CSI: Miami

Season 5 Episode 10

Come As You Are

2
Aired Sunday 10:00 PM Nov 27, 2006 on CBS
8.6
out of 10
User Rating
195 votes
14

EPISODE REVIEWS
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Episode Summary

EDIT
A Marine recruiter is found dead on a civilian shooting range with various bullet holes in him. The team can fine no evidence of blood at the scene. The investigators uncover that the victim was dead before he was shot and that his body was pulled onto the range. As the case advances, Horatio determines the murder may be tied to the death of a marine in Iraq who was killed in combat. Natalia is shocked to learn that Nick asked Valera out and that she accepted.moreless

Who was the Episode MVP ?

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SUBMIT REVIEW
  • Hollywood Realism....was I the only one sympathetic to the "bad guys"?

    9.0
    I am a retired military officer who served in SW Asia in the 1990s and I found the episode quite interesting.



    There is always a lot of discussion about how realistically “Hollywood” portrays the military and the intelligence worlds. It certainly makes it look “grander, bigger, and darker” than it really is. After all, we would not be interesting in participating in an hour of fantasy unless it had something a bit outrageous or a little bigger than life. The writers, directors, photographers, and cast only have to get enough “realism” to hook us and then reel us into their fantasy world. In this episode, there were some areas that some observers felt were farfetched.



    The quote by the character Brad Hoffman (played by Robert Hoffman) “Isn’t Iraq a little out of your jurisdiction?” was perhaps the most pivotal on whether the episode was realistic. The real truth is maybe not.



    As a general rule, the military tries to avoid assuming jurisdiction in what are considered to be purely criminal cases normally tried in civilian courts, and prefers to concentrate on crimes that are more purely military, such as unauthorized absence or failure to obey lawful orders. In this case, the crimes were possible murder at the beginning, and probable manslaughter toward the end. In foreign countries, the military has what are known as Status of Forces agreements with many countries with more “civilized” legal systems. Essentially, once we have validated the accusations have some validity, we will turn over military personnel to those countries for trial. We only resist in cases where the actual or perceived illegal activity arises out of the individuals performing official duties. Such examples include when national passions become enraged over what is an accidental act, such as Canadians killed by American friendly fire in Afghanistan, or aviators severing a gondola cable in Italy while on a training mission.



    In this episode, even though the event occurred in Iraq, evidence turned up in Florida, involving what were apparently residents of Florida, despite the Iraqi venue. We don’t have a Status of Forces agreement with Iraq. Besides, the case involved a contractor, who would not be subject to the Uniform Code of Military Justice (UCMJ) anyway. As a result, it would be quite conceivable that Florida law enforcement would assume jurisdiction.



    If the recruiter had been receiving two to three notifications per week that his recruits had been killed in Iraq, then if one does the math, this recruiter is responsible for about a third of the deaths in Iraq, which is a little unrealistic. However, despite the Hollywood exaggeration, the plain truth is that there have been recruiters have suffered a lot of trauma over finding out that one or two of their recruits have died out of hundreds over a two year period. So, on this point, they are portraying a human reaction that really has happened.



    As for the “tough guy” reputation that marines, special forces, and covert operatives get, the real truth is that they are flesh and blood human beings. Moreover, the “tough guys” include “tough girls”, as we now have women increasingly integrated into frontline fighting units, including fighter pilots. I once saw a Navy Seal (I think that they meet the "tough guy" threshold) step off the edge of a sidewalk, lose his balance, and break his foot. So the scene with the marine falling and hitting his head was déjà vu for me.



    The most difficult image for me to swallow was the Terrorism Watch List. The parents of Matt Batra (played by Michael Trevino) were supposedly on it. You don’t get on that list just because you are born in Iran. There are many US citizens of Iranian birth serving in many important capacities within the US government. Moreover, they are obviously naturalized US Citizens. The few US citizens on it are generally people who have gone overseas and are now believed to be working for terrorist organizations.



    Moreover, if Matt’s parents were Iranian, there is good chance that Matt either would speak or understand Farsi. He could pass as an Iranian. Instead of being rejected, he would be very much in demand by the military and intel community.



    However, what I think the directors and writers were trying to do was paint an image of what could happen when otherwise enthusiastic young people get caught up in intensely unfortunate circumstances and start going down a slippery slope of bad decisions as a result. In Matt’s case, it was frustration over escaping from the negative image of a heritage that was pressing down on his career choices. In Brad’s case, he panicked in a fire fight, normal for young soldier, even more so for someone with no military training. I guess that I was more sympathetic toward the bad guys than everyone else. I am sure that they can be charged with perjury, obstruction of justice, larceny (in the case of Matt) , which are the things they did after going down the slippery slope, but I am not sure that manslaughter would hold up.moreless
  • It needs more Horatio work.

    7.0
    Maybe it’s ‘cause I’m Canadian that the war in Iraq doesn’t affect me quite as much as it does the Americans, but I found this episode to be rather lacking. Using the war as the plot, wasn’t a bad idea, actually it scores top points for originality, and being able to solve a crime from overseas was pretty cool, and the fact that they brought Nick back to flirt with Valera and make Boa Vista suffer in silence was mean but I think the way it was played out was what made it bad. The producers really need to give Horatio better lines. These episodes are becoming way too obvious. Horatio’s there in the beginning and only shows up when they’re interrogating a suspect. Although, that changed a little for this episode. I think it was only because this had to do with the fact the vic was a Marine and that’s about it. What happened to the Horatio we all knew who helped process the evidence with his team? Nowadays, he’s just being shown putting his glasses on, intimidating suspects and posing with his hands on his hips.



