• 1
    Soul Train

    Soul Train

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    (ended 2006)
    It's the SOOOOOOOOOOOOUUUUL TRAIN!

    Pop music has always had shows like American Bandstand to sing its praises, but R&B music had to wait a while for its own major weekly showcase. Just the same, Soul Train proved to be well worth the wait when it hit the airwaves in the 1970s. This weekly extravaganza, which showed off the latest and greatest in soul music and dance moves, became a national sensation in the mid-1970s and became a pop culture juggernaut that broke new ground for African-American entertainment.

    Soul Train was the brainchild of radio announcer Don Cornelius. After studying broadcasting in college, Cornelius got a job at WVON, one of Chicago's most popular urban radio stations. During this time, he pondered breaking into television with a dance and music show from an African-American perspective. In 1969, he produced a pilot episode and dubbed it "Soul Train" after a local radio promotion he had done in Chicago. The pilot impressed the Sears Roebuck Company, which gave Cornelius some funding in exchange for the rights to use Soul Train to promote a line of record players. With this help, Cornelius launched Soul Train on WCIU-TV, a Chicago UHF station. It premiered on August 17, 1970 as a weekday series airing from 4:30-5:30pm. Cornelius himself hosted the dance-stravaganza, which took place on a club-set. The show featured performances by soul music acts, appearances by guest hosts, and scorching dance numbers from the Soul Train Gang. Local word-of-mouth made Soul Train a big hit in Chicago, which won it another sponsor in The Johnson Products Company, makers of Afro-Sheen.

    Soul Train's relationship with The Johnson Products Company also helped it make the move from local television to syndication. With this company's financial backing, Cornelius moved the show to Hollywood and got it into television syndication in the fall of 1971. Only seven cities were on the initial lineup, but the Soul Train quickly picked up steam and began playing in new cities as its reputation spread. Pretty soon, people all over the country were enjoying the funky thrills that only Soul Train could provide. By the mid-1970s, Soul Train was a force to be reckoned with. Each week, the latest hits and coolest dances were served up in a slick package that had kids of all ages and races dancing around the TV-room floor. Cornelius cut a stylish, unflappably cool figure as the host, making him an often-imitated icon in the entertainment community. Music groups clamored for an appearance on Soul Train, since it was practically a free ticket to r&b (and often pop) chart success. Today, many critics fondly remember Soul Train as the television show that did the most to bring African-American popular culture into American households.

    As the 1980's began, Soul Train was as popular as ever. Tribune Entertainment, a Chicago-based company, became the exclusive distributor of the show and helped launch The Soul Train Music Awards. This yearly awards gala has become one of the most popular and respected awards ceremonies for r&b musicians and now enjoys "institution" status in the music world. The success of this awards show has also led to other popular Soul Train spin-off specials like The Soul Train Lady Of Soul Annual Awards Special and The Soul Train Christmas Starfest.

    In the 1990s, Don Cornelius stepped down as Soul Train host and passed the role to others. Guest hosts were used from 1993-97 (seasons 23 through 26). Mystro Clark became host in 1997. Following him, was Shemar Moore who hosted seasons 29 through 32. Dorian Gregory is the current Soul Train host. Cornelius remains active as an executive producer for the show, which shows no signs of slowing down. With r&b music more popular than ever in the mainstream, viewers everywhere continue to shake their groove thing to the churning wheels of the Soul Train.

    Soul Train continued with new episodes through the 2005-06 season. The final, first-run episode aired on March 25, 2006. The 2006-07 season began with repeats from 2005-06. As of December 9, 2006, the series has been retitled The Best of Soul Train and features c episodes from the 1970s and 1980s. 1970's & early 1980's Soul Train airdates On this guide, we've listed the earliest known airdates for episodes 1 - 163. The original Los Angeles airdates are listed for episodes 164 - 366 (Dec. 27, 1975 - June 20, 1981). In the 1970s through the early '80s, the episode airdates varied from city to city. Instead of using communications satellites, tapes of the episodes were mailed directly to individual TV stations. And once a station aired an episode, the tape would then be forwarded to a station in another city. (This practice, called "bicycling," was common with most 1970s first-run syndicated shows.) Sometime in the early 1980s, Tribune Entertainment began using satellites to distribute Soul Train resulting in standard airdates across the country.

