• 81
    Showtime Championship Boxing

    Showtime Championship Boxing

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    Showtime
    Since March 1986 premium cable channel Showtime has been broadcasting boxing on the first Saturday of every month. Showtime Championship Boxing is called by Gus Johnson, Al Bernstein and Steve Farhood and has televised some of the biggest fights in history.moreless
  • 82
    Endurance

    Endurance

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    Discovery Channel Kids (ended 2008)
    The premise of Endurance is simple: 20 teens will be dropped off in an exotic location, and will compete against eachother in both physical and mental challenges, with hopes of staying in the game. In the end, only one teen team will be left standing, and will take home the grand prize. In the first season, 20 teens competed in the Pacific Islands. During season 2, 20 new teens (and 2 returning competitors from season 1) faced off in Baja, Mexico. Season 3 brought the competition to Hawaii, and Season 4 went inland to the Tehachapi mountains. Season 5 soared to new heights in "High Sierras". Season 6 "Fiji" is now airing on the Discovery Kids network. ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ Broadcast History: October 5, 2002 - April 8, 2006: Saturday morning NBC (time varied regionally) October 14, 2006 - Present: Saturday, 8:30 (EST) Discovery Kids ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ The Episode List uses the first time the particular episode was aired on any network. For episodes 1-1 through 4-13 this premiere was on NBC on Saturday mornings. Episodes 4-14 and 4-15 premiered on Saturday night on Discovery Kids and were aired later on NBC. Starting with episode 5-1, the shows premiere Saturday night on Discovery Kids and do not air on NBC at all. ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ "Endurance" At a Glance "Endurance": Blue Team (Jonna and Aaron) Win "Endurance II": Brown Team (Jenna and Max) Win "Endurance III: Hawaii": Gray Team (Lindi and Chris) Win "Endurance IV: Tehachapi": Red Team (Franke and Erika) Win "Endurance V: High Sierras": Green Team (Alex and Cealy) Win "Endurance VI: Fiji": Blue Team (Ben and Jordyn) Winmoreless
  • 83
    Driving Force

    Driving Force

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    A&E (ended 2007)
    Racing legend John Force, his wife Laurie, and his three drag-racing daughters Ashley, Brittany and Courtney take viewers on a behind the scenes look at the everyday life of the Force family. John has a fourth daughter, Adria, is the CFO of John Force Racing, Inc. John missed out on much of the girls' upbringing since he was out on the road in the drag racing circuit. Now John is trying to bring the family together and spends most of his time with the girls as he brings them into his profession. It's a real-life reality series about the life of a drag racing family and what its like to have the fastest man in the world as your father. John Force is a 14 time NHRA Champion Funny Car driver in the NHRA. Ashley Force drives a Funny Car in the NHRA. Brittany and Courtney both run Super Comp. Fasten your seat belts.moreless
  • 84
    Saturday Night's Main Event

    Saturday Night's Main Event

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    NBC (ended 2008)
    WWE Saturday Night's Main Event has returned to NBC this March after a 13-year hiatus. In the mid-1980s through early 1990s, WWE fans would scour the television listings each month - making sure they didn't miss the highly anticipated special that replaced network staple Saturday Night Live on occasion. When Jon Lovitz, Dennis Miller and Dana Carvey weren't performing comedy sketches, WWE Superstars were squaring off in matches that often took on a pay-per-view feel. The show's original theme song was "Obsession" by the band Animotion, but by the time the first run of the series ended in 1992, the music was changed to a generic theme.moreless
  • 85
    E:60

    E:60

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    ESPN
    This primetime news magazine series hails from ESPN. Reporters discuss issues relating to sports from a more controversial approach.
  • 86
    Saw Dogs

    Saw Dogs

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    Velocity
    Master chainsaw sculptors go head to head as they compete for the right to be called the best chainsaw carvers. Hosted by Master Carver Steve Blanchard.
  • 87
    Inside the NBA

    Inside the NBA

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    NBA - National Basketball Association
    This show covers the NBA Games once sometimes twice a week with former MVP Charles Barkley, 3 NBA Champion Kenny Smith, and the moderator Erine Johnson. They give indepth analysis of all of the games and have a comedic approach to most everything. Other in-studio show co-hosts include Reggie Miller and hall of famer Earvin "Magic" Johnson.moreless
  • 88
    MLB Division and League Championship Series

    MLB Division and League Championship Series

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    FOX
    There's only October, and it is that ultimate time in Major League Baseball when courage and talent are tested, when champions are celebrated, when heroes and goats find a fixed place in our memory. No sporting event can match the MLB postseason for tradition, grandeur, excitement and sheer storybook power.moreless
  • 89
    NBC Sports College Football

