Cold Case

Season 3 Episode 21

The Hen House

2
Aired Sunday 8:00 PM Apr 30, 2006 on CBS
8.8
out of 10
User Rating
116 votes
7

EPISODE REVIEWS
By TV.com Users

Episode Summary

EDIT
The Hen House
AIRED:
The 1945 case of a murdered newspaper reporter is reopened when new evidence suggests that the woman was thrown in front of a passing train by someone she knew.

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SUBMIT REVIEW
  • Love and the Netherlands

    9.0
    First of all, I loved this episode, except for one, recurring, annoying thing. This Anton/Noah may be from Holland, his accent is definitely not Dutch. It's more eastern-European like. Neither Johanna's accent is Dutch. The accent of the old Johanna is more like French or something like that, and I can't place it of the young Johanna.



    It is also a pity the Dutch guy is either bad or crazy.moreless
  • Taking characters from major historical events gives Cold Case an edge.

    9.0
    Even though we suspected earlyon that we had a Nazi hiding out in America, the plot works. Tying a plot to history lends credibility to the story. Not only that, it also provides some context for people who may not be familiar with WWII. Seeing the concentration camp numbers burned onto the German woman's arm is a sober reminder of the horrors of the Holocaust. The eager young reporter was well played and another example of how the storyline provides insight for younger viewers who may not be aware of how different it was for women working more than fifty years ago. It was great seeing Peter Graves again too.moreless
  • Before a newspaper closes it's doors, an employee finds a note for a meeting the same night and place that a woman writer is found murdered in 1945.

    10
    Lo Kinney was a newspaper writer who wanted to write about more than "what women want to hear", making her quite a few enemies along the way. On July 17, 1945, she was pushed in front of a train. At first it was believed to be a purse jacking murder, but with the new evidence the suspect quickly turns to her fellow employees to her boyfriend.



    I loved this episode. Once again, there's an episode that goes back in time and this one actually reaches back to history. It reminded me of "Factory Girls", in which another tragedy occurs because of the war. It's nice to see how these events not only impacted the people who experienced them, but also the people around them.



    I really felt bad for Lo. She was obviously a very talented writer and she never got to live long enough for things to change and her to finally be recognized by the brillant work she did.



    Yet another episode beautifully done that should not be over-looked.moreless
  • war episode

    10
    The team reopens the 1945 case of a female reporter who was pushed in front of a train when a member of the newspaper she was working for (which is now closing due to the fact that more and more people get their news online; like today) finds a long-lost letter indictating she was meeting someone the night she died. This episode was perfect. The music (old, but good esp. the ending song) fit the episode, the plot (female reporter years ahead of her time and the love-story-with a twist, of course) was excellent and the fact that Noah (victim's lover) was really a Nazi-officer who part took in the Holocaust and fled Europe after, taking the identity of a painter who, for lack of a better word, "entertained" the Nazis before he was killed in a concentration camp was a great but sad twist. And then Jo (the victim) found out and he accidentally killed her (at the train station) because of it. Overall: 10/10moreless
  • Another war story reminds me of one done in the past. I really like episodes that show world history such as this one. I recommend it. Its about the murder of a female reporter in the 1940s.moreless

    8.3
    Lo (victim) was a fiesty reporter not interested in writing fluff. This leads to her butting heads with another woman writer and male collegue who can't write his own stories. One of her stories was about a holocaust survivor, Noah Poole. As she learns more about his life, she begins developing feelings for him. There are basically 3 suspects. What the murderer did was sick & in my opinion can never be forgiven. If I were the killer, I would have nightmares for the rest of my life. I could write more but don't want to give it away. I think this s/l is realistic & I'm sure happened for real.moreless
Danny Pino

Danny Pino

Scotty Valens

Jeremy Ratchford

Jeremy Ratchford

Det. Nick Vera

John Finn

John Finn

Lt. John Stillman

Kathryn Morris

Kathryn Morris

Det. Lilly Rush

Thom Barry

Thom Barry

Det. Will Jeffries

Tracie Thoms

Tracie Thoms

Kat Miller (Episodes 3.13+; recurring previously)

Michelle Harrison

Michelle Harrison

Lo Kinney (1945)

Guest Star

Peter Graves

Peter Graves

Noah Pool (2006)

Guest Star

Todd Babcock

Todd Babcock

Noah Pool (1945)

Guest Star

Trivia, Notes, Quotes and Allusions

FILTER BY TYPE

  • TRIVIA (4)

  • QUOTES (8)

    • (Mr. McDuff is handing assignments to the writers.)
      Lo Kinney: How about me, Mr. McDuff?
      Mr. McDuff: Oh, uh... Crumb cakes!
      Lo Kinney: Excuse me?
      Mr. McDuff: I want to hear what kind of victory vittles the ladies are baking for the soldiers coming home from the war.
      Helen: Red, white and blue Jell-O gelatin! That's a story gals will go dizzy for!

    • Lilly: Is it true? Jeffries got demoted?
      Lt. Stillman: Disciplined... the bosses put him on desk duty.
      Lilly: For how long?
      Lt. Stillman: Undetermined.
      Lilly: Well, that's going to make him nuts.
      Lt. Stillman: Doesn't help that his birthday's this week.
      Lilly: Oh, right. Double whammy.
      Lt. Stillman: No, whatever you do, don't mention it to him. He was very clear... no cake, no presents.

    • Noah: (to Lo Kinney) A month ago, a woman asks you what type of curtains to use. You tell her, "None, so you can see the sky."

    • Helen: Women don't want to be bothered with war talk.
      Lo Kinney: Because meat pies and nylons are so much more interesting.

    • Noah: Lo was my second chance after so much darkness. I came here to start over and there she was: light. When she died, though, that light went out for good.

    • (Jeffries is pacing around the office.)
      Scotty: Man, you're making me nervous. Why don't you sit down?
      Det. Jeffries: Cause my ass has been planted all day. Growing roots in that seat.

    • Lo Kinney: Wrapping fish, that's all the Womens' Page is good for.

    • Birdie: I had a byline but no stories. Lo had a million stories.
      Det. Nick Vera: And no byline.

  • NOTES (2)

  • ALLUSIONS (1)

    • The numbering system used to identify Jewish people in the Nazi German concentration camps is called Ka-tzetnik. The numbers on the concentration camp inmates' arms are referred to as tattoos. This is a common way to describe them but they were not actually tattoos. The numbers were burned into peoples' arms in the same way animals are branded. The process left a permanent scar.

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