    Find at what television station and time the train pulls up to your TV: http://tv.tribune.com/showfinder/search/1,1001,soultrain,FF.html

    Contributors to this guide include: --Nick Puzo (Nickfresh) - editor of the Soul Train Yahoo Group --Jabar Robbins (Calatine9) --Robert Spiegel --Edward Loney ("ehloney")moreless
  • 2
    American Bandstand

    American Bandstand

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    ABC (ended 1989)
    "American Bandstand" brought rock 'n' roll music into millions of households and showed Americans how to do the latest dance steps. Dick Clark, "America's Oldest Teenager" hosted the series for most of its run.
    Regular Bandstand segments were "The Spotlight Dance," "Rate-A-Record" and The "American Bandstand" Top 10 Countdown. "The Spotlight Dance" featured 2 or more couples dancing to a softer tune. "Rate-A-Record" had teenage contestants rate and comment on a record played on the show. The "American Bandstand Top Ten" was a countdown of the Top 10 hits of the day.
    "American Bandstand" began as a local Philadelphia show called "Bandstand," which made its debut October 13, 1952 on WFIL-TV Channel 6.
    The series was retitled "American Bandstand" on August 5, 1957 when ABC began broadcasting it nationwide. For its first 6 seasons, "American Bandstand" aired Mondays through Fridays.
    Two major changes took place during the 1963-64 season. On September 7, 1963, it became a once-a-week series airing Saturday afternoons. A few months later on February 8, 1964, production of the show moved from Philadelphia, PA to its new home in Los Angeles, CA.
    Despite these changes, American Bandstand's fans remained loyal to the series, as it continued to present the latest music and dances. It even inspired another long-running dance show, "Soul Train."
    American Bandstand's long association with ABC ended on September 5, 1987. Two weeks later, on September 19, 1987, the series returned in first-run syndication. On April 8, 1989, American Bandstand made another move, this time to the USA cable network. It also featured a new host, David Hirsch. This version lasted only 6 months with the final show airing on October 7, 1989. In 1995, VH-1 began showing vintage episodes of American Bandstand. These edited 30-minute reruns featured many of the stars that the show helped make famous.
    "Bandstand" Air Dates (local Philadelphia show)
    (1) "Bob Horn's Bandstand" (hosted by Bob Horn) October 13, 1952 - July 6, 1956
    (2) "Bandstand" (hosted by Dick Clark) July 9, 1956 - August 2, 1957
    "American Bandstand" Air Dates
    Weekday Afternoon shows (ABC-TV network, Monday-Friday) August 5, 1957 - August 30, 1963
    Broadcast times:
    August 5-November 15, 1957 - AB aired from 3:00 to 4:30pm.
    November 18, 1957-October 10, 1958 - AB was split into 2 shows airing from 3:00 to 3:30pm and from 4:00 to 5:00pm. AB was split up by the game show Who Do You Trust?
    October 13, 1958-September 29, 1961 - one show airing from 4:00pm to 5:30pm.
    October 2, 1961-September 28, 1962 - from 4:00 to 4:50pm*
    October 1, 1962-August 30, 1963 - from 4:00 to 4:30pm
    Note: *From October 2, 1961 through September 28, 1962, AB was followed by "American Newsstand," a current affairs program produced by ABC News.
    Nighttime shows (ABC network, Monday nights 7:30-8:00pm) In addition to the weekday shows, American Bandstand had a 13-week (October 7 - December 30, 1957) Prime-time run. (Note: This shouldn't be confused with "The Dick Clark Saturday Night Beechnut Show", which ran from February 15, 1958 to September 10, 1960.)
    Saturday Afternoon shows (abc-TV network) September 7, 1963 - September 6, 1986
    During these 23 years, the air times varied anywhere between 12:30 and 2:30pm on Saturdays (sometimes earlier on the West Coast). Most of these shows were an hour long. (Some episodes were shortened for sporting events.)
    On AB's Last Season on ABC-TV, it aired from 12:30 to 1:00pm (from September 13, 1986 through September 5, 1987).
    Syndicated American Bandstand episodes ran from September 19, 1987 to August 27, 1988 (times varied by city). This version was syndicated by LBS Communications. (According to some sources the syndicated series ran through April 1, 1989. But we haven't been able to find any AB listings beyond August 27, 1988.)
    USA Cable Network (Saturday afternoons) From April 8 to October 7, 1989, AB was aired from 12noon to 1:00pm. David Hirsch was the host of this final version.moreless
  • 3
    The Midnight Special

    The Midnight Special

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    NBC (ended 1981)
    Welcome to The Midnight Special guide at TV.com. The Midnight Special was a late-night rock music series airing Friday nights (or, to be more exact, early Saturday mornings). On most NBC affiliates, The Midnight Special followed "The Tonight Show starring Johnny Carson."