    NBC Sports College Football

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    NBC Sports
    Stay up to date on games, players, rankings, recruits, trophies, conferences, rivalries, and bowls with NBC Sports College Football!
  • 90
    2012 Summer Olympic Games

    2012 Summer Olympic Games

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    NBC (ended 2012)
    NBC continues its broadcast of the world's most prestigious sporting event by showcasing the Games of the 30th Olympiad. The 2012 Summer Olympics were the third time the competition has taken place in England.moreless
  • 91
    Quick Pitch

    Quick Pitch

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    MLB
    Quick Pitch is the MLB Network series that brings you all the highlights from the day in baseball, in 60 minutes. Major League Baseball is the organization that operates the National League and American League baseball leagues, in a join organizational structure that began development in 1901. In 2000 the leagues became one legally, with the commissioner's office running all of MLB. The league is the premiere baseball league in North America, with 29 teams in the United States and one in Canada. In 2009 they launched MLB Network, a specialty cable channel dedicated to professional baseball. The network features live game coverage of regular season games, international games, and spring training, as well as daily shows like MLB Tonight, Hot Stove, and Quick Pitch. Quick Pitch brings you the days events in baseball, with 60 minutes of highlights from the day. Get your baseball fix quickly and easily with the guys on MLB Network's Quick Pitch.moreless
  • 92
    ESPN FC

    ESPN FC

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    ESPN2
    An extension of the popular website, this daily show updates viewers on all the latest happenings in the world of soccer. Dan Thomas and Max Bretos rotate as hosts with analysis by ESPN's soccer announcers and former players.moreless
  • 93
    Angry Boys

    Angry Boys

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    ABC1
    The latest project from comedian Chris Lilley (Summer Heights High, We Can Be Heroes) is a 12-part mockumentary which puts the male species under the microscope to explore what it means to be a guy in the 21st century. A joint production between the ABC (Australia), the BBC and HBO, the series went into pre-production on October 5, 2009 -- shooting in locations around Australia, the UK and USA. Originally slated to premiere in 2010, the series in now expected to air in 2011.moreless
  • 94
    Jim Rome is Burning

    Jim Rome is Burning

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    ESPN
    Welcome to the Jim Rome is Burning guide at TV.com.



    Seasoned television and radio sports talk authority Jim Rome will bring his signature of rapid-fire dialogue and hard-hitting analysis and opinions to ESPN five days per week starting Monday, Feb. 14 at 4:30 p.m. ET. Jim Rome is Burning, the half-hour discussion and interview program, will further solidify ESPN's daily programming block of debate and opining by some of the nation's top sports experts (Around the Horn at 5 p.m., Pardon the Interruption, 5:30 p.m.) leading into the 6 p.m. SportsCenter.

    The half-hour show will continue its mix of interviews with guest in-studio and via satellite, and Rome's unique take on what's going on in sports.

    Segments include:

    Rome is Burning: a monologue featuring five topics Rome is fired up about and wants to get off his chest.

    The Forum: "politically incorrect-"debate and discussion with guest sports writers and other personalities.

    FAN-ning the Flames: Rome debates the hot-button sports news issues of the week with sports experts.

    Alone with Rome: a daily one-on-one interview with some of the biggest names in sports.

    Rise and Fall: a who's hot and who's not list with commentary.

    Also, viewers can expect to see an increased presence of Rome's rabid fans known as "The Clones" as he takes viewer phone calls and emails.

    Jim Rome is Burning is produced by ESPN Original Entertainment in conjunction with Mandt Brothers Productions.moreless
  • 95
    Big Ten Wrestling

    Big Ten Wrestling

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    Big Ten Network
    Video and highlights for Big Ten wrestling.
  • 96
    Sunday Night Baseball

    Sunday Night Baseball

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    ESPN
    Sunday Night Baseball allows ESPN viewers to see a nationally televised marquee major league baseball game in prime time. For 21 years, Ford C. Frick Award winner Jon Miller called the play-by-play and Joe Morgan added color commentary. For the 2010 season, Orel Hershiser joined the booth.

