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    Nathan For You

    Nathan For You

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    Comedy Central (Returning Summer 2014)
    Comedian Nathan Fielder attempts to use his business degree help actual small businesses start making money. From introducing a controversial frozen yogurt flavor or helping a taxi company change how they provide cab ride, Nathan takes it as far as needed to make his ideas come to life. But because of his sometimes-bizarre approach, Nathan's sincere attempts often lead these business owners into experience that goes way farther than what they bargained for.moreless
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    The People's Court

    The People's Court

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    The People's Court - a throwback to 1950s syndicated courtroom fare such as Traffic Court and The Stand Accused - was set in a small-claims court. The litigants had both agreed to bring their grievances to a California small-claims court, where retired Superior Court Judge Joseph A. Wapner heard the cases. The plaintiffs could file a claim for up to $1,500, while the defendants sometimes filed a countersuit if they felt they were due compensation. While most cases were run-of-the-mill complaints over poor service, broken contracts, ownership rights and malfunctioning merchandise, others had odd twists. For instance: * The overweight stripper who was not paid because the bachelor party-goers thought she was unattractive. During the arguments, she reveals she had gone at the request of her friend, the bride-to-be who found out about the party. * The mother who refused to pay a clown after he came to a birthday party dressed as a towering purple monster (he was supposed to play a Smurf); the clown ended up terrifying the party-goers. * The woman who requested a male friend make good on a verbal contract to pay half of the cost of her daughter's abortion, when she thought he was the father. He had backed out when he was sterile. * A woman who sued the owner of a pitbull after he jumped on the hood of his car. The pitbull's owner claimed she struck the dog and requested payment for the dog's injuries; and even suspected the resulting damage to the car was from a prior accident. And the list of odd cases went on. Each litigant (who, as the announcer reminded viewers each day, were not actors) stated his case before Joseph A. Wapner . After he was through asking questions, he retreated to his chambers before rendering his decision. More than once, he refused to support either side. Each litigant was then interviewed by the courtroom reporter (originally Doug Llewelyn from 1981-1993); sometimes, he gave the results of how courtroom spectators would have decided the case. Usually two cases were heard per show, though some longer cases took up the entire 30 minutes. If time permitted, Wapner fielded questions from the gallery; or legal expert Harvey Levin gave advice on handling that episode's legal scenario (i.e., confronting a car dealer about a car suspected to be a lemon). Each episode ended with Llewelyn admonishing viewers with some variation of the age old advice: "When you get mad, don't take the law into your own hands ... take 'em to court!" The original version of The People's Court ran for 12 years. When The People's Court returned to syndicated TV in 1997, the show expanded to 60 minutes, with Judge Ed Koch (the former New York City mayor) now presiding. Koch lasted until 1999, when Judge Jerry Scheindlin took over in 1999. Judge Marilyn Milian has presided since 2001. The format of the revised The People's Court was essentially similar, except the small claim's court limit was upped to $5,000. Sometimes, the interviewers also asked spectators on-camera their thoughts of a case before the judge's verdict was announced. Related Shows The People's Court UK Carol Smillie is set to present a new UK version of the People's Court for ITV1's new daytime line-up titled itv DAY.moreless
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    The Graham Norton Show

    The Graham Norton Show

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    BBC
    Graham Norton presents a show focusing on the people, trends, stories and aspects of celebrity culture that interest him most, featuring trademark Norton comedy monologues and celebrity chat. Each week celebrity guests join the camp comedian to discuss their latest projects and the celebrity gossip hitting the news stands during the week. Graham is often joined by a band or artist to play the show out with.moreless
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    Attack of the Show!

    Attack of the Show!

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    G4 (ended 2013)
    Attack of the Show (or "AOTS")--the self-proclaimed "show that gets it before it gets out"--is a signature show of G4, the video game network. There's the inside track, and then there are those who pave the inside track. Attack of the Show gets you inside, underneath, around, and behind the newest tech, the hottest games, the fastest-breaking news, and the oddest oddities from the fringe. In addition to reporting the hot Internet memes of the day, AOTS features interviews with both famous and internet-famous celebrities, the most-blogged news of the day, coverage of alt-events like the Geek Prom and the Modern Drunkard Festival, and the latest games and gear for PCs and consoles. AOTS is also well-known for its regular weekly segments such as "Gems of the Internet," "DVDuesday," "It Came From eBay," "The Feed," "User Created," "AOTS LAN Party," "Free Play Friday," and "Damn Good Download."moreless
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    GMTV

    GMTV

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    GMTV (ended 2010)
    GMTV originally aired between 1st January 1993 and 31st December 1999. At this point the show changed it's title toGMTV Today. The show returned as part of a rebrand of the channel on January 5th 2010 and aired on ITV1 and ITV1HD (as of 2nd April 2010) 6am-8.35am Monday-Thursday and 6am-9.25am on Fridays until 3rd September 2010. It bought you up to date with the mornings latest news and views. With real-life stories, celebrity exclusives, tv reviews and more.moreless
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    The Dick Cavett Show

