Dad's Army

Season 9 Episode 4

The Miser's Hoard

0
Aired Wednesday 8:20 PM Oct 23, 1977 on BBC
9.0
out of 10
User Rating
7 votes
0

EPISODE REVIEWS
By TV.com Users

Episode Summary

EDIT
The Miser's Hoard
AIRED:
Frazer is busy counting up his earnings when his doctor visits and accidentally knocks over a money box revealing that Frazer is far from poor. Concerned, the doctor alerts Mainwaring, who alerts Jones and very soon Frazer's fortune is the subject of town gossip. Eventually the platoon, Hodges, the Vicar and the Verger are spying on Frazer to see what he does with his money. Will they get their hands on it, or does Frazer have a sneaky trick up his sleeve?moreless

Who was the Episode MVP ?

Wednesday
No results found.
Thursday
No results found.
Friday
No results found.
SUBMIT REVIEW
    Arthur Lowe

    Arthur Lowe

    Captain George Mainwaring

    John Le Mesurier

    John Le Mesurier

    Sergeant Arthur Wilson

    Clive Dunn

    Clive Dunn

    Lance Corporal Jack Jones

    John Laurie

    John Laurie

    Private James Frazer

    Arnold Ridley

    Arnold Ridley

    Private Charles Godfrey

    Ian Lavender

    Ian Lavender

    Private Frank Pike

    Fulton Mackay

    Fulton Mackay

    Doctor McCeavedy

    Guest Star

    Bill Pertwee

    Bill Pertwee

    Chief Warden Hodges

    Recurring Role

    Frank Williams

    Frank Williams

    The Vicar

    Recurring Role

    Edward Sinclair

    Edward Sinclair

    The Verger

    Recurring Role

    Trivia, Notes, Quotes and Allusions

    FILTER BY TYPE

    • TRIVIA (0)

    • QUOTES (8)

      • Vicar: (to Frazer): And a small contribution to the fabric of the church will be most gratefully received.
        (Mainwaring opens Frazer's money box).
        Mainwaring: It's a brick! It's a damn brick!
        Frazer: Aye, it's a brick! And yon vicar can have it for the fabric of his Kirk!

      • (In the graveyard the platoon are at the spot where Frazer was seen burying his gold).
        Mainwaring: Uncover it Pike.
        Pike: What with?
        Mainwaring: Your hands of course!
        Pike: There might be slugs and worms and creepy crawlies!
        Mainwaring: Get on with it
        (turns to Wilson) You ought to have someone look at that boy you know.

      • Jones: You can't bury things in concrete, not unless you've got one of those rhumatic drills.

      • (Wilson's been looking for Frazer... he's drunk).
        Wilson: Wull'e wasn-at the Horse and Houndsssa-a-nd they haven' seen 'im at the Fox since chris'mas and I know that because w-we made enquiries (He grins).
        Pike: (to Mainwaring) We also made enquries at the Red Lion, the Marques of Rendall, The Goat, The Fox and Pheasant and the Black Horse... (turns to Wilson) and what Mum's gonna say when she sees you like this I do not know!

      • Frazer: Captain Mainwaring, there's just one thing I want to say to ye. If you think you're gonna get your hands on my gold, you can think again. I don't trust banks, I don't trust bankers and I don't trust you! That's all I want to say, thank you.

      • Jones: Now what we've got to do first is practice doing things in our gas masks
        Godfrey: Resperators?
        Jones: One more interruption from you Private Godfrey and I'll have you doubling around the church hall fifty times!

      • Jones: I had a hard life sir. When I was ten years old I had to get up at 5 o clock in the morning and follow the milkman around with his horse. And everytime the horse stopped the milkman shouted 'HANG ON TO THAT HORSE YOU LITTLE SHAVER!'. And he wasn't a nice horse Captain Mainwaring, cos in the winter, in the cold he used to stamp his feet and tread all over my toes and in the summer with his flies he used to keep tossing his head and he used to toss me over his shoulder and if I let go the milkman would clip me round the earhole. He only paid me tupence a week (Smiles proudly) but it was a good life!

      • (Frazer reads out loud a letter he's written to one of his funeral customers).
        Frazer: Dear Mrs. Pickering. I hope you found the funeral arrangements for your late husband entirely satisfactory. May I say how sorry I was that the hearse ran out of petrol just outside the cemetary. I'm sure your dearly departed husband would have been proud of the way you helped to push him to his final resting place and what a fine strong women your mother is. I hope you managed to get the mud off her skirt.

    • NOTES (1)

      • During the closing credits, aswell as applauding, the audience cheer at the sections showing John Le Mesurier, Clive Dunn and John Laurie.

    • ALLUSIONS (1)

      • Frazer: "Transport three pounds fourteen and tupence. That makes an allowance of two pounds... no... of thirty two shillings... Total nine pounds two and eleven pence. Profit, now let me see, three pounds six and eight pence, three farthings".

        Frazer is using old English money in use during the war and right up to it's replacement with the current system in 1971.

        The BBC has a page which goes some way to explaining what a farthing or a tupence is. More info.

    More
    Less