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    Cops

    Cops

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    Spike TV
    Now known as the original reality series, COPS hit the airwaves in early 1989, putting camera crews in police cars all across the United States. Adopting the Cinema Verité style of documentary filming, COPS uses no narration, depending completely on the police officers and the footage shot as it happens to tell the story. Each COPS camera crew consists of a camera operator and a sound mixer. The officer is mic'd with a wireless mic directly to the camera and the sound mixer captures the suspects, witnesses and other officers with a boom mic. Multiple crews can be stationed in one area as well as crews working different cities across the country at the same time. Still one of the most popular television shows on the air, COPS moved from the FOX network to Spike TV in the fall of 2013, keeping it's original 8pm time slot on Saturday nights.moreless
  • 2
    Soul Train

    Soul Train

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    (ended 2006)
    It's the SOOOOOOOOOOOOUUUUL TRAIN!

    Pop music has always had shows like American Bandstand to sing its praises, but R&B music had to wait a while for its own major weekly showcase. Just the same, Soul Train proved to be well worth the wait when it hit the airwaves in the 1970s. This weekly extravaganza, which showed off the latest and greatest in soul music and dance moves, became a national sensation in the mid-1970s and became a pop culture juggernaut that broke new ground for African-American entertainment.

    Soul Train was the brainchild of radio announcer Don Cornelius. After studying broadcasting in college, Cornelius got a job at WVON, one of Chicago's most popular urban radio stations. During this time, he pondered breaking into television with a dance and music show from an African-American perspective. In 1969, he produced a pilot episode and dubbed it "Soul Train" after a local radio promotion he had done in Chicago. The pilot impressed the Sears Roebuck Company, which gave Cornelius some funding in exchange for the rights to use Soul Train to promote a line of record players. With this help, Cornelius launched Soul Train on WCIU-TV, a Chicago UHF station. It premiered on August 17, 1970 as a weekday series airing from 4:30-5:30pm. Cornelius himself hosted the dance-stravaganza, which took place on a club-set. The show featured performances by soul music acts, appearances by guest hosts, and scorching dance numbers from the Soul Train Gang. Local word-of-mouth made Soul Train a big hit in Chicago, which won it another sponsor in The Johnson Products Company, makers of Afro-Sheen.

    Soul Train's relationship with The Johnson Products Company also helped it make the move from local television to syndication. With this company's financial backing, Cornelius moved the show to Hollywood and got it into television syndication in the fall of 1971. Only seven cities were on the initial lineup, but the Soul Train quickly picked up steam and began playing in new cities as its reputation spread. Pretty soon, people all over the country were enjoying the funky thrills that only Soul Train could provide. By the mid-1970s, Soul Train was a force to be reckoned with. Each week, the latest hits and coolest dances were served up in a slick package that had kids of all ages and races dancing around the TV-room floor. Cornelius cut a stylish, unflappably cool figure as the host, making him an often-imitated icon in the entertainment community. Music groups clamored for an appearance on Soul Train, since it was practically a free ticket to r&b (and often pop) chart success. Today, many critics fondly remember Soul Train as the television show that did the most to bring African-American popular culture into American households.

    As the 1980's began, Soul Train was as popular as ever. Tribune Entertainment, a Chicago-based company, became the exclusive distributor of the show and helped launch The Soul Train Music Awards. This yearly awards gala has become one of the most popular and respected awards ceremonies for r&b musicians and now enjoys "institution" status in the music world. The success of this awards show has also led to other popular Soul Train spin-off specials like The Soul Train Lady Of Soul Annual Awards Special and The Soul Train Christmas Starfest.

    In the 1990s, Don Cornelius stepped down as Soul Train host and passed the role to others. Guest hosts were used from 1993-97 (seasons 23 through 26). Mystro Clark became host in 1997. Following him, was Shemar Moore who hosted seasons 29 through 32. Dorian Gregory is the current Soul Train host. Cornelius remains active as an executive producer for the show, which shows no signs of slowing down. With r&b music more popular than ever in the mainstream, viewers everywhere continue to shake their groove thing to the churning wheels of the Soul Train.

