Crash

Season 2 Episode 4

Can't Explain

0
Aired Friday 10:00 PM Oct 09, 2009 on Starz
9.0
out of 10
User Rating
18 votes
1

EPISODE REVIEWS
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Episode Summary

EDIT
Inez receives a gift from the club's client. Seth goes out into the streets wondering about the true meaning of his life. Bo has to lean on Tyler for support. Ben meets a lawyer that tries to have him stop his investigation.

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SUBMIT REVIEW
  • Some story lines flounder, while Bo's story continues to fascinate and Ben's plot line grows more engaging.

    8.0
    First off, the Bo Olinville story line with the amateur league baseball players is taking quite a surprising turn and makes for this episode's best moments. It seemed as though Bo -- bent on ensuring his young student's success -- would wish to ward off the negative influence of the professional league player's son, even if he was partially motivated by wanting to live vicariously through that student's potential success. One feels sorry for Bo, working hard at prepping the pitching mound and waiting for his student who promised to be there but preferred instead to ditch his trainer and have some fun.



    However, when Bo finds the student smoking marajuana with the "bad boy" professional player's son, he joins them. For a time, it seemed that he was simply trying to change his strategy from driving the student away by being too strict to now winning him over by trying to be a better friend than the professional player's son -- a pretense to get the young man trust him again. I even thought it might all be a ruse to get the professional player's son to be open with him long enough so that he could get enough dirt on him to have him kicked out of the league and keep away from his student. Yet, something more disturbing seems to be occurring, as he seems more intent on outdoing the player's son in mischievous -- and, indeed, illegal -- activity. By the end of the episode, he seems to have taken things too far by humiliating the two young men by making them watch him from a parked car have sex with a prostitute outside. He seems to think he's simply showing off or on the right track to winning back the student's respect, but the look on the two boys' faces echoed my own of shock, disgust, and confusion. Not only has Bo missed an opportunity to use evidence of pot-smoking against the professional player's son to dismiss him, but he has instead given him ammunition to dismiss Bo from his post for such outrageous behavior among minors. What were his intentions? Did he misjudge the situation or his effect upon his student? I'm interested in finding out what drives this increasingly complex character.



    Another story line that is yielding more excitement is Ben Cendars' storyline, as he further investigates the murder of his daughter to discover that a record industry producer was involved. I liked the moment when Ben assents to Anthony's accusation that his daughter's murder has replaced medication as his new addiction or obsession. I was disappointed that Ben admitted it so easily and that there wasn't enough savoring and texture to this moment. Yet, as a plot element, it pleased me in showing how people are often motivated by various incentives. In this case, Ben was motivated by his obsessional nature, but, as Anthony soon realized, was correct to suspect the record producer anyway. It also showed Anthony taking a more active role, just as Ben began to lose hope. It felt slightly forced as both characters swapped positions. Still, the evidence Anthony discovered in Ben's daughter's apartment of backstage guest passes to concerts by artists belonging exclusively to the record producer's company was original and believable. The evidence wasn't melodramatic or cliche.



    While the least interesting story line this week was definitely the one in which Inez dealt with Jimmy's jealousy over her suitors, the one involving Kenny helping Seth Blanchard's wife, Maggie Cheon, find Seth was the runner up. Although, Maggie says all the right things in describing her marital problems, Linda Park's acting doesn't quite express it well enough; there's something missing. Still, I loved that she explained that Seth's privileged lifestyle lends itself to delusions of grandeur; his expectations of life can far exceed those of normal society because he never has to deal with any financial constraints. Thinking he is linked to the divine is not a big cognitive leap for someone who lives like a god.



    The closing moments of this plot element coincide with Seth's continuation along an arc similar to that of Jordan Collier of "The 4400". As in previous shows run by Ira Steven Behr, Seth stumbles upon various homeless folks, who are not portrayed as threats, but as either spiritual messengers or simply benign, normal human beings; this reflects Behr's humanitarian concern for the plight of the poor that he has commented upon in both "Star Trek: Deep Space Nine" and "The 4400." Hopefully Behr will delve deeper into their issues with this show, given that Seth confesses to Kenny and Maggie that he has found his purpose and vows to help the disadvantaged.moreless
Mike McGlone

Mike McGlone

Bobby

Guest Star

Cameron Van Hoy

Cameron Van Hoy

Eddie Alvarez

Guest Star

Robert Blanche

Robert Blanche

Tommy Vanderbeck

Guest Star

Julie Warner

Julie Warner

Andrea Schillo

Recurring Role

Spencer Daniels

Spencer Daniels

Tyler Lomand

Recurring Role

Tess Harper

Tess Harper

Wendy Olinville

Recurring Role

Trivia, Notes, Quotes and Allusions

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