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    Great Performances

    Great Performances

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    PBS
    Great Performances is the longest running performing arts anthology on television. It is part of of the PBS tradition of bringing the arts to viewers free of charge. The show began as Theater in America in 1972. The next year, several arts productions, including Dance in America, were brought together under the Great Performances umbrella. Great Performances at the Met would join the family in 1977. Over the years the productions have moved more toward music than plays. Check your local listings for air times.moreless
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    MTV Unplugged

    MTV Unplugged

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    MTV - Music Television
    The idea of Unplugged is that bands perform only acoustical and without any electronically devices. So this term usually only applies to music bands or performers that usually don't perform unplugged. Many performers fought with a performance the judgment that they actually can't play and computers and machines produce the entire sound. The origin of the idea isn't absolutely clear. There are only concerts in the unplugged style, but who really invented it, is unclear. The first concert you could describe as unplugged was Elvis Presley's concert in 1968 today known as the 68 Comeback Special. As inventors Bon Jovi and Richie Sambora get named, because they performed with only with two guitars at the MTV Music Awards in 1989 the tracks Wanted Dead Or Alive und Livin' On A Prayer. So the Unplugged series started soon later in 1989. Jules Shear hosted the first season, with was produced as 30 minute short "concerts", in an absolute simple way. The artists sitting in a half circle, maybe some background musicians behind them and playing their music in a small location, styled almost like a café. The second season was basically the same concept, but the duration now changes and MTV Unplugged leaves the US for the first time and goes to the UK. Also there isn't any host from now on. The bands announce themselves. The third season was the last one really organized as season. The ending of this season with the session of Bruce Springsteen also change the image of the series, because he performs plugged instead of unplugged. Season four starts with a big surprise: The first session with no English speaking band: Roxette! Season four already takes on the character this series will have in all other seasons from now on. It isn't a series anymore it's an idea. All sessions are a project to fallow this idea. In this context MTV invites comedians for the Spoken Word I session. A basically non musical session, but season four ends with a big bang. The Nirvana unplugged session makes this show part of music history. Nirvana doesn't perform a completely unplugged session, because Kurt Cobain uses some electronic sampler in the background. The discussion if this performance can be counted as unplugged doesn't hurt the success in any way. In season five, MTV Latin America starts recoding performances in the US starting with episode eight of this season. MTV US also airs these sessions. Season six and seven are basically the same like season five – they write the story of the show even further. With season eight the seasons aren't organized in the usual TV year rhythm anymore. Instead of the summer till summer schedule and the fact that it isn't a series anymore, the schedule now works similar to the usual calendar from 1.1 till 12.31. In 1998 the big break comes. MTV only produces one session and the series is basically dead. In 1999 the show is basically reborn, because now every characteristics of a series were now gone and every single session is a project by its own and is produced and released as such. Season 11 in 2000 features only one session again, basically because the time spirit works against the show concepts – the IT boom and the ultimate believe in the new millennium makes this show look spare. The first year in the new millennium the show starts over once more. More globally than ever the show starts with three Latin American performances before two US performances fallow and the year ends over in Asia, but visited Europe first. From now on the number of sessions produced in one year goes down dramatically. Season 13 features only three sessions, season 14 and 15 only one. In 2005 the show comes back form Europe to the US after three years absence with one other big performance. This time it's Alicia Keys who gives the show a new boost. ------------------------------------------- Notes to this show guide: Seasons: 1-8 are numbered as regular seasons. 9+ are organized annually, because of this shows character. Episodes: Numbered according to the original air dates (where ever that was). The show: The show isn't only the US series, since this is a global series since the beginning. Many episodes helped to build up MTV stations in many countries, sessions where produced. So this guide lists all sessions, not only the US ones. So the guide has more seasons and episodes than can be found in other guides. So don't be confused about that.moreless
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    Austin City Limits

    Austin City Limits

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    PBS
    Austin City Limits has established a reputation for showcasing great live musical performances. The show's studio allows for intimate and engaging performances by independent, mainstream, critically acclaimed, and popular artists. The show was originally created to display the emerging talents of the alternative country music scene in Austin, TX in the 1970s. Soon, however, the show branched out to include all types of music: alt country, pop rock, bluegrass and zydeco are just a few. Many television historians attribute MTV, CMT and VH1'a success to the contributions of this groundbreaking musical series. On Wednesday, November 12th, 2003; President Bush presented ACL with the National Medal of the Arts. ACL was the first television show (ever) to win the award.moreless
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    CMA Awards

