Crash

Season 2 Episode 6

No Matter What You Do

0
Aired Friday 10:00 PM Oct 30, 2009 on Starz
9.1
out of 10
User Rating
18 votes
1

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Episode Summary

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Seth receives a visit from a son he hasn't seen in years, while Ben reunites with his ex-wife. Bo tries to get his old job back. Inez becomes the object of desire for a rich man.

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SUBMIT REVIEW
  • Despite a slight drop in quality, this episode contains real changes as the characters' arcs move in different directions.

    8.0
    As usual, Bo's plot is the most engaging, but not quite as mystifyingly unpredictable – and therefore, not as exciting -- as in previous episodes. When Bo shows up to his former student Tyler Lomand's amateur league baseball practice, the latter immediately tells his coach, who insists that Bo leave because Tyler doesn't want him around. Although the coach says he thinks Bo incapable of such an act, he tells him that many suspect that he assaulted Eddie Alvarez, the professional player's son, and it's surprising to see Bo deny it so convincingly. The coach gets tired of pleading with Bo and even threatens to call the police. Bo later shows up outside of Tyler's house to ask his forgiveness for pushing him too hard, seeking to repair their relationship. Although Tyler says it's okay, one gets the sense he is uncomfortable or afraid. In the next scene, Bo is given a restraining order. To the audience's sadness, he angrily awaits Tyler to ask why this was necessary; at some level, I sympathized with Bo because the restraining order felt like he was being categorized in a negative light and made him feel even more dismissively isolated. When he walks up to Tyler, Tyler's father comes out of the house and walks toward Bo, who quickly drives away.



    Later on, Bo finds the store destroyed. I and Bo assumed it was Eddie, seeking revenge, but Bo's mother Wendy insists that it's Tyler or his friends and that Bo should realize that Tyler has been exploiting Bo's affection for him. Due to the tough economic conditions, Wendy tells Bo that she didn't make payments on the store's insurance. Bo flies into a rage, blaming his mother, who apologizes, and now determined to seek retribution. He waits outside Tyler's home and pushes him hard against his truck demanding that he take responsibility for destroying his mother and his store. Tyler pushes him off, hinting that he didn't know anything about it. Bo quickly tries to apologize. Even later on, Tyler's father and another enter the store and beat Bo up badly. When Bo's mother finds him, she hugs him tightly, saying that she'll protect him, as he cries in agony, soliciting my deepest sympathy, despite his obsessive actions. He is so lonely and one is sure that he cries not only for his physical pain, but out of his emotional insecurity and need for his mother due to his fear of not only those that might seek revenge against him, but – more importantly – perhaps having to go on living his own oppressive life. One wonders if, in showing Wendy's concern for Bo, the writers intend to demonstrate Wendy's natural unconditional love of her son or whether they are hinting that she is part of the problem -- willingly blind to her son's dark side, which has gotten them into this mess.



    I thought "No, not again" as it seemed as though the Inez/Jimmy plot line was headed toward repeating the cycle of Jimmy getting into debt trouble and Inez feeling obliged to bail him out. The episode intimated such a predictable repetition, when Jimmy gets into business with the man to whom he had been indebted in selling drugs and Inez, exasperated though she was, acquiesced to Jimmy begging her to let him make some big bucks. Luckily, I was wrong. Inez is falling for a client, whose party she hosted. Meanwhile, Jimmy's business associate makes the sale and only gives him half of what he promised. Jimmy protests and pulls a gun, demanding what is owed him. The man asks him to put the gun away and confesses that he knew Jimmy would get back into debt from gambling, so he was storing away the other half owed Jimmy just in case. I kept thinking that, once he'd pulled the gun, there was no way to return to an amicable relationship with a man who had rejoiced in having him badly beaten, even if he were doing the right thing by Jimmy in setting debt money aside without telling him. Jimmy rails in anger about how people always screw with him and accidentally shoots and kills the man – and, as explained before, this might have been for the best. The episode began with Jimmy making me hate him by cruelly responding to news that Seth Blanchard was starting a city for the homeless by exclaiming that they shouldn't be helped, but burned. Yet, in the moments after he accidentally shoots his partner, Jimmy finally wins my sympathy as he feels terrible for shooting the man and cries in desperation, repeatedly calling Inez for help; it's another mess into which he's plunged himself, to be sure, but the stakes are higher, and Inez' reaction to his mounting phone rings and unchecked messages is the most surprising part – as we realize that Jimmy had finally worn out her patience, as he had ours long ago, and allowed her to be seduced into bed by her charming client. One wonders, though, if she's just getting into another bad relationship, given the quickness with which she sleeps with him and her history of falling for "bad boys."



    I liked that Seth Blanchard's public announcement is greeted skeptically by members of the public, given his past; one person interviewed by the media notes that he witnessed Blanchard ignoring the many homeless around him on some past occasion. Still, the episode gives Blanchard a different relationship with which he must wrestle, as he is visited by his son from another marriage. Things are reasonably interesting, but not terribly shocking as it comes to light that Seth was never really there for his son. It is noteworthy that the show tries to aim for moral ambiguity in demonstrating that, although Seth was a bad father, he did love his son and that his son was not perfect, either – however, I'd argue that his son was probably rebellious and more interested in alcohol and drugs because of his upbringing. As his son is warily won over to accepting that his father has changed and is earnest about his commitment to aid the most needy and be a better parent; his son recommends naming the city Byzantium. It is only in the final moments between the two characters that this plot drew me in. It turns out that Seth is seeing a son who died a few years ago of a drug overdose, and that the hopes he and the audience have of making amends and repairing their relationship were lost long ago. This is quite a moving moment. It is given even greater impact by the fact that Seth asks his son if his connection with God is why he is able to see him now. Seth also now expresses in private the doubt about his mission that must arise in any political/revolutionary activist and which he cannot afford to reveal publicly because it would make him vulnerable to those who would wish to defeat his reforms.



    Although I applaud the writers for taking a different path with Ben Cendars by having him visit a musician named Owen with whom he worked, it isn't that interesting. Owen is played well enough by Keith Carradine, but his wife – and this is the twist – who is the former wife of Ben and mother of Cassie, isn't very well acted. The entire plot is okay, but not much better. Owen's wife recounts at a guest party how she met Owen while she was on a date with Ben. As she tries to highlight her burgeoning love for Owen in the story, Ben interjects to try to remind her of their own love at the time; this was an interesting way of showing that he still loved her and her discomfort with admitting that she had loved Ben but didn't want to seem to betray her love for her current husband. I half expected Owen to grow angry at Ben's demonstrations of affection for her, but It turns out that Owen is dying of cancer and wants Ben to assist his suicide. Ben faces a moral dilemma – let his friend and father to his late daughter Cassie suffer or risk angering his former wife, whom he still loves and with whom he might have a chance at a relationship were he to not give into Owen's wishes. At the end of the episode Ben and Seth "crash" (but don't notice each other) as they visit the gravesite where their children are buried, seeking solace.moreless
Mike McGlone

Mike McGlone

Bobby

Guest Star

Neil Hopkins

Neil Hopkins

Kieran

Guest Star

Zane Holtz

Zane Holtz

Paul

Guest Star

Spencer Daniels

Spencer Daniels

Tyler Lomand

Recurring Role

Tess Harper

Tess Harper

Wendy Olinville

Recurring Role

Lillie Richardson

Lillie Richardson

Shauna

Recurring Role

Trivia, Notes, Quotes and Allusions

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