• 21
    Dr. Phil

    Dr. Phil

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    In this spin-off from The Oprah Winfrey Show, Dr. Phil gives advice to guests and tackles a variety of topics.
  • 22
    Frontline

    Frontline

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    PBS
    Since it began in 1983, ‘Frontline' has been airing public-affairs documentaries that explore a wide scope of the complex human experience. Frontline's goal is to extend the impact of the documentary beyond its initial broadcast by serving as a catalyst for change.moreless
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    The Ed Sullivan Show

    The Ed Sullivan Show

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    CBS (ended 1971)
    This long-running variety series premiered on June 20, 1948 with the title Toast of the Town. (The Toast of the Town link covers the first 8 seasons of Ed Sullivan.)

    The series was re-titled The Ed Sullivan Show on September 25, 1955 (the beginning of the 9th season). Although the name had changed, it remained the same variety show with "something for everyone." There continued to be a diverse guest line-up which included singers, musicians, actors, dancers, comedians, circus acts, plate spinners and acrobats.

    But now there was now a new type of guest: the rock 'n' roll performer. While Ed booked a few rock 'n' roll acts on "Toast of the Town," these performers became even more prominent on "The Ed Sullivan Show."

    One of the most famous rock 'n' roll acts was, of course, Elvis Presley. Ed had at first scoffed at the idea of booking Elvis, who had already appeared on "Stage Show," "The Milton Berle Show" and "The Steve Allen Show" amid much controversy. But as Elvis' popularity grew, Ed relented and booked him for three appearances.

    Then there were the famous Beatles appearances. Legend has it that Ed booked the Beatles without hearing even a note of their music. While visiting England, Sullivan happened to be at Heathrow Airport on October 31, 1963 when the Beatles' plane arrived. The British press and hundreds of fans were there to greet them. Upon seeing all the frenzy, Ed signed the band to appear on his show. Beatlemania was already in full swing when the Beatles arrived at New York's JFK airport on February 7, 1964. On February 9, the Beatles made their "Ed Sullivan" debut. The Beatles' three 1964 Sullivan appearances were among the highest rated TV programs of the 1960's.

    In 1967, Ed's NYC studio, Studio 50, was officially re-titled "The Ed Sullivan Theater." The ratings of The Ed Sullivan Show began to drop in 1968. CBS cancelled the series in 1971. The final new show aired on March 28, 1971 which was followed by several weeks of reruns. The series' network run ended on June 6, 1971 (which was a repeat of the February 7, 1971 show). At the time of the cancellation, CBS did not give The Ed Sullivan Show the sendoff that it deserved. Instead of ending with a tribute show focusing on all the great moments of the past 23 years, the show quietly went off the air. But in the 33 years since the series was cancelled, CBS has aired numerous tribute shows giving the series the recognition it deserves.

    Syndicated, cable TV and PBS repeats:

    In 1980, a "Best of Sullivan" series hosted by John Byner appeared in syndication. Each episode was an edited 30-minute version of the original 1-hour shows. This version has not been broadcast since the 1980's.

    Around 1992, a new 30-minute "Ed Sullivan" series was syndicated. These were edited versions of the original shows (but often clips from other episodes were added). This version later appeared on the TV Land cable network (1996-1998).

    From 2001 through 2004, PBS stations across the U.S. aired edited versions of The Ed Sullivan Show (usually airing two 30-minute programs back-to-back). These were produced by WQED Multimedia in Pittsburgh. --The first PBS season (2001-02) consisted of the 1990s shows that were edited for commercial TV. To fill in the commercial breaks, WQED added new intros by Shirley Jones. --For the 2002-03 PBS season, WQED publicized a new package of 76 Sullivan shows. (These do not have Shirley Jones.) Ten of these shows have not been seen since their original broadcasts. The other 66 were previously shown in the 1990s but were slightly re-edited with a few "missing" performances restored. This group of Sullivan shows continued into the 2003-04 season.

    A different series, titled "Ed Sullivan's Rock 'N' Roll Classics," first appeared in the 1990's on VH1 (in the US). This version features rock and pop music clips taken from various Ed Sullivan episodes. This series is currently available on VHS and DVD.

    For information about The Ed Sullivan Show and Toast of the Town, contact: SOFA Entertainment 9121 W. Sunset Blvd. West Hollywood, CA 90069 Fax: 310-276-0242 greg.vines@sofaent.com www.sofaentertainment.com Sofa Home Entertainment SOFA Entertainment owns the right to every Ed Sullivan Show and Toast of the Town.