    CMA Awards

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    ABC
    Since their inception in 1967, the CMA Awards have been country music's most anticipated night of the year. The hottest stars in America's most popular music genre turn out annually to see who will be named the top talent in categories such as Entertainer of the Year, Vocal Group of the Year, Album of the Year, Song of Year, Musical Event of the Year and many more. Outstanding performances and top notch entertainment make this awards show a not-to-be-missed tradition for the country music follower.moreless
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    Access Granted

    Access Granted

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    BET
    Access Granted reveals the tricks and trades of making the hottest videos performed by hip-hop and rap artists.

    Beautiful people, steamy backdrops and fancy cars...You've seen the finished product, but you'd never guess what it takes to make the successful videos you see on your favorite BET shows. Take a behind-the-scenes look at what goes into the production and planning of a sizzling shoot. Viewers are granted an "all-access" pass to the set of their favorite artists top-notch videos as the crew demonstrates how they make it happen from start to finish followed by the world premiere of the featured video.moreless
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    Love & Hip Hop

    Love & Hip Hop

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    VH1
    VH1's Love & Hip Hop follows the lives of six women connected to the world of hip hop. From being girlfriends to famous rappers to aspiring to make it big in the industry, these women all have a story to tell.moreless
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    Beat-Club

    Beat-Club

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    ARD (ended 1972)
    The legendary West German rock series Beat-Club was broadcast from September 1965 through December 1972. It was broadcast from Bremen, Germany and produced by the regional TV network Radio Bremen, which at that time was part of the German Government radio chain ARD. Radio Bremen was the sole producer for episodes 1 – 34. Episodes 35 through 74 were produced jointly by Radio Bremen and the WDR network. Beat-Club was co-created by Gerhard Augustin and Mike Leckebusch. Gerhard ("Gerd") Augustin was a well-known disc jockey in Bremen and northern Germany. In 1963 he was the first DJ to spin records at local clubs. He was a moderator (co-host) of the first seven Beat-Club shows.

    Michael Leckebusch, a former trumpet player in a theatre band in Hamburg, came to work for Radio Bremen's TV station in 1965. He became the director of Beat-Club. Uschi Nerke joined Augustin as co-host of Beat-Club. She started with the first show and remained with the series through the end of its run. (She was not, however, involved in the concept or creation of the show.) Beat-Club premiered September 25, 1965. While this premiere episode may appear tame, the TV network at the time feared complaints by parents and other adults who didn't like rock music. This show, in fact, began with a plea by German TV personality William Wieben for tolerance. Rough translation: "Good day, dear Beat friends. The time has come. In few seconds we will begin the first show on German television made especially for you. As for you Ladies and Gentlemen who do not like Beat (rock) music, we ask for your understanding: this is a live show for young people. And now we're taking off..."

    Beat-Club
    is believed to have been Germany's first rock music series. Beat-Club should not be confused with another German TV series, Beat! Beat! Beat!, which premiered in 1966. Beat! Beat! Beat! was produced in a different city (Frankfurt am Main), by the regional network Hessischer Rundfunk. The series went through many format changes in its 7 years on the air. At first the show took on a (sort of) Cavern Club look. The walls behind the stage were brick - no fancy sets. The bands performed live while audience members were shown dancing. Sometime after show #8, Dave Lee Travis became a co-host. Travis had been a D.J. with "Radio Caroline," a pirate radio station that broadcasted into Britain from an offshore ship. Eddie Vickers, a soldier with the British Forces Broadcasting Service (BFBS), appeared sporadically as host during 1966-67.

    Dave Lee Travis' last appearance as host was on episode #45. His replacement was Dave Dee, of "Dave Dee, Dosy, Beaky, Mick & Titch." Dave Dee appeared on episodes 46 through 53.

    Around 1967, the series switched from live performances to lip-synching. The look of the set also changed, from the brick walls to the more familiar set with large cards in the background displaying the names of the performers. Another change around this time was the introduction of the "Go-Go-Girls," a troupe of young women who danced to recordings of current hits.

    "Beat Club" switched from black & white to color on December 31, 1969 (episode #50). Starting with episode 46 (September 1969) most of the music guests started performing live again.

