• 141
    The Goldbergs

    The Goldbergs

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    CBS (ended 1953)
    "Yoo-hoo,Mrs. Bloom" calls each of us to the intimate daily gossip of this warm ethnic family comedy. Gertrude Berg starred in the show and won an Emmy Award for her portrayal of "Molly" the Jewish Mother who cared a lot about everyone.moreless
  • 142
    Mr. & Mrs. North

    Mr. & Mrs. North

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    CBS (ended 1954)
    Carried over from the popular radio program, Mr. & Mrs. North was a mystery/suspense show played with light humor. It featured Jerry North as a book publisher, happily married to his charming housewife, Pamela. Each half-hour episode concerned itself with a mysterious crime, frequently involving a murder that the Norths stumbled upon and solved before show's end. The Norths live in New York City's Greenwich Village and often call upon their friend for assistance, Lieutenant Bill Weigand, a homicide detective with the city's police department. Jerry is considered an intelligent, worldly, capable man whose familiarity with mystery stories should leave him a worthy amateur detective. Pamela is characterized as a simple-minded, naive wife, like so many other women on TV in the '50s. She is presented as reasoning illogically, as well as acting plain foolishly. Sometimes she just doesn't grasp her husband's reasoning or is dismissed for following her own women's intuition. But much like George Burns' character to Gracie, Jerry loves Pam and her notions even if they are beyond his understanding. What makes this show interesting however, is that it is Pam who most often solves the crimes and identifies the guilty persons in each week's episode! It is Pam with her particular perspective that sees what the other's don't. Never at the expense of her husband's pride nor played for humor, Pam solves these crimes doing what her husband and police Lt. Weigand don't do. It is not that they couldn't solve the crimes, but it is Pam who usually does it first. Pam is able to determine what is evidence, listen to testimony, and put the pieces of the crime together by using her particular skills. These same skills often irritate and annoy Jerry in other circumstances and sometimes appear illogical to him. For example, she pays attention to the smallest of details, she's aware of facial expressions and gestures as people talk, she listens to how people talk and hears more than just facts, as other's speak. She is sensitive to how people relate to each other and can feel people's emotions and passions. It is these particular qualities, arguably referred to as feminine skills that give Pam the advantage over the others in crime solving. As a housewife, Pam finds excitement and adventure in the mysteries that they become involved in. She often mulls over clues and evidence while her husband Jerry tries to focus on his publishing business or goes to sleep at night. Also, she is willing to go to dangerous lengths to find more evidence or pursue her latest theory. Jerry often warns her with reasons why she shouldn't take so many risks or tries to convince her that what she does is too dangerous for her. But she can't be held back, often resulting in Jerry and Lt. Weigand's participation in her sometimes outlandish plots to catch a culprit. Her actions are usually overlooked by the police, she's an unthreatening presence and calls no attention to herself. They are frequently too concerned with their own procedures and methods to mind what she is doing. But it is Pam who most often points out and provokes a confession from the perpetrator. More than one captured criminal admits that they underestimated Pam's abilities. Perhaps this is typical of the expectations for womanhood in general, at that time. Mr. & Mrs. North may be an insignificant program when considering the history of television but it was present none-the-less, although for only 2 short years. At the least, it provided an image of a capable woman contributing significantly to society's betterment, even if she is under appreciated. It would be another decade before television would see its first female private detective in Honey West which lasted just one season. And, it would be the '70s before TV viewers would become more familiar with seeing women in crime-solving roles such as Police Woman and Charlie's Angels. This show's influence can be seen in later crime-solving, husband/wife programs, most notably The Thin Man, McMillan and Wife, and Hart to Hart. Actress Barbara Britton later appeared in the pilot show, Head of the Family opposite Carl Reiner, that was eventually developed into The Dick Van Dyke Show. And, actor Richard Denning is well remembered for his role as Governor Philip Grey on the long-running, Hawaii Five-O. This black-&-white classic ran on CBS, Friday nights at 10pm from October 1952-September 1953. Then on NBC, Tuesday nights at 10:30pm from January-July 1954. This show was based on original characters created by Richard and Frances Lockridge for a series of stories that ran in The New Yorker magazine. In addition to being a radio program, it was also produced as a Broadway play and a film. June 2005: Episode information is currently being added as more of this series is being released on DVD. Episodes can be found on dollar DVDs and classic TV box sets. Check below for further details.moreless
  • 143
    26 Men