    Soul Train continued with new episodes through the 2005-06 season. The final, first-run episode aired on March 25, 2006. The 2006-07 season began with repeats from 2005-06. As of December 9, 2006, the series has been retitled The Best of Soul Train and features c episodes from the 1970s and 1980s. 1970's & early 1980's Soul Train airdates On this guide, we've listed the earliest known airdates for episodes 1 - 163. The original Los Angeles airdates are listed for episodes 164 - 366 (Dec. 27, 1975 - June 20, 1981). In the 1970s through the early '80s, the episode airdates varied from city to city. Instead of using communications satellites, tapes of the episodes were mailed directly to individual TV stations. And once a station aired an episode, the tape would then be forwarded to a station in another city. (This practice, called "bicycling," was common with most 1970s first-run syndicated shows.) Sometime in the early 1980s, Tribune Entertainment began using satellites to distribute Soul Train resulting in standard airdates across the country.

    Find at what television station and time the train pulls up to your TV: http://tv.tribune.com/showfinder/search/1,1001,soultrain,FF.html

    Contributors to this guide include: --Nick Puzo (Nickfresh) - editor of the Soul Train Yahoo Group --Jabar Robbins (Calatine9) --Robert Spiegel --Edward Loney ("ehloney")moreless
  • 3
    This is Your Life (UK)

    This is Your Life (UK)

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    BBC (ended 2003)
    Each week, a celebrity guest of honour is surprised and presented with a 'Red Book' by the show host. The host conducts a biography of the guest with the help of family members, friends, and acquaintances.moreless
  • 4
    America's Funniest Home Videos

    America's Funniest Home Videos

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    ABC
    America's Funniest Home Videos is ABC's longest-running comedy series. The show began with original host Bob Saget (Full House)The series was an instant sensation on Sunday nights and ran for seven successful seasons. The show was re-launched with new hosts John Fugelsang (a stand up comedian with a one man show called Junk Male) & Daisy Fuentes (Loving), with a new hour long format, and moved to Monday nights where it would once again become a ratings success and then aired on Saturday. Then, after several years of being shown as an occasional special hosted by D.L. Hughley (The Hughleys) and Richard Kind (Spin City), ABC brought the series back on Friday nights with new host Tom Bergeron (Hollywood Squares). In September 2003, it was moved back to Sunday nights. Once again, the series has become a success. On This Show First Price is 10,000 and second is 5,000 and 3,000 for third also there is a 100,000 grand price show every so often where the 10,000 winners compete for 100,000.moreless
  • 5
    Rescue 911

    Rescue 911

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    CBS (ended 1996)
    Rescue 911 was a reality show hosted by William Shatner. It consisted of re-enactments of real life emergency situations and documentaries of hospitals, police, and firefighters. It ran for seven seasons on CBS from 1989 to 1996.moreless
  • 6
    The People's Court

    The People's Court

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    The People's Court - a throwback to 1950s syndicated courtroom fare such as Traffic Court and The Stand Accused - was set in a small-claims court. The litigants had both agreed to bring their grievances to a California small-claims court, where retired Superior Court Judge Joseph A. Wapner heard the cases. The plaintiffs could file a claim for up to $1,500, while the defendants sometimes filed a countersuit if they felt they were due compensation. While most cases were run-of-the-mill complaints over poor service, broken contracts, ownership rights and malfunctioning merchandise, others had odd twists. For instance: * The overweight stripper who was not paid because the bachelor party-goers thought she was unattractive. During the arguments, she reveals she had gone at the request of her friend, the bride-to-be who found out about the party. * The mother who refused to pay a clown after he came to a birthday party dressed as a towering purple monster (he was supposed to play a Smurf); the clown ended up terrifying the party-goers. * The woman who requested a male friend make good on a verbal contract to pay half of the cost of her daughter's abortion, when she thought he was the father. He had backed out when he was sterile. * A woman who sued the owner of a pitbull after he jumped on the hood of his car. The pitbull's owner claimed she struck the dog and requested payment for the dog's injuries; and even suspected the resulting damage to the car was from a prior accident. And the list of odd cases went on. Each litigant (who, as the announcer reminded viewers each day, were not actors) stated his case before Joseph A. Wapner . After he was through asking questions, he retreated to his chambers before rendering his decision. More than once, he refused to support either side. Each litigant was then interviewed by the courtroom reporter (originally Doug Llewelyn from 1981-1993); sometimes, he gave the results of how courtroom spectators would have decided the case. Usually two cases were heard per show, though some longer cases took up the entire 30 minutes. If time permitted, Wapner fielded questions from the gallery; or legal expert Harvey Levin gave advice on handling that episode's legal scenario (i.e., confronting a car dealer about a car suspected to be a lemon). Each episode ended with Llewelyn admonishing viewers with some variation of the age old advice: "When you get mad, don't take the law into your own hands ... take 'em to court!" The original version of The People's Court ran for 12 years. When The People's Court returned to syndicated TV in 1997, the show expanded to 60 minutes, with Judge Ed Koch (the former New York City mayor) now presiding. Koch lasted until 1999, when Judge Jerry Scheindlin took over in 1999. Judge Marilyn Milian has presided since 2001. The format of the revised The People's Court was essentially similar, except the small claim's court limit was upped to $5,000. Sometimes, the interviewers also asked spectators on-camera their thoughts of a case before the judge's verdict was announced. Related Shows The People's Court UK Carol Smillie is set to present a new UK version of the People's Court for ITV1's new daytime line-up titled itv DAY.moreless
  • 7
    PBS American Masters