    The final Beat-Club program aired in December 1972. The series was replaced by Musikladen, which lasted until 1984. Uschi Nerke was a co-host on Musikladen from 1972-1980.moreless
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    The Wanted Life

    The Wanted Life

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    E! (ended 2013)
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    VH1 Rock Docs

    VH1 Rock Docs

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    VH1
    VH1 Rock Docs are high-end feature length documentaries that each reveal an untold story in the history of rock and hip-hop music, combining never-before-seen footage with a unique and unconventional narrative approach. The documentaries tell some of the most unique stories of artists and music from a wide range of genres, styles, and musical perspectives.moreless
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    Muppets Tonight

    Muppets Tonight

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    ABC (ended 1998)
    "Muppets Tonight!" was a short lived new version of the classic 'The Muppet Show', that hoped to appeal to a new generation. This series continued with several traditions that the original series did. Each episode revolved around a celebrity guest and there were new Muppet skits throughout the show. New Muppets are introduced throughout the series who would later appear in the newer Muppet films. The show itself gains a new host as Kermit the Frog passes the torch to a new Muppet named Clifford who hosts the show. In February 2004, Disney Enterprises bought two major Jim Henson properties: the Muppets and Bear in the Big Blue House. "Muppets Tonight!" premiered its first 10 episodes on ABC. The remaining episodes aired on the Disney Channel until the show's cancellation. Theme Song Kermit: It's Muppets Tonight with our very special guest star(s), (guest star's name(s))! YAY! OW! Clifford: If you're a human being, take a break from the race. Take a load off your feet. Wipe the look of your face. We got a lot to do, And we'll do it for you, where everybody takes your place. Muppets Tonight! Chorus: You're gonna see something better to see. Clifford: Tonight's the night! Chorus: You're gonna live with the memories. Clifford: We got a show for you. Guaranteed brand-new. All: Where here come the Muppets Tonight! Clifford: Yeah! (whistle) All: We got a show for you. Guaranteed brand-new! Where here come the Muppets. Here come the Muppets! HERE COME THE MUPPETS TONIGHT!!!moreless
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    Kids Incorporated

    Kids Incorporated

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    Disney Channel (ended 1993)
    The crew from Kids Incorporated dance and sing their way through teenage issues. The show combined music and performance with the trials and tribulations of growing up. Not all titles are official due to the titles not being listed on the show. Please note all these are episodes that happened on Disney Channel and in Syndication.moreless
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    California Dreams

    California Dreams

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    NBC (ended 1997)
    California Dreams is a show about a group of high school teens that form their own band, The California Dreams. The show follows the group through their problems in high school as well as their problems in trying to score a record deal. The theme song to California Dreams is an original song performed by the season's current bandmates. The lyrics are as follows:

    Surf dudes with attitudes (Kinda groovy) Laid back moods Sky above, sand below (Good vibrations) Feelin' mellow Won't give it up Don't wanna stop Don't wake me up Don't wake me up if I'm dreamin' California dreams Just let me lay here in the sun Until my dream is done

    All actors sang their own songs in each and every episode, with the exception of Jay Anthony Franke (Jake) and Aaron Jackson (Mark), whose characters were voiced by Barry Coffing and Zachary Throne.moreless
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    Friday Night with Jonathan Ross

    Friday Night with Jonathan Ross

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    BBC (ended 2010)
    With a cheeky gag never too far away and a wit sharper than his own suits, don't expect the guests to get an easy ride on the way to plugging their latest film, book, session in rehab or range of underpants. Funny, likeable and unlike any other chat show host, if you get to sit with Jonathan you're doing something right. Either that, or you're just Ricky Gervais.moreless
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    Disneyland

