• 41
    NCAA® March Madness®

    NCAA® March Madness®

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    CBS
    March Madness returns with live coverage of the NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament. CBS has been televising the Tournament since 1982 and was the exclusive broadcaster for all games (except the Tuesday play-in game) from 1991 through 2010. The only exception was 2003 when the daytime first round games were moved to ESPN to accommodate CBS News' coverage of the Gulf War.

    The 2011 Tournament marked a new-era of television coverage as the $10.8 billion, 14-year contract with CBS and Turner kicked in. The 67 games will be spread across four networks (CBS, TNT, TBS and truTV) allowing for all games to be televised nationally.

    The Tournament, one of the most popular events on the U.S. sporting calendar, is a single knockout tournament staged annually at various sites across America. The field, increased to 68 teams (from 65) for 2011, is made up of 32 automatic bids for conference tournament winners and 36 at-large bids as determined by a selection committee. The committee also determines the seeding for each participant. The tournament takes place over three weeks beginning in mid-March.

    There are four geographic regions with 16 teams each and the winner of each region qualifies for the national semi-finals, which are better known as the Final Four. During the first week, there are two First Four games (which reduce each region to 16 teams) each on Tuesday and Wednesday, 16 second round games each on Thursday and Friday and eight third round games each on Saturday and Sunday which reduce the field to 16 teams. The 16 teams are better known as the Sweet 16. During the second week, there are four Regional semi-final games each on Thursday and Friday and two Regional final games each on Saturday and Sunday which determine the Final Four participants.

    During the third week, the National semi-finals are contested on Saturday night and the National Final on Monday night. This guide begins with the 1978 Tournament, as that was the first year in which all games were televised on one network or another.

    The first HDTV telecasts were the 2000 Final Four and National Championship games. From 2001 through 2006, a limited number of games were shown in HDTV and since 2007 all games have been televised in HD. The telecast format is shown in the Recap of each Tournament game for the 2000-2006 seasons.moreless
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    Super Bowl

    Super Bowl

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    CBS
    The Super Bowl is the biggest football game of the year. Each year since 1967 two teams battle it out on the gridiron for the NFL's most prized possession, the Lombardi Trophy, which was named after legendary Green Bay coach Vince Lombardi, the winner of the first two Super Bowls.

    The Pittsburgh Steelers hold the record for most Super Bowl victories with six. The Dallas Cowboys have the most appearances in The Super Bowl with eight.

    Four teams have never made it to the Super Bowl; they are the Detroit Lions, Cleveland Browns, Jacksonville Jaguars, and Houston Texans.moreless
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    The Sports Reporters

    The Sports Reporters

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    ESPN
    The Sports Reporters features host John Saunders and three panelists from the print media who discuss current events in sports. This show, which is run weekly on ESPN, was originally hosted by Dick Schaap. It is on Sunday mornings at 10:00am on ESPN and repeated Sunday afternoon at 12:30pm on ESPN2.moreless
  • 44
    Dear Boys

    Dear Boys

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    Animax Entertainment (ended 2003)
    The team is in trouble, as there are not enough players to play a game. Additionally, the coach has left after a conflict with Fujiwara. However, Aikawa transfers to Mizuho and, through his enthusiasm and sheer love of the game, infuses the few remaining members with a sense of purpose. Despite the fact that there are only five of them (i.e., they have no substitutes), they manage to get the coach of the girls' team to coach them, as well. At first, she seems very strict, but later reveals her attachment to her "Dear Boys." Together, they do their best to make their dreams come true.moreless
  • 45
    Resurrection Blvd.

    Resurrection Blvd.