    PBS American Masters

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    PBS
    Produced (or acquired) by Thirteen/WNET New York for the Public Broadcasting Service, episodes of American Masters are dedicated to documenting and honoring America's most notable creative artists and the inspiration behind their work. Each year a series of special broadcasts profiles a cross-section of the nation's finest artistic pioneers from the past and present.moreless
  • 8
    Double Dare

    Double Dare

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    Nickelodeon (ended 2000)
    Double dare is undoubtedly the phenomenon that made Nickelodeon what it is today. The rules go something like this:Each round starts off with a toss-up physical challenge. Whoever wins gets $10 and control of the game. Host Marc Summers (Jason Harris in Double Dare 2000) asks the winning team a question. If they don't know the answer or think the other team doesn't have a clue, they can dare them to answer it for double the dollars. But they have to be careful because they can double dare the first team back for 4 times the amount. Then, they either have to answer the question or take a physical challenge. In round 2, dollar values are doubled. The winner of the game moves on to the obstacle course, where they navigate through 8 obstacles and they win a prize for each obstacle. If they make it through all 8 obstacles, they win the grand prize. Double Dare history On October 6, 1986, the first episode of Double Dare was taped at WHYY studios in Philadelphia. In 1987, Nickelodeon decided to create a short-lived weekend edition called Super Sloppy Double Dare, which was cancelled after about 20 episodes. One year later, in 1988, Fox bought syndication rights from Nickelodeon, so they created another short-lived edition called Family Double Dare. Because Fox wanted more adult material on their network, Family Double Dare was canned after 13 episodes. But the good news: the original Double Dare was still in production.Later, in 1989, other kids game shows came into play, thus causing Double Dare's ratings to drop a little. So Nickelodeon reincarnated Super Sloppy Double Dare and dusted it off to incorporate the "super sloppiness". This version of Super Sloppy Double Dare lasted about one season, but it had 100 episodes, plus a bunch of special episodes. Then, in 1990, Nickelodeon reincarnated Family Double Dare, redesigning the Fox version. A year later, in 1991, because of these new spin-offs, the original Double Dare was cancelled, but its spin-offs remain. In 1992, a two-episode spin-off called Super Special Double Dare was created. In Super Special Double Dare, Nickelodeon celebrities played against each other (usually boys against girls). In the first episode of Super Special Double Dare, the cast of Clarissa Explains It All played against the cast of Welcome Freshmen. The second episode was the NBA All-star special. In 1993, the last season was shown. Harvey had to quit his job of announcer because of the birth of his son Caleb. So Doc Holiday took over. The final episode was the hour-long Family Double Dare Tournament of Cahmpions, which pitted the smartest and fastest teams against each other. After that, Double Dare was officially cancelled, but Family Double Dare played reruns until 1999. Like Marc Summers said in his autobiography, Everything In Its Place, "We had enough episodes on tape to do reruns forever".That could have been the end of Double Dare...until January 22, 2000! Double Dare was reincarnated as Double Dare 2000. Jason Harris was the new host of this short-lived revival of Double Dare. The preview Snick episode of Double Dare 2000 pitted the cast of the Amanda Show and the cast of 100 Deeds For Eddie McDowd against each other. The show was cancelled in December of 2000, but, just like the other Double Dare spin-offs, reruns are shown on Nickelodeon GASmoreless
  • 9
    C.O.P.S.