    Disneyland

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    ABC (ended 1990)
    Walt Disney, one of Hollywood's most ambitious producers, was first approached to do television in 1950, when The Coca-Cola Company offered him a one-hour special. The one hour special, "One Hour in Wonderland," aired December 25, 1950 on NBC and garnered 90% of the television viewing audience. A second special, "The Walt Disney Christmas Special," aired December 25, 1951 on CBS. When Walt had drawn up plans for a theme park, known as Disneyland, he found a hard time obtaining funding; critics, including Walt's brother Roy, thought that it was unfeasible and that it would be a fiasco. At the same time, the ABC television network offered him a deal for a television anthology series. Walt wouldn't agree to it unless they put up partial financing for Disneyland (a term that had kept CBS and NBC from signing with him). ABC agreed, and also paid him $50,000 per program, an exorbitant sum for the time. The show, titled Disneyland, premiered on October 27, 1954 and was an immediate success. Historically, the show is significant for two reasons. First, with thirty-four seasons, it is the longest-running prime time network series in history (not counting news programs; if one were to count news programs, 60 Minutes would take that title). Second, it was the first original television production by a major Hollywood studio. Other studios resented television for fear that it would keep people from going out to the movies. Thus, they refused to produce television programs, and they refused to let networks or stations use any of their more recent or better-known material. Walt Disney was the first Hollywood producer to do so. Disneyland was a mixture of cartoons, live-action adventures, documentaries, and nature stories. Some of these were made expressly for television, but others were former theatrical releases. Many of the early programs were designed to promote upcoming theatrical releases. One particular early success of the Disneyland series was the Davy Crockett trilogy. This was a phenomenal success in every aspect; the merchandising bonanza that followed sold $300 million worth of Crockett memorabilia. Thus, ABC wanted more adventure stories along the lines of Davy Crockett. Disney provided them, but none were nearly as successful. Along the way, in 1958, it was retitled Walt Disney Presents. Eventually the show became more reliant on original material, though pre-existing material was used at times. In 1961, his contract with ABC expired. He moved his show to NBC where he could broadcast it in color (ABC would not have the capability for color broacasting until 1962). It was rechristened Walt Disney's Wonderful World of Color, with an original theme song by Richard M. Sherman and Robert B. Sherman (who went on to write the song scores to such well-known Disney films as Mary Poppins, The Jungle Book, The Many Adventures of Winnie-the-Pooh and Bedknobs and Broomsticks). It premiered on NBC on Sunday, September 24, 1961. On NBC, he was able to re-air many of the ABC shows in color, as they had been filmed that way as insurance for possible future airings once color broadcasting, or "colorcasting," took hold. In September of 1966, doctors told Walt Disney, a lifetime chain-smoker, that he had lung cancer. Though the cancerous lung was removed, doctors told him that the cancer had been detected too late, and he died on Thursday, December 15, 1966. Knowing full well that no one could replace him as a host, Walt Disney Productions dropped the hosted introduction segments after the season's end. Luckily, Walt had filmed that all of that season's host segments before it was too late. The show changed its name to The Wonderful World of Disney on September 14, 1969, and dropped the Sherman Brothers theme song in favor of various alternating medleys of well-known songs from Disney movies and parks. The trusted Disney name continued to insure high ratings for the next few years. As popular tastes changed dramatically during the late 1960s and early 1970s, the public seemed to have largely begun to turn away from anything Disney (except theme parks and merchandise), seeing the name as symptomatic of a square, uptight, and unhip mindset that young people were coming to reject. The studio itself suffered from the lack of hit movies and accusations of incompetent management at the time. The ratings of the anthology series, however, remained