    Bring the old H back!!moreless
  • Another average episode.

    8.5
    OK. This is just another average episode. A Marine recruiter is found dead on a civilian shooting range with various bullet holes in him, but there is no blood at the scene. The killer in this episode is the dumbest killer in this series. If you want to fake a crime scene, you must have blood at the crime scene. Stupid.



    The investigation of the dead man leads Horatio to another marine who just came back from Iraq, and he must investigate whether he did killed his brother in Iraq to clear his name from the charge against him. Good episode. This episode might have the dumbest killer, but it has one of the best plot in this season.moreless
  • A real shocker

    9.3
    I liked this episode but I didn't love it. The director is going to have to stop putting Horatio in these weird positions the first time he comes on screen. I almost missed the opening liner as I was laughing that much. They seem to get more ridiculous as the seasons go by, although Horatio wouldn't be Horatio without them. I liked how self centred Natalia seemed to be over her ex husband when he was talking to Valera and she thought it was about her. Hopefully the episode next week will make up for the episode this week and will be a 10.moreless
  • Not bad but not back to normal SPOILERS

    9.1
    The plot for this episode was based around a marine recruiter being killed. So far that's pretty normal and the plot that comes off this is normal. Two guys want to get their Marine applications back after having second thoughts. It's the subplot that annoys me a bit. A story about a Marine being killed in a war zone by a stray bullet. I don't understand why CSI Miami always has to have a big subplot and a bigger picture. Why not just back to normal crimes?



    The first part is reminiscent of NCIS, a Marine recruiter and all that so it is odd that CSI has this case and not JAG but I'm willing to let that one slide.



    The plot about the soldier being killed is a bit silly because it happened thousands of miles away and has nothing to do with Horatio. A Marine's brother is killed after he encourages him to join the Marines. During a gun fight a US civilian doing supplies pulls out a gun and accidentally shoots through his own door and hits the Marine. That is a very big accident and nothing more so trying to catch him on murder was unrealistic.



    I'm still looking for an episode of CSI Miami without an enourmous bigger picture segment. The show doesn't need it and it ruins the crime investigating part.moreless
Adam Rodriguez

Adam Rodriguez

Eric "Delko" Delektorsky

David Caruso

David Caruso

Lieutenant Horatio Caine

Emily Procter

Emily Procter

Calleigh Duquesne

Eva LaRue

Eva LaRue

Natalia Boa Vista Episode 98+ Recurring Previously)

Jonathan Togo

Jonathan Togo

Ryan Wolfe (Episodes 54+, Recurring Previously)

Khandi Alexander

Khandi Alexander

Chief Medical Examiner Alexx Woods

Charles Duckworth

Charles Duckworth

Kevin Kirby

Guest Star

Ethan Erickson

Ethan Erickson

Sergeant Reynolds

Guest Star

Rob Estes

Rob Estes

Nick Townsend

Guest Star

Boti Bliss

Boti Bliss

M. Valera

Recurring Role

Brendan Fehr

Brendan Fehr

Dan Cooper

Recurring Role

Trivia, Notes, Quotes and Allusions

FILTER BY TYPE

  • TRIVIA (3)

    • Goof: In reality, the investigation into the death of a Marine would be overseen by the Naval Criminal Investigative Service (NCIS) and not a local law enforcement agency. Furthermore, the Judge Advocate Generals Corps (JAG) is the legal branch of the U.S. Navy that acts in courts-martial and, as such, would not be the ones conducting the arrest of a U.S. Marine like in this episode. That would again fall to NCIS. Since the television series NCIS was on the air at the time of this episode (and also broadcast by CBS), this is a fairly obvious mistake that should have been avoided.

    • Goof: Ryan Wolfe handled the letter to Hicks without gloves. This would compromise any evidence they might be able to get from the envelope or the letter.

    • Recruiter: Competition keeps us frosty.
      "Frosty" is military slang for "on your toes."

  • QUOTES (5)

    • Eric: You found the Kirby footage?
      Cooper: I think I have post-traumatic stress after all the battle scenes I went through.

    • Natalia: Hey, hum... was he... was he just asking about me?
      Valera: Nick? Not at all.
      Natalia: So, my ex-husband just comes in the lab... just to hang out.
      Valera: He asked me out.
      Natalia: What did you say?
      Valera:(looking guilty) I... said... yes. (Natalia looks uncomfortable) Are you mad?
      Natalia: Not... at you.

    • Horatio: The war may be staged, but the murder is real. (Music intro starts)

    • Recruiter: Competition keeps you frosty. That's the Marine Corps way.
      (Later)
      Ryan: That's okay. The challenge keeps us frosty. It's the CSI way.

    • Matthew: I could have been the best Marine, you know that? I got 20/10 eyesight. I could run the 100 yard dash under ten. Hold my breath for two minutes...
      Calleigh: Matthew, Matthew, stop. The Marines are looking for people to stop the killing, not cover it up.

  • NOTES (3)

  • ALLUSIONS (1)

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