    26 Men

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    (ended 1960)
    Twenty-Six Men was based on true official files of the Arizona Rangers in the final days taming the old west. In 1901, a law enforcement organization was formed, known as the Arizona Rangers, consisting of twenty-six men: a captain, a lieutentant, four sergeants, and twenty privates. The Rangers preserved and maintained law and order in the Arizona Territory, making arrests of criminals in any part of Arizona. As one of the original members reportedly recalled: "The reason there was only twenty-six of us was because the Territory couldn't afford no more." The series, incidentally, was shot on location in Arizona, and many residents of Tulsa and Phoenix played supporting roles.moreless
  • 144
    I've Got a Secret (1952)

    I've Got a Secret (1952)

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    CBS (ended 1976)
    On the heels of the successful What's My Line?, Goodson-Todman Productions created this spin-off of sorts, I've Got a Secret. This show, which featured a four-member celebrity panel trying to guess a contestant's secret, proved even more successful in its 16-Season period on CBS-TV.

    Throughout most of the run, the four-member panel included Bill Cullen, Henry Morgan, Betsy Palmer and Bess Myerson. Their distinct personalities complemented each other and provided a successful chemistry throughout the run. Other frequent guests were Faye Emerson and Jayne Meadows.

    Host & The Star of "I've Got A Secret" Garry Moore (who had his own daytime TV series, not unlike today's Live with Regis and Kelly) introduced a guest (or more often than not, team of guests), who whispered his/her/their secret in Moore's ear; the secret was then shown on-screen to the home audience. One at a time, each panelist had 30 seconds to question the guest(s) in an attempt to guess the secret. For each panelist who failed to guess the secret, the player(s) was/were paid $20 and up to a maximum total of $80 (early in the show's run, the panelists had two questioning opportunites each, and it was $10 per panelist who failed to guess after 15 seconds). Many times after the secret was revealed, Moore interviewed the guest(s) and sometimes they got to demonstrate their skill or other talent associated with the secret.

    Once each week, a guest celebrity appeared with a secret of his own. While some secrets were serious and/or inspirational, more often than not, the segment was played for laughs.

    Moore left the show in 1964 and to be replaced by former late-night comedian Steve Allen. The show ended its 1st CBS-TV Network run on April 3, 1967.

    In 1972, I've Got a Secret returned in syndication as a once-a-week entry. Allen once again hosted with Morgan joining Richard Dawson as regulars on the panel; the other two chairs were filled by rotating guests (though Dawson and Morgan didn't appear each week, either). Everything else remained the same, though most celebrity segments were played for laughs. The syndicated series lasted one year in 1973.

    The show returned for a brief network run (on CBS-TV) in the summer of 1976, with Bill Cullen as host. Morgan and Dawson once again returned, flanked by other regulars including Gene Rayburn, Elaine Joyce and Phyllis George.

    Most recently, I've Got a Secret returned as a five-a-week entry on the Oxygen network. Hosted by comedienne Stephanie Miller, the show retained the classic rules (except that awards were bumped up to $200 per failed guess and $1000 for an across-the-board stumper). Regulars were Teri Garr, Jm. J. Bullock, Jason Kravits and Amy Yasbeck. In one of his last TV appearances before his death, Allen filled in as host during the summer of 2000; surviving regulars from the original CBS run (including Allen's wife, Jayne Meadows) that've got also made appearances as celebrity guests and panelists. ----------------------------------------------------- "I've Got A Secret" is A Mark Goodson-Bill Todman Production in association with The CBS-TV Network (1952-1976), Metromedia, Inc. (1972-1973) & Oxygen & PEARSON TELEVISION INTERNATIONAL (2000-2006). The Broadcast Report of "I've Got A Secret": June 19, 1952-June 25, 1953 CBS-TV Thursday at 10:30-11:00pm Eastern July 1, 1953-September 6, 1961 CBS-TV Wednesday at 9:30-10:00pm September 11, 1961-September 3, 1962 CBS-TV Monday at 10:30-11:00pm September 10, 1962-September 5, 1966 CBS-TV Monday at 8:00-8:30pm September 12, 1966-April 3, 1967 CBS-TV Monday at 10:30-11:00pm June 15-July 6, 1976 CBS-TV Tuesday at 8:00-8:30pm Syndicated for METROMEDIA TELEVISION and airs weekly at 7:30-8:00pm from September 11, 1972 to September 9, 1973. The Show airs on Oxygen (Cable Network) from February 2000 to April 2006. Ratings History Oct. 1954-Apr. 1955 - #15 Oct. 1955-Apr. 1956 - #9 Oct. 1956-Apr. 1957 - #7 Oct. 1957-Apr. 1958 - #5 Oct. 1958-Apr. 1959 - #9 Oct. 1962-Apr. 1963 - #16 Oct. 1963-Apr. 1964 - #12 Oct. 1965-Apr. 1966 - #20moreless
  • 145
    Mighty Mouse