reasonably stable, enough so that NBC renewed Disney's contract through 1978. In the fall of 1975, the show began a ratings decline when it was moved back to 7 PM from 7:30 PM. Disney's ratings fell from the Top 30 and continued to fall every year afterwards. The following year went face to with CBS's 60 Minutes. Though it had begun in 1968 and was scheduled on Tuesday, the CBS newsmagazine had been scheduled on Sunday evenings since the 1971-1972 season, and had been held back until after football season due to the risk of pre-emptions; it was this year that the show finally began its season in the fall. The show was easily able to beat ABC's Sunday night offerings but trailed the CBS newsmagazine by a wide margin. As the number of original installments decreased every year, so, too, did the ratings. In 1979, NBC (which, as a network, was also in the midst of a very public, humiliating decline) threatened Disney with cancellation unless the ratings improved. That fall, Walt Disney Productions rechristened the anthology series Disney's Wonderful World and commissioned a new, original theme song by John Debney and John Klawitter, new opening and closing credits, and a new announcer, Gary Owens (longtime announcer Dick Wesson committed suicide in January of that year). In a flashback to the original themed format, many episodes initially were divided into one of four categories: "Fantasy Night," "Adventure Night," "Comedy Night," and "Animation Night." Beneath the "happy new face" sung of in the new theme song, however, was more of the same: too little original material, airings of theatrical movies, and far too many reruns. In spite of this, the face-lift helped the ratings, so the show was renewed for the 1980-1981 season. But the next season saw only 10 installments that had not been aired on the anthology series before, and pre-emptions were far more frequent. Ratings for the show's 27th season did not improve, and in on December 30, 1980 NBC announced that it would not be renewing the series for next season. All was not lost that year, as the show was then immediately picked up by CBS. It was moved from its longtime Sunday night slot to Saturday night at 8 PM, as the network would not displace its highly-rated pride and joy 60 Minutes. Retitled Walt Disney, the show promised to present more original programming than it had in its final years on NBC. On September 26, 1981, after a huge advertising campaign by the network, the series premiered on CBS. Ratings improved against mediocre competition, and the show was renewed for another season (its 29th on network television). A few of these shows were pilots for series that were never picked up. The second CBS year saw an increase in the number of reruns (as opposed to last year's increase in new episodes), and the ratings dropped. Disney did, however, produce several midseason replacement series for CBS, but all of them failed. On Monday, April 18, 1983, Walt Disney Productions and Westinghouse Broadcasting launched The Disney Channel, a cable network created to showcase the large library of Disney cartoons, movies, and TV shows (the anthology series was rerun under the name Walt Disney Presents). Thus, in the eyes of CBS, the anthology series had outlived its purpose and was canceled. There were occasional network and syndicated specials, but all of Disney's television resources were concentrated on the cable service. When Michael Eisner became CEO of Walt Disney Productions in September of 1984, one of the first things he and his new regime did was express an interest in reviving Disney's presence on network TV. He had some success, as the Emmy-winning, Touchstone-produced sitcom The Golden Girls and the Saturday morning cartoon (a medium with which Walt Disney himself had refused to get involved due to fears of compromised quality) Disney's Adventures of the Gummi Bears both premiered on NBC on Saturday, September 14, 1985 and lasted several years. However, these particular shows were the exception, not the rule; a number of series that the new regime eventually launched failed (Wildside and The Ellen Burstyn Show, for instance). Also, of course, did the company plan to revive the anthology series. Now known as The Disney Sunday Movie, it made its much-hyped return to network television on February 2, 1986 after a hiatus of 2 years, 4 months, and eight days, replacing the dismally-rated Ripley's Believe it or Not. Just as Walt Disney had hosted the