    For its first 8 seasons, The Midnight Special's time slot was from 1:00am to 2:30am. But when Johnny Carson cut "The Tonight Show" down from 90 to 60 minutes, The Midnight Special was moved up to the 12:30am-2:00am time slot.

    NBC aired The Midnight Special's pilot on August 19, 1972. The pilot was presented as a 90-minute special encouraging young people to vote in the upcoming Presidential election. On February 2, 1973, The Midnight Special premiered as a weekly series. For most of its run, a different guest host was featured every week. (An exception to this was from July 1975 through March 1976 when Helen Reddy was the regular host.) Wolfman Jack, fresh from his role in "American Graffiti," was the series' announcer and a frequent guest host.

    Around 1978, at the height of the Disco craze, the set was modified to resemble a Disco nightclub, complete with a platform dance floor. Wolfman Jack stood behind an elevated DJ booth. But by Fall 1979, as the genre's popularity waned, the disco set was gone.

    During its last few seasons, The Midnight Special received criticism for not giving enough attention to the punk & new wave music of the late-1970s to early 1980s. While a few punk/new wave acts were presented (either as live guests or in music videos), the majority of musical guests continued to be MOR or disco acts.

    Beginning April 11, 1980, The Midnight Special faced competition from ABC's "Fridays," a "Saturday Night Live" comedy series. Fridays' musical guests were often more cutting edge than those seen on The Midnight Special.

    In May 1981, NBC replaced The Midnight Special with "SCTV Network 90," an expanded version of "Second City TV," previously a syndicated 30-minute series.moreless
  • 4
    The Lawrence Welk Show

    The Lawrence Welk Show

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    ABC (ended 1982)
    Welcome to The Lawrence Welk Show guide at TV.com.

    The Lawrence Welk Show was good old fashioned family entertainment at its best with all kinds of music, particularly from the Big Band Era. The show had a close-knit group of singers, dancers, and musicians known as the "Musical Family."

    The Lawrence Welk Show made its national television debut on July 2, 1955. It was originally filmed in black and white and then it went into color September 18, 1965. The show was on Saturday nights on ABC until 1971 when the network canceled the show; that year, it went into first-run syndication with new episodes being produced until 1982. Reruns began airing until 1983. There were also two Christmas reunion specials, in 1984 and 1985.

    On October 3, 1987, reruns of the The Lawrence Welk Show began airing on PBS, where they continue to air to this day. These shows were hosted by members of the Musical Family until the 2005 season, when Mary Lou Metzger interviewed former members of the Musical Family after each show.

    Below is a list of Lawrence Welk PBS specials: 2001 - Milestones and Memories 2003 - God Bless America 2005 - Precious Memories 2007 - Lawrence Welk's TV Treasuresmoreless
  • 5
    MTV Unplugged