    The Dick Cavett Show

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    ABC (ended 1986)
    During the late 60's and early 70's, The Dick Cavett Show was beloved by critics and hailed as an intelligent alternative to the other more frothy interview shows. In addition to the standard-fare of celebrities, he often booked controversial and opinionated guests like Gore Vidal, Timothy Leary and Georgia's segregationist governor Lester Maddox. This occasionally led to fireworks between the host and guests: Maddox stormed off when he was asked to defend his views; Cavett once said to a condescending Norman Mailer, "Why don't you fold it five ways and put it where the moon don't shine?" His late-night series also booked musical guests that shows like Tonight and Merv tended to ignore, namely rock acts. Now-legendary performers like Ravi Shankar, Paul Simon and Sly Stone appeared to sing and chat. Cavett was occasionally able to devote a whole show, or more, to one guest. This yielded memorable interviews with the likes of Groucho Marx, Katharine Hepburn, Lawrence Olivier and Orson Welles. Cavett also held the distinction of being the only show to have a guest die during it. Organic farming advocate J.I. Rodale had moved "down the couch" after his interview. Cavett, assuming he had dozed off during the chat with the next guest, asked, "Are we boring you, Mr. Rodale?". Rodale had passed away from a heart attack; the show did not air. Despite the acclaim, his series were chronically plagued with low ratings, coming in a distant third place to Carson and CBS. First was a 90-minute weekday program on ABC daytime called This Morning, Dick Cavett, airing from March 4th 1968 to January 1969. This was followed by a Monday/Tuesday/Friday ABC prime-time series from May-September 1969. Next came his best remembered program, the late-night ABC series airing weeknights from December 1969-December 1972. Beginning in January 1973, that series aired as an occasional part of the network's ABC's Wide World of Entertainment, an umbrella title for various series, concerts, and specials running in late-night. His show remained in this rotation through January 1, 1975. Next came a half-hour PBS interview program running from 1977-1982. He returned to his old home ABC one more time from September-December of 1986. Cavett's theme song, used regularly throughout the years, is part of the overture from Candide.moreless
  • 67
    Trucks!

    Trucks!

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    Spike TV
    Welcome to the Trucks! guide at TV.com. This show is for gearheads who love big trucks and lowriders that are hot rod trucks. More information to come soon.
  • 68
    Lopez Tonight

    Lopez Tonight

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    TBS (ended 2011)
    George Lopez brings his unique style of comedy to TBS in a new late night talk show series. Lopez Tonight originally aired at 11 PM before moving to 12 AM after Conan began.moreless
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    The Nate Berkus Show

    The Nate Berkus Show

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    W.
    Design expert, best-selling author and contributor to The Oprah Winfrey Show, Nate Berkus takes on design challenges, showcases home improvement and personal makeover stories, and offers tips and tricks on The Nate Berkus Show.moreless
  • 70
    Talking Bad

    Talking Bad

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    AMC (ended 2013)
    AMC will now air a discussion show every week following Breaking Bad. Talking Bad will recap the events of the last hour and look ahead to next week.
  • 71
    The Soup

    The Soup

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    E!
    With this new satirical series, the E! Entertainment Network returns to a format they helped create with the popular '90s show Talk Soup. Only this time instead of just poking fun at talk shows, they're setting their sights on all things in entertainment, reality TV, pop culture, and politics.moreless
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    Late Night with Jimmy Fallon

    Late Night with Jimmy Fallon

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    NBC (ended 2014)
    Saturday Night Live veteran Jimmy Fallon takes the Late Night reins from Conan O'Brien when O'Brien as the new host. The Roots are the house band with Steve Higgins as the announcer. The show features comedy sketches, interviews and whatever other antics the Late Night crew can come up with.moreless
  • 73
    Maury

    Maury

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    Maury Povich, who continues to post record ratings on his hit syndicated talk show Maury, returned Sept. 13, 2004, for a seventh season of NBC Universal Domestic Television's daily one-hour series. As always, Povich will continue to explore the compelling issues that impact teens, their parents, and society as a whole. A veteran journalist, Povich is well known for his ability to get to the heart of any matter.moreless
  • 74
    SportsNation

    SportsNation

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    ESPN2
    Michelle Beadle, Marcellus Wiley, and Max Kellerman host the show which features a more light-hearted look at the day in sports. Previous co-hosts include: Colin Cowherd and Charissa Thompson.
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    The Phil Donahue Show

    The Phil Donahue Show

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    (ended 1996)
    Welcome to The Phil Donahue Show guide at TV.com. The precursor to all the daytime talk shows that arose during the 1980's and 90's. Phil Donahue's show started off similar to other shows of its day, featuring celebrities and musical acts, but he soon started pushing the envelope by discussing health and social topics previously considered taboo. Eventually, the popularity of this approach proved to be his downfall, as he was soon competing with host such as Oprah Winfrey, Sally Jesse Raphael and Geraldo Rivera, who were willing to stoop to new depths in search of sensational topics. The Phil Donahue Show debuted in November 1967 as a local affairs talk show in Dayton, Ohio. It's host, Cleveland native Phil Donahue, was previously a news reporter for the small station on which it premiered. The show would premiere nationally on January 5, 1970 and run an astounding 26 years until September 13, 1996.