    2011 marks the program's 22nd season and the first without Jon and Joe. Dan Shulman takes over the play-by-play duties and Bobby Valentine joins Hershiser to provide color commentary. For the 2012 season, Valentine left to manage the Boston Red Sox, replacing fired manager Terry Francona, who took over Valentine's spot in the broadcast booth. For the 24th season of 2013, Francona left to manage the Cleveland Indians and was replaced in the booth by John Kruk.moreless
  • 97
    MLS Cup

    MLS Cup

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    ESPN
    The MLS cup is the annual championship game of Major League Soccer.
  • 98
    WCW WorldWide

    WCW WorldWide

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    (ended 2001)
    WCW WorldWide was a weekly recap show that would also show exclusive matches. However, as the years went on, the bigger names stopped appearing as often in matches.
  • 99
    NASCAR Classic Races

    NASCAR Classic Races

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    NASCAR
    NASCAR Classic Races recaps some of NASCAR's greatest races as part of the NASCAR Hall of Fame grand opening celebration.
  • 100
    SlamBall

    SlamBall

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    SlamBall.net (ended 2004)
    When SlamBall made its groundbreaking debut last summer on The New TNN, the sports world got its first glimpse of the future; a non-stop, live-action human video game that broke all the rules of traditional sport and defined a new generation.

    But for the game's creator, 28 year old Mason Gordon, it was much more. For Gordon, SlamBall's debut was the transfiguration of a vision that had been embedded in his imagination for years, to a physical reality that the rest of the world could finally see and understand.

    In his youth, he could visualize it perfectly. In a recurring dream, it would happen over and over again. A guy goes up in the air. Another guy comes up after him. CRASH. There is a huge collision in the air. One guy takes control and pushes his opponent out of the way. Dream over. Every time he had the dream, it was the same thing. There was always a mid-air collision, but it was a different guy, a different uniform and a different move.

    Despite the familiar dreams, Gordon didn't think about acting on this imagery until many years later. Like a growing number of sports fans, his interest in traditional sports was increasingly influenced by the creativity and intensity of action sports like skateboarding, bmx and motocross.

    For Gordon, action sports had so much to offer the traditional sports world: non-stop action, riveting highlights, and most of all, fearless athletes. Yet, as a traditional athlete himself, he started to wonder about combining the best of both worlds. What would you get if you took the athletic components of football, basketball, hockey and gymnastics, and mixed them together with the insanity of action sports?

    He went back to the dreams. Once he made the connection between his new idea and the imagery of the mid-air confrontations he had seen thousands of times in his sleep, his confidence was unshakable. He knew it could be done. The question was, who else would ever believe it?

    Gordon took it to the one person who might, a visionary producer/director, Mike Tollin, principal of Tollin/Robbins Productions where Gordon had once worked as an intern. Says Gordon, "I approached Mike and told him I'd never bother him again, but that I just had this one idea that I wanted him to look at."

    Gordon spent the next six months trying to convince Tollin to help him make SlamBall a reality. Tollin recognized the potential of the idea, and after much thought, had the brainstorm that would be the project's jump off.

    Tollin did not see SlamBall as fitting into the traditional professional sports model. He didn't think it needed to develop in obscurity for several years at the grassroots level, build up a gradual fan base, and then hopefully find its way to television, as other, more established sports were struggling to at the time. If SlamBall was to be the future of pro sports, as Gordon intended, it would create it's own model: first put the games on TV, generate a mass audience, create a demand, and then back it into a more traditional league model.

    In what Gordon describes as the pairing of his extreme sports mentality and Tollin's brilliant understanding of traditional sports dynamics, a working relationship was solidified. Together, they set out to build the first SlamBall half-court.

    Constructed from spare parts: rusty gymnastics springs, second hand plywood and one trampoline, it wasn't pretty, but it would work. Next Gordon needed players. Combing the inner city parks, gyms, and rec. centers, he looked for what he calls prototype SlamBall players, vastly superior athletes who were creative, tough, and would play through pain.

    "You have to be tough as aluminium siding to play this game," says Gordon, "and your heart has to be bigger than your entire chest. You have to possess boundless belief in yourself and your ability. If you don't have that, you can't come close to playing SlamBall at this level."

    After looking at hundreds of players, he found his army, the five guys who would join with Gordon to make up SlamBall's Original Six: Jeff Sheridan, Sean Jackson, Michael Goldman, Dave Redmond and James Willis. Gordon chose to play and develop the game from the inside as a player. Gordon remembers, "We could only afford five players, so I had to be this sixth." In no time, all of them were seriously hooked. For three weeks straight they played 15 hours a day, going home completely beat down, and then coming back for more the next day.

    "It was the most fun I'd ever had in my life. It was crazy," remembers Gordon. "Here were these five guys who initially thought I was a lunatic, who were giving up their bodies and playing a really rough game and loving every minute of it."