    MTV Unplugged

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    MTV - Music Television
    The idea of Unplugged is that bands perform only acoustical and without any electronically devices. So this term usually only applies to music bands or performers that usually don't perform unplugged. Many performers fought with a performance the judgment that they actually can't play and computers and machines produce the entire sound. The origin of the idea isn't absolutely clear. There are only concerts in the unplugged style, but who really invented it, is unclear. The first concert you could describe as unplugged was Elvis Presley's concert in 1968 today known as the 68 Comeback Special. As inventors Bon Jovi and Richie Sambora get named, because they performed with only with two guitars at the MTV Music Awards in 1989 the tracks Wanted Dead Or Alive und Livin' On A Prayer. So the Unplugged series started soon later in 1989. Jules Shear hosted the first season, with was produced as 30 minute short "concerts", in an absolute simple way. The artists sitting in a half circle, maybe some background musicians behind them and playing their music in a small location, styled almost like a café. The second season was basically the same concept, but the duration now changes and MTV Unplugged leaves the US for the first time and goes to the UK. Also there isn't any host from now on. The bands announce themselves. The third season was the last one really organized as season. The ending of this season with the session of Bruce Springsteen also change the image of the series, because he performs plugged instead of unplugged. Season four starts with a big surprise: The first session with no English speaking band: Roxette! Season four already takes on the character this series will have in all other seasons from now on. It isn't a series anymore it's an idea. All sessions are a project to fallow this idea. In this context MTV invites comedians for the Spoken Word I session. A basically non musical session, but season four ends with a big bang. The Nirvana unplugged session makes this show part of music history. Nirvana doesn't perform a completely unplugged session, because Kurt Cobain uses some electronic sampler in the background. The discussion if this performance can be counted as unplugged doesn't hurt the success in any way. In season five, MTV Latin America starts recoding performances in the US starting with episode eight of this season. MTV US also airs these sessions. Season six and seven are basically the same like season five – they write the story of the show even further. With season eight the seasons aren't organized in the usual TV year rhythm anymore. Instead of the summer till summer schedule and the fact that it isn't a series anymore, the schedule now works similar to the usual calendar from 1.1 till 12.31. In 1998 the big break comes. MTV only produces one session and the series is basically dead. In 1999 the show is basically reborn, because now every characteristics of a series were now gone and every single session is a project by its own and is produced and released as such. Season 11 in 2000 features only one session again, basically because the time spirit works against the show concepts – the IT boom and the ultimate believe in the new millennium makes this show look spare. The first year in the new millennium the show starts over once more. More globally than ever the show starts with three Latin American performances before two US performances fallow and the year ends over in Asia, but visited Europe first. From now on the number of sessions produced in one year goes down dramatically. Season 13 features only three sessions, season 14 and 15 only one. In 2005 the show comes back form Europe to the US after three years absence with one other big performance. This time it's Alicia Keys who gives the show a new boost. ------------------------------------------- Notes to this show guide: Seasons: 1-8 are numbered as regular seasons. 9+ are organized annually, because of this shows character. Episodes: Numbered according to the original air dates (where ever that was). The show: The show isn't only the US series, since this is a global series since the beginning. Many episodes helped to build up MTV stations in many countries, sessions where produced. So this guide lists all sessions, not only the US ones. So the guide has more seasons and episodes than can be found in other guides. So don't be confused about that.moreless
  • 6
    Great Performances

    Great Performances

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    PBS
    Great Performances is the longest running performing arts anthology on television. It is part of of the PBS tradition of bringing the arts to viewers free of charge. The show began as Theater in America in 1972. The next year, several arts productions, including Dance in America, were brought together under the Great Performances umbrella. Great Performances at the Met would join the family in 1977. Over the years the productions have moved more toward music than plays. Check your local listings for air times.moreless
  • 7
    Austin City Limits

    Austin City Limits

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    PBS
    Austin City Limits has established a reputation for showcasing great live musical performances. The show's studio allows for intimate and engaging performances by independent, mainstream, critically acclaimed, and popular artists. The show was originally created to display the emerging talents of the alternative country music scene in Austin, TX in the 1970s. Soon, however, the show branched out to include all types of music: alt country, pop rock, bluegrass and zydeco are just a few. Many television historians attribute MTV, CMT and VH1'a success to the contributions of this groundbreaking musical series. On Wednesday, November 12th, 2003; President Bush presented ACL with the National Medal of the Arts. ACL was the first television show (ever) to win the award.moreless
  • 8
    CMA Awards

    CMA Awards

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    ABC
    Since their inception in 1967, the CMA Awards have been country music's most anticipated night of the year. The hottest stars in America's most popular music genre turn out annually to see who will be named the top talent in categories such as Entertainer of the Year, Vocal Group of the Year, Album of the Year, Song of Year, Musical Event of the Year and many more. Outstanding performances and top notch entertainment make this awards show a not-to-be-missed tradition for the country music follower.moreless
  • 9
    Kids Incorporated

    Kids Incorporated

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    Disney Channel (ended 1993)
    The crew from Kids Incorporated dance and sing their way through teenage issues. The show combined music and performance with the trials and tribulations of growing up. Not all titles are official due to the titles not being listed on the show. Please note all these are episodes that happened on Disney Channel and in Syndication.moreless
  • 10
    Disneyland