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    Showtime (ended 2002)
    Three generations of the Santiago family have forged their legacy in boxing. Widower Roberto Santiago (Tony Plana), who is also struggling with his illness is worried about his children which all take different paths in their lifes. Miguel (Mauricio Mendoza), the oldest son, tries to be a great manager, while Carlos (Michael DeLorenzo), after an enemy shot at him tries to go back to his life as a boxer. His brother Alex (Nicholas Gonzales) replaced him in boxing, but was soon lost and had to find a way to go back living normal without boxing. Yolanda (Ruth Livier), the oldest daughter, works at a office and goes thorugh her life with her boyfriend, Luke Bonner (Brian Austin Green), a policeman that changed her life forever. The youngest daughter, Victoria (Marisol Nichols), was always a mutinous daughter, trying to live her life, but soon she realizes how important her family is. Meawhile, their neighbour, Aunt Bibi Corrales (Elizabeth Peña), the sister of Roberto's deceased wife, has troubles with her hair stylist shop. There is also Uncle Ruben (Daniel Zacapa), a former boxer who is unable to speak due to his brain damage. In one word, Resurrection Blvd. relates the individual trials, tribulations, tragedies and triumphs of this Mexican-American family in East Los Angeles, California. The show aired three season from 2000-2002 on Showtime. Brian Austin Green, well known from "Beverly Hills, 90210," joined the cast in second season, but hasn't returned for third. The original theme song was perfomed by Los Lobos. Original music by Julián Gonzáles.moreless
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    SlamBall

    SlamBall

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    SlamBall.net (ended 2004)
    When SlamBall made its groundbreaking debut last summer on The New TNN, the sports world got its first glimpse of the future; a non-stop, live-action human video game that broke all the rules of traditional sport and defined a new generation.

    But for the game's creator, 28 year old Mason Gordon, it was much more. For Gordon, SlamBall's debut was the transfiguration of a vision that had been embedded in his imagination for years, to a physical reality that the rest of the world could finally see and understand.

    In his youth, he could visualize it perfectly. In a recurring dream, it would happen over and over again. A guy goes up in the air. Another guy comes up after him. CRASH. There is a huge collision in the air. One guy takes control and pushes his opponent out of the way. Dream over. Every time he had the dream, it was the same thing. There was always a mid-air collision, but it was a different guy, a different uniform and a different move.

    Despite the familiar dreams, Gordon didn't think about acting on this imagery until many years later. Like a growing number of sports fans, his interest in traditional sports was increasingly influenced by the creativity and intensity of action sports like skateboarding, bmx and motocross.

    For Gordon, action sports had so much to offer the traditional sports world: non-stop action, riveting highlights, and most of all, fearless athletes. Yet, as a traditional athlete himself, he started to wonder about combining the best of both worlds. What would you get if you took the athletic components of football, basketball, hockey and gymnastics, and mixed them together with the insanity of action sports?

    He went back to the dreams. Once he made the connection between his new idea and the imagery of the mid-air confrontations he had seen thousands of times in his sleep, his confidence was unshakable. He knew it could be done. The question was, who else would ever believe it?

    Gordon took it to the one person who might, a visionary producer/director, Mike Tollin, principal of Tollin/Robbins Productions where Gordon had once worked as an intern. Says Gordon, "I approached Mike and told him I'd never bother him again, but that I just had this one idea that I wanted him to look at."

    Gordon spent the next six months trying to convince Tollin to help him make SlamBall a reality. Tollin recognized the potential of the idea, and after much thought, had the brainstorm that would be the project's jump off.

    Tollin did not see SlamBall as fitting into the traditional professional sports model. He didn't think it needed to develop in obscurity for several years at the grassroots level, build up a gradual fan base, and then hopefully find its way to television, as other, more established sports were struggling to at the time. If SlamBall was to be the future of pro sports, as Gordon intended, it would create it's own model: first put the games on TV, generate a mass audience, create a demand, and then back it into a more traditional league model.

    In what Gordon describes as the pairing of his extreme sports mentality and Tollin's brilliant understanding of traditional sports dynamics, a working relationship was solidified. Together, they set out to build the first SlamBall half-court.

    Constructed from spare parts: rusty gymnastics springs, second hand plywood and one trampoline, it wasn't pretty, but it would work. Next Gordon needed players. Combing the inner city parks, gyms, and rec. centers, he looked for what he calls prototype SlamBall players, vastly superior athletes who were creative, tough, and would play through pain.

    "You have to be tough as aluminium siding to play this game," says Gordon, "and your heart has to be bigger than your entire chest. You have to possess boundless belief in yourself and your ability. If you don't have that, you can't come close to playing SlamBall at this level."