    C.O.P.S.

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    (ended 1989)
    "C.O.P.S. - Central Organization of Police Specialists. Fighting crime in a future time,... protecting Empire City from Big Boss, and his gang of crooks. C.O.P.S.!"

    "It's crime fighting time!"

    In 1993, CBS picked up the syndication of this show, it was renamed "Cyber C.O.P.S."moreless
  • 10
    House of Style

    House of Style

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    MTV - Music Television (ended 1996)
    House of Style was MTV's groundbreaking catch-all infotainment series on fashion, designers, models, shopping, personal style and the arts. Hosted by world famous model-personality Cindy Crawford, there were no closed doors in regards to fashion shows, movie sets, and access to celebrities, designers and artists. While the show was shot in a casual, hand-held style and edited in a breath-taking manner of cuts, the show approached models, fashion and fashion with level-headed seriousness. Information was presented in a matter-of-fact style; guests were treated with reverence and models, designers and everyone featured were presented and treated as leading artists of our society. Each show was unique from the each other - there were no set studio or stock opening. There was a brief introduction of the episode - taking place indoors or out - from the mundane to the spectacular. The show's content/segments were also random and varied in length and breadth from episode to episode. They covered the full gamut of all fashion - from personal style how-to to the history of Vogue magazine to a designer runway show to every topic in between. When Cindy Crawford was host, there were also many episodes and segments devoted to her life and business ventures from the making of her workout video to her cover photo shoots. Todd Oldham was a frequent how-to contributor when Cindy was the host - his segments usually involved re-purposing an old item (furniture, clothes, etc) into something new & different. There was also a regular feature on shopping with a celebrity. The series started out as a quarterly covering the seasonal fashion changes then increasing in frequency to almost monthly basis until Cindy Crawford left. The series was not as successful with the other hosts and decreased in frequency. The series has not been officially canceled and presumably will return again. There are also many "recap" episodes with segments re-purposed/ edited or re-edited from other episodes - sometimes with new introductions, sometimes without - so it's difficult to keep track of every episode with any accuracy.moreless
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    Beadle's About

    Beadle's About

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    ITV (ended 1996)
    Beadle's About was a British television programme which ran from 1986 to 1996 and was hosted by the late Jeremy Beadle. In the show, members of the public became victims of practical jokes behind hidden cameras.moreless
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    On Stage America

    On Stage America

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    (ended 1984)
    coming soon...
  • 13
    Wedding Day (1981)

    Wedding Day (1981)

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    NBC (ended 1981)
    Reality show which lasted only one week in NBC daytime.
  • 14
    TMZ on TV

    TMZ on TV

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    Can't get enough of TMZ online? Well now you can watch all Hollywood gossip on television with this entertainment news magazine show. TMZ TV tracks down today's hottest stars with their cameras whether they are hitting the clubs or the dry cleaners.moreless
  • 15
    Look-A-Like

    Look-A-Like

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    TV Guide
    Look-A-Like is a reality TV series produced by TV Guide that turns ordinary people into famous celebrity doppelgangers. Have you ever been told that you look like that famous TV or film star? On TV Guide’s Look-A-Like, these typical people have been given the chance to truly look like their VIPs, gaining access to the wardrobe stylists, make up artists, and hair stylists of the Hollywood Elite in order to truly look just like them. From Katy Perry to Joss Stone, Joe Jonas to Sylvester Stallone, some of these makeovers can be as simple as a haircut or as elaborate as a whole new look with all the fixings.moreless
  • 16
    The Dating Game