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  • 76
    Feherty

    Feherty

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    The Golf Channel
    Former professional golfer and current analyst for the sport, David Feherty, hosts this new talk show. Guests on the show will include current players, celebrities and anyone with a love of golf.moreless
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    American Muscle Car

    American Muscle Car

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    (ended 2001)
    Welcome to TV.com's American Muscle Car Guide!
  • 78
    Monday Night Football

    Monday Night Football

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    ESPN
    "Monday Night Football really got on the air because of Pete Rozelle," recalls former producer Don Ohlmeyer. Indeed, it was Rozelle's reputation for public relations and marketing that created a prime-time venue for the National Football League. The prototypes for Monday Night Football were those annual Monday night games staged from 1966 to 1969 inclusive on CBS. St. Louis hosted three of them, and it seemed natural for the NFL to make Monday night their regular turf. The only trouble was, Rozelle couldn't get a network to agree. CBS did not want to lose Gunsmoke. NBC had Rowan and Martin's Laugh-In, TV's highest-rated show the past two years. Even ABC, floundering in third place in the ratings, was unsure. Rozelle then threatened to put the Monday night package in syndication via the Hughes Television Service. So ABC bought in. NFL owners themselves weren't keen on Monday Night Football. Some thought the gates would be dormant. But then-Cleveland Browns owner Art Modell, who knew a thing or two about marketing himself, agreed to host the first MNF game. He asked that the Browns face the Jets to maximize ABC's first-night audience. The result was a smashing success. For 36 years, Monday Night Football would air on ABC at Mondays at 9pm ET/6pm PT ever since (except for when it aired at 8pm ET). Though two teams would always meet on the field, viewers often got their fill from watching the original ABC broadcasters. Don Meredith and Howard Cosell were, along with Keith Jackson, part of the original team that started in 1970. After Jackson returned full-time to ABC's college football broadcasts, the network hired Frank Gifford away from CBS. From there, Monday Night Football began its most memorable years. It got ratings thanks to the wide appeal that Cosell, Meredith, and Gifford collectively garnered. Except for a shift in the mid-70s that sent Meredith briefly to another network, ABC played a strong football card for twelve years. The separate departures of Meredith and Cosell left the Monday Night Football booth in a shaky transition period during the mid-80s. Though they sometimes got it right on the field, with the high-water mark being Miami's romping of the eventual Super Bowl champion Chicago Bears in 1985, it was plain that the booth could not work with three ex-players (what Howard Cosell had labeled "jockocracy"). The likes of Fred Williamson, O.J. Simpson, and Joe Namath were quickly disposed. The second-most-stable team was assembled in 1986, when veteran ABC sportscaster Al Michaels joined Gifford. Rounding out the booth was future Hall of Fame offensive lineman Dan Dierdorf. They would share more than a decade of prime time football coverage, including three Super Bowls. For all its considerable charm and novelty, one thing Monday Night Football did not achieve was a proper farewell to Frank Gifford. After the 1997 season, the booth welcomed the recently-retired Bengals quarterback Boomer Esiason. Gifford was cramped in a studio to introduce pregame and halftime stories for the 1998 season. Neither change worked, as Gifford was out of ABC after one year and Boomer Esiason agreed to a contract settlement in 2000. The next two years were the least successful. Joining Al Michaels was ABC college football analyst Dan Fouts and, of all people, Dennis Miller. Even though their first season had an abundance of nail-biters (witness the Jets' Midnight Miracle over the Dolphins), the new recruits were unable to get in focus. Miller in particular was over-rehearsed in the hours leading up to a broadcast. Both he and Fouts were out of the booth after January 7, 2002. ABC needed a lift for the show, and thought they had it when John Madden (who had recanted on his offer to join ABC in 1994) came over from another network. Monday Night Football went from planes to buses for the next four years. Again, though, the players were meant to be bigger stars than Madden or Michaels. Sometimes it showed, such as the Colts' stunning comeback over the defending World Champion Buccaneers in 2003. But in all honesty, the hundred forces that had emerged after 1970 to compete with Monday Night Football, were collectively getting the better of ABC. Thus, on April 18, 2005, a new eight-year contract sent Monday Night Football to ABC's adopted sister network, ESPN.moreless
  • 79
    Tosh.0

    Tosh.0

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    Comedy Central
    Comedian Daniel Tosh is the host of this rambunctious program that ranges from the absurd to the profane, the humorously silly to the shockingly irreverent. Built around a unique byproduct of the Internet age, the viral video, Tosh and company scour the Internet searching for the most intriguing, disgusting and entertaining of these mini-cinematic gems and present them with a narrative that is witty, provocative, insightful and outrageous. Add to that Tosh's interviews, skits, and other unclassifiable bits and it's almost guaranteed that you'll find something that will offend you or make you laugh out loud-probably at the same time.moreless
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    Last Call with Carson Daly

    Last Call with Carson Daly

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    NBC
    Hosted by Carson Daly, whose career now spans a multitude of media including network television, cable, radio and most recently, the recording industry, "Last Call" features interviews and musical performances by today's top artists and entertainers.moreless
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