    Disneyland

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    ABC (ended 1990)
    Walt Disney, one of Hollywood's most ambitious producers, was first approached to do television in 1950, when The Coca-Cola Company offered him a one-hour special. The one hour special, "One Hour in Wonderland," aired December 25, 1950 on NBC and garnered 90% of the television viewing audience. A second special, "The Walt Disney Christmas Special," aired December 25, 1951 on CBS. When Walt had drawn up plans for a theme park, known as Disneyland, he found a hard time obtaining funding; critics, including Walt's brother Roy, thought that it was unfeasible and that it would be a fiasco. At the same time, the ABC television network offered him a deal for a television anthology series. Walt wouldn't agree to it unless they put up partial financing for Disneyland (a term that had kept CBS and NBC from signing with him). ABC agreed, and also paid him $50,000 per program, an exorbitant sum for the time. The show, titled Disneyland, premiered on October 27, 1954 and was an immediate success. Historically, the show is significant for two reasons. First, with thirty-four seasons, it is the longest-running prime time network series in history (not counting news programs; if one were to count news programs, 60 Minutes would take that title). Second, it was the first original television production by a major Hollywood studio. Other studios resented television for fear that it would keep people from going out to the movies. Thus, they refused to produce television programs, and they refused to let networks or stations use any of their more recent or better-known material. Walt Disney was the first Hollywood producer to do so. Disneyland was a mixture of cartoons, live-action adventures, documentaries, and nature stories. Some of these were made expressly for television, but others were former theatrical releases. Many of the early programs were designed to promote upcoming theatrical releases. One particular early success of the Disneyland series was the Davy Crockett trilogy. This was a phenomenal success in every aspect; the merchandising bonanza that followed sold $300 million worth of Crockett memorabilia. Thus, ABC wanted more adventure stories along the lines of Davy Crockett. Disney provided them, but none were nearly as successful. Along the way, in 1958, it was retitled Walt Disney Presents. Eventually the show became more reliant on original material, though pre-existing material was used at times. In 1961, his contract with ABC expired. He moved his show to NBC where he could broadcast it in color (ABC would not have the capability for color broacasting until 1962). It was rechristened Walt Disney's Wonderful World of Color, with an original theme song by Richard M. Sherman and Robert B. Sherman (who went on to write the song scores to such well-known Disney films as Mary Poppins, The Jungle Book, The Many Adventures of Winnie-the-Pooh and Bedknobs and Broomsticks). It premiered on NBC on Sunday, September 24, 1961. On NBC, he was able to re-air many of the ABC shows in color, as they had been filmed that way as insurance for possible future airings once color broadcasting, or "colorcasting," took hold. In September of 1966, doctors told Walt Disney, a lifetime chain-smoker, that he had lung cancer. Though the cancerous lung was removed, doctors told him that the cancer had been detected too late, and he died on Thursday, December 15, 1966. Knowing full well that no one could replace him as a host, Walt Disney Productions dropped the hosted introduction segments after the season's end. Luckily, Walt had filmed that all of that season's host segments before it was too late. The show changed its name to The Wonderful World of Disney on September 14, 1969, and dropped the Sherman Brothers theme song in favor of various alternating medleys of well-known songs from Disney movies and parks. The trusted Disney name continued to insure high ratings for the next few years. As popular tastes changed dramatically during the late 1960s and early 1970s, the public seemed to have largely begun to turn away from anything Disney (except theme parks and merchandise), seeing the name as symptomatic of a square, uptight, and unhip mindset that young people were coming to reject. The studio itself suffered from the lack of hit movies and accusations of incompetent management at the time. The ratings of the anthology series, however, remained reasonably stable, enough so that NBC renewed Disney's contract through 1978. In the fall of 1975, the show began a ratings decline when it was moved back to 7 PM from 7:30 PM. Disney's ratings fell from the Top 30 and continued to fall every year afterwards. The following year went face to with CBS's 60 Minutes. Though it had begun in 1968 and was scheduled on Tuesday, the CBS newsmagazine had been scheduled on Sunday evenings since the 1971-1972 season, and had been held back until after football season due to the risk of pre-emptions; it was this year that the show finally began its season in the fall. The show was easily able to beat ABC's Sunday night offerings but trailed the CBS newsmagazine by a wide margin. As the number of original installments decreased every year, so, too, did the ratings. In 1979, NBC (which, as a network, was also in the midst of a very public, humiliating decline) threatened Disney with cancellation unless the ratings improved. That fall, Walt Disney Productions rechristened the anthology series Disney's Wonderful World and commissioned a new, original theme song by John Debney and John Klawitter, new opening and closing credits, and a new announcer, Gary Owens (longtime announcer Dick Wesson committed suicide in January of that year). In a flashback to the original themed format, many episodes initially were divided into one of four categories: "Fantasy Night," "Adventure Night," "Comedy Night," and "Animation Night." Beneath the "happy new face" sung of in the new theme song, however, was more of the same: too little original material, airings of theatrical movies, and far too many reruns. In spite of this, the face-lift helped the ratings, so the show was renewed for the 1980-1981 season. But the next season saw only 10 installments that had not been aired on the anthology series before, and pre-emptions were far more frequent. Ratings for the show's 27th season did not improve, and in on December 30, 1980 NBC announced that it would not be renewing the series for next season. All was not lost that year, as the show was then immediately picked up by CBS. It was moved from its longtime Sunday night slot to Saturday night at 8 PM, as the network