Century City

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CBS (ended 2004)

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7.2
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77 votes
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SHOW REVIEWS
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Century City

Show Summary

Century City is a legal drama set in Los Angeles around the firm of Constable, Crane and Montero in 2030 that speculates on how the legal system will have changed by then.

The series was cancelled by CBS after four episodes had aired; however, the five remaining episodes later aired on Universal HD.
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SUBMIT REVIEW
  • Did you ever notice how when science fiction depicts the future, people always have weird clothes and cool gadgets? You know, robotic assistants and silver jumpsuits?

    7.9
    Did you ever notice how when science fiction depicts the future, people always have weird clothes and cool gadgets? You know, robotic assistants and silver jumpsuits? CBS's new drama, Century City, isn't quite science fiction but the show is set in 2032 and has more than its share of weird clothes and cool gadgets.



    I say that Century City isn't exactly sci-fi because it's not about the clothes or the gadgets. The near-future setting is a technique that allows the writers to explore the legal and ethical questions raised by the steady march of technology. In the second episode, the two main plots deal with the legal and ethical questions that arise from genetic testing on fetuses and the "downloading" of someone's personality into "smart" appliances and clothing. Both situations that seem entirely plausible in the next 30 years.



    Billed, sometimes, as Law & Order of the future the show actually feels a bit more like L.A. Law of the future. Besides the Los Angeles setting there's the fact the show deals almost exclusively with the lawyers in their office and courtroom settings. And of course hints that the show will explore romantic liaisons in and out of the office.



    As for the future setting, the writers do a good job in using the setting to allow them to explore the types of questions that society seems to want to ignore today. Unlike the mostly dystopian views of the future that sci-fi seems to prefer, Century City shows a rather rosy picture. Ethnic and gender inequality seem to have diminished, technology is largely used for good and (most unrealistically) L.A. has an effective (if crowded) mass transit system.



    The show suffers however when it trots out the obligatory weird clothes and cool gadgets just for the sake of reminding us that it's the future. Ok, the holographic teleconference is a good idea but the artificial intelligence assistant and all the odd suit jackets without collars just tend to get in the way of the story. Sure the a.i. secretary is supposed to teach a lesson about how technology can't replace human relationships but it's heavy handed and unnecessary.



    Perhaps most telling about Century City's future as a television program is its debut date – in March – and short 9-episode order. It would likely take a ratings miracle to bring this one back. Century City raises interesting questions and brings them to the appropriate – if predictable – conclusions. If you're interested in this kind of thing, give it a look. But don't get too attached.



    Century City debuts on Tuesday March 16 at 9pm on CBS.moreless
  • Century City only aired four episodes, but during that time I became a fan.

    8.1
    Century City had a unique view on the future. The show had a realistic viewing of the future. The sets did not look cheesy as some futuristic show do. They had a bright crisp look to them. The cases in this legal drama were very interesting and brought a freshness because they were new and inventive. The events that happened could not happen today and therefore I never had never heard about them. I would love to see the unaired episodes, but it looks like that will never happen. It was a show that kept my intrest for the whole hour and I wish there were more of those hours.moreless
  • Ally McBeal but set in the future - a law firm tackles the law under a changing technological world. what would you do if the medication allowing you to function was killing you, but removing it would turn you back into a special needs persmoreless

    9.1
    The issues tackled in this well made, scifi lite show, were currant and relevant...looking at currant technological advances, and projecting them into the future - analysing the potential legal issues around them.



    I thought that this show was cancelled prematurely - the cast had a good dynamic, the beginnings of indivual stories were presented and all in all I felt that it had potential. I also liked the individual nature of the episodes, while the concepts might have felt silly in other circumstances, here they inspired debate and discussion.



    And oddly enough, all the cast have gone on to bigger and better things - lost for instance!moreless
  • Wished it would had last very long!

    8.0
    I loved this show and dumb CBS had to pull it from its lineup after only just four shows and didn't give it time to grow.

    It had very good acting and writing but the audience just wasn't there like they were for the Unit.

    Again a great show that just didn't get a chance to grow!
  • This show is "ahead of it's time!"

    9.0
    Century City is about about a group of lawyers that tackle subjects that you would see on law shows in the present. Cases relevant in 30 years or so, Century City tackles cloning and advance technology. This show was too WAY before it's time and CBS needed to give this show a chance, and it didn't. At least some cable network should have picked this show up. I believe NBC Universal HD replays some episodes, but I'm not sure. This is show is so, the best way I can put it, cool (with the whole futuristic setting). CBS should have given it a longer life.moreless

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More Info About This Show

Categories

Drama, Science Fiction

Themes

high stake situations, Adult, moral dilemmas, characters with hidden agendas, judicial justice