    Mighty Mouse

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    FOX (ended 1961)
    Created by I. (Izzy) Klein in the spring of 1940, this character was originally designed as a fly. Paul Terry liked the concept, and green-lighted the project after changing the fly to a mouse called, "Supermouse." After two years on the screen, the Supermouse name was changed to Mighty Mouse. Some reports are that the threat of a lawsuit from DC Comics was behind this name change. Others insist that Terry did not want to compete against a character of the same name that an ex-TerryToons employee drew for Coo Coo Comics. In any case, in 1944, the character's name was changed, and the Supermouse cartoons were retitled to the new name, Mighty Mouse!moreless
  • 146
    We, The People

    We, The People

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    CBS (ended 1952)
    The hosts on this interview program chatted with celebrities, politicians and regular Americans with interesting lives. People who had overcome some sort of adversity or faced a challenge were often featured. We, The People began on radio in 1936 and continued to be heard there; this was the first series to be simulcast on television and radio. (This simulcast situation continued through the summer of 1950.) The original host was voice-over announcer Dwight Weist before actor Dan Seymour took over the job in 1949. The information here has been gleaned from magazines and newspapers of the era, as well as the personal papers of the show's director, Preston Wood. (Those papers are part of the Belknap Collection at University of Florida in Gainesville.)moreless
  • 147
    Hopalong Cassidy

    Hopalong Cassidy

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    NBC (ended 1954)
    The first significant Western to appear on network television was The Hopalong Cassidy Show, which began in 1949. It starred movie-cowboy legend William Boyd as Hopalong, a character he had played in sixty-six movies between 1935 and 1948. In the Hopalong Cassidy Show on television, Hoppy was still owner of the Bar 20 Ranch and had a sidekick, Red Connors, who was the perfect foil for Cassidy, who, unlike most cowboys heroes, dressed all in black and, with snow-white hair, cut quite a fugure atop his horse Topper. William Boyd died September 12, 1972; Edgar Buchanan died April 4, 1979.moreless
  • 148
    Miss USA

    Miss USA

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    NBC
    The Miss USA beauty contest has been held annually since 1952 to select the United States entrant in the Miss Universe pageant. The Miss Universe Organization operates both pageants, as well as Miss Teen USA.moreless
  • 149
    Quick Draw MCGraw

    Quick Draw MCGraw

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    CBS (ended 1966)
    Quick Draw was usually depicted in his shorts (which were set in the American Old West) as a sheriff. Quick Draw was often accompanied by his deputy, a Mexican burro with a stereotypical Spanish accent named Baba Looey, who was also voiced by Butler. Quick Draw was depicted as a satire of the westerns that were popular among the American public at the time. His personality was well intentioned, but somewhat dim; oftentimes, Baba Looey would make a more accurate assessment of the problem at hand than Quick Draw would. Whenever that happened, Quick Draw would often utter his catchphrase: "Now hoooooold on thar, Baba Looey! I'll do the thinnin' [thinking] around here, and doooon't you forget it!" Quick Draw also spoke with a heavy drawl, as shown by his catchphrase. Although Quick Draw was himself a horse, this did not stop the show's producers from depicting him riding into town on a "real" horse, or, as seen in the show's opening credits, driving a stagecoach pulled by "real" horses into a town. This aspect was made light of in the 1980s made-for-television film The Good, the Bad, and Huckleberry Hound, which featured Quick Draw. In a series of episodes, Quick Draw would also assume the identity of the masked vigilante, "El Kabong" (a parody of Zorro). As El Kabong, Quick Draw would attack his foes by swooping down on a rope and hitting them on the head with an acoustic guitar, producing a distinctive kabong sound and destroying the guitar in the process. Quick Draw McGraw's supporting characters in The Quick Draw McGraw Show's two other segments were Augie Doggie and Doggie Daddy, a father-and-son pair of dogs, and Snooper and Blabber, a pair of detectives who were a cat and a mouse.moreless
  • 150
    Ivor the Engine

