Dalziel and Pascoe

Season 4 Episode 1

On Beulah Height

0
Aired Unknown Jun 12, 1999 on BBC
8.1
out of 10
User Rating
10 votes
1

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Episode Summary

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On Beulah Height
AIRED:
Memories of a case fifteen years before are revived for Dalziel when an eight year old girl is found murdered in a local beauty spot. Meanwhile Pascoe has other things to worry about when his daughter falls ill with meningitis.

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SUBMIT REVIEW
  • Dalziel & Pascoe, a greatly underrated show to begin with, should have had much wider distribution. The stories are interesting, well-thought out, brilliantly acted, but On Beulah Height is in a category of its own. Few come close, let alone equal it.moreless

    10
    On Beulah Height is a great episode, a classic in story, acting, filming and mood. Everything comes together in this episode and yet one can see how people more accustomed to a very literal depiction of a story might lose interest in it, or have difficulty with it. The partial narration by Peter Pascoe of a children's story further adds to the sense of foreboding and dread.



    This particular story is woven together from a number of different strands that act now in synergy, then in opposition to one another, creating the sort of tension that makes for great story telling. A child has gone missing. Coincidentally, Sgt. Pascoe's daughter Ellie - Dalziel's goddaughter - has gone on a day trip with another family. A child's disappearance throws everyone into high panic because a child molester from years gone by, who had disappeared from the area, apears to have returned - his red haired form has been seen in a few places. Noted soprano Elizabeth Wulfstan, meanwhile, has returned to the area for a recital. The heartbreaking revelations come thick and fast once the story has been set up and there is about the entire episode a bittersweet grace note that touches again and again upon children - children nearly lost (Ellie has meningitis); children murdered - the eight-year-old who disappears at the beginning; children who have undergone metamorphoses - young Betsy Allgood, who is adopted by the Wulfstans after they lose their own daughter. All the while, the drowned village sits at the bottom of the lake by Beulah Height with its own terrible secret. In the end almost everyone has lost something. The acting is superb. Not only from the great Warren Clarke and Colin Buchanan, the two lead investigators, but from the rest of the cast - the powerhouse Tom Georgeson is faultless as Jack Allgood and has never done a wrong turn since first he appeared, years gone by, as Dixie Dean in "Boys From The Blackstuff"; Ronald Pickup, one of the finest character actors around, plays sparks off Joanna David's finely nuanced performance as his wife; Kaye Wragg as the daughter with her own secret. And not to forget David Royle, whose character 'Wieldy' - DS Edgar Wield - is homosexual as a matter of fact, rather than giving Dalziel a tortured confession or being outed in some garish way.



    On Beulah Height is one of the greatest stories of any police/detective/mystery show, bar none. Its mystery, its tragedy, its sense of doom rooted in hubris, its sense of people's lives broken, left hanging through a moment's carelessness, the stark beauty of Beulah Height itself are so stirring, so moving, one will want to savour it again and again.



    ©bluemlein.blogspot.commoreless
Warren Clarke

Warren Clarke

Det Supt Andrew Dalziel

Susannah Corbett

Susannah Corbett

Ellie Pascoe

David Royle

David Royle

DS Edgar Wield

Colin Buchanan

Colin Buchanan

DI Peter Pascoe

Jo-Anne Stockham

Jo-Anne Stockham

Detective Constable Shirley 'Ivor' Novello (Till Season 6)

Tom Georgeson

Tom Georgeson

Jack Allgood

Guest Star

James Kennedy

James Kennedy

Benny Lightfoot

Guest Star

Kaye Wragg

Kaye Wragg

Elizabeth Wulfstan

Guest Star

Malcolm Tierney

Malcolm Tierney

DCC Raymond

Recurring Role

Trivia, Notes, Quotes and Allusions

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