would not displace its highly-rated pride and joy 60 Minutes. Retitled Walt Disney, the show promised to present more original programming than it had in its final years on NBC. On September 26, 1981, after a huge advertising campaign by the network, the series premiered on CBS. Ratings improved against mediocre competition, and the show was renewed for another season (its 29th on network television). A few of these shows were pilots for series that were never picked up. The second CBS year saw an increase in the number of reruns (as opposed to last year's increase in new episodes), and the ratings dropped. Disney did, however, produce several midseason replacement series for CBS, but all of them failed. On Monday, April 18, 1983, Walt Disney Productions and Westinghouse Broadcasting launched The Disney Channel, a cable network created to showcase the large library of Disney cartoons, movies, and TV shows (the anthology series was rerun under the name Walt Disney Presents). Thus, in the eyes of CBS, the anthology series had outlived its purpose and was canceled. There were occasional network and syndicated specials, but all of Disney's television resources were concentrated on the cable service. When Michael Eisner became CEO of Walt Disney Productions in September of 1984, one of the first things he and his new regime did was express an interest in reviving Disney's presence on network TV. He had some success, as the Emmy-winning, Touchstone-produced sitcom The Golden Girls and the Saturday morning cartoon (a medium with which Walt Disney himself had refused to get involved due to fears of compromised quality) Disney's Adventures of the Gummi Bears both premiered on NBC on Saturday, September 14, 1985 and lasted several years. However, these particular shows were the exception, not the rule; a number of series that the new regime eventually launched failed (Wildside and The Ellen Burstyn Show, for instance). Also, of course, did the company plan to revive the anthology series. Now known as The Disney Sunday Movie, it made its much-hyped return to network television on February 2, 1986 after a hiatus of 2 years, 4 months, and eight days, replacing the dismally-rated Ripley's Believe it or Not. Just as Walt Disney had hosted the original until his death, Michael Eisner appeared in an introductory segment at the beginning of each episode. Nostalgia and ratings were high initially, but both eventually wore off. The show premiered at a two-hour length, but in the fall of 1987, once again being soundly beaten in the ratings regularly by 60 Minutes in its first hour, and by Murder, She Wrote in its second, it was shortened to one hour for its third and final season on ABC. NBC, which had not been able to launch a hit show in Disney's old time slot in the seven years since the show was axed by that network, picked up the show, which was renamed The Magical World of Disney. At first, a rotating "wheel" format was used, utilizing three different genres; every fourth week would be a special. This lasted until a few months into the following season. Eisner continued to host the show, but ratings on NBC were no better than they had been on ABC, and it limped through a two-year run here before the network pulled the plug for good. After 36 years (save for the September 1983-January 1986 hiatus), one of television's last remaining institutions from its golden age came to an unceremonious end. In 1995, The Walt Disney Company announced plans to buy out the ABC television network, which went through in January of 1996. In the fall of 1997, a family-oriented movie time slot was set aside on ABC and christened The Wonderful World of Disney. Ratings to date have been middling. Though the show is not currently repeated anywhere (The Disney Channel dropped it and all vintage Disney programming in September of 2002), episodes are slowly being released on DVD in the United States, and its legacy of quality television entertainment for all members of the family lives on in the hearts and minds of many. Here is a chronology of titles used for the series: Disneyland: October 27, 1954-September 3, 1958
    Walt Disney Presents: September 12, 1958-September 17, 1961
    Walt Disney's Wonderful World of Color: September 24, 1961-September 7, 1969
    The Wonderful World of Disney: September 14, 1969-September 2, 1979
    Disney's Wonderful World: September 9, 1979-September 13, 1981
    Walt Disney: September 26, 1981-September 24, 1983
    The Disney Sunday Movie: February 2, 1986-September 11, 1988
    The Magical World of Disney: October 9, 1988-September 9, 1990 The final name was used as an umbrella title for Disney movie airings on cable's The Disney Channel from September 23, 1990 to August 25, 1996. ABC Broadcast History (1954-1961):
    October 27, 1954-September 3, 1958: Wednesday, 7:30 PM-8:30 PM
    September 12, 1958-September 25, 1959: Friday, 8:00 PM-9:00 PM
    October 2, 1959-September 23, 1960: Friday, 7:30 PM-8:30 PM
    September 25, 1960-September 17, 1961: Sunday, 6:30 PM-7:30 PM NBC Broadcast History (1961-1981):
    September 24, 1961-August 31, 1975: Sunday, 7:30 PM-8:30 PM
    September 14, 1975-September 11, 1977: Sunday, 7:00 PM-8:00 PM
    September 18, 1977-October 23, 1977: Sunday, 7:00 PM-9:00 PM
    October 30, 1977-September 13, 1981: Sunday, 7:00 PM-8:00 PM CBS Broadcast History (1981-1983):
    September 26, 1981-January 1, 1983: Saturday, 8:00 PM-9:00 PM
    January 4, 1983-February 15, 1983: Tuesday, 8:00 PM-9:00 PM
    July 9, 1983-September 24, 1983: Saturday, 8:00 PM-9:00 PM
    (two irregularly scheduled airings on May 3, 1983 and May 21, 1983) ABC Broadcast History (1986-1988):
    February 2, 1986-September 6, 1987: Sunday, 7:00 PM-9:00 PM
    September 13, 1987-September 11, 1988: Sunday, 7:00 PM-8:00 PM NBC Broadcast History (1988-1990):
    October 9, 1988-July 2, 1989: Sunday, 7:00 PM-8:00 PM
    July 9, 1989-July 23, 1989: Sunday, 8:00 PM-9:00 PM
    August 6, 1989-February 25, 1990: Sunday, 7:00 PM-8:00 PM
    March 4, 1990-April 15, 1990: Sunday, 7:00 PM-9:00 PM
    April 22, 1990-May 6, 1990: Sunday, 7:00 PM-8:00 PM
    May 27, 1990-July 22, 1990: Sunday, 7:00 PM-9:00 PM
    August 5, 1990-September 9, 1990: Sunday, 7:00 PM-8:00 PM
    First Telecast: October 27, 1954
    Last Telecast: September 9, 1990 Episodes: 751 (180 black and white episodes, 571 color episodes [as far as the format in which they were first broadcast]) (NOTE: many of these were originally theatrical releases, and a small number were specials aired at other times, but for purposes of their first airing on the anthology series they are counted as episodes)moreless
  • 11
    Grand Ole Opry