    And thanks to Historic Films for their on-line database. Their website has been very helpful in verifing guest lists and other information.moreless
  • 24
    TMZ on TV

    TMZ on TV

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    Can't get enough of TMZ online? Well now you can watch all Hollywood gossip on television with this entertainment news magazine show. TMZ TV tracks down today's hottest stars with their cameras whether they are hitting the clubs or the dry cleaners.moreless
  • 25
    The People's Court

    The People's Court

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    The People's Court - a throwback to 1950s syndicated courtroom fare such as Traffic Court and The Stand Accused - was set in a small-claims court. The litigants had both agreed to bring their grievances to a California small-claims court, where retired Superior Court Judge Joseph A. Wapner heard the cases. The plaintiffs could file a claim for up to $1,500, while the defendants sometimes filed a countersuit if they felt they were due compensation. While most cases were run-of-the-mill complaints over poor service, broken contracts, ownership rights and malfunctioning merchandise, others had odd twists. For instance: * The overweight stripper who was not paid because the bachelor party-goers thought she was unattractive. During the arguments, she reveals she had gone at the request of her friend, the bride-to-be who found out about the party. * The mother who refused to pay a clown after he came to a birthday party dressed as a towering purple monster (he was supposed to play a Smurf); the clown ended up terrifying the party-goers. * The woman who requested a male friend make good on a verbal contract to pay half of the cost of her daughter's abortion, when she thought he was the father. He had backed out when he was sterile. * A woman who sued the owner of a pitbull after he jumped on the hood of his car. The pitbull's owner claimed she struck the dog and requested payment for the dog's injuries; and even suspected the resulting damage to the car was from a prior accident. And the list of odd cases went on. Each litigant (who, as the announcer reminded viewers each day, were not actors) stated his case before Joseph A. Wapner . After he was through asking questions, he retreated to his chambers before rendering his decision. More than once, he refused to support either side. Each litigant was then interviewed by the courtroom reporter (originally Doug Llewelyn from 1981-1993); sometimes, he gave the results of how courtroom spectators would have decided the case. Usually two cases were heard per show, though some longer cases took up the entire 30 minutes. If time permitted, Wapner fielded questions from the gallery; or legal expert Harvey Levin gave advice on handling that episode's legal scenario (i.e., confronting a car dealer about a car suspected to be a lemon). Each episode ended with Llewelyn admonishing viewers with some variation of the age old advice: "When you get mad, don't take the law into your own hands ... take 'em to court!" The original version of The People's Court ran for 12 years. When The People's Court returned to syndicated TV in 1997, the show expanded to 60 minutes, with Judge Ed Koch (the former New York City mayor) now presiding. Koch lasted until 1999, when Judge Jerry Scheindlin took over in 1999. Judge Marilyn Milian has presided since 2001. The format of the revised The People's Court was essentially similar, except the small claim's court limit was upped to $5,000. Sometimes, the interviewers also asked spectators on-camera their thoughts of a case before the judge's verdict was announced. Related Shows The People's Court UK Carol Smillie is set to present a new UK version of the People's Court for ITV1's new daytime line-up titled itv DAY.moreless
  • 26
    Pardon the Interruption

    Pardon the Interruption

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    ESPN
    On Monday, Oct. 22, ESPN premiered Pardon The Interruption, a live and provocative show devoted exclusively to sports opinions and headline issues, airs each weekday at 5:30 p.m. ET leading into SportsCenter. The 30-minute program originates from Washington, D.C. and features Washington Post columnists Tony Kornheiser and Mike Wilbon. The two address a variety of issues from the sports world each day with some the help of some in-studio and out-of-studio contributors. The program reairs each weekday at 6:30 p.m. ET on ESPNEWS, and often at 7:30 on ESPN2. Kornheiser and Wilbon, who have been debating each other in the sports and style pages of the Washington Post for more than two decades, face-off nightly on the day's hot topics. Timely interviews with newsmakers frame the debates. Viewers also have an opportunity to ask questions and voice opinions. Veteran ESPN news executive Jim Cohen serves as the show's executive producer. Kornheiser and Wilbon, frequent guests on ESPN's The Sports Reporters, remain with The Post and continue writing columns for the sports pages. Kornheiser also continues as host of Tony Kornheiser Show on ESPN Radio.moreless
  • 27
    The Early Show

    The Early Show

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    CBS (ended 2012)
    The Early Show has aired on CBS since 1999, often competing with other network morning news shows, Good Morning America and The Today Show, which are also from New York City. Bryant Gumbel, Jane Clayson, and Mark McEwen hosted The Early Show from inception until they left the show in October 2002. The show is currently anchored by Harry Smith, Julie Chen, Russ Mitchell, Maggie Rodriguez, and Dave Price.moreless
  • 28
    Steve Harvey

    Steve Harvey

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    NBC
    Steve Harvey hosts a brand new syndicated American talk show. Co-produced by Harvey, Endemol, and NBCUniversal, the show debuted on Sept. 4th, 2012. Topics covered will include real life issues men and women face as well as ways to better themselves. Steve will also occasionally interview big name celebrities.moreless
  • 29
    Entertainment Tonight