    The Dating Game

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    ABC (ended 2000)
    THE DATING GAME was and still is by all accounts, the premiere game show for singles. It was the forerunner for many imitators such as "Love Connection", MTV's "Singled Out" and numerous others. But they all have the same influence: Chuck Barris, the creator of the one that started it all! "THE DATING GAME" first premiered on December 20-24, 1965 on abc-TV and remained a fixture on the network in both daytime and nighttime incarnations through the rest of the 1960s and well into the 1970s. Jim Lange, fresh from his announcing duties with Tennessee Ernie Ford stepped through the flower-speckled rotating partitions for the first of many, many times shortly before Christmas 1965. The game play was simple. On one side you had 3 bachelors answering questions from a girl on the other side of the partition (each not being able to see the other). The girl was given a certain amount of time to ask as many questions as she could to the 3 bachelors. More often than not the questions would be of a quirky nature. (E.G.: "If we were marooned on a desert island, what would be the first thing you'd do and why?"). During a commercial break, the girl would think about which bachelor she'd select. When the show returned, Jim would have her announce her choice. After meeting the 2 boys she didn't select, she's meet her date at which point Jim would tell them where they were going for their dream date. On less frequent occasions, the roles were reversed. To wit, the game would feature a boy selecting 1 from the 3 Bachelorettes. The show became an enormous hit with young viewers. (In fact, in light of its success, Baskin-Robbins named an ice cream flavor in honor of the show.) And over the years, the show featured many stars of the day (Burt Reynolds, Paul Petersen and even Dick Clark showed up) as well as newcomers who would in later years become big stars in their own right (John Ritter, Teri Garr, Tom Selleck and Farrah Fawcett were among these.) The show left abc-TV on July 2-6, 1973, but stayed in syndication for another year (1973-1974) before leaving the airwaves altogether. Creator Chuck Barris brought the show back again 4 years later with Lange as host from 1978 to 1980. Along with an updated version of "The Newlywed Game" and 2 new shows, ("The Gong Show" and "The $1.98 Beauty Show") "The Dating Game" returned to syndicated in 1978, only this time with a more adult-oriented borderline dialogue format--perhaps in an effort to recapture the same audience that had grown up watching THE DATING GAME in the 1960s. The newer version- along with Jim Lange's gaudy red tuxedo- lasted for 2 years until local stations finally got tired of the protesting phone calls. Once again, the show featured both present-day and future stars such as Jaye P. Morgan, Bob Saget and Murray "The Unknown Comic" Langston. THE DATING GAME was all but forgotten until the mid-80s, when Barris decided to do it yet again. An all new 80s update of "The Dating Game (The All-New DATING GAME)" premiered on syndicated on September 8-12, 1986, but this time the hosting duties were handled by Elaine Joyce (Lange was busy at the time hosting "The $1,000,000 Chance Of A Lifetime"). This version lasted for three years with Joyce hosting the 1st season and Jeff McGregor hosting the last 2 Seasons and again as in the previous 2 incarnations, the show featured present and future stars. (Among the future stars was Oscar-winning actor Cuba Gooding, Jr.!) The Program Demised on September 8, 1989. Now... as for the NINETIES update? Well... I don't know terribly much about it except for the following: By the time the 90s rolled around, Chuck Barris sold the rights to all his shows to Columbia-Tristar Television. A newer, corporate-whitewashed version of the DATING GAME was released on September 9-13, 1996 and packaged with another updated version of "The Newlywed Game", this time with Chuck ("Love Connection") Woolery (1st Host is Whose Line is it Anyway (US) Brad Sherwood for the 1st Season for the difference) and outside of the quizzer and the respective suitors & suitorettes not being able to see one another, the rules were almost completely overhauled and all ended the show on September 15, 2000. But if you're a game show retrophile like me, you would have to agree that there's just no Dating Game without Jim Lange with or without the awful tux. And now you don't have to suffer from Lange withdrawal because Game Show Network has some episodes to show you... And HEEEEEEEE-RE THEY ARRRRRRRR-RE! Now you can see the classic Jim Lange episodes of the original DATING GAME on The Game Show Network- in particular, the ones that featured present-day and future superstars. You can see them Saturday and Sunday nights at 11:30pm on GSN. Enjoy them if you can... and if you can't stay up that late, TAPE THEM... LIKE ME!! (Dates with celebrities are always subject to their availability.) THE BROADCAST HISTORY of THE DATING GAME: December 20, 1965-March 31, 1967 at 11:30am-12Noon on ABC-TV April 3, 1967-July 12, 1968 at 4:00-4:30pm on ABC-TV July 15, 1968-July 6, 1973 at 2:30-3:00pm on ABC-TV. On 1st Run Syndicated from September 10, 1973-September 15, 2000.moreless