original until his death, Michael Eisner appeared in an introductory segment at the beginning of each episode. Nostalgia and ratings were high initially, but both eventually wore off. The show premiered at a two-hour length, but in the fall of 1987, once again being soundly beaten in the ratings regularly by 60 Minutes in its first hour, and by Murder, She Wrote in its second, it was shortened to one hour for its third and final season on ABC. NBC, which had not been able to launch a hit show in Disney's old time slot in the seven years since the show was axed by that network, picked up the show, which was renamed The Magical World of Disney. At first, a rotating "wheel" format was used, utilizing three different genres; every fourth week would be a special. This lasted until a few months into the following season. Eisner continued to host the show, but ratings on NBC were no better than they had been on ABC, and it limped through a two-year run here before the network pulled the plug for good. After 36 years (save for the September 1983-January 1986 hiatus), one of television's last remaining institutions from its golden age came to an unceremonious end. In 1995, The Walt Disney Company announced plans to buy out the ABC television network, which went through in January of 1996. In the fall of 1997, a family-oriented movie time slot was set aside on ABC and christened The Wonderful World of Disney. Ratings to date have been middling. Though the show is not currently repeated anywhere (The Disney Channel dropped it and all vintage Disney programming in September of 2002), episodes are slowly being released on DVD in the United States, and its legacy of quality television entertainment for all members of the family lives on in the hearts and minds of many. Here is a chronology of titles used for the series: Disneyland: October 27, 1954-September 3, 1958
    Walt Disney Presents: September 12, 1958-September 17, 1961
    Walt Disney's Wonderful World of Color: September 24, 1961-September 7, 1969
    The Wonderful World of Disney: September 14, 1969-September 2, 1979
    Disney's Wonderful World: September 9, 1979-September 13, 1981
    Walt Disney: September 26, 1981-September 24, 1983
    The Disney Sunday Movie: February 2, 1986-September 11, 1988
    The Magical World of Disney: October 9, 1988-September 9, 1990 The final name was used as an umbrella title for Disney movie airings on cable's The Disney Channel from September 23, 1990 to August 25, 1996. ABC Broadcast History (1954-1961):
    October 27, 1954-September 3, 1958: Wednesday, 7:30 PM-8:30 PM
    September 12, 1958-September 25, 1959: Friday, 8:00 PM-9:00 PM
    October 2, 1959-September 23, 1960: Friday, 7:30 PM-8:30 PM
    September 25, 1960-September 17, 1961: Sunday, 6:30 PM-7:30 PM NBC Broadcast History (1961-1981):
    September 24, 1961-August 31, 1975: Sunday, 7:30 PM-8:30 PM
    September 14, 1975-September 11, 1977: Sunday, 7:00 PM-8:00 PM
    September 18, 1977-October 23, 1977: Sunday, 7:00 PM-9:00 PM
    October 30, 1977-September 13, 1981: Sunday, 7:00 PM-8:00 PM CBS Broadcast History (1981-1983):
    September 26, 1981-January 1, 1983: Saturday, 8:00 PM-9:00 PM
    January 4, 1983-February 15, 1983: Tuesday, 8:00 PM-9:00 PM
    July 9, 1983-September 24, 1983: Saturday, 8:00 PM-9:00 PM
    (two irregularly scheduled airings on May 3, 1983 and May 21, 1983) ABC Broadcast History (1986-1988):
    February 2, 1986-September 6, 1987: Sunday, 7:00 PM-9:00 PM
    September 13, 1987-September 11, 1988: Sunday, 7:00 PM-8:00 PM NBC Broadcast History (1988-1990):
    October 9, 1988-July 2, 1989: Sunday, 7:00 PM-8:00 PM
    July 9, 1989-July 23, 1989: Sunday, 8:00 PM-9:00 PM
    August 6, 1989-February 25, 1990: Sunday, 7:00 PM-8:00 PM
    March 4, 1990-April 15, 1990: Sunday, 7:00 PM-9:00 PM
    April 22, 1990-May 6, 1990: Sunday, 7:00 PM-8:00 PM
    May 27, 1990-July 22, 1990: Sunday, 7:00 PM-9:00 PM
    August 5, 1990-September 9, 1990: Sunday, 7:00 PM-8:00 PM
    First Telecast: October 27, 1954
    Last Telecast: September 9, 1990 Episodes: 751 (180 black and white episodes, 571 color episodes [as far as the format in which they were first broadcast]) (NOTE: many of these were originally theatrical releases, and a small number were specials aired at other times, but for purposes of their first airing on the anthology series they are counted as episodes)moreless
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    The Glee Project

