a daytime soap opera on ABC-TV which aired weekdays during the afternoon. With vampires, witches, worlocks, werewolves, and other supernatural creatures, it became a surprising phenomenon, lasting for five years before it was cancelled.moreless
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    Alfred Hitchcock Presents

    Alfred Hitchcock Presents

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    CBS (ended 1962)
    Alfred Hitchcock Presents was a mystery and suspense anthology hosted by the master of suspense Alfred Hitchcock. Each 30 minute episode included opening and closing vignettes featuring Hitchcock who would often explain some aspect of the day's show and would often offer subtle (or not so subtle) jabs at the shows sponsors. The series premiered on CBS on Sunday, October 2, 1955 in the 9:30-10:00 PM timeslot opposite ABC's The Original Amateur Hour and NBC's Alcoa-Goodyear Playhouse. In its sixth season the show moved to NBC and was shown on Tuesday 8:30-9:00 PM. On NBC it served as the lead in for two other anthology shows Thriller and The Dick Powell Show. Alfred Hitchcock Presents featured both original works produced directly for television and adaptations of existing source material. Some authors whose work was adapted for the series include: Alexander Woollcott, Ambrose Bierce, Cornell Woolrich, Frederic Brown, Henry Slesar, H.H. Munro (aka Saki), John Cheever, John Collier, John Wyndham, Ray Bradbury, Roald Dahl, and Robert Bloch. The show also featured work by famous (or later famous) directors Alfred Hitchcock and Robert Altman. It also served as a proving ground for stars and future stars: Charles Bronson, Robert Redford, Steve McQueen, Peter Lorre, Robert Duvall, and Vera Miles. In 1962, Alfred Hitchcock Presents was expanded to one hour and was shown under the title the The Alfred Hitchcock Hour. In 1985, the these shows experienced a revival under the title Alfred Hitchcock Presents. Spinoff: The Alfred Hitchcock Hour Revivals: Alfred Hitchcock Presents (1985) Broadcast History CBS: October 1955-September 1960----Sunday----9:30 p.m.
    NBC: September 1960-June 1962----Tuesdays----8:30 p.m. Nielsen Ratings: (Top 30 or Better) #6 in the 1956-1957 Season
    #12 in the 1957-1958 Season
    #24 in the 1958-1959 Season
    #25 in the 1959-1960 Season Emmy Awards and Nominations 1955 Nominated: Alfred Hitchcock Presents Best Action or Adventure Series Nominated: Alfred Hitchcock Best MC or Program Hose (Male or Female) Nominated: Alfred Hitchcock, "The Case of Mr. Pelham" Best Director (Film Series) Winner: Edward W. Williams, "Breakdown" Best Editing of a Television Film 1956 Nominated: Alfred Hitchcock Presents Best Series (Half-Hour or Less) Nominated: Alfred Hitchcock Best Male Personality (Continuing Performance) Winner: James P. Cavanagh, "Fog Closes In" Best Teleplay Writing (Half-Hour or Less) 1957 Nominated: Alfred Hitchcock Presents Best Dramatic Anthology Series Winner: Robert Stevens, "The Glass Eye" Best Direction (Half-Hour or Less) 1958 Nominated: Alfred Hitchcock Presents Best Dramatic Series (Less Than One Hour) Nominated: Alfred Hitchcock, "Lamb to the Slaughter" Best Direction of a Single Program of a Dramatic Series (Less Than One Hour) Nominated: Roald Dahl, "Lamb to the Slaughter" Best Writing of a Single Program of a Dramatic Series (Less Than One Hour) 1959 Nominated: John J. Lloyd Outstanding Achievement in Art Direction and Scenic Design Nominated: Edward W. Williams, "Man from the South" Outstanding Achievement in Film Editing for Television 1960 Nominated: Edward W. Williams, "Incident in a Small Jail" Outstanding Achievement in Film Editing for Television Other Awards or Nominations The Golden Globe Awards (Voted each year since 1944 by members of the Hollywood Foreign Press Association): 1957 Winner: Alfred Hitchcock Presents Best Television Program Look Magazine's Annual Television Awards (Voted initially by poll of TV executives, producers, directors, advertising executives and TV columnists, then, in 1955, via polls taken of TV critics and editors. The Award was Presented annually from 1950 to 1959 by the editors of Look magazine): 1955 Winner: Alfred Hitchcock Best Director 1956 Winner: Alfred Hitchcock Presents Best Dramatic Series (One-Half Hour) 1957 Winner: Alfred Hitchcock Presents Best Dramatic Series (One-Half Hour) Television Champion Awards (Voted each year since 1949 by polls of the nation's TV critics taken by the publishers of Television Almanac. The awards ceased in 1972): 1955 Winner: Alfred Hitchcock Presents Best Mystery Program 1956 Winner: Alfred Hitchcock Presents Best Mystery Program 1960 Winner: Alfred Hitchcock Presents Best Mystery Program First Telecast: October 2, 1955
    Last Telecast: June 26, 1962
    Unaired Episodes: 1 Episodes: 266 B&W Episodes
    (266 half-hour episodes, 1 three-part episode) moreless
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    The Alfred Hitchcock Hour