    After looking at hundreds of players, he found his army, the five guys who would join with Gordon to make up SlamBall's Original Six: Jeff Sheridan, Sean Jackson, Michael Goldman, Dave Redmond and James Willis. Gordon chose to play and develop the game from the inside as a player. Gordon remembers, "We could only afford five players, so I had to be this sixth." In no time, all of them were seriously hooked. For three weeks straight they played 15 hours a day, going home completely beat down, and then coming back for more the next day.

    "It was the most fun I'd ever had in my life. It was crazy," remembers Gordon. "Here were these five guys who initially thought I was a lunatic, who were giving up their bodies and playing a really rough game and loving every minute of it."

    After testing the half court game, the group relocated to a downtown Los Angeles youth center where the first full court was built. With the addition of more players (including current SlamBall sensations Dion Mays, Stan "Shakes" Fletcher and Rob Wilson), the game soared to incredible new heights, literally. On the new court, Gordon added another trampoline at each basket. Gordon's recurring dreams would now be realized in flesh and blood, with spectacular mid-air collisions becoming one of the sport's main staples.

    As word of mouth traveled and local crowds started to get bigger, Gordon and Tollin brought in TRP's production partner Telepictures/Warner Bros to show them the local phenomenon that was building. What they saw was a fully developed underground sport that captured the core attributes of the videogame generation, a new combination of wild athleticism and amazing creativity, never seen before. "Simply put," says Gordon, "they went bananas."

    A 90-second highlight tape went to Albie Hecht, The New TNN's President. After one meeting with Tollin and Gordon, Hecht was sold. SlamBall would debut in the summer of 2002 as part of the network's "Slammin' Saturday Night" line up.

    "From that point on, it was like skiing downhill atone hundred miles an hour," says Gordon. "We had six months to find enough athletes for six teams, hire quality coaches and teach them all the game from scratch."

    Immediately, the group launched a series of radio campaigns to get the word out to potential athletes, and began reaching out to qualified coaches from around the country. Out of 400 coaching applications, the pool was narrowed down to 40 who were evaluated over a four-day clinic based on their understanding of the game and ability to formulate basic strategies.

    Surprisingly to Tollin and Gordon, many of the top tier basketball coaches could not get their heads around SlamBall. It was the younger candidates who better understood SlamBall's youthful energy, and had the kind of passion needed to guide it. Some candidates in their early twenties, like Hernando Planells, Jr. and Brendan Kirsch were awarded head coaching positions and encouraged to innovate.

    The search for players was equally as challenging. Three months and hundreds of athletes later, the first-ever SlamBall draft took place, producing six teams of eight players each. With players and personnel in place, Gordon and his team faced their biggest challenge of the sport's first season.

    "In six weeks," he says, "we had to teach a group of players a brand new skill set and get them to where they could put a professional quality sports product on the floor. With our original players already at a certain level, we had to get the rest of the guys caught up. By this time, the addition of two more trampolines on each side made the SlamBall court complete.

    Knowing the critical role credibility would play in establishing SlamBall's legitimacy, Tollin, a Philadelphia native, reached out to hometown businessman, Pat Croce, former President of the Philadelphia 76ers and one of the most successful sports entrepreneurs ever.

    Three days after seeing the game live and up-close, Croce signed on as a SlamBall partner and became the game's premier spokesperson, generating a PR frenzy no fledgling sport could even hope to achieve. With little marketing and promotion behind the initial campaign , Croce's involvement came at a critical time and soon the mainstream media; including ESPN, Sports Illustrated, Time Magazine and The Jay Leno Show were all chasing the SlamBall story.

    SlamBall made its national television debut on August 3, 2002, as a six-episode summer series and delivered the young and diverse audience TNN was looking for. Ratings were consistent throughout five consecutive re-run cycles as tremendous word of mouth brought new viewers to the game each week.

    "The greatest thing in the world for me," says Gordon, "was seeing glimpses of the sport I wanted SlamBall to be. When players would work out some kind of intricate pass or misdirection of the stopper, I saw a new type of instinctive strategy. To me, that's what was so cool about the first season."

    By December of 2002, SlamBall got the green light for Season Two. Seeing the potential for big ratings, the network more than doubled the number of SlamBall episodes, scheduling a 13-week series for the new season.

    With increased exposure, Gordon knows the game will be scrutinized more closely as critics try to decide whether SlamBall is, in fact, a "real" sport. "I want people to look at us," he says, "because the closer they look, the more they'll realize that these players are tremendous athletes who are playing their hearts out in a game that's so exciting, creative and dynamic."