    The Glee Project

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    Oxygen (ended 2012)
    Performers will compete for a multi-episode guest-starring role on "Glee."
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    School House Rock!

    School House Rock!

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    ABC (ended 1996)
    Release history:
    The soundtrack to Multiplication Rock was released on LP (Capitol 11174) in 1973 and on CD (Capitol 91253) in 1989. The discs are in stereo, but missing some foley from the broadcast versions. (see also reissues and covers) Filmstrips and 16mm films of Multiplication Rock, Grammar Rock, America Rock and Science Rock (hereafter The Big Four) were available to schools and libraries from Xerox Films. The film prints (and possibly the filmstrips) came with teachers' aides which included lyrics, questions for students and activities. In 1987 The Big Four were released by Golden Book Video on four VHS tapes. Cloris Leachman and "a group of young friends" sang and danced to new between-segment songs not produced by the original team. The tapes were missing The Good Eleven, Little Twelvetoes, and Three-Ring Government and America Rock was renamed History Rock. The videos were re-released on VHS (Aug. 8, 1995) and laserdisc (Dec. 13, 1995) by Capital Cities/ABC Video Publishers, restoring the missing segments and removing Ms. Leachman and friends. CD-ROMs and at least two music folios were released in 1996. Released Apr. 9, 1996 School House Rock! Rocks featured new versions of SHR songs performed by contemporary rock stars. School House Rock, the Box Set was released June 18, 1996 and featured 41 songs on 4 CDs. Disc 1 featured the stereo versions of Multiplication Rock plus a bonus track, My Hero, Zero by The Lemonheads. Discs 2-4 featured mono versions of the songs (probably directly from film) except The Preamble which is in stereo, and Verb which has an extremely small amount of separation. Episodes made in the 1990s were made in stereo and are presented in stereo in the box. The four discs were released separately, minus The Lemonheads track, on Apr. 1, 1997. Another tribute album, School House Rocks the Vote was released Aug. 18, 1998. It featured various artists covering School House Rock songs. Among the artists were Grady Tate singing Messin' with My Bill of Rights!, I'm Just a Bill by Joan Osborne and South Park's Isaac Hayes, and The Campaign Trail by Bob Dorough. A sampler CD, The Best of School House Rock was released Nov. 3, 1998, featuring songs by the original artists. I Got Six was named Best Picture of 1973 by ASIF-East, a chapter of the International Animated Film Association. Multiplication Rock received honors from Action for Children's Television. Bob Dorough received an Grammy nomination in 1974 for the Multiplication Rock LP, probably for Best Recording for Children (the winner was Winnie the Pooh and Tigger Too). Most impressive was SHR's 4 Emmys, beating out shows like Sesame Street and Mr. Rogers' Neighborhood Each discipline has been given its own season. Years of first airing are listed below as original airdates are likely lost forever. 1973 Multiplication Rock (season 1) (premiered 06-Jan-73) 1973-1977 Grammar Rock (season 2) (premiered 08-Sep-73) 1975-1979 America Rock (season 3) 1978-1979 Science Rock (season 4) (premiered 11-Mar-78) 1983-1984 Scooter Computer & Mr. Chips (season 5) (premiered 08-Jan-83) (last show 31-Aug-85) 1995-1996 Money Rock (season 6) Years of first broadcast for each episode are given in the production code field. moreless
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    VH1 Storytellers

    VH1 Storytellers

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    VH1
    This acclaimed series began with a broadcast of Ray Davies talking about his songs and performing them solo, as part of his own "Storyteller" concert tour in 1996. Ray being one of more eloquant and insightful writers of our time, the show was well-received, and other performers were lined up. Many of popular music's greatest artists and songwriters have taped episodes, mostly in intimate settings, some taking audience questions and telling first-hand stories about their writing and personal experiences. By definition, the series is rather uneven, (after all, if you're not a fan of the performer, it's not your cup of tea). But it has produced many inspiring moments and memorable performances. As of November 2008, 79 episodes have aired, many in conjunction with its sister series, "Behind The Music". CD's and DVD's of episodes are available, including some "Best Of" and "Lost Songs" collections. It was listed as on hiatus from 2002 to 2005, then a few occasional episodes have been taped, mostly in conjunction with the artist's latest release.moreless
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    Instant Star

    Instant Star

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    CTV (ended 2008)
    Instant Star stars Alexz Johnson as Jude Harrison, the newest winner of G Major's contest (Season 1). The life of a super star isn't so easy. Instant Star is about Jude's ups and downs of being a super star. Every episode features a original Jude Harrison single which is available on the official soundtrack. Instant Star is produced by Eptiome Pictures in association with CTV and The-N. It airs on CTV in Canada and on The-N in the States. Music: Season 1 CD: Songs From Instant Star Featuring Alexz Johnson Canadian Release Date: April 26, 2005. American Release Date: September 13, 2005. Season 2 CD: Songs From Instant Star Two Canadian Release Date: TBA American Release Date: April 4, 2006.moreless
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    The Perry Como Show

    The Perry Como Show

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    NBC (ended 1963)
    Welcome to The Perry Como Show guide at TV.com. Perry Como's first series, "The Chesterfield Supper Club" ran on NBC from December 24,1948 through June 4, 1950 after his success on the radio program of the same name. Due to Perry's popularity the series was renamed, "The Perry Como Show," and aired on CBS from October 2, 1950 through June 24, 1955. He moved back to NBC on September 12, 1955 when he took over "The Kraft Music Hall." The Kraft series lasted through June 12, 1963. From 1963 through 1967, Como continued his association with Kraft by doing "Kraft Music Hall" specials. He then did many holiday specials until 1993.moreless
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    Gone Country

    Gone Country

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    CMT - Country Music Television
    Seven established music performers are led through every aspect of the country music industry in an attempt to break out as the next big thing. John Rich of the hit country duo Big & Rich hosts this Nashville-based production.moreless
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  • 10:00 pm
    20/20
    NEW
    ABC