    Grand Ole Opry

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    (ended 2011)
    Week after week, Opry Live welcomes an impressive lineup of Country Music's finest performers, from the legends to bright and shining newcomers. Get a front seat view from your own living room every Saturday night at 9 pm on Great American Country! Encore performances on Sunday and Tuesday. Broadcast History:
    • The Nashville Network (TNN) from 1985-2001 (now Spike TV) as Grand Ole Opry
    • Country Music Television (CMT) from 2001-2003 as Grand Ole Opry
    • Great American Country (GAC) from 2003-2011 as Opry Live Broadcast at 8 pm E/P until August 2008 when it moved forward an hour to 9 pm E/P Opry Live ended as a weekly series in 2008, but GAC broadcast a number of specials through 2011. In May 2012 GAC premiered Noteworthy at the Opry, a program described as "the next chapter in the Grand Ole Opry's television presence," that ended this show's storied run. Conventions for this guide: The Grand Ole Opry/Opry Live television show is performances cherry-picked from the full show that occurs live in Nashville. One of the performers is designated host for the evening there, and you may hear them called that throughout the broadcast. For purposes of this guide, and to avoid confusion, the television presenters are named hosts and the show hosts are labeled co-hosts.moreless
  • 12
    MTV Week In Rock

    MTV Week In Rock

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    MTV - Music Television (ended 1997)
    Half-hour week in review in rock music.
  • 13
    Praise the Lord

    Praise the Lord

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    The main program of TBN. Except for some special programming, Praise the Lord is a live Christian talk/variety ministry show with various guests and hosts.
  • 14
    Pop! Goes the Country

    Pop! Goes the Country

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    (ended 1983)
    Country Blast From The 70s

    In 1974, Nashville production company Show Biz, Inc. launched this attempt to cash in on the powerful influence of Pop music, on the Country Music world (Hence, the title), as well as to extend it's success streak begun with another of its productions: The Porter Wagoner Show.