    This year, the league added two new teams, the Riders and Bandits, and took tryouts national, something Gordon believes will raise the level of play exponentially, "What people don't understand is that we're just scratching the surface of the level of creativity and athleticism you're going to see in this game for years to come"

    "One day, there is going to be a guy out there who will have an interdisciplinary skill set so far beyond anything we've ever seen before, that no one will be able to discount his ability."

    As for SlamBall's future and the possibility of growing the sport, Gordon says it all depends on the fans. "If the fans want to see it, it's going to happen," he says, "but people can trust that everyone involved in SlamBall is going 24-7 on the accelerator to get it there."moreless
  • 47
    The Association

    The Association

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    NBA - National Basketball Association
    The Association is an ESPN documentary series that gives fans and viewers complete inside access to some of the biggest teams in the NBA. Each episode of The Association follows a different team in the league, including both the Boston Celtics and the Los Angeles Lakers, two of the NBA's oldest and most prestigious clubs. With their behind-the-scenes cameras, ESPN's camera crews are able to catch teams' most intimate moments, from the deals made and player signings of the offseason to the first practices of a new season all the way down to the last game of the playoffs. The Association documents the chemistry and good times as well as the disputes and infighting that occur within every team (and every family). Whether you follow a particular team chronicled in The Association or are merely a fan of basketball, the series is a must-watch for all whole love the game and enjoy watching the professional players go about their jobs.moreless
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    Sunday NFL Countdown

    Sunday NFL Countdown

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    ESPN
    Since 1985 ESPN has been on hand to kick off your Sunday afternoon and get you ready for a day of football. Chris Berman, Tom Jackson, Mike Ditka, Keyshawn Johnson and Cris Carter all return to the desk.moreless
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    Coaches Show

    Coaches Show

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    Big Ten Network
    Get the latest news and updates on your favorite Big Ten teams, straight from the head coach.
  • 50
    WWE Velocity

    WWE Velocity

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    Spike TV (ended 2006)
    WWE Velocity is one hour of highly intensive wrestling action which continues the highs and lows experienced by all theWWE Smackdown! Superstars. Velocity has its own matches and gives all the updates and gossip you want to hear from the locker rooms of the WWE. WWE Velocity left television and for a couple of shows went online where you could watch it online and on June 10, 2006 they had their last show to open up room for ECW.moreless
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    Football Night in America

    Football Night in America

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    NBC
    Football Night in America began in the 2006 season in conjunction with NBC winning the rights to Sunday Night Football away from ESPN. Each Sunday at 7 pm ET, the team presents highlights and analysis of Sunday action and sets the stage for the Sunday night game, which starts around 8:20 ET. They also discuss what is going on in the world of the NFL. The show also includes interviews with players and coaches involved in the Sunday Night game and an in-depth report on one of the key afternoon games.

    The show is followed by Sunday Night Football and, during halftime, a brief analysis of the first half, abbreviated highlights of the earlier games and an essay by Bob Costas are presented. There is a post-game segment which includes player interviews, game analysis, an NFL injury update and closing thoughts and a preview of the next Sunday Night game from the broadcast booth.moreless
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    UFC Wired

    UFC Wired

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    (ended 2009)
    Joe Rogan hosts this UFC highlight show featuring some of the best bouts from years past.
  • 53
    In Depth With Graham Bensinger

    In Depth With Graham Bensinger

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    NBC Sports
    If you're into sports like me, In Depth With Graham Bensinger is a must see show for all sports fans. Whether your childhood hero was Manny Pacquiao, Jim Brown, or Muhammad Ali; or even a modern hero such as Bear Grylls and Tarrel Owens (T.O.): Graham Bensinger can be counted on to deliver the story on the table. Often you only know about your favorite celebrities and athletes from their performance on TV. Graham Bensinger really gets into details first hand with questions that had bothered your mind for some time, or simply curiosities that you've wanted to have answered to put your mind at peace. Do not confuse Graham Bensinger with gossip, though. With a man like Bensinger who started his own sports internet-based talk show while only being in the 8th grade, you can expect quality interviews that really gets in touch with the viewer. Specially with his long line of notable interviews, and sometimes controversial, such as O.J. Simpson or Jim Brown. Not everyone Graham Bensinger spurs controversy though. The famous boxing champions Manny Pacquiao and Oscar De La Hoya have made their appearance in NBC Sport's In Depth with Graham Bensinger. If boxing or football isn't your thing; don't feel left out! Nascar racers and athletes from various sports are interviewed. If there's one person who can convey your favorite athlete's story with depth: it's Graham Bensinger.moreless
  • 54
    NASCAR Now