    After testing the half court game, the group relocated to a downtown Los Angeles youth center where the first full court was built. With the addition of more players (including current SlamBall sensations Dion Mays, Stan "Shakes" Fletcher and Rob Wilson), the game soared to incredible new heights, literally. On the new court, Gordon added another trampoline at each basket. Gordon's recurring dreams would now be realized in flesh and blood, with spectacular mid-air collisions becoming one of the sport's main staples.

    As word of mouth traveled and local crowds started to get bigger, Gordon and Tollin brought in TRP's production partner Telepictures/Warner Bros to show them the local phenomenon that was building. What they saw was a fully developed underground sport that captured the core attributes of the videogame generation, a new combination of wild athleticism and amazing creativity, never seen before. "Simply put," says Gordon, "they went bananas."

    A 90-second highlight tape went to Albie Hecht, The New TNN's President. After one meeting with Tollin and Gordon, Hecht was sold. SlamBall would debut in the summer of 2002 as part of the network's "Slammin' Saturday Night" line up.

    "From that point on, it was like skiing downhill atone hundred miles an hour," says Gordon. "We had six months to find enough athletes for six teams, hire quality coaches and teach them all the game from scratch."

    Immediately, the group launched a series of radio campaigns to get the word out to potential athletes, and began reaching out to qualified coaches from around the country. Out of 400 coaching applications, the pool was narrowed down to 40 who were evaluated over a four-day clinic based on their understanding of the game and ability to formulate basic strategies.

    Surprisingly to Tollin and Gordon, many of the top tier basketball coaches could not get their heads around SlamBall. It was the younger candidates who better understood SlamBall's youthful energy, and had the kind of passion needed to guide it. Some candidates in their early twenties, like Hernando Planells, Jr. and Brendan Kirsch were awarded head coaching positions and encouraged to innovate.

    The search for players was equally as challenging. Three months and hundreds of athletes later, the first-ever SlamBall draft took place, producing six teams of eight players each. With players and personnel in place, Gordon and his team faced their biggest challenge of the sport's first season.

    "In six weeks," he says, "we had to teach a group of players a brand new skill set and get them to where they could put a professional quality sports product on the floor. With our original players already at a certain level, we had to get the rest of the guys caught up. By this time, the addition of two more trampolines on each side made the SlamBall court complete.

    Knowing the critical role credibility would play in establishing SlamBall's legitimacy, Tollin, a Philadelphia native, reached out to hometown businessman, Pat Croce, former President of the Philadelphia 76ers and one of the most successful sports entrepreneurs ever.

    Three days after seeing the game live and up-close, Croce signed on as a SlamBall partner and became the game's premier spokesperson, generating a PR frenzy no fledgling sport could even hope to achieve. With little marketing and promotion behind the initial campaign , Croce's involvement came at a critical time and soon the mainstream media; including ESPN, Sports Illustrated, Time Magazine and The Jay Leno Show were all chasing the SlamBall story.

    SlamBall made its national television debut on August 3, 2002, as a six-episode summer series and delivered the young and diverse audience TNN was looking for. Ratings were consistent throughout five consecutive re-run cycles as tremendous word of mouth brought new viewers to the game each week.

    "The greatest thing in the world for me," says Gordon, "was seeing glimpses of the sport I wanted SlamBall to be. When players would work out some kind of intricate pass or misdirection of the stopper, I saw a new type of instinctive strategy. To me, that's what was so cool about the first season."

    By December of 2002, SlamBall got the green light for Season Two. Seeing the potential for big ratings, the network more than doubled the number of SlamBall episodes, scheduling a 13-week series for the new season.

    With increased exposure, Gordon knows the game will be scrutinized more closely as critics try to decide whether SlamBall is, in fact, a "real" sport. "I want people to look at us," he says, "because the closer they look, the more they'll realize that these players are tremendous athletes who are playing their hearts out in a game that's so exciting, creative and dynamic."

    This year, the league added two new teams, the Riders and Bandits, and took tryouts national, something Gordon believes will raise the level of play exponentially, "What people don't understand is that we're just scratching the surface of the level of creativity and athleticism you're going to see in this game for years to come"

    "One day, there is going to be a guy out there who will have an interdisciplinary skill set so far beyond anything we've ever seen before, that no one will be able to discount his ability."

    As for SlamBall's future and the possibility of growing the sport, Gordon says it all depends on the fans. "If the fans want to see it, it's going to happen," he says, "but people can trust that everyone involved in SlamBall is going 24-7 on the accelerator to get it there."moreless
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