    The Alfred Hitchcock Hour

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    CBS (ended 1965)
    The Alfred Hitchcock Hour was a mystery and suspense anthology hosted by the master of suspense, Alfred Hitchcock. Each 60 minute episode included opening and closing vignettes featuring Hitchcock, who would often explain some aspect of the day's show and would often offer subtle (or not so subtle) jabs at the show's sponsors. The series premiered on CBS on Thursday, September 20, 1962, in the 10:00-11:00 PM time-slot opposite ABC's Alcoa Premiere and NBC's The Andy Williams Show. In its third season, the show moved to NBC and was shown on Monday 10:00 to 11:00 PM. On NBC it was broadcast opposite ABC's Ben Casey and CBS's Slattery's People. The Alfred Hitchcock Hour featured both original works produced directly for television and adaptations of existing source material. Some authors whose work was adapted for the series include: Cornell Woolrich, Ellery Queen, H.G. Wells, Henry Slesar, John Wyndham, William Link, Ray Bradbury, and Robert Bloch. The show also featured work by famous (or soon to be famous) directors Alfred Hitchcock, Sydney Pollack, and William Friedkin.moreless
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    Strange Paradise

    Strange Paradise

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    CBC (ended 1970)
    Set in an island in the Caribbean, Strange Paradise deals with Jean Paul Desmond, one of the wealthiest men in the world, who makes a pact with the devil to bring his wife back from the dead. His beautiful sister-in-law, Alison Carr, tries to help him, whilst the mysterious Raxl, housekeeper and Voodoo Priestess, has a war of her own with the evils of Maljardin, the plantation where everything takes place.moreless
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    Milton the Monster

    Milton the Monster

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    ABC (ended 1966)
    In the fall of 1964, primetime television was invaded by two clans of monsters who were definitely more funny than scary, The Munsters and The Addams Family. Ever quick to capitalize on the hot trend, Hal Seeger Productions sold The Milton The Monster Show to ABC for the 1965-1966 season. It would be Seeger's only network television series. Milton and his friends definitely fell into the more funny than scary category, thanks to some clever scripts by the team of Jack Mercer and Kin Platt, as well as Woody Kling. Milton himself was a giant Frankenstein-type, but since too much tenderness was added to the recipe by Milton's creators, Professor Weirdo and Count Kook, it resulted in Milton being a good-hearted monster. The late Bob McFadden did the voice for Milton as a good ol' Southern boy, not unlike Gomer Pyle. Milton's other friends included Heebie and Jeebie, as well as Abercrombie The Zombie. When Hiram The Fly puts on a pair of super glasses, he becomes the assertive superhero Fearless Fly in the most prolific supporting series from this show. Usually he hangs around the Sugar Bowl with his fly friends Flory and Horsey. Fearless adversaries include Dr. Goo Fee and (crossing over from his Milton role) Professor Weirdo. In the other supporting series, Stuffy Durma is a hobo who inherits ten million dollars, hires an advisor named Bradley Brinkley to handle his affairs, and opens his mansion to hobo friends like Ashcan Annie and Stu Mulligan. Most of the cartoons in this subseries were animated by New York cartooning legend Jim Tyer. Among the less-prevalent supporting series are Penny Penguin, Muggy-Doo, and Flukey Luke. The Milton The Monster Show aired on ABC from 1965 to 1968 and in syndication afterwards. It is still offered for syndication by Worldvision Enterprises.moreless
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    Ultra Q

    Ultra Q

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  • 8
    Night Gallery

    Night Gallery

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    NBC (ended 1973)
    Night Gallery was creator-host Rod Serling's follow-up to The Twilight Zone. Set in a shadowy museum of the outre, Serling weekly unveiled disturbing portraiture as preface to a highly diverse anthology of tales in the fantasy-horror vein. Bolstering Serling's thoughtful original dramas were adaptations of classic genre material--short stories by such luminaries as H. P. Lovecraft, Fritz Leiber, A.E. van Vogt, Algernon Blackwood, Conrad Aiken, Richard Matheson, August Derleth, and Christianna Brand. Variety of material brought with it a variety of tone, from the deadly serious to the tongue-in-cheek, stretching the television anthology concept to its very limits. (CREW INFORMATION SUPPLEMENT: Jaroslav Gebr was the artist for the pilot film's three gallery paintings. For the series, all of the gallery canvases were painted by Tom Wright. The gallery's metal sculptures were created by Phil Vanderlei and Logan Elston. Most episodes contained multiple story segments. For the listing of episode credits, crew information is listed under the primary story segment except where a production aspect--music, cinematography--differs among the segments.)moreless