Crash

Season 2 Episode 3

The World's a Mess, It's in My Kiss

0
Aired Friday 10:00 PM Oct 02, 2009 on Starz
9.0
out of 10
User Rating
17 votes
1

EPISODE REVIEWS
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Episode Summary

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Kenny is puzzled about partaking in a gift he receives. Inez and Jimmy find someone that might help them pay off the gambling debt. Wendy and Bo have trouble with keeping their shop. Anthony and Ben continue their murder investigation. Seth wonders if purchasing NFL franchise was a good idea.moreless

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SUBMIT REVIEW
  • The storyline is moving along slowly, but remains engaging.

    8.5
    Most thrilling is finding out more of what makes Bo Olinville tick. In many ways, his character is the most relatable and his actions share the trait of exerting his authority -- the very control over the lives of others that he doesn't feel he has over his own. He gets upset at his mother, whom he dotes over, when she worries him by not following the doctor's orders about her sugar intake; perhaps, this struck home because it reminded me of my own tendency to obsess over the lives of those in my family to avoid living my own. He definitely seems to be living his life vicariously through his amateur league baseball student. He is shown as demanding toward him and incensed at the easy fame and respect another player -- the son of a professional league player -- is getting at the expense of his protege. This is very realistic and original writing -- and poignant, I think, given the self-reflection it's causing in me.



    Seth Blanchard continues to seek consolation from Kenny Battaglia. The relationship has needed more of an interesting dynamic to stay fresh, and there's a hint of it in this episode. I loved how Ira Behr is defying cliche by having Kenny provide lousy advice to Blanchard. Blanchard comes to Kenny's apartment late at night, explaining how he has just upset his wife by confessing to infidelity. He tells him that this is all part of the course he feels certain that God wants of him to chart. So is selling off assets and turning away from his project to build a football stadium -- which is also worrying those around him and the financial community. He further expresses his unease at not knowing exactly what this higher power wants of him. However reluctantly, Kenny strangely advises that he resolve matters by buying an expensive diamond ring for his wife -- a woman who surely has has never wanted for anything extravagantly material in their marriage. It makes sense that Kenny, whose own wife has just finalized their divorce, fails to understand what it takes to keep one together -- that it's more about emotions and quality time and communication than possessions to buy a spouse's affections. Then again, maybe he knows that, but doesn't care or know enough about Blanchard's difficulties to offer anything beyond cliche optimism about how he'll eventually figure out how to deal with them. Blanchard thanks him for being helpful. Yet he doesn't seem to follow through when he leaves Kenny's place and throws away the keys to his parked car and chooses instead to walk home.



    As I predicted, Blanchard is emerging as a man driven by a desire to strip himself of material possessions. I loved how his seeming selflessness is belied by his heroic acts being shown as feeding into his egocentrism, as his wife reminded him; she emphasized that his admitting to cheating on her was more about making him feel good about himself than being honest with her and ruining the illusion of their happy marriage. That was an interesting and very real moment between them because it shows that she may be both right about his self-serving motives -- which most charitable people have -- and her own flaws in wanting to continue a lie that, despite her protests, was not resulting in her happiness. Otherwise, the Grace Park character remains a bit dull, but I'm sure that'll change.



    I thought it was interesting that the story involved two women driven into prostitution. One introduced into it miserably by a sleazy businessman offering $5000 in return to pay off Inez' boyfriend's debts. Since the man refused to sleep with Inez for the money, she had to ask her young friend to do it. This creates a moral dilemma for an otherwise kindhearted character like Inez, who feels forced by her affection for her boyfriend and her own sense of security to encourage her friend to enter a world of exploitation.



    The other prostitute was a woman who had surely been in the business for years and treated our reluctant but happy Kenny to a good time. Although, the second case seemed to involve a prostitute who was more forward and a client who was respectful, one wonders if the writers are asking if the two women's experiences are all that different. Perhaps the second woman was conditioned by experiences similar to that of the first. I'm not sure. Otherwise, the Inez storyline is continuing apace without too many surprises.



    I liked how police corruption was implied in the selling of crime video surveillance and how Kenny was implicated in this illegal activity and needed to be prodded by Anthony Adams to do the right thing by Ben Cendars. I especially enjoyed the moment of Anthony losing his cool when meeting the underground dealer in such tapes; very funny and believable stuff.



    Dennis Hopper finally shows some chops in reacting with passion and subtlety to finally seeing the tape on which his daughter is murdered.moreless
Jessy Schram

Jessy Schram

Kim

Guest Star

Mike McGlone

Mike McGlone

Bobby

Guest Star

Cameron Van Hoy

Cameron Van Hoy

Eddie Alvarez

Guest Star

Julie Warner

Julie Warner

Andrea Schillo

Recurring Role

Spencer Daniels

Spencer Daniels

Tyler Lomand

Recurring Role

Tess Harper

Tess Harper

Wendy Olinville

Recurring Role

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