    Ivor the Engine

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    BBC (ended 1982)
    Welcome to the Ivor the Engine guide at TV.com. "...Not very long ago, in the top left-hand corner of Wales, there was a railway. It wasn't a very long railway or a very important railway, but it was called The Merioneth and Llantisilly Rail Traction Company Limited, and it was all there was. And in a shed, in a siding at the end of the railway, lives the Locomotive of the Merioneth and Llantisilly Rail Traction Company Limited, which was a long name for a little engine so his friends just called him Ivor..." ...And that was how it began, back in 1959: one of Oliver Postgate's most loved creations, Ivor the Engine. It was a series about the Welsh adventures of a little green railway engine and his many friends. But Ivor wasn't an ordinary steam engine. He pretty much wished he was a person and ended up doing things like singing in a choir and swimming in the sea! One season of six, 10 minute, Black and White films was made for and screened by Associated-Redefusion. These were told entirely by Postgate, showing how Ivor got his famous pipes and got to sing with the Grumbly and District Choral Society. There followed another two 13-episode seasons for Associated-Redefusion (also in black and white) in 1962 and 1963. These told the further adventures of Ivor, introducing the Dragons and Alice the Elephant. In 1975, Smallfilms got the rights to stories back and remade the previous two seasons, along with some new stories, in colour. These were screened by the BBC in two 20-episode seasons, between 1976 and 1982. Repeats of Ivor have recently been screened on Channel 4 and Nick Jr. Unfortunately the first six episodes are never shown, but were released on a video some years ago - this has now been deleted. The good news is a video containing all 40 colour episodes is available from Universal. This guide lists the first six black and white episodes and the two colour BBC seasons.moreless
  • 151
    Rocky and Bullwinkle and Friends

    Rocky and Bullwinkle and Friends

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    Classic Media
    Rocky and Bullwinkle and Friends is a classic early 1960s cartoon comedy show produced by Jay Ward Productions. The show ran for 5 years and aired on both the ABC and NBC television network. The show's two main characters are Rocky J. Squirrel, a brave flying squirrel and his best pal, Bullwinkle, a dumb and clumsy moose living in the town of Frostbite Falls, Minnesota. The series usually involves their misadventures involving enemies Boris and Natasha, the dastardly Russian spy duo bent on ending the noble antics of "moose and squirrel" and thereby gaining power over the fictional nation of Pottsylvania. Rocky and Bullwinkle and Friends also featured short bookend stories- most notably Dudley Do-Right, the clueless Canadian Mountie always saving damsels from the villainous Snidely Whiplash, and another bookend involving Sherman and Peabody, a boy and dog brainiac who travel through time to discover the real story behind historical events and right the wrongs to make sure the events actually happen. Fun, vintage and famous for using groan-worthy puns, Rocky and Bullwinkle and Friends is great for kids and kids at heart.moreless
  • 152
    Space Patrol

    Space Patrol

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    ABC (ended 1955)
    Space Patrol provides security for the solar system c. A.D. 3000. Operating from a terra-formed planet named Terra, the Space Patrol is lead by Commander Buzz Cory. Commander Cory and his crew fight against supercriminals threatening the peace of the solar system. Space Patrol began as a 15 minute program on local Los Angeles station KECA on the 9th of March 1950 and continued 5 days a week until 1953. These were live action programs and there were about 800 episodes. ABC picked up the program in September of 1950 and it ran until February 1955, airing 210 30 minute episodes. The show ran in syndication on 35mm kinescope by Comet Productions from 1957 to 1959. The 15 minute episodes also became available on 16mm kinescope to ABC affiliates. The cast also did a 30 minute weekly radio broadcast on the ABC radio network from 1950 through 1955.moreless
  • 153
    Davy Crockett

    Davy Crockett

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    ABC (ended 1955)
    The classic Walt Disney series featuring the life of Davy Crockett, King of the Wild Frontier, starring Fess Parker (Daniel Boone) and Buddy Ebsen (Beverly Hillbillies, Barnaby Jones) as the legendary frontiersman Davy Crockett and his best friend, Georgie Russell.

    The series followed their adventures through the Indian Wars, Davy's tenure in Congress, travels down the Missisippi River, and the last stand at the Alamo.

