Dead Like Me

Season 2 Episode 2

The Ledger

1
Aired Unknown Aug 01, 2004 on Showtime
9.1
out of 10
User Rating
175 votes
2

EPISODE REVIEWS
By TV.com Users

Episode Summary

EDIT
George is bummed when she finds out that her parents are selling the home she grew up in, her bike's been stolen and at work she is suspected of stealing office supplies. Daisy goes on her assignment to the jewelry shop, while Mason is trying to prove to everyone that he is not drinking anymore.moreless

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SUBMIT REVIEW
  • An average episode with some funny moments

    7.0
    This is a rather average episode but with some delicious quirky moments; a woman stabs a guy with a knitting needle in the police station, a blind man beats Mason at the nutshell game.



    That doesn't add up to much more than a series of funny scenes. The "theme" of the episode is balance - what goes around comes around - but it doesn't really tackle this revelation with any insight or originality. The security guy is great though, a complete tosspot.



    It's good to see George starting to question Rube about how and from where he gets his instructions. The show should address it's own mythology more often. In this and the opening episode the writers have had some fun with the fact that the Reapers are dead and can withstand horrific injuries. Last week George sliced her finger off, this week Roxy shoots Mason in the foot - both very funny scenes.moreless
  • Joy and Clancy are splitting? and we're what? surprised by that?

    8.8
    After a decent season opener the second season continues with an episode that does develop the storyline but felt very strange at times.



    This episode continues the exaggeration of the humor that was used in the first episode, only that one at least mixed it well with drama while this episode was at times just plain silly.



    This episode begins in the waffle house, George is for some reason upset at Rube because he was the one who wrote the little piece of paper that was going to kill George. The fun part of that whole scene was Mason making Roxy to shoot him in his foot with her new and improved gun.



    When George realised she stole her car she gets pretty upset. But when she hears that her parents are getting a divorce it completely breaks her down. Her case this time is some weird guy who sells mini-guillotines. Which makes up for one of the best deaths on the show. She steals his car as a reward for herself an his tiny guillotines for Mason to sell.



    The best developing during this episode was Joy and Clancy splitting, Reggie chooses to finally respect her mother a little better. Her father is a real bastard against Joy and he deserves a piano being thrown at him.



    Besides that, the episode had some laughs but sometimes felt to forced.George also got herself into trouble at her work but she was able to piss off a guy which was a lot of fun.

    The episode was one of the most unmemorable yet, though still quite a lot of fun.

    moreless
John R. Taylor

John R. Taylor

Blind Man

Guest Star

Alex Kliner

Alex Kliner

Kiosk Owner

Guest Star

Cody Laudan

Cody Laudan

Louis Pick

Guest Star

Crystal Dahl

Crystal Dahl

Crystal

Recurring Role

Patricia Idlette

Patricia Idlette

Kiffany

Recurring Role

Talia Ranger

Talia Ranger

Young Georgia Lass

Recurring Role

Trivia, Notes, Quotes and Allusions

FILTER BY TYPE

  • TRIVIA (8)

    • Featured Deaths:
      - A salesman cuts his throat on one of his own kitchen guillotines (soul taken by George)
      - A jewelery shop owner falls off a ricety stool (soul taken by Daisy)
      - A guy robs a small convenience store, avoids getting hit by cars in the street and jumps into a hole (soul taken by Rube)

    • When Roxy allows Mason to hold her gun, she removes the magazine but neglects to empty the chamber.

    • The Real Estate company selling the Lass home is Empyrean Reality, and their sign has a website for www.empyreanhomes.com, which does not really exist.

    • While packing Clancy's things, Joy drops a book that is entitled Irish Poems and it appears that the author and/or publisher is Valentine and the location is New York. This is a possible allusion to Jean Valentine, a well respected Irish poet.

    • Daisy and Rube's post-its had the same location, 126 Main Street, but it is clearly seen that their reaps are in two different locations.

    • While Joy and Clancy are cleaning out the boxes, Clancy says "Where do we start?". Joy replies with "1983......it was a joke." Later in the episode, as nameless coworkers at Happy Time are leaving the office, one mentions--in discussion of karaoke-- "With you, one apple martini and it's 1983."

    • All of the license plates in this episode (and quite possibly the series) are Washington plates.

    • Nobody seems to notice, or care, that Roxy fired her gun in Das Wafflehaus, and whatever injury Mason suffered was completely ignored following the scene (including by the people who saw him get shot and whine in pain for a few minutes).

  • QUOTES (8)

  • NOTES (0)

  • ALLUSIONS (1)

    • The entire episode has two themes: one discussing luck (both good and bad) and the other concerning things evening out (such as the scale myth depicted by Rube). The car keys that Georgia snatches from the "Kitchen Caboodle" worker's pocket has a rabbit's foot attached to it, which normally is associated with good luck (didn't work for the worker, though). When George goes into the police station one of the officer is having his worker's scratching off lottery scratch-offs only to find out that he didn't win anything (having bad luck).
      The name of this episode is "the Ledger". A ledger is "an accounting journal" or "a book of final entry". It is normally used in business, but here it goes along with the scales and the balance between good luck and bad luck. This is further symbolized by Mason's tome of people to die that Georgia is so curious about throughout the show (she wants to know how her life balanced out in the end).

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