    NASCAR Now

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    ESPN2
    ESPN2's daily NASCAR news and information program hosted by Nicole Briscoe, Mike Massaro and Allen Bestwick. The show includes highlights, opinion, debate, analysis and the latest news from drivers, crew chiefs and insiders. In addition to reports from races, NASCAR Now reporters also visit race shops and special events.moreless
  • 55
    The American Sportsman

    The American Sportsman

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    ABC (ended 1982)
    The American Sportsman is an outdoors show of hunting and fishing.
  • 56
    NASCAR Race Rewind Plus

    NASCAR Race Rewind Plus

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    NASCAR
    NASCAR Race Rewind Plus gives you the chance to catch up on all the latest NASCAR races at your convenience. Tired of having to record all the NASCAR races and then trying to find the pivotal moments from each race? Well now, with NASCAR Race Rewind Plus the work is already done for you! Each week you can download highlight reels even driver interviews with a click of the mouse from iTunes. You will know that you are only receiving the best coverage because NASCAR Race Rewind Plus comes straight from NASCAR.com. The sights, sounds and feel of each race are captured perfectly for your viewing delight and you can even pause and rewind as you see fit. Next time you get a chance in your busy day for a pit-stop, open up iTunes and rev up your engine for all the latest and greatest NASCAR moments from the weekend!moreless
  • 57
    ShoBox: The New Generation

    ShoBox: The New Generation

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    Showtime
    ShoBox: The New Generation is a Showtime boxing series that presents exciting matches between talented young boxers who are working their way towards a major showdown. ShoBox has earned a reputation for quality match-making and intense fights, often proving to be a training ground for young boxers who will go on to become major contenders in world boxing. Nick Charles is the blow-by-blow commentator, and he brings his three-plus decades of experience in sports announcing to this thrilling series. Boxing historian Steve Farhood appears as the color analyst. This series has hosted some of the premier boxers of our time, including Sechew Powell and Cornelius Bundrage, as well as Allan Green, whose 18-second knockout victory against Jaidon Codrington won the 2005 Knockout of the Year Award from Ring Magazine. ShoBox: The New Generation is an excellent boxing series, featuring up-and-coming fighters who are hungry for the chance to prove their skill in a major match.moreless
  • 58
    Sport Fishing with Dan Hernandez

    Sport Fishing with Dan Hernandez

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    CreateSpace
    Sport Fishing with Dan Hernandez has become widely known as one of the most popular fishing shows on television. The program features Hernandez, a crafty fisherman, traveling various waterways in search of some of the world's biggest fish. In particular, Hernandez enjoys scouring the Pacific Coast, where viewers can enjoy his exploits in both fresh and saltwater. The show also intertwines various tips for cooking fish and finding the hottest fishing spots in your hometown, making it a great watch for either a casual or experienced fisherman. Sport Fishing with Dan Hernandez airs every week in 450 cities nationwide, but most notably in California where it airs from 5 - 6:30 a.m. every Saturday morning through the Comcast Sports network. Sport Fishing is also one of the few fishing programs to cater to the online network with appearances on Facebook, Twitter and Hernandez's own online blog for the show which gives extra fishing tips not seen on the broadcast.moreless
  • 59
    Inside NASCAR

    Inside NASCAR

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    Showtime
    This show features host Chris Myers and analysts Brad Daugherty, Randy Pemberton and Michael Waltrip as they discuss the latest news and rumors of the past week in NASCAR racing. Inside NASCAR aired for three seasons on Showtime from 2010 - 2012.moreless
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    FIFA World Cup Germany 2006

    FIFA World Cup Germany 2006

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    FIFA (ended 2006)
    The 2006 FIFA World Cup finals showcases the talents of thirty-two teams from across the globe as they compete for the ultimate prize.
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