    Entertainment Tonight

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    Welcome to the Entertainment Tonight guide at tv.com. ET is a daily, half-hour, nationally syndicated entertainment newsmagazine, reporting on breaking news events, exclusive interviews, behind-the-scenes first looks, and Hollywood's hottest stories from the worlds of film, television, fashion, literature and interactive media.moreless
  • 30
    The Tyra Banks Show

    The Tyra Banks Show

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    (ended 2010)
    Tyra Banks hits daytime television in her daily talk show, The Tyra Banks Show. The show focuses on empowering young women, and encourages them to reach their goals and achieve their dreams.moreless
  • 31
    The Mike Douglas Show

    The Mike Douglas Show

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    (ended 1981)
    The Mike Douglas Show was first broadcast live in 1961 from the studios of KYW-TV (owned by Westinghouse Broadcasting Company) in Cleveland, Ohio as a local program (Mike Douglas's salary was $400 per week). The show offered a wide variety of guests, ranging from Richard Nixon to the Rolling Stones. Most of the guests, though, were entertainers (singers and/or musicians) along with a fair share of comics. The show is probably MOST noted for its exposure and introduction of (now) famous musical acts and singers, including Barbra Streisand and Aretha Franklin. Regretfully, Westinghouse taped over the Streisand shows to produce editorials. (These yet-to-be-famous performers were given a package deal that, after appearing on the show, would perform at a now-defunct night club in suburban Lakewood called The Chateau.) The show also showcased all of the latest rock groups of the 1960s. These groups ranged from "The Box-Tops" (1968), "Herman's Hermits" (1965 and 1967), the "Strawberry Alarm Clock" (1967), "The Turtles" (1968 and 1969) to John Lennon and "The Plastic Ono Band" (1972). A true example of the amazing cross section of guests who appeared on any particular show was when "The Turtles" appeared on the same show with comedic actor Ted Knight, and author, Truman Capote. In the words of Howard Kaylan (of the Turtles), "Not too shabby." In August, 1963, The Mike Douglas Show went into national syndication with a total of 5 local markets (Westinghouse owned local TV stations in Baltimore, San Francisco, Boston and Pittsburgh) airing the program. Following Westinghouse's victory in a lawsuit against NBC in June of 1965, The Mike Douglas Show moved to a basement studio (142 seats) at 1619 Walnut St. in Philadelphia. (This was the new home of KYW, owned and operated by Westinghouse Broadcasting Company, Group W Productions). The show discontinued live broadcasts in early 1965 following some "off-color" language verbalized by guest Zsa Zsa Gabor. At this time the show's popularity grew extensively and by 1967 the show reached 171 markets, had over 6,000,000 daily viewers (mostly housewives), and was bringing in over $10.5 million annually in sponsors' fees. At this time Mike Douglas's salary was over $500,000 annually. Also in 1967, the program received an Emmy Award for Individual Achievement in Daytime Television, the first such award ever given by the National Academy of Television Arts and Sciences. The show remained at the Walnut St. location until July 31, 1972, when the move was made to a newly constructed studio at 5th and Market Sts. in Philadelphia, where KYW remains today. This was the first time a studio was constructed especially for the show. The last PHILADELPHIA broadcast was in July, 1978, when the show moved to LOS ANGELES, California. The last airing was November, 1981. Note: Mike Douglas started another syndicated program, "The Mike Douglas Entertainment Hour," which ceased production in 1982.moreless
  • 32
    The Oprah Winfrey Show

    The Oprah Winfrey Show

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    (ended 2011)
    The Oprah Winfrey Show has featured many celebrities over the years, but that´s only one side of it. There´s also Oprah´s eternal quest to better herself, and to make the viewers change themselves. Oprah has started several organizations: Oprah´s angel network, Oprah´s book club, and O Magazine. For a couple of years now, the show frequently ends with a "Remember your spirit" segment. The show is produced by Oprah´s own company, Harpo (which spells Oprah backwards). The Oprah Winfrey show ended after its 25th year of production.moreless
  • 33
    Late Night with Jimmy Fallon

    Late Night with Jimmy Fallon

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    NBC (ended 2014)
    Saturday Night Live veteran Jimmy Fallon takes the Late Night reins from Conan O'Brien when O'Brien as the new host. The Roots are the house band with Steve Higgins as the announcer. The show features comedy sketches, interviews and whatever other antics the Late Night crew can come up with.moreless
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    American Greed