    The five episodes of the series aired as segments of "Disneyland"; in 1954 and 1955. Later, they were re-edited and packaged into the theatrical releases Davy Crockett, King of the Wild Frontier and Davy Crockett and the River Pirates. In 1989, Disney launched a revival series, with Tim Dunigan and Gary Grubbs. Though good in its own right, it never reached the popularity of the original Fess Parker episodes.

    The popularity of the shows made the "Ballad of Davy Crockett" a chart-topping single and inspired children across the country to sport coonskin caps.moreless
  • 154
    Danger

    Danger

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    CBS (ended 1955)
    Danger was live half-hour dramatic anthology on CBS-TV. The series, with stories focused on characters in peril facing psychological suspense and often murder, was highly regarded for the quality of its stories and productions. Yul Brynner, CBS-TV staff director, headed the directing at the beginning; he brought in friend Sidney Lumet as his assistant director. When Brynner departed after landing the lead in The King and I, Lumet took over and directed some 150 live episodes of the series. Another later-famous film director, John Frankenheimer, took over later when Lumet finally moved to other series. The series employed a number of writers who were "blacklisted" (Walter Bernstein and Abraham Polonsky) who used phony pen names to hide their identities. The initial producer, Martin Ritt, was sacked in 1952 when he became "blacklisted".moreless
  • 155
    The Tennessee Ernie Ford Show

    The Tennessee Ernie Ford Show

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    NBC (ended 1961)
    Welcome to The Tennessee Ernie Ford Show guide at TV.com. Hosted by Tennessee Ernie Ford, the likeable singer, comedian, entertainer received his own variety show sponsored by the Ford Motor Company which gave Ernie the venue to entertain millions with his informal friendly manner and talent. His music was a combination of gospel and country and western. His homespun catch phrase "Bless Their Little Pea Pickin' Hearts", endeared him to the nation. During the first season the choral group "The Voices of Walter Schumann" backed Ernie. During the remainder of the series "The Top Twenty" (consisting of Dick Beavers, Joanne Burgin, Howard Chitjean, Donna Cook, Irene Cummings, Chet Fisher, Dorothy Gill, John Guarnieri, Ken Harp, Deltra Kamsler, Don Kent, David McDaniel, Katy Nero, Ken Remo, Pat Rocco, Elaine Tavano Thompson, Tommy Traynor, Dick Wessler, Karen Wessler, Ted Wills) were Ernie's back-up group. Tennessee Ernie Ford topped the pop and country charts with "Sixteen Tons." He ended every show with a gospel number.moreless
  • 156
    The Trouble With Father

    The Trouble With Father

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    ABC (ended 1955)
    Early television was filled with bumbling fathers who were not the smartest member of the household. One of the earliest examples of this time-honored premise was Stu Erwin, head of the family, in "Trouble With Father".
    One of TV's first filmed sitcoms revolved around the Erwins who lived in an unnamed American town. Stu was a high school principal who, though not stupid, was something of a dullard who found himself in uncomfortable situations with regularity. June (Stu's real-life spouse) was his patient wife who busied herself by managing the household and being involved in numerous "ladies groups". Their oldest daughter was Joyce, a high school student, that was boy-crazy. Youngest daughter Jackie was a tomboy with a smart mouth who delivered most of the actual comedy lines. "Trouble With Father" is the prototype of the "perfect family" sitcom that one thinks of as representing the 1950s. Without the warmth of a "Father Knows Best" or "Leave it to Beaver", this series comes across today as heavy-handed and naive in it's depiction of life, social norms,and conformity: -There are no Eddie Haskells or Walter Dentons at Stu's school; all of the students at Hamilton High are earnest to the extreme. -Joyce's desire is only to get married once she decides on the boy. Her desire to wear a strapless gown is considered risque. -Stu regularly gives those types of long-winded speeches that "Green Acres" later made fun of by having "Yankee Doodle" play in the background. He'd pontificate with the utmost seriousness on most anything, from how studying Latin in school is crucial in life to freedom of the press to the superiority of men. The one "fly in the ointment" was young Jackie who said what was on her mind and delivered the zingers no one else would dare say. The series' recurring characters included handyman Willie, a rare Black character for the time, who was often employed in one of Stu's schemes. Though quite toned down, Willie was still in the tradition of the offensive Black servant stereotype: slow-moving, bugged-out eyes, and mumbling. Neighbors Harry and Adele Johnson were regularly seen friends/enemies of Stu and June. George Selkirk was a bossy school official who usually caused headaches for Stu. Actor Martin Milner played two roles in the series. Early on, he was Drexel Potter, a frequent boyfriend of Joyce. In the final season, he played Jimmy Clark, Joyce's new husband. "Trouble With Father" underwent several title changes during its run, including "Life With the Erwins", "The Stu Erwin Show" and finally "The New Stu Erwin Show". Airing on the then-struggling ABC network, the series aired new episodes in a bizarre fashion designed to get maximum usage out of the reruns. Season One consisted of 52 all-new episodes. Season Two (10/1951-4/1952) aired 26 new shows followed by 26 weeks of repeats. Beginning in the fall of 1952, every third episode was a rerun from previous seasons. For a full 65 weeks beginning in July 1953, ABC showed nothing BUT reruns. The final season was a traditional 26 episodes of new programs. It's during this last season that the series finally acquired a laugh track.moreless
  • 157
    Lights Out (1949)