    Originally hosted by famed Country DeeJay Ralph Emery, this weekly syndicated music series premiered on September 7th, 1974, and was an immediate hit. The half-hour presentation featured performances by popular, well-established names in Country Music, as well as many up-and-coming performers, whose careers received a well-deserved boost from their appearances. Such Nashville luminaries as George Jones, Tammy Wynette, Charley Pride, Merle Haggard, Barbara Mandrell, Sonny James, Willie Nelson, Waylon Jennings, Mel Tillis, and Chet Atkins appeared on the show, over the years (Some of them, numerous times), and many newcomers (At the time) such as Reba McEntire, Eddie Rabbitt, Crystal Gayle, and Jon Conlee got some early-career national TV exposure on the show. Each episode featured two or three musical performances by the guests, between which, Emery would conduct brief interviews of the Performers.

    Emery left the show after its 6th season, and, in 1980, Tom T. Hall - 'The Old Storyteller' - took over the hosting duties. The show was then called Tom T. Hall's Pop! Goes The Country, and Hall, himself performed at least one number for each show, and chatted with his Guest Stars between performances.

    The show underwent a major format change, for it's 9th, and final season, when it moved to Opryland U.S.A.'s Gaslight Theatre. It's title became Tom T.'s Pop! Goes The Country Club, and it took place in a nightclub-like setting, where, between Guests' performances, Hall played straight man to comedian Jim Varney, and his various characters, in brief comedy sketches that always involved the Guest Stars.

    The show, itself, appears a bit dated, nowadays, but the performers who appeared, and the music they performed, are timeless, and any Country Music fan, young or old, would well enjoy it.moreless
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    The Tube

    The Tube

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    BBC (ended 1987)
    British music video show
  • 16
    Yo! MTV Raps

    Yo! MTV Raps

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    MTV - Music Television (ended 1995)
    Yo! MTV Raps is the classic MTV show that brought Hip-Hop and Rap Music to the whole country in the 80's and 90's. Hitting the airwaves in 1988, Yo! MTV Raps played hip hop music videos and had guests like the legendary Rakim, Big Daddy Kane, and Run-DMC. A force for hip hop, the show brought the new genre of music to people across the country who weren't aware of the urban movement. Hosted by Fab 5 Freddy, Ed Lover, and Doctor Dre, and was one of the highest rated MTV shows of the time. The original series aired until 1995, when it was closed out with a freestyle cipher featuring legendary artists like Salt-N-Pepa, who also appeared on the first episode of the series. With moments like Ol' Dirty Bastard's drunk freestyle and Tupac Shakur's admitting that he assaulted filmmakers the Hughes Brothers, Yo! MTV Raps captured some of the most important moments and artists of old school rap, and launched the young genre into an international favorite.moreless
  • 17
    Headbangers Ball

    Headbangers Ball

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    MTV - Music Television
    Headbangers Ball was a music video show featuring Heavy Metal music. With special guests Ozzy Osbourne, Rob Halford, Alice Cooper and Rob Zombie.
  • 18
    Dick Clark's Primetime New Year's Rockin' Eve With Ryan Seacrest

    Dick Clark's Primetime New Year's Rockin' Eve With Ryan Seacrest

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    ABC (Holiday Event 1972)
    Dick Clark's New Year's Rockin' Eve has been a New Year's tradition for decades. Many people the country over wait for the ball to drop in New York City's Times Square with Dick Clark. The show promises great musical performers and live coverage of New Year's Eve festivities. The show airs every New Year's Eve with the exception of 1999, when there was a special new millennium coverage. Dick Clark did a small segment for that year. And in 2004, Dick Clark did not host the show due to illness.moreless
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    Dance Party USA

    Dance Party USA

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    USA (ended 1992)
  • 20
    MTV News

    MTV News

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    MTV - Music Television
    Get all the news that matters, MTV-style on this informative series.
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