    American Greed

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    CNBC
    American Greed is an original business documentary television series from CNBC that examines the some of the biggest corporate and white collar crimes in the United States. Companies such as Tyco, Enron, HealthSouth, and WorldCom, that have exploited hard working Americans out of their equity investments, retirement funds, and employment due to corporate lavish spending and lack of oversight. In addition to profiling these high profile cases, American Greed covers stories about more common crimes such as medical fraud, money laundering, Ponzi schemes, embezzlement, insurance fraud, and murder. Host Stacy Keach narrates how each case started from beginning to end, with dramatizations, interviews with real life victims, and evidence recovered by respective agencies in charge of bringing each perpetrator to justice. American Greed, some people will do anything from money.moreless
  • 35
    Judge Mathis

    Judge Mathis

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    The CW
    Judge Mathis is entertaining Court TV inspired by the troubled childhood of the judge of the same name. Judge Greg Mathis leads the court for an hour long session. Cases in the court are anything but dull. The litigants in each case are typically comical in their own right each with a lengthy story to tell. But Judge Mathis holds his own against the revolving guests, as he can always be counted on to offer a witty statement or instigation from the bench. And his two cents is constantly appreciated by the viewers and the spectators of the court. Lately the television judges of today are straying further from the 'stern-faced' no nonsense judges of the past and the intimidation role of such persons like Judge Judy. Instead, it looks as if the judge of today aims to display this "I want to be your friend" sort of demeanor – which often comes across as strained or scripted. But not with Mathis. When Judge Mathis laughs it up from his post on the bench, or heckles a litigant that was caught cheating on his girlfriend – it doesn't seem scripted, but downright genuine. Mathis seems to gather just as much amusement listening to the stories from his ruling position as the viewers gather from their posts at home. Of course, Judge Mathis isn't based upon an entire platform of humor. Present is the sporadic second of blatant seriousness. No times for laughs, but time for the spotlight to shine as Greg Mathis addresses a courtroom guest about straightening up their life. For importance adds his 'been-there-done-that' point of view about how life on the streets, drugs, and 'thuggin' will get you nowhere but in prison, or dead. The moment of unsmiling monologue is easy to digest – Mathis never goes over the top, he keeps it short and like a flash he moves on and the ho-hum 'scared straight' moment is lifted. Judge Mathis is 60 minutes of entertainment. Underrated against other shows of its genre, it remains a highly favored show among staunch fans. But the show doesn't go completely unnoticed. In 2004 and 2005, Judge Mathis was nominated for a NAACP Image Award in the category of Outstanding TV News, Talk or Information Series or Special.moreless
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    The Merv Griffin Show

    The Merv Griffin Show

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    (ended 1986)
    The Merv Griffin Show first aired on NBC (1962-1963, then again 1965-1968), CBS (1969-1972) and in syndication afterwards. Merv Griffin became a television host after filling in for Jack Parr on the Tonight Show in 1962 which impressed NBC enough to develop The Merv Griffin Show. Originally airing in black and white the first color telecast on The Merv Griffin Show was on August 24, 1967. Merv interviewed celebrities, politicians and some very interesting people over the years. A charming, eloquent host Merv had this wonderful interest in people which usually displayed itself in his signature expression of OOOOO and rapt attention to his guests.moreless
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    CBS This Morning

    CBS This Morning

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    CBS
    Charlie Rose, Gayle King and Norah O'Donnell host "CBS This Morning," a morning show with a brand new format, look and state-of-the-art studio. The style, tone, and content of the new morning program extends CBS News' commitment to original reporting and journalistic integrity. The broadcast presents a mix of daily news, coverage of developing stories of national and global significance, and interviews with leading figures in politics, business and entertainment.moreless
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    The Jerry Springer Show

    The Jerry Springer Show

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    The Jerry Springer Show is probably most known for its foul mouths, excessive fighting, excessive nudity and wacky stories. Nearly every episode, if not all, have at least one bleeped over foul word. Then there's the sound effects. A clanging bell indicates it's time for a fight! Whenever a fat woman shows her boobs, the sound of a cow going "MOO!" is heard. Even the audience gets into it! Women show their boobs to get "Jerry Beads". Whenever a touching good moment happens or an audience member asks a goody goody logical question, the audience chants, "Go to Oprah"! TV Guide voted The Jerry Springer Show as the "Worst Show In The History of Television." A new UK version will soon be airing on ITV1 for 4 weeks after the UK's talk show queen Trisha Goddard left ITV to present her new five show Trisha Goddard.moreless
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    The Steve Wilkos Show

    The Steve Wilkos Show

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    Steve Wilkos, better known as long-time head of security on The Jerry Springer Show doles out advice in this hour-long talk show.
    Wilkos' assets as a host include morals instilled by his Marine training and street smarts garnered from his experience as a police officer.moreless
  • 40
    Maron

    Maron

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    IFC
    Marc Maron stars as a fictionalized version of himself in this new sitcom.  
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