    Lights Out (1949)

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    NBC (ended 1952)
    The camera is tightly focused on a set of eyes. It slowly pulls out to reveal the disembodied head of the narrator, suspended in the darkness, ominously setting the stage for tonight's tale of horror or the supernatural. The narrator declares, "Lights out!", blows out a candle, and the story begins. This creepy anthology series began in 1934 on Chicago radio station WENR, the creation of writer Wyllis Cooper. Arch Oboler, however, is more closely associated as the series' writer/director, taking over after a couple of years when Cooper moved on to other projects. Lights Out was a pioneering television effort, with Fred Coe producing four episodes on WNBT-TV in New York during 1946. Once network television began in earnest in the late forties, the series was an early success, airing on NBC from 1949-1952.moreless
  • 158
    H.G. Wells' Invisible Man

    H.G. Wells' Invisible Man

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    ITV (ended 1959)
    Welcome to the H.G. Wells' Invisible Man episode guide at TV.com. A series produced in the 1950s from ITV in the UK, this show was remarkable for its time for the special effects and action storylines. It is the story of a scientist who's pursuit for the secret of invisibility causes an accident where he himself becomes invisible. While trying to cure himself, he is drafted by the government to solve crimes and conduct secret spy missions. After broadcast in the UK, the series had a successful run on CBS in the USA.moreless
  • 159
    M Squad

    M Squad

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    NBC (ended 1960)
    Lee Marvin starred as Lt. Frank Ballinger, a plainclothes detective assigned to an elite police group known as M Squad. 117 Episodes. 30 min. B&W
  • 160
    The Ruff & Reddy Show

    The Ruff & Reddy Show

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    NBC (ended 1964)
    The Ruff & Reddy Show was Hanna-Barbera's first cartoon series which featured a cat (Ruff) and dog (Reddy) in serialized adventures, with thirteen episodes comprising a story arc. Ruff, was voiced by Don Messick, and Reddy was voiced by Daws Butler.

    Hanna and Barbera opened their cartoon studio the same year MGM (the studio they worked for) closed down its cartoon studio. After much effort, they were able to sell Ruff & Reddy to NBC, but they were only able to get $2700 per half hour of cartoon show, so all the meticulous detail into making the Tom and Jerry shorts were eschewed for a production-line process. Bill and Joe, taking a cue from 1949's "Crusader Rabbit," reasoned the best way to offset the low production values was to create appealing heroes and captivating storylines. Ruff and Reddy made their way through clandestine escapades squaring off against villains like Scarey Harry Safari, Killer and Diller, and Captain Greedy and Salt Water Daffy. Assisting our heroes in several adventures was wacky scientist Professor Gizmo.

    The show was first aired on NBC in December 1957 as part of live action host segments. Jimmy Blaine was the host on the show's first run (1957-60), and Captain Bob Cottle replaced him in the second run (1962-64). When the show went into syndication, the opening titles, which were never shown on the NBC telecasts, were seen with the "H-B Enterprises" card. The theme song was also heard for the first time:

    Get set, get ready Here comes Ruff and Reddy They're tough but steady Always rough and ready

    They sometimes have their little spats Even fight like dogs and cats But when they need each other That's when they're Ruff and Reddy Ruff & Reddy episodes appeared on Family Channel's "Incredible Animals" cartoon show in 1992 and recently the series has aired on Cartoon Network and its